Ernest V Holt

14 Nov 1916 - 15 Jan 2007

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Ernest V Holt

14 Nov 1916 - 15 Jan 2007
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Ernest Voyal Holt Born November 14, 1916 Married Themla Butler June 28, 1938 ERNEST VOYAL HOLT I, Ernest Voyal Holt, was born November 14, 1916, in Huntington, Emery County, Utah. I was the eighth child born to Enoch Alphonzo and Altha Elnorah Turner Holt. At that time my Dad was a photographer so w
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Life Information

Ernest V Holt

Born:
Married: 28 Jun 1938
Died:

Evergreen Cemetery

1876-1998 North 2000 West
Springville, Utah, Utah
United States
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Catirrel

May 23, 2011
Photographer

Evergreen Cemetery

January 1, 1970

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Ernest Voyal Holt

Contributor: Springsteen Groupie :-) Created: 7 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

Ernest Voyal Holt Born November 14, 1916 Married Themla Butler June 28, 1938 ERNEST VOYAL HOLT I, Ernest Voyal Holt, was born November 14, 1916, in Huntington, Emery County, Utah. I was the eighth child born to Enoch Alphonzo and Altha Elnorah Turner Holt. At that time my Dad was a photographer so we moved often. I was still very young when we moved to Price. While we were there, World War I broke out. Due to the shortage of materials necessary for my father's job, he soon decided to give up photography and bought a small farm in Vermillion near Richfield. We lived on this farm a few years, and then Dad heard about the Pipe Plant and Ironton being built in Utah County and figured he and the older boys could get work there. He traded his equity in the farm for a team and wagon and we took our belongings and started for Utah County. After about eight days, traveling a few miles a day, we arrived in Springville. Dad rented a house on the south end of Springville. During the next few years we moved quite a few times. Dad worked at several jobs, wherever he could find work. We always had a modest home and furnishings. Dad had a hard time supporting such a large family, so we all had to help in any way that we could. My parents taught me thrift, honesty, and to be happy with what I had ¬which usually wasn't much. My parents were LDS, but we seldom went to church. When I was 10 years old, I was baptized into the LDS Church. When I was about 14, I started going to church quite regularly and was ordained into the priesthood. I was ordain¬ed an Elder on April 18, 1937. Later in my life, (July 20, 1969) I was ordain¬ed a High Priest. I started school in Springville and went through the fourth grade, before the family moved to Provo. I went the next three years in Provo. By now there were 3 more children in the family, making 11 in all. By this time the great depression had started and jobs were very scarce, so Dad decided to move back to Springville. My older sister, Ella, was married and lived on a cattle ranch in Fremont. I went down and lived with them and worked on the ranch. This was my first job, and I started the eighth grade there. I returned home at Christmas and finished in Springville. I had always gone by the name of Voyal but when I came back to Springville, I changed it to Ernest. I graduated from Jr. High in Springville and was Vice President of the class. Jobs were still scarce. I worked whenever I could in the fields har¬vesting crops. Often I would drop out of school for six weeks until the har¬vest was over. I worked mostly in beets, onions, grain, and potatoes. I remember riding freight trains to Idaho to pick up potatoes. (A common form of transportation for people out of work.) I also worked for the Utah Con¬struction Co. in Spanish Fork Canyon and the Utah Railroad. I continued my schooling in Springville. When I was in my senior year, a couple of boyfriends and I decided to quit school and go to California to find work. It didn't work out; we split up and I ended up coming home on a freight train. I had just a few months of school left to get my diploma so the next year, 1937, I went back to finish high school. It was here that I met and started dating Thelma Butler. She was very instrumental in helping me get my diploma. Just before graduation, Dad and I went to the Henry Mountains to work a claim he had there. It was a big disappointment and I was back in about a month. After a while, I went to Salt Lake City to look for work. I was going steady with Thelma and she was working up there. I found work in a service station. In January 1938, we became engaged and on June 28, 1938 I married Thelma Butler, daughter of Christopher Lorenzo Butler and Reba Hutchings Butler in the Salt Lake Temple for time and eternity. I was 21 years old and Thelma was 19. The people who accompanied us to the Temple were Thelma's mother, my sister and her husband, Valeria and Evon Averett, and a friend and partner at work, Milton Bush, and his wife, Louisa. We were very glad to finally be married. We had gone together for two years, having met in high school, and had been engaged for 6 months. We would have been married sooner but I didn't have a job. We had a wedding reception the next evening in the church in Springville, Utah. An interesting thing; after the reception, I wheeled Thelma down the middle of Main Street in a wheelbarrow with a crowd of people follow¬ing. The next morning we moved to our first home, a small-furnished apartment on "B" Street in Salt Lake City, Utah. The rent on this place was $27.00 a month. We had very little to start out on, less than $5.00 between us, so we had to charge our first groceries. I had worked two weeks for free in order to get that first job at Mac Hales gas station. I made $2.00 a day for 10 and 12 hour shifts and worked every day of the week. Thelma soon discovered she was expecting a baby and we couldn't afford this place any longer, so Thelma set out to find something less expensive. We moved several times that first year whenever Thelma could find a place that would save a few dollars. Thelma always looked for furnished apartments within walking distance of work, sometimes as close as 3 blocks and at other times as far as 5 miles one way. We had no car or furniture, just a cedar chest. Thelma did the laundry on the washboard in the bathtub. Every 3 or 4 weeks Thelma would pack the laundry in suitcases, walk to the Orem train station and take the train to Springville to visit her parents. The Orem was a one car electric commuter train that rare on tracks from Salt Lake to Payson several times a day. Because of being pregnant she was usually sick when she arrived. Her mother would help her over the violent sick stomach, help her laundry and occasion¬ally bottle fruit; then Thelma would take the train back to Salt Lake. We didn't know how we could afford a baby on wages we were making, but the Lord does provide. I got a fifty cent a day raise just before the baby was born. We lived in an apartment on Wall Street by the State Capitol for our first Christmas. I'll never forget it. We were all alone, we weren't able to go home, but we did get a nice present. We paid $5.00 down and got us a $49.00 washing machine. Thelma thinks it was the most beautiful present she ever received. We still lived on Wall Street when our first son was born. He was born at home on April 16, 1939, at 2:30 a.m. a beautiful 8 lb. boy. Those helping were Dr. V.M. Sevy, Thelma's mother, her girlfriend, Ardell Ford, and I. We named him Gary Ernest and I blessed him August 6, 1939, in the Ninth Ward, Liberty Stake in Salt Lake City. Gary was a good-natured child, very smart and eager to learn. He wasn't afraid of people. He was the first grandchild tin Thelma's side of the family. Her father was so proud of him that he bought him his first pair of shoes and used to show him off to everyone. We couldn't have been happier. We soon managed to buy a baby buggy on time and Thelma would walk down and meet me after work at midnight. It was about 20 blocks away. She would window shop in the downtown area until I got off work; then we would walk home wheeling our baby up Capitol Hill. Many times we had big holes in the soles of our shoes and we would wear cardboard inserts in them. Maybe once in 2 weeks we would splurge and buy a 5~ ice cream cone. Our recreation was mostly walking, visiting friends, and an occasional trip home on the Orem to see our folks. (Money was extremely tight in the 30's. Most everyone was in the same situation.) Thelma's mother would come up and visit whenever she could, usually riding the Orem. She loved to come to the city. Often we would sleep 3 in a bed because we didn't have an extra bed. After the baby was born we felt we could get by in a smaller, less expen¬sive place again so we moved to an one room apartment with a kitchenette where we shared the bath with 3 other termites. That didn't last long; we soon found bedbugs and got out of there in a hurry. We moved to another one room place and bought a refrigerator About this time I changed jobs, and started driving a big gas truck, delivering gas for Co op. We also got another break; we were able to move into a nice apartment in the Wilson Hotel, and work part time for our rent. I worked on the switchboard and Thelma took the baby in a walker and cleaned rooms a couple of hours a day. We also bought our first car, an old Model A Ford. We lived there about 6 months until we were expecting another baby and Thelma was too sick to work. About this time I went to work in a Co op service station as manager. We moved into an unfurnished duplex up on Chase Avenue. We bought second¬hand furniture a couch, a bed, a set of drawers, a breakfast set, a new mattress and springs all for about $100.00 and paid for it by the month. Thelma bought a used sewing machine for $5.00 and made all our curtains, spreads, baby clothes, Gary's clothes, even sewed rags and braided rugs. Thelma had one change of maternity clothes and washed them out at night About this time I started driving Taxi for Yellow Cab Co. part time and worked full time at the station; however, just before the baby was born, I lost my job due to a change of company executives, and except for odd jobs as out of work. Our second son was born at home on May 6, 1941, at 10:30 p.m. and weighed lbs. Those assisting Dr. V. M. Sevy were Thelma's mother, the next-door neighbor, Alice Anthony, and I. An interesting thing happened just 10 minutes before the baby was born. The bed broke down, the doctor lifted the Mattress down on the floor and that's where the baby was born. When Thelma cooked at the baby, all she could think of was a sweet little rose bud so we started calling him Buddy. He was blessed, Buddy Lee, September 7, 1941, in the Springville Third Ward, Kolob Stake. He was a shy tenderhearted child, very easy to teach and enjoyed being clean. As Buddy grew, he idolized Gary and loved waiting on him. I wasn't out of work long, and soon got a job with American Express for Union Pacific Railroad. It was a good job and I was very happy with it, but did have to supplement part time at another service station. We got along fine for a few months. We managed to get our first radio and a new living room set. Then World War II broke out and everything started changing. The short¬ages began; the first big one was rubber you couldn't get tires and we had been caught with very poor ones. For lack of tires and available parts, we sold the car. The young men were being drafted into the service and I was draft age. My two brothers, Lloyd and Ivan, were both in the service as were Thelma's brothers, Frank and Pierce. It seemed the best thing to do was to get the family closer to our parents so that if I had to go in the service Thelma could manage. We had two little boys and were expecting again. I managed to transfer to the Union Pacific Railroad yards in Provo. In December 1942 we moved to Springville into Valeria Averett's basement. Housing was scarce and we were lucky to find what we did. We had no bathroom and had coal stoves. The rationing began. We had stamps and points for scarce items. Sugar, shoes, meat, gas and many things like shortening and soap could rarely be found. Wages were good but commodities were high and scarce. There was a lot of worry and sadness all around. Our third son was born July 17, 1943, in the Payson Hospital. He was three weeks early and weighed 6 lbs 6 oz. We had to get special gas rations to take Thelma to the hospital and bring her home. We didn't have a car and had to borrow Thelma's parent’s car to get back and forth. Our baby was born on my brother Lloyd's birthday so we named him Dennis Lloyd. I blessed him September 5, 1943, in the Springville First Ward, Kolob Stake. He was a small dainty baby with a big appetite. We were happy with him and very glad to have our family together. 41e now had three beautiful sons. As it turned out, my job was essential to the war so was frozen to the job for the duration of the war and was never drafted. After about a year we found a house with a bathroom down on Main Street so we moved. While we lived here we took our first vacation. I could get free passes on the Union Pacific train so we left the children with Grandma Holt and went to Hollywood to visit Thelma’s sister, Grace, and her husband. We were cone less than a week, but we were sure glad to get back to the children. I was bucking rivets at the railroad yards. I would often get burned and wasn't too happy with the job. Because of the men being drafted, there were job openings in the stores so I took a part time job at Safeway as a food clerk, and just loved it. We bought our first home in 1944 in a housing area in Springville called "Brookside". It was a 3 bedroom frame with a full basement and a coal furnace. It was a $6,000 home and we got it for 850.00 down. It was a big chance to take, and many people thought we were foolish. After living here for a while the war finally ended. I quit the job at the railroad and went full time for Safeway in Springville. The children were old enough to be left with a baby sitter until I came home from work at night, so Thelma got a job as a waitress at Brown's Cafe. I worked days and she worked evenings. We lived here a little over two years. During that time we took the children on their first vacation to Yellowstone Park. We both felt a need for a little more ground so we could have a garden where our boys could learn the joy of planting and raising their own vegetables. The value of our home had increased so we sold our home and bought 32 acre on 700 South in Springville and started to build. It was a hard struggle. Many things hadn't returned to the market since the war. We did much of the work ourselves and learned a lot "the hard way". We had a water right and a big garden. The back of our property joined my parent’s property. We received much good advice from Dad about planting. We also had a dog-named "Cubby" and raised rabbits. Thelma worked evenings in Kapp's Cafe. I made rapid progress with Safeway, and was soon made Assistant Manager and transferred to the Provo store. Within a few months I was made Manager of the Mt. Pleasant Safeway store. I left immediately and started house hunting. Thelma sold our home and prepared to move. We moved to a big, old fashioned home in Mt. Pleasant in June 1949. After a long wait, our fourth baby, a lovely 8 lb. 13 oz. boy, was born August 23, 1949, in the Mt. Pleasant Hospital. He had mucus in his lungs and we had a problem with him for about 24 hours; then he got along fine. He was a shy beautiful baby with a slightly curly, golden hair. We were delighted with him and so were his brothers. Thelma had a favorite cousin, Ray Butler, who was on a mission at the time so we named him Ray after him, and Dean because we liked it. I blessed him Ray Dean on September 25, 1949, in the Mt. Pleasant South Ward, North Sanpete Stake. When the baby was six weeks old, Thelma started having stomach problems, which turned out to be gallstones. In January 1950, she had her gall bladder removed. It took a few months to recover. Due to the added expense of doctor bills, we got behind financially so in the fall of 1950, Thelma and I worked in the evening for a short time at the Moroni turkey plant picking turkeys. Our stay in Mt. Pleasant was delightful. We loved the people there. The children loved school. Gary and buddy both played baritones in the Hamilton School band. They also had paper routes. Dennis started school there and also took snare drum lessons. Thelma was band mother, served as counselor in the Relief Society and the MIA. She was also active in civic clubs (Jaycee Ettes, LaIcos and Lady Lions) and built floats for parades. I was a counselor in the IIA, active in the Boy Scout program, president of the Junior Chamber of Commerce and belonged to the Lions Club. In 1951 I received the DSA (Distinguished Service Award) for outstanding young man of the year. The store did very well, and in November 1952, I was transferred to a larger store in Springville. We had to close our home in Mt. Pleasant as they’re as no sale for it at that time. We bought a home back in "Brookside" again and moved back to Springville. After several months, we sold our home in Mt. Pleasant for what we owed on it. We were also expecting another baby. On March 14, 1953, our baby was born in the Payson Hospital, a lovely 6 lb. 8oz boy. He was born 3 weeks early, had mucus in his lungs and was put in an air lock for 24 hours until he was breathing properly. We named him Kelly Butler because he was born close to St. Patrick's Day, and Thelma's maiden name was Butler. I blessed him May 3, 1953, in the Springville Sixth Ward, Kolob Stake. Kelly was a very good baby, smiled very easily and had a happy disposition. He brought a lot of joy to our home. While we lived here, I was on the Scout council. Thelma was a visiting teacher in Relief Society. Gary and Buddy were both active in the Boy Scouts, and received many advancements. Buddy was made a member of the "Order of the Arrow", a very select group of Boy Scouts. We bought an accordion and Buddy started taking lessons. Gary graduated from Jr. Nigh and started driving a car. He also started working for Safeway in Spanish Fork. I continued to do well with Safeway, and in the spring of 1955 was trans¬ferred to a bigger store in Tooele. We were a little reluctant to move; we had just fixed up our home, both our folks lived in Springville, and the child¬ren were doing well, but it meant a lot to me professionally so we moved again. Our first home in Tooele was a white frame home on Parkway with a beauti¬ful big back yard. Tooele was less than half LDS and was quite a transient community due to the Army Depot. We knew that raising children here would be quite a challenge. On July 7, 1956, my mother passed away. We lost a lovely mother and grand-mother. We all missed her so much. The following January my father was hit by a car, ended up in the hospital with a broken leg, and was still there when he passed away on April 30, 1957, from a blood clot. In August that same Summer (1957) we took all of the children on a camp¬ing trip up Spanish Fork Canyon. We pitched a tent, fished, and were having a delightful time when Buddy got shot in the back with a 22 short shell. In a state of panic we rushed him to the Spanish Fork Hospital. We learned the bullet had just missed his heart and had lodged in his lung. He stayed there a few days and then we transferred him to the Tooele Hospital. We were so very thankful the Lord had spared our son. He carried the bullet for a year before we had it removed in the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City. That same year on October 17, 1957, we were blessed with another beauti¬ful 7 1b.142 oz. baby boy, born at Tooele Valley Hospital. We named him Steven Wayne. He was blessed December 1, 1957, in the Tooele Tenth Ward, North Tooele Stake. Stephen was Thelma’s grandfather's name and we just liked Wayne. He was a good baby, loved attention, and got plenty of it. His brothers adored him and we all enjoyed spoiling him. When he was 6 months old, he began having convulsions and was hospitalized. We ended up taking him to a brain specialist in Salt Lake. It was determined that he had a vein injury in his head at birth and would have to be under strict medication until his growth could take care of it. He was under care and medication for 2 years, but never had another convulsion after he was 9 months old. He gave us all some scary moments. Gary had reservations about leaving Utah County. He gave up a nice girl¬friend and a good job in Spanish Fork to move. While in Tooele, he belonged to the National Guard and drove the compressor truck and was also a member of the drill team. We watched with pride as he graduated from High School and Seminary. He was active in the church, holding the office of Elder. He was a good boy, very independent and ambitious. He enrolled in trade school in Salt Lake but soon quit and took a full time job at Alta Ski Resort. It was here that he met Sue Pat Kinsley, the girl he married November 7, 1959. We had mixed emotions but they had our blessing. Our children are the most pre¬cious things in our lives and we had so hoped for a Temple Marriage for each of them. Jobs for the youth were very scarce in Tooele. We had a good friend and neighbor Ethel Halgren, who worked at a publishing company called "The Tooele Bulletin". She was instrumental in getting our boys jobs there. The oldest five boys all had turns working for them. Some delivered papers and some work¬ed on the press. Our Stake President, Alex Dunn, owned the business. His son, Joel Dunn, managed it. These choice people provided jobs as well as counsel for our boys. We shall always be grateful for this experience. Buddy adjusted to the move a little better. He was well liked and had many friends. He was active in church and did well in school, earning his letter in tennis. He was also a representative at Boy's State. He graduated from Seminary and High School and then went to BYU for a year. In 1960 he received a call to the North British Mission. It was something he had always wanted and we were all very happy. He left for England in mid November 1960. Dennis didn't care much for school although we tried very hard to keep him interested. He enjoys being mischievous and gave us many anxious moments but he didn’t seem to want what we wanted for him. In his junior year of school he quit and joined the Air Force. In 2 months he was home again with an honor¬able discharge. He went to work for the Tooele Smelter. By now we were grandparents; Gary and Sue had a baby girl named Gretchen. Ray was playing a baritone in the school band and Kelly was taking accor¬dion lessons. On June 28, 1961, Thelma's father passed away. He had been ill a long time but it was hard to give him up. We loved him so much. It was a great loss. Buddy had become very close to him while he was attending BYU. It surely was hard to tell our missionary the sad news. I continued to do well with Safeway, winning many contests and getting many congratulations from the company president. On November 14, 1961, my birthday, they opened a new supermarket and I was selected to be the manager. The Boy Scout program was very weak in our ward in Tooele. I was called to be Scoutmaster and did all I could to get it organized. Thelma taught Primary for a while, and then served as work director counselor in the Relief Soc¬iety. She was also secretary of the MIA and worked in the Parent Teachers Association. In March 1962, we moved to a beautiful new home, which we had built on brook Street. That same summer we bought a vacation trailer. In November 1962, Buddy returned from his mission. His girlfriend, Gwen Lynn Phillips, had waited for him. On January 11, 1963, they were married in the Logan Temple. That evening they had a beautiful big church reception. In April 1963, Dennis married Alice June Maestas. Later that same year Gary and Sue got a divorce. There were two children, Gretchen and Nicholas. Sue was given custody of the children. In the fall of 1963 we opened a little business called "The Spudnut Shop". Thelma was manager; Buddy and Gwen helped her. It turned out to be a costly experience. We dumped it a year later. On January 18, 1964, Thelma's mother married Dewey 0. Nelson. She had been so lonely since Dad had passed away. Dewey was good to her and we all enjoyed his company. In the spring of 1964, totally unexpected, I was transferred to a smaller store in Magna. When school was out that year, Thelma sold our beautiful new home and we moved to Magna. While we lived here, Ray and Kelly became inter¬ested in raising racing pigeons. We would take the birds a great distance and they would always find their way home. They also entered them in the fairs and received some ribbons. It proved to be a great sport. On October 18, 1964, Garb married Judith Louise Schow, a girlfriend from Eugene, Oregon. I was now in my late 40's and had a little less than 2 years to go with Safeway until I had earned "Vested Rights". This would secure our retirement and provide for the future. It didn't turn out that way. In the summer of 1965, completely without reason, I was relieved of management, reduced to a food clerk, and transferred to Orem. I've never been so hurt. There was a lot of prestige and good money in management, but there was also a lot of pressure so maybe it was a blessing. In December 1965, we moved to a new home in Orem. This proved to be a good move and a blessing in many ways. The children did well in school, made good friends, and were active in the church. We took Kelly up to Kearns every week for accordion lessons for a while. He was playing in an accordion band. In the summer of 1966, Kelly went to California to compete in the Western States Accordion Festival. The trio he played in took 3rd place. We sure enjoyed hearing him play. The children were nearly raised, so Thelma went back to work as a clerk at Cornet, a variety store in Orem. In 1968, I quit Safeway and went into management training for Cornet. I trained in Tooele, and then managed a store in Pocatello, Idaho. In 1970, I was transferred to the Orem, store. Thelma stayed in Orem with the children during this time and kept her job. When I got the Orem store, it was against company rules for us to be in the same store so Thelma was let go. While I was in Pocatello, Kelly had emergency surgery for release of torsion suspension. Ray graduated from Seminary and from Orem High in 1967, went to BYU for a year, then to Utah Technical School where he earned a degree in electronics. He also worked for Safeway. He was deeply religious, a clean quiet boy always respectful to us. On June 12, 1969, he married his high school sweetheart, Jeana Rose Rowley, in the Salt Lake Temple. They had a lovely garden reception that evening at her home. We enjoyed many summer vacations most of them at Hebgen Lake in Montana. Thelma's brothers had boats and campers and we had a trailer. We would take our families and everyone that could, would go for a week every year. Four of us had motorcycles, and the cousins had a great time water skiing. They loved pulling tricks on Uncle Pierce. We enjoyed fishing, gathering mushrooms, visiting around the bonfire, and baking goodies just unforgettable fun: This went on for almost 10 years until most of the children were raised. It had been a tradition in the Butler family to camp up Spanish Fork Canyon every fall for the deer hunt. This has been going on for over 30 years. I think it was Thelma's father who started it. He used to go up there with us long after he was unable to climb the mountains. All relatives arid many friends joined us from time to time. They nearly always pot their deer, usually on Billy's Mountain. It was mostly a men and boys camp, but some of the women joined us for a few days every season. We'll always have some special memories of God's are at outdoors and our family together. We also had many enjoyable trips with Thelma's mother and Dewey. They loved to travel, eat out, and stay in motels. We went to Las Vegas and saw some nice shows. We also went to Elko, Ely, and Jackpot many times. Every time their health would permit and we could get some time off, we would go for a couple of days. Once again I'm glad we moved to Orem and thankful we could help them enjoy their later years. In the summer of 1970 Thelma went to work for the W. T. Grant Co. in Provo as a clerk. She was also secretary of the Sunday School. In 1971 Kelly graduated as an honor student from Orem high and from 4 years of LDS Seminary. He received a scholarship and went to BYU for a year. A couple of year’s prior, he had earned his Eagle Scout award. He was working for Safeway and was very active in the church. We tried hard to live up to his expectations. We knew that he was mission material and in the spring of 1972 he was called to the Japan Central Mission. It was quite a coincident: He already had 2 cousins in the Japan West Mission. In June he left for the LTM in Hawaii, spent 2 months there, and then went on to Japan. That same Spring I was transferred to a bigger Cornet store in Cedar City. Both Steven and Thelma felt that they just couldn't give up everything and move down there, but prompted by the scripture "Whither Thou goest I will no" fin¬ally gave in to the move. We sold our beautiful home and bought one in Cedar City. We also bought a new truck and camper. Steven worked in Cornet's for me and made good money. He bought some new guns and a new motorcycle. He was lonely, didn't like being away from his Orem friends, and didn't like school. Kelly felt that he could not return to Cedar City from his mission. Thelma's mother was sick a lot and she was going back to Springville every other week. The move to Cedar had been a costly mistake. It was decided that Thelma would go back to Orem and make a home for the boys, and I would follow as soon as I could. In June 1973, we sold our home in Cedar City and rented a small one in Orem while a new one was being built. We were trying so hard to pet Steven interested in church and school again. In July 1973, Thelma went back to work for W. T. Grant Co. In October that same year she was visiting up at deer camp. She went on a motorcycle ride with Bob Parkinson (her niece's husband). They met a car on a curve and had to go over the side of the road. The motorcycle landed on Thelma's left leg. It was quite badly hurt from the knee down. It was a very painful or¬deal. She was off work for 6 weeks, and ended up with an ulcer on her ankle and had it bandaged for 4 months. Because of my concern over the family and not giving work a high priority, I lost my job. We really felt like we were being tried. Thelma was down with her leg, I was out of work, it was just 6 weeks until Christmas, and we had a missionary to support. I did however obtain a job in the Physical Plant at GYU. The wages were low, but we were glad to get the work and it was a job where we wouldn't be forced to move. Thelma also went back to work anti before long thins were going better again. On January 4, 1974, Thelma's mother had a heart attack and passed away. What a precious person she was. I am so thankful that we decided to come back to Orem so that we could be near and spend more time with her. In February 1974, we moved to our new home, which is where we are currently living. We worked hard getting it landscaped and fixed up for Kelly's re¬turn. He returned from his mission in June. It was nice having him home again. He enrolled at BYU and went back to work for Safeway. On November 15, 1974 Kelly married Janese Richardson in the Salt Lake LDS temple. She was our neighbor and had waited for Kelly while he was on his mission. The next evening they had a nice church reception. As for our health, Thelma has had problems with heart fibrillation and has been hospitalized several times ('62, '67, '73,'77). She has had both medical and electric conversions. In 1972 she had eye surgery for a closed tear duct. I had cataract surgery on one eye in 1967 and then had the same think done on the other eye in 1975. At the present we are both enjoying good health. On April 29, 1977, Steven married Melanie Soulier, a girl he had met in high school. They were married in the church by an LDS Bishop. They had a nice church reception that same evening. All of our boys stood with Steven, as he was married. It surely was a handsome sight. If only it could have been in the Temple. We are alone now. I am still working at BYU and part time in produce at a food store. Thelma is working full time for Skaggs. We have 21 grandchild¬ren and we see most of our children quite often. Ray, Kelly, and Steven all live in Orem, Dennis lives in Salt Lake, and Buddy lives in Tooele. Gary is the only one out of state. He lives in Eugene, Oregon. We have a very good marriage. We've had hardships and trying times but feel we have grown because of them. Our greatest blessing and accomplishment in life is our children. May God bless each one of them to live good clean lives and be honorable men before their families, associates, and God. ERNEST VOLYAL HOLT’S TESTIMONY I was born in Huntington Utah November 14, 1916. My parents were always living on a ranch somewhere. I didn’t have any contact with the church in my boyhood. My sisters took me to church when I was 10 or 11 and was baptized at that time. As a boy we didn’t have much contact with the church but my testimony has grown since that time. Going through the different steps in the Aaronic and Melchizedek Priesthood and reading and the influence of others my testimony has grown. I now have a testimony of the Priesthood and I believe in God and his Son Jesus Christ and the Holy Ghost. I was married in the Salt Lake Temple June 28th 1938 and Blessed with a good family. Great Grandpa Holt I just found this in some of our papers mom had wrote some more history so I will type it. Jeana Holt June 1988 It is hard to believe that it has been 10 years since we wrote our histories, I guess it is time we up date them. After having cataract surgery, I had to wear heavy glasses and had rather limited vision. A few years later we learned they could implant lenses in the eye. In August 1981 I had a secondary implant in one eye, followed 2 months later by the same operation in the other eye. I was delighted with the results, I can see without glasses. Thelma worked for Skaggs until 1981 then she started drawing her Social Security. I reached my retirement birthday in November and was officially retied from B.Y.U. on December 1, 1981. I continued to work part time at Norton’s food store. Since retirement we have been fishing and camping several times with Thelma’s sister and brothers. Other family members joined us whenever they could. We do enjoy the outdoors. We have driven up to Eugene, Oregon 4 times to see Gary, Judy and there family. In November 1983, Bud’s oldest boy Scott went on a mission to Japan. He was our first grandchild to fill a mission. On August 31 and September 1, 1985, we had a very enjoyable trip. A bunch of us went down to Hanksville to Ivan and Fay’s Golden Wedding. We took Golda and Della with us. Richard and Myrle took Evon, Valeria, Lea Mae and Maurine. We all stayed in a motel across the road from most of Ivan’s family. They had a nice celebration and we enjoyed visiting with a lot of our relatives. On the way home we stopped at Ivan and Fay’s and visited. We stopped at 3 cemeteries and looked up some of our relative’s graves. It is beautiful country down there and we all enjoyed the trip. In May 1985, we learned that Thelma’s brother Frank had cancer. He suffered such a long time before he passed away in February 1986. I THINK august 3, 1986 was one of the hardest days of my whole life. Our second son Buddy passed away suddenly from a heart attack. He was everything a father could want in a son, a loving husband and father of 210. He filled a mission to England and he was and inspiration to all who knew him. Maybe someday will understand. The shock of Bud’s death proved to be too much for Thelma. Just 2 weeks later she had a heart attach. She ended up having triple by pass surgery. She has had a lot of medical care since then and tries hard. I guess life will never be quite the some. At present I am still working a few hours at Norton’s food store. We go to church quite regular and do some temple work. We take a lot of walks together, work in the yard and do other home projects. In the summer we go camping and fishing whenever we can. We enjoy our family and enjoy doing things with them. At present we have 24 grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren. This year we will celebrate our Golden Wedding. 50 wonderful years together. We hope we can be blessed with good health and many more happy years. Our greatest accomplishment in life is surely our children. We are so thankful for all we have and hope we can live worthy of our blessings.

Ernest Voyal Holt

Contributor: NyxMCPS Created: 3 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

Ernest Voyal Holt Born November 14, 1916 Married Themla Butler June 28, 1938 ERNEST VOYAL HOLT I, Ernest Voyal Holt, was born November 14, 1916, in Huntington, Emery County, Utah. I was the eighth child born to Enoch Alphonzo and Altha Elnorah Turner Holt. At that time my Dad was a photographer so we moved often. I was still very young when we moved to Price. While we were there, World War I broke out. Due to the shortage of materials necessary for my father's job, he soon decided to give up photography and bought a small farm in Vermillion near Richfield. We lived on this farm a few years, and then Dad heard about the Pipe Plant and Ironton being built in Utah County and figured he and the older boys could get work there. He traded his equity in the farm for a team and wagon and we took our belongings and started for Utah County. After about eight days, traveling a few miles a day, we arrived in Springville. Dad rented a house on the south end of Springville. During the next few years we moved quite a few times. Dad worked at several jobs, wherever he could find work. We always had a modest home and furnishings. Dad had a hard time supporting such a large family, so we all had to help in any way that we could. My parents taught me thrift, honesty, and to be happy with what I had ¬which usually wasn't much. My parents were LDS, but we seldom went to church. When I was 10 years old, I was baptized into the LDS Church. When I was about 14, I started going to church quite regularly and was ordained into the priesthood. I was ordain¬ed an Elder on April 18, 1937. Later in my life, (July 20, 1969) I was ordain¬ed a High Priest. I started school in Springville and went through the fourth grade, before the family moved to Provo. I went the next three years in Provo. By now there were 3 more children in the family, making 11 in all. By this time the great depression had started and jobs were very scarce, so Dad decided to move back to Springville. My older sister, Ella, was married and lived on a cattle ranch in Fremont. I went down and lived with them and worked on the ranch. This was my first job, and I started the eighth grade there. I returned home at Christmas and finished in Springville. I had always gone by the name of Voyal but when I came back to Springville, I changed it to Ernest. I graduated from Jr. High in Springville and was Vice President of the class. Jobs were still scarce. I worked whenever I could in the fields har¬vesting crops. Often I would drop out of school for six weeks until the har¬vest was over. I worked mostly in beets, onions, grain, and potatoes. I remember riding freight trains to Idaho to pick up potatoes. (A common form of transportation for people out of work.) I also worked for the Utah Con¬struction Co. in Spanish Fork Canyon and the Utah Railroad. I continued my schooling in Springville. When I was in my senior year, a couple of boyfriends and I decided to quit school and go to California to find work. It didn't work out; we split up and I ended up coming home on a freight train. I had just a few months of school left to get my diploma so the next year, 1937, I went back to finish high school. It was here that I met and started dating Thelma Butler. She was very instrumental in helping me get my diploma. Just before graduation, Dad and I went to the Henry Mountains to work a claim he had there. It was a big disappointment and I was back in about a month. After a while, I went to Salt Lake City to look for work. I was going steady with Thelma and she was working up there. I found work in a service station. In January 1938, we became engaged and on June 28, 1938 I married Thelma Butler, daughter of Christopher Lorenzo Butler and Reba Hutchings Butler in the Salt Lake Temple for time and eternity. I was 21 years old and Thelma was 19. The people who accompanied us to the Temple were Thelma's mother, my sister and her husband, Valeria and Evon Averett, and a friend and partner at work, Milton Bush, and his wife, Louisa. We were very glad to finally be married. We had gone together for two years, having met in high school, and had been engaged for 6 months. We would have been married sooner but I didn't have a job. We had a wedding reception the next evening in the church in Springville, Utah. An interesting thing; after the reception, I wheeled Thelma down the middle of Main Street in a wheelbarrow with a crowd of people follow¬ing. The next morning we moved to our first home, a small-furnished apartment on "B" Street in Salt Lake City, Utah. The rent on this place was $27.00 a month. We had very little to start out on, less than $5.00 between us, so we had to charge our first groceries. I had worked two weeks for free in order to get that first job at Mac Hales gas station. I made $2.00 a day for 10 and 12 hour shifts and worked every day of the week. Thelma soon discovered she was expecting a baby and we couldn't afford this place any longer, so Thelma set out to find something less expensive. We moved several times that first year whenever Thelma could find a place that would save a few dollars. Thelma always looked for furnished apartments within walking distance of work, sometimes as close as 3 blocks and at other times as far as 5 miles one way. We had no car or furniture, just a cedar chest. Thelma did the laundry on the washboard in the bathtub. Every 3 or 4 weeks Thelma would pack the laundry in suitcases, walk to the Orem train station and take the train to Springville to visit her parents. The Orem was a one car electric commuter train that rare on tracks from Salt Lake to Payson several times a day. Because of being pregnant she was usually sick when she arrived. Her mother would help her over the violent sick stomach, help her laundry and occasion¬ally bottle fruit; then Thelma would take the train back to Salt Lake. We didn't know how we could afford a baby on wages we were making, but the Lord does provide. I got a fifty cent a day raise just before the baby was born. We lived in an apartment on Wall Street by the State Capitol for our first Christmas. I'll never forget it. We were all alone, we weren't able to go home, but we did get a nice present. We paid $5.00 down and got us a $49.00 washing machine. Thelma thinks it was the most beautiful present she ever received. We still lived on Wall Street when our first son was born. He was born at home on April 16, 1939, at 2:30 a.m. a beautiful 8 lb. boy. Those helping were Dr. V.M. Sevy, Thelma's mother, her girlfriend, Ardell Ford, and I. We named him Gary Ernest and I blessed him August 6, 1939, in the Ninth Ward, Liberty Stake in Salt Lake City. Gary was a good-natured child, very smart and eager to learn. He wasn't afraid of people. He was the first grandchild tin Thelma's side of the family. Her father was so proud of him that he bought him his first pair of shoes and used to show him off to everyone. We couldn't have been happier. We soon managed to buy a baby buggy on time and Thelma would walk down and meet me after work at midnight. It was about 20 blocks away. She would window shop in the downtown area until I got off work; then we would walk home wheeling our baby up Capitol Hill. Many times we had big holes in the soles of our shoes and we would wear cardboard inserts in them. Maybe once in 2 weeks we would splurge and buy a 5~ ice cream cone. Our recreation was mostly walking, visiting friends, and an occasional trip home on the Orem to see our folks. (Money was extremely tight in the 30's. Most everyone was in the same situation.) Thelma's mother would come up and visit whenever she could, usually riding the Orem. She loved to come to the city. Often we would sleep 3 in a bed because we didn't have an extra bed. After the baby was born we felt we could get by in a smaller, less expen¬sive place again so we moved to an one room apartment with a kitchenette where we shared the bath with 3 other termites. That didn't last long; we soon found bedbugs and got out of there in a hurry. We moved to another one room place and bought a refrigerator About this time I changed jobs, and started driving a big gas truck, delivering gas for Co op. We also got another break; we were able to move into a nice apartment in the Wilson Hotel, and work part time for our rent. I worked on the switchboard and Thelma took the baby in a walker and cleaned rooms a couple of hours a day. We also bought our first car, an old Model A Ford. We lived there about 6 months until we were expecting another baby and Thelma was too sick to work. About this time I went to work in a Co op service station as manager. We moved into an unfurnished duplex up on Chase Avenue. We bought second¬hand furniture a couch, a bed, a set of drawers, a breakfast set, a new mattress and springs all for about $100.00 and paid for it by the month. Thelma bought a used sewing machine for $5.00 and made all our curtains, spreads, baby clothes, Gary's clothes, even sewed rags and braided rugs. Thelma had one change of maternity clothes and washed them out at night About this time I started driving Taxi for Yellow Cab Co. part time and worked full time at the station; however, just before the baby was born, I lost my job due to a change of company executives, and except for odd jobs as out of work. Our second son was born at home on May 6, 1941, at 10:30 p.m. and weighed lbs. Those assisting Dr. V. M. Sevy were Thelma's mother, the next-door neighbor, Alice Anthony, and I. An interesting thing happened just 10 minutes before the baby was born. The bed broke down, the doctor lifted the Mattress down on the floor and that's where the baby was born. When Thelma cooked at the baby, all she could think of was a sweet little rose bud so we started calling him Buddy. He was blessed, Buddy Lee, September 7, 1941, in the Springville Third Ward, Kolob Stake. He was a shy tenderhearted child, very easy to teach and enjoyed being clean. As Buddy grew, he idolized Gary and loved waiting on him. I wasn't out of work long, and soon got a job with American Express for Union Pacific Railroad. It was a good job and I was very happy with it, but did have to supplement part time at another service station. We got along fine for a few months. We managed to get our first radio and a new living room set. Then World War II broke out and everything started changing. The short¬ages began; the first big one was rubber you couldn't get tires and we had been caught with very poor ones. For lack of tires and available parts, we sold the car. The young men were being drafted into the service and I was draft age. My two brothers, Lloyd and Ivan, were both in the service as were Thelma's brothers, Frank and Pierce. It seemed the best thing to do was to get the family closer to our parents so that if I had to go in the service Thelma could manage. We had two little boys and were expecting again. I managed to transfer to the Union Pacific Railroad yards in Provo. In December 1942 we moved to Springville into Valeria Averett's basement. Housing was scarce and we were lucky to find what we did. We had no bathroom and had coal stoves. The rationing began. We had stamps and points for scarce items. Sugar, shoes, meat, gas and many things like shortening and soap could rarely be found. Wages were good but commodities were high and scarce. There was a lot of worry and sadness all around. Our third son was born July 17, 1943, in the Payson Hospital. He was three weeks early and weighed 6 lbs 6 oz. We had to get special gas rations to take Thelma to the hospital and bring her home. We didn't have a car and had to borrow Thelma's parent’s car to get back and forth. Our baby was born on my brother Lloyd's birthday so we named him Dennis Lloyd. I blessed him September 5, 1943, in the Springville First Ward, Kolob Stake. He was a small dainty baby with a big appetite. We were happy with him and very glad to have our family together. 41e now had three beautiful sons. As it turned out, my job was essential to the war so was frozen to the job for the duration of the war and was never drafted. After about a year we found a house with a bathroom down on Main Street so we moved. While we lived here we took our first vacation. I could get free passes on the Union Pacific train so we left the children with Grandma Holt and went to Hollywood to visit Thelma’s sister, Grace, and her husband. We were cone less than a week, but we were sure glad to get back to the children. I was bucking rivets at the railroad yards. I would often get burned and wasn't too happy with the job. Because of the men being drafted, there were job openings in the stores so I took a part time job at Safeway as a food clerk, and just loved it. We bought our first home in 1944 in a housing area in Springville called "Brookside". It was a 3 bedroom frame with a full basement and a coal furnace. It was a $6,000 home and we got it for 850.00 down. It was a big chance to take, and many people thought we were foolish. After living here for a while the war finally ended. I quit the job at the railroad and went full time for Safeway in Springville. The children were old enough to be left with a baby sitter until I came home from work at night, so Thelma got a job as a waitress at Brown's Cafe. I worked days and she worked evenings. We lived here a little over two years. During that time we took the children on their first vacation to Yellowstone Park. We both felt a need for a little more ground so we could have a garden where our boys could learn the joy of planting and raising their own vegetables. The value of our home had increased so we sold our home and bought 32 acre on 700 South in Springville and started to build. It was a hard struggle. Many things hadn't returned to the market since the war. We did much of the work ourselves and learned a lot "the hard way". We had a water right and a big garden. The back of our property joined my parent’s property. We received much good advice from Dad about planting. We also had a dog-named "Cubby" and raised rabbits. Thelma worked evenings in Kapp's Cafe. I made rapid progress with Safeway, and was soon made Assistant Manager and transferred to the Provo store. Within a few months I was made Manager of the Mt. Pleasant Safeway store. I left immediately and started house hunting. Thelma sold our home and prepared to move. We moved to a big, old fashioned home in Mt. Pleasant in June 1949. After a long wait, our fourth baby, a lovely 8 lb. 13 oz. boy, was born August 23, 1949, in the Mt. Pleasant Hospital. He had mucus in his lungs and we had a problem with him for about 24 hours; then he got along fine. He was a shy beautiful baby with a slightly curly, golden hair. We were delighted with him and so were his brothers. Thelma had a favorite cousin, Ray Butler, who was on a mission at the time so we named him Ray after him, and Dean because we liked it. I blessed him Ray Dean on September 25, 1949, in the Mt. Pleasant South Ward, North Sanpete Stake. When the baby was six weeks old, Thelma started having stomach problems, which turned out to be gallstones. In January 1950, she had her gall bladder removed. It took a few months to recover. Due to the added expense of doctor bills, we got behind financially so in the fall of 1950, Thelma and I worked in the evening for a short time at the Moroni turkey plant picking turkeys. Our stay in Mt. Pleasant was delightful. We loved the people there. The children loved school. Gary and buddy both played baritones in the Hamilton School band. They also had paper routes. Dennis started school there and also took snare drum lessons. Thelma was band mother, served as counselor in the Relief Society and the MIA. She was also active in civic clubs (Jaycee Ettes, LaIcos and Lady Lions) and built floats for parades. I was a counselor in the IIA, active in the Boy Scout program, president of the Junior Chamber of Commerce and belonged to the Lions Club. In 1951 I received the DSA (Distinguished Service Award) for outstanding young man of the year. The store did very well, and in November 1952, I was transferred to a larger store in Springville. We had to close our home in Mt. Pleasant as they’re as no sale for it at that time. We bought a home back in "Brookside" again and moved back to Springville. After several months, we sold our home in Mt. Pleasant for what we owed on it. We were also expecting another baby. On March 14, 1953, our baby was born in the Payson Hospital, a lovely 6 lb. 8oz boy. He was born 3 weeks early, had mucus in his lungs and was put in an air lock for 24 hours until he was breathing properly. We named him Kelly Butler because he was born close to St. Patrick's Day, and Thelma's maiden name was Butler. I blessed him May 3, 1953, in the Springville Sixth Ward, Kolob Stake. Kelly was a very good baby, smiled very easily and had a happy disposition. He brought a lot of joy to our home. While we lived here, I was on the Scout council. Thelma was a visiting teacher in Relief Society. Gary and Buddy were both active in the Boy Scouts, and received many advancements. Buddy was made a member of the "Order of the Arrow", a very select group of Boy Scouts. We bought an accordion and Buddy started taking lessons. Gary graduated from Jr. Nigh and started driving a car. He also started working for Safeway in Spanish Fork. I continued to do well with Safeway, and in the spring of 1955 was trans¬ferred to a bigger store in Tooele. We were a little reluctant to move; we had just fixed up our home, both our folks lived in Springville, and the child¬ren were doing well, but it meant a lot to me professionally so we moved again. Our first home in Tooele was a white frame home on Parkway with a beauti¬ful big back yard. Tooele was less than half LDS and was quite a transient community due to the Army Depot. We knew that raising children here would be quite a challenge. On July 7, 1956, my mother passed away. We lost a lovely mother and grand-mother. We all missed her so much. The following January my father was hit by a car, ended up in the hospital with a broken leg, and was still there when he passed away on April 30, 1957, from a blood clot. In August that same Summer (1957) we took all of the children on a camp¬ing trip up Spanish Fork Canyon. We pitched a tent, fished, and were having a delightful time when Buddy got shot in the back with a 22 short shell. In a state of panic we rushed him to the Spanish Fork Hospital. We learned the bullet had just missed his heart and had lodged in his lung. He stayed there a few days and then we transferred him to the Tooele Hospital. We were so very thankful the Lord had spared our son. He carried the bullet for a year before we had it removed in the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City. That same year on October 17, 1957, we were blessed with another beauti¬ful 7 1b.142 oz. baby boy, born at Tooele Valley Hospital. We named him Steven Wayne. He was blessed December 1, 1957, in the Tooele Tenth Ward, North Tooele Stake. Stephen was Thelma’s grandfather's name and we just liked Wayne. He was a good baby, loved attention, and got plenty of it. His brothers adored him and we all enjoyed spoiling him. When he was 6 months old, he began having convulsions and was hospitalized. We ended up taking him to a brain specialist in Salt Lake. It was determined that he had a vein injury in his head at birth and would have to be under strict medication until his growth could take care of it. He was under care and medication for 2 years, but never had another convulsion after he was 9 months old. He gave us all some scary moments. Gary had reservations about leaving Utah County. He gave up a nice girl¬friend and a good job in Spanish Fork to move. While in Tooele, he belonged to the National Guard and drove the compressor truck and was also a member of the drill team. We watched with pride as he graduated from High School and Seminary. He was active in the church, holding the office of Elder. He was a good boy, very independent and ambitious. He enrolled in trade school in Salt Lake but soon quit and took a full time job at Alta Ski Resort. It was here that he met Sue Pat Kinsley, the girl he married November 7, 1959. We had mixed emotions but they had our blessing. Our children are the most pre¬cious things in our lives and we had so hoped for a Temple Marriage for each of them. Jobs for the youth were very scarce in Tooele. We had a good friend and neighbor Ethel Halgren, who worked at a publishing company called "The Tooele Bulletin". She was instrumental in getting our boys jobs there. The oldest five boys all had turns working for them. Some delivered papers and some work¬ed on the press. Our Stake President, Alex Dunn, owned the business. His son, Joel Dunn, managed it. These choice people provided jobs as well as counsel for our boys. We shall always be grateful for this experience. Buddy adjusted to the move a little better. He was well liked and had many friends. He was active in church and did well in school, earning his letter in tennis. He was also a representative at Boy's State. He graduated from Seminary and High School and then went to BYU for a year. In 1960 he received a call to the North British Mission. It was something he had always wanted and we were all very happy. He left for England in mid November 1960. Dennis didn't care much for school although we tried very hard to keep him interested. He enjoys being mischievous and gave us many anxious moments but he didn’t seem to want what we wanted for him. In his junior year of school he quit and joined the Air Force. In 2 months he was home again with an honor¬able discharge. He went to work for the Tooele Smelter. By now we were grandparents; Gary and Sue had a baby girl named Gretchen. Ray was playing a baritone in the school band and Kelly was taking accor¬dion lessons. On June 28, 1961, Thelma's father passed away. He had been ill a long time but it was hard to give him up. We loved him so much. It was a great loss. Buddy had become very close to him while he was attending BYU. It surely was hard to tell our missionary the sad news. I continued to do well with Safeway, winning many contests and getting many congratulations from the company president. On November 14, 1961, my birthday, they opened a new supermarket and I was selected to be the manager. The Boy Scout program was very weak in our ward in Tooele. I was called to be Scoutmaster and did all I could to get it organized. Thelma taught Primary for a while, and then served as work director counselor in the Relief Soc¬iety. She was also secretary of the MIA and worked in the Parent Teachers Association. In March 1962, we moved to a beautiful new home, which we had built on brook Street. That same summer we bought a vacation trailer. In November 1962, Buddy returned from his mission. His girlfriend, Gwen Lynn Phillips, had waited for him. On January 11, 1963, they were married in the Logan Temple. That evening they had a beautiful big church reception. In April 1963, Dennis married Alice June Maestas. Later that same year Gary and Sue got a divorce. There were two children, Gretchen and Nicholas. Sue was given custody of the children. In the fall of 1963 we opened a little business called "The Spudnut Shop". Thelma was manager; Buddy and Gwen helped her. It turned out to be a costly experience. We dumped it a year later. On January 18, 1964, Thelma's mother married Dewey 0. Nelson. She had been so lonely since Dad had passed away. Dewey was good to her and we all enjoyed his company. In the spring of 1964, totally unexpected, I was transferred to a smaller store in Magna. When school was out that year, Thelma sold our beautiful new home and we moved to Magna. While we lived here, Ray and Kelly became inter¬ested in raising racing pigeons. We would take the birds a great distance and they would always find their way home. They also entered them in the fairs and received some ribbons. It proved to be a great sport. On October 18, 1964, Garb married Judith Louise Schow, a girlfriend from Eugene, Oregon. I was now in my late 40's and had a little less than 2 years to go with Safeway until I had earned "Vested Rights". This would secure our retirement and provide for the future. It didn't turn out that way. In the summer of 1965, completely without reason, I was relieved of management, reduced to a food clerk, and transferred to Orem. I've never been so hurt. There was a lot of prestige and good money in management, but there was also a lot of pressure so maybe it was a blessing. In December 1965, we moved to a new home in Orem. This proved to be a good move and a blessing in many ways. The children did well in school, made good friends, and were active in the church. We took Kelly up to Kearns every week for accordion lessons for a while. He was playing in an accordion band. In the summer of 1966, Kelly went to California to compete in the Western States Accordion Festival. The trio he played in took 3rd place. We sure enjoyed hearing him play. The children were nearly raised, so Thelma went back to work as a clerk at Cornet, a variety store in Orem. In 1968, I quit Safeway and went into management training for Cornet. I trained in Tooele, and then managed a store in Pocatello, Idaho. In 1970, I was transferred to the Orem, store. Thelma stayed in Orem with the children during this time and kept her job. When I got the Orem store, it was against company rules for us to be in the same store so Thelma was let go. While I was in Pocatello, Kelly had emergency surgery for release of torsion suspension. Ray graduated from Seminary and from Orem High in 1967, went to BYU for a year, then to Utah Technical School where he earned a degree in electronics. He also worked for Safeway. He was deeply religious, a clean quiet boy always respectful to us. On June 12, 1969, he married his high school sweetheart, Jeana Rose Rowley, in the Salt Lake Temple. They had a lovely garden reception that evening at her home. We enjoyed many summer vacations most of them at Hebgen Lake in Montana. Thelma's brothers had boats and campers and we had a trailer. We would take our families and everyone that could, would go for a week every year. Four of us had motorcycles, and the cousins had a great time water skiing. They loved pulling tricks on Uncle Pierce. We enjoyed fishing, gathering mushrooms, visiting around the bonfire, and baking goodies just unforgettable fun: This went on for almost 10 years until most of the children were raised. It had been a tradition in the Butler family to camp up Spanish Fork Canyon every fall for the deer hunt. This has been going on for over 30 years. I think it was Thelma's father who started it. He used to go up there with us long after he was unable to climb the mountains. All relatives arid many friends joined us from time to time. They nearly always pot their deer, usually on Billy's Mountain. It was mostly a men and boys camp, but some of the women joined us for a few days every season. We'll always have some special memories of God's are at outdoors and our family together. We also had many enjoyable trips with Thelma's mother and Dewey. They loved to travel, eat out, and stay in motels. We went to Las Vegas and saw some nice shows. We also went to Elko, Ely, and Jackpot many times. Every time their health would permit and we could get some time off, we would go for a couple of days. Once again I'm glad we moved to Orem and thankful we could help them enjoy their later years. In the summer of 1970 Thelma went to work for the W. T. Grant Co. in Provo as a clerk. She was also secretary of the Sunday School. In 1971 Kelly graduated as an honor student from Orem high and from 4 years of LDS Seminary. He received a scholarship and went to BYU for a year. A couple of year’s prior, he had earned his Eagle Scout award. He was working for Safeway and was very active in the church. We tried hard to live up to his expectations. We knew that he was mission material and in the spring of 1972 he was called to the Japan Central Mission. It was quite a coincident: He already had 2 cousins in the Japan West Mission. In June he left for the LTM in Hawaii, spent 2 months there, and then went on to Japan. That same Spring I was transferred to a bigger Cornet store in Cedar City. Both Steven and Thelma felt that they just couldn't give up everything and move down there, but prompted by the scripture "Whither Thou goest I will no" fin¬ally gave in to the move. We sold our beautiful home and bought one in Cedar City. We also bought a new truck and camper. Steven worked in Cornet's for me and made good money. He bought some new guns and a new motorcycle. He was lonely, didn't like being away from his Orem friends, and didn't like school. Kelly felt that he could not return to Cedar City from his mission. Thelma's mother was sick a lot and she was going back to Springville every other week. The move to Cedar had been a costly mistake. It was decided that Thelma would go back to Orem and make a home for the boys, and I would follow as soon as I could. In June 1973, we sold our home in Cedar City and rented a small one in Orem while a new one was being built. We were trying so hard to pet Steven interested in church and school again. In July 1973, Thelma went back to work for W. T. Grant Co. In October that same year she was visiting up at deer camp. She went on a motorcycle ride with Bob Parkinson (her niece's husband). They met a car on a curve and had to go over the side of the road. The motorcycle landed on Thelma's left leg. It was quite badly hurt from the knee down. It was a very painful or¬deal. She was off work for 6 weeks, and ended up with an ulcer on her ankle and had it bandaged for 4 months. Because of my concern over the family and not giving work a high priority, I lost my job. We really felt like we were being tried. Thelma was down with her leg, I was out of work, it was just 6 weeks until Christmas, and we had a missionary to support. I did however obtain a job in the Physical Plant at GYU. The wages were low, but we were glad to get the work and it was a job where we wouldn't be forced to move. Thelma also went back to work anti before long thins were going better again. On January 4, 1974, Thelma's mother had a heart attack and passed away. What a precious person she was. I am so thankful that we decided to come back to Orem so that we could be near and spend more time with her. In February 1974, we moved to our new home, which is where we are currently living. We worked hard getting it landscaped and fixed up for Kelly's re¬turn. He returned from his mission in June. It was nice having him home again. He enrolled at BYU and went back to work for Safeway. On November 15, 1974 Kelly married Janese Richardson in the Salt Lake LDS temple. She was our neighbor and had waited for Kelly while he was on his mission. The next evening they had a nice church reception. As for our health, Thelma has had problems with heart fibrillation and has been hospitalized several times ('62, '67, '73,'77). She has had both medical and electric conversions. In 1972 she had eye surgery for a closed tear duct. I had cataract surgery on one eye in 1967 and then had the same think done on the other eye in 1975. At the present we are both enjoying good health. On April 29, 1977, Steven married Melanie Soulier, a girl he had met in high school. They were married in the church by an LDS Bishop. They had a nice church reception that same evening. All of our boys stood with Steven, as he was married. It surely was a handsome sight. If only it could have been in the Temple. We are alone now. I am still working at BYU and part time in produce at a food store. Thelma is working full time for Skaggs. We have 21 grandchild¬ren and we see most of our children quite often. Ray, Kelly, and Steven all live in Orem, Dennis lives in Salt Lake, and Buddy lives in Tooele. Gary is the only one out of state. He lives in Eugene, Oregon. We have a very good marriage. We've had hardships and trying times but feel we have grown because of them. Our greatest blessing and accomplishment in life is our children. May God bless each one of them to live good clean lives and be honorable men before their families, associates, and God. ERNEST VOLYAL HOLT’S TESTIMONY I was born in Huntington Utah November 14, 1916. My parents were always living on a ranch somewhere. I didn’t have any contact with the church in my boyhood. My sisters took me to church when I was 10 or 11 and was baptized at that time. As a boy we didn’t have much contact with the church but my testimony has grown since that time. Going through the different steps in the Aaronic and Melchizedek Priesthood and reading and the influence of others my testimony has grown. I now have a testimony of the Priesthood and I believe in God and his Son Jesus Christ and the Holy Ghost. I was married in the Salt Lake Temple June 28th 1938 and Blessed with a good family. Great Grandpa Holt I just found this in some of our papers mom had wrote some more history so I will type it. Jeana Holt June 1988 It is hard to believe that it has been 10 years since we wrote our histories, I guess it is time we up date them. After having cataract surgery, I had to wear heavy glasses and had rather limited vision. A few years later we learned they could implant lenses in the eye. In August 1981 I had a secondary implant in one eye, followed 2 months later by the same operation in the other eye. I was delighted with the results, I can see without glasses. Thelma worked for Skaggs until 1981 then she started drawing her Social Security. I reached my retirement birthday in November and was officially retied from B.Y.U. on December 1, 1981. I continued to work part time at Norton’s food store. Since retirement we have been fishing and camping several times with Thelma’s sister and brothers. Other family members joined us whenever they could. We do enjoy the outdoors. We have driven up to Eugene, Oregon 4 times to see Gary, Judy and there family. In November 1983, Bud’s oldest boy Scott went on a mission to Japan. He was our first grandchild to fill a mission. On August 31 and September 1, 1985, we had a very enjoyable trip. A bunch of us went down to Hanksville to Ivan and Fay’s Golden Wedding. We took Golda and Della with us. Richard and Myrle took Evon, Valeria, Lea Mae and Maurine. We all stayed in a motel across the road from most of Ivan’s family. They had a nice celebration and we enjoyed visiting with a lot of our relatives. On the way home we stopped at Ivan and Fay’s and visited. We stopped at 3 cemeteries and looked up some of our relative’s graves. It is beautiful country down there and we all enjoyed the trip. In May 1985, we learned that Thelma’s brother Frank had cancer. He suffered such a long time before he passed away in February 1986. I THINK august 3, 1986 was one of the hardest days of my whole life. Our second son Buddy passed away suddenly from a heart attack. He was everything a father could want in a son, a loving husband and father of 210. He filled a mission to England and he was and inspiration to all who knew him. Maybe someday will understand. The shock of Bud’s death proved to be too much for Thelma. Just 2 weeks later she had a heart attach. She ended up having triple by pass surgery. She has had a lot of medical care since then and tries hard. I guess life will never be quite the some. At present I am still working a few hours at Norton’s food store. We go to church quite regular and do some temple work. We take a lot of walks together, work in the yard and do other home projects. In the summer we go camping and fishing whenever we can. We enjoy our family and enjoy doing things with them. At present we have 24 grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren. This year we will celebrate our Golden Wedding. 50 wonderful years together. We hope we can be blessed with good health and many more happy years. Our greatest accomplishment in life is surely our children. We are so thankful for all we have and hope we can live worthy of our blessings.

Life Timeline of Ernest V Holt

Ernest V Holt was born on 14 Nov 1916
Ernest V Holt was 4 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
1920
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Ernest V Holt was 23 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1939
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Ernest V Holt was 28 years old when World War II: German forces in the west agree to an unconditional surrender. The German Instrument of Surrender ended World War II in Europe. The definitive text was signed in Karlshorst, Berlin, on the night of 8 May 1945 by representatives of the three armed services of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW) and the Allied Expeditionary Force together with the Supreme High Command of the Red Army, with further French and US representatives signing as witnesses. The signing took place 9 May 1945 at 00:16 local time.
1945
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Ernest V Holt was 36 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
1953
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Ernest V Holt was 47 years old when The Beatles make their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, performing before a "record-busting" audience of 73 million viewers across the USA. The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. With members John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, they became widely regarded as the foremost and most influential music band in history. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later experimented with several musical styles, ranging from pop ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock, often incorporating classical elements and unconventional recording techniques in innovative ways. In 1963, their enormous popularity first emerged as "Beatlemania"; as the group's music grew in sophistication, led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the band were integral to pop music's evolution into an art form and to the development of the counterculture of the 1960s.
1964
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Ernest V Holt was 62 years old when Jim Jones led more than 900 members of the Peoples Temple to mass murder/suicide in Jonestown, Guyana, hours after some of its members assassinated U.S. Congressman Leo Ryan (pictured). James Warren Jones was an American religious cult leader who initiated and was responsible for a mass suicide and mass murder in Jonestown, Guyana. He considered Jesus Christ as being in compliance with an overarching belief in socialism as the correct social order. Jones was ordained as a Disciples of Christ pastor, and he achieved notoriety as the founder and leader of the Peoples Temple cult.
1978
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Ernest V Holt was 72 years old when The tanker Exxon Valdez spilled 10.8 million US gallons (260,000 bbl; 41,000 m3) of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska, causing one of the most devastating man-made maritime environmental disasters. A tanker is a ship designed to transport or store liquids or gases in bulk. Major types of tankship include the oil tanker, the chemical tanker, and gas carrier. Tankers also carry commodities such as vegetable oils, molasses and wine. In the United States Navy and Military Sealift Command, a tanker used to refuel other ships is called an oiler but many other navies use the terms tanker and replenishment tanker.
1989
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Ernest V Holt was 77 years old when The Rwandan genocide begins when the aircraft carrying Rwandan president Juvénal Habyarimana and Burundian president Cyprien Ntaryamira is shot down. The Rwandan genocide, also known as the genocide against the Tutsi, was a genocidal mass slaughter of Tutsi in Rwanda by members of the Hutu majority government. An estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 Rwandans were killed during the 100-day period from 7 April to mid-July 1994, constituting as many as 70% of the Tutsi population. Additionally, 30% of the Pygmy Batwa were killed. The genocide and widespread slaughter of Rwandans ended when the Tutsi-backed and heavily armed Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) led by Paul Kagame took control of the country. An estimated 2,000,000 Rwandans, mostly Hutus, were displaced and became refugees.
1994
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Ernest V Holt died on 15 Jan 2007 at the age of 90
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Ernest V Holt (14 Nov 1916 - 15 Jan 2007), BillionGraves Record 35 Springville, Utah, Utah, United States

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