Thelma B. Holt

22 Apr 1919 - 12 Mar 1995

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Thelma B. Holt

22 Apr 1919 - 12 Mar 1995
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Thelma Butler Holt Born April 22, 1919 Died March 12, 1995 Married Ernest Voyal Holt June 28, 1938 PERSONAL HISTORY OF THELMA BUTLER HOLT I, Thelma Butler Holt, was born April 22, 1919, in my Grandpa Hutchings' home in Victor, Teton County, Idaho. I was the fourth child and first girl born to Christ

Life Information

Thelma B. Holt

Born:
Married: 28 Jun 1938
Died:

Evergreen Cemetery

1876-1998 North 2000 West
Springville, Utah, Utah
United States
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Catirrel

May 23, 2011
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Amy Robbins-Tjaden

September 2, 2018
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enjoying the pool

September 30, 2017
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Laura

September 2, 2018
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F D Dennis

September 2, 2018
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dlc84088

July 4, 2019
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Catirrel

May 21, 2011

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Thelma Butler

Contributor: enjoying the pool Created: 2 years ago Updated: 11 months ago

Thelma Butler Holt Born April 22, 1919 Died March 12, 1995 Married Ernest Voyal Holt June 28, 1938 PERSONAL HISTORY OF THELMA BUTLER HOLT I, Thelma Butler Holt, was born April 22, 1919, in my Grandpa Hutchings' home in Victor, Teton County, Idaho. I was the fourth child and first girl born to Christopher Lorenzo Butler and Reba Hutchings Butler. My oldest two brothers had died shortly after their birth. Stephen Lorenzo was born June 7, 1913, in Hiawatha, Utah, and died June 8, 1913, and was buried in Springville, Utah. Milton was born June 9, 1914, in Victor, Idaho, and died June 9, 1914, and he was buried in Victor. My brother, Christopher Franklin was born January 18, 1917, in Spanish Fork, Utah. When I was born, my parents were living with my grandparents and Dad was helping Grandpa on the farm. I was blessed in the Victor Ward, Teton County, Idaho, on July 6, 1919, by my grandpa, Stephen Hutchings. He was bishop at that time. Shortly after I was born, my folks moved back to the farm in Spanish Fork, Utah. This farm was originally part of Grandpa Butler's farm and was located west of the highway between Spanish Fork and Salem. A few years before, my folks helped to build a small house there and had lived there for a while. On March 13, 1921, my brother, Pierce Hutchings, was born. A year later on June 21, 1922, my sister, Grace, was born. There seemed to be a little friction between my parents and grandparents over the farm property. It wasn't long before my parents gave it up and moved back up to Victor, Idaho. My folks had a hard time making a living. Dad worked on dry farms. Mother washed on the washboard for the hotel. I used to iron the pillow cases when I was only five years old. Mother also used to bake pies and sell them to the pool hall. I remember at this time Dad had a broken foot and was on crutches for quite a while. I can remember Grandpa and Grandma Hutchings and their home in Victor. Grandpa was a big impressive man. Grandma was a very small quiet woman and was always kind and gentle with me. I remember we celebrated July 4th one year. Grandpa strung red, white, and blue bunting around some trees and we made a freezer of ice cream. On August 12, 1924, my brother, Royal Christopher, was born. He was another "blue" baby and died the next day. He was buried in the Victor cemetery next to his brother, Milton. About this time, my mother's sister and brother in law, Grace and Harry Ballard, decided to manage the hotel in Victor. It was a large building that housed the hotel, a cafe, and a drug store. Mother and Dad decided to run the cafe part. We moved into a house right next door. For a while things seemed to go quite well we even got some new furniture. We had a lady tend us while Mother and Dad both worked in the cafe. I started school in Victor and went to the first grade there. I also remember going to Sunday School a few times. In the summer of 1926, my folks had a "falling out" with Aunt Grace. They sold everything and moved back to Spanish Fork, Utah. We rented the "Cornaby" house in town and Dad worked odd jobs just whatever he could find. I went to the second grade at the Thurber School. I went to the third grade at the Central School. I was baptized December 4, 1927, by Elmer Fillmore and confirmed by Gilbert A. Johnson. We spent quite a bit of time on Grandpa and Grandma Butler's farm south of Spanish Fork helping with the work. I remember picking beans, hoeing celery, separating milk, churning butter, turning the washing machine, and helping Grandma cook for threshers. Grandpa Butler was a stocky built man, very strict and set in his ways. He believed in everyone working. Grandma Butler was a German. She was a very hard worker and very bossy. It was the summer of 1928. Times were hard and Dad was having a time finding enough work. His sister and brother in law, olive and "Pete" Peterson, lived in Mutual, a coal camp, and Pete worked in the coal mine. They seemed to think Dad could get work there. Dad went up and was hired to work in the Mutual mine. Mutual was next to the last coal camp up Spring Canyon in Carbon County, Utah. After a short while, Dad was able to find just two small rooms in a house in Martin, another coal camp, for us to move to. It was the last house in the last camp going up the canyon. By winter, Dad's brother, Alma, was also working in the mines and living with us. That made seven of us in two small rooms. It was good for us to have regular income again. My parents were finally able to get me the eye glasses I had needed all my life. I was very near sighted. I'll never forget when I first got them. I could see things I had never seen before. Winters in the coal camps were very severe. We had to walk down two camps to the coal camp, Rains, to go to school. The first winter up there I got pneumonia and they nearly lost me. The next summer, we moved down the canyon to Mutual to a four room house. It was hard for the miners to find a place to stay so Mother took in two men boarders for a while. I went to the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades in Rains. We had three grades in one room. When I was in sixth grade, we had just three sixth grade students. Life in the coal camp was quite different. I had Japanese, Greek, and Italian friends. We had no car, no radio, and no church. They did organize Relief Society once and mother was a counselor, but people weren't interested and it only lasted about a year. There was a company show once a month. We played outdoor games and hiked the hills a lot. Due to boredom, we got into our share of mischief. The water in camp couldn't be used for drinking. Twice a week we had to fill containers from the train and keep it for drinking. Mother kept a very clean house. I remember bare board floors being scrubbed white. She was also a good cook and did a lot of sewing for us. We all had a lot of household chores to do. My parents were strict and made us help with the work. The affects of the depression were really being felt now. Some of the miners had been layed off. Others had been cut back. People were losing their possessions and trading work for food. We felt lucky that Dad still had a job. In March, 1930, Dad was in a mine accident that broke his back. We didn't realize at the time that his days of full time employment were over. He spent the next five months in a hospital in Salt Lake. There was no public transportation in the coal camps, so Mother had to get someone to take her to Helper to board the train to Salt Lake to see Dad. When she made these trips, we children were left alone. It was a hard period for all of us. We did get to live in our house free and receive compensation monthly from the mine. In 1931, I started the seventh grade in Latuda, the next camp down the canyon from Rains. Frank was playing cornet in the band and I was able to borrow a school instrument, so I started playing the alto horn. I really enjoyed being in the band. In October, 1931, my sister, Lois, was born. We all enjoyed her so much, especially Dad. He was home all the time still recovering from his injury. In January, 1932, Lois got pneumonia and died. She was buried in Springville next to her brother, Stephen Lorenzo. In the summer of 1932, we moved to Springville. Dad received a monthly settlement for his injury for quite a few months. He planted a garden and raised a pig to help out. We finally started going to church regular at the Springville Third Ward. Dad was janitor of the church for a while. He had several part time, easy jobs in the next few years but couldn't qualify for any kind of steady employment. He was in pain much of the time. In March, 1934, my brother, Jay Paul, was born. We all enjoyed our new baby brother. After a while, the settlement from the mine was paid in full and we didn't receive monthly checks anymore. Dad wasn't capable of working full time so we went on state welfare. We seemed to always be quite poor, tho we never wanted for a warm clean house or food to eat. If we wanted more than that, we had to work and earn our own. I did a lot of sewing and made most of my clothes. Mother taught me to cook, sew, embroider, and how to take care of things. In spite of all our problems, I always felt blessed that the Lord had given me such good parents. We had a good respectful home life. I went to school in Springville for the next five years. I became active in the band and orchestra, playing cornet and string bass. I looked forward to going to the band contests and also playing in the opera orchestra. I started dating when I was in ninth grade. I went to nearly all of the formal dances, having earned and made my own formals. I loved the ball games and played in the Pep band. I had to work much of the time. I had house cleaning jobs, did baby sitting, worked in the cannery, picked fruit, worked in the fields, and dusted school rooms. My best girl friends were Ardell Angus and Donna Harmer. We took turns sleeping at each others house and had a lot of fun together. I had several boy friends and used to love going to the dances at high schools nearby and Utahna and Rainbow Gardens in Provo. When I was a senior, I started dating Ernest Holt. He had quit school the year before, to go to work. He came back in the middle of my senior year to finish so he could graduate. School was a lot of fun after that. He walked me home after school and I used to do a lot of homework for him. We dated and went to all of the school Functions together. His folks didn't have a car and neither did mine, so we usually walked or double dated with his boy friend. I graduated from Springville High School and LDS Seminary in 1937. Just before graduation, Ernest went to Southern Utah with his father to prospect for gold. He was gone several weeks. By then our relationship was quite special, so I was real disappointed that he didn't take me to graduation. I ended up going with Les Ford, who was from Provo. In those days it was generally expected that you support yourself after you finsh Finish school. I was eager to try and wanted to go to the big city. I went to Salt Lake and got a job working in a home for five dollars a week plus board and room. During the next eight months, I worked in three different homes doing washing, ironing, cooking, and housework. I usually had a day and a half off per week. By then, Ernest had come back from his prospecting trip and was trying to find work. Jobs were scarce and it wasn't easy. He finally found one in a gas station in Salt Lake. We continued dating and had fun together. My girl friend, Ardell, had married Owen Ford and they lived in Salt Lake, so we spent a lot of time with them. In January, 1938, Ernie gave me a diamond. In the spring, Mother got sick and I felt a need to go home and help out. I also wanted to sew and get some things ready for my wedding. I was able to get a job in the Mission Cafe in Springville and move back home. Ernie quit his job and financed another prospecting trip with his father, to the Henry Mountains. His father had a claim down there and felt he would find gold. He never did. When Ernie came back, we decided things weren't getting much better so we would take our chances and get married as soon as we could. We wanted a Temple marriage and a church reception. Neither of our folks could help much financially, so we knew much of it would be up to us. I remember my brother, Frank, helped pay for the orchestra. I made my own dress. Ernie rented his clothes. We payed for much of it a whole year after we were married. It took some planning and some help from other family members. I married Ernest Voyal Holt, son of Enoch Alphonzo Holt and Altha Elnorah Turner Holt, on June 28, 1938, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple for time and eternity. George F. Richards Jr., of the Council of the Twelve, performed the ceremony. I was 19 years old Ernie was 21. The people who accompanied us to the Temple were my mother, Ernie's sister, Valeria, and her husband, Evon, and Ernie's friend and partner at work, Milton Bush, and his wife, Louisa. We were very glad to finally be married. We had gone together for two years and had been engaged for six months. We had a wedding reception the next evening in the church in Springville, Utah. I made me a nice wedding dress, rented a veil, and had bridesmaids. We had an orchestra, danced, and served refreshments. It was modest but nice. An interesting thing; after the reception, Ernie wheeled me down the middle of Main Street in a wheelbarrow, with a crowd of people following. The next morning we moved to our first home, a small fur¬nished apartment on "B" Street in Salt Lake City, Utah. The rent on this place was $27.00 a month. We had very little to start out on, less than $5.00 between us, so we had to charge our first groceries. Ernie had worked two weeks for free in order to get his first job at Mac Hale's gas station. He made $2.00 a day for 10 and 12 hour shifts and worked every day of the week. I soon discovered we were expecting a baby and we couldn't afford this place any longer, so I set out to find something less expensive. We moved several times that first year, when¬ever I could find a place that would save a few dollars. I always looked for furnished apartments within walking distance of work, sometimes as close as 3 blocks and at other times as far as 5 miles one way. We had no car or furniture, just a cedar chest. I did the laundry on the washboard in the bathtub. I Every 3 or 4 weeks I would pack the laundry in suitcases, walk to the Orem train station, and take the train to Springville to visit my parents. The Orem was a one car electric commuter train that ran on tracks from Salt Lake to Payson several times. Because of being pregnant, I was usually sick when I arrived. Mother would get me over my violent sick stomach, help me with laundry, and occasionally we would bottle fruit; then I would take the train back to Salt Lake. We didn't know how we could afford a baby on wages we were making, but the Lord does provide. Ernie got a fifty cent a day raise just before the baby was born. We lived in an apartment on Wall Street by the State Capitol for our first Christmas. I'll never forget it. We were all alone, we weren't able to go home, but we did get a nice present. We paid $5.00 down and got us a $49.00 washing machine. I think it was the most beautiful present I've ever received. We still lived on Wall Street when our first son was born. He was born at home on April 16, 1939, at 2:30 a.m. a beautiful 8 lb. boy. Those helping were Dr. V. M. Sevy, my mother, my girl friend, Ardell Ford, and Ernie. We named him Gary Ernest after his father. He was blessed August 6, 1939, in the Ninth Ward, Liberty Stake, in Salt Lake City by his father, Ernest Voyal Holt. Gary was a good natured child, very smart and eager to learn. He wasn't afraid of people. He was the first grand¬child on my side of the family. I remember my father was so proud of him that he bought him his first pair of shoes and used to show him off to everyone. We couldn't have been happier. We soon managed to buy a baby buggy on time and I would walk down and meet Ernie after work at midnight. It was about 20 blocks away. I would window shop in the downtown area until he got off work; then we would walk home wheeling our baby up Capitol Hill. Many times we had big holes in the soles of our shoes and we would wear cardboard inserts in them. Maybe once in two weeks we would splurge and buy a 5~ ice cream cone. Our recreation was mostly walking, visiting friends, and an occasional trip home on the Orem to see our folks. (Money was extremely tight in the 30's. Most everyone was in the same situation.) Mother would come up and visit whenever she could, usually riding the Orem. She loved to come to the city. Often we would sleep three in a bed because we didn't have an extra bed. After the baby was born, we felt we could get by in a smaller, less expensive place again so we moved to a one room apartment with a kitchenette where we shared the bath with three other tenants. That didn't last long; we soon found bedbugs and got out of there in a hurry. We moved to another one room place and bought a fridge. About this time Ernie changed jobs. He started driving a big gas truck, delivering gas for Co op. We also got another break; we were able to move into a nice apartment in the Wilson Hotel, and work part time for our rent. Ernie worked on the switchboard and I took my baby in a walker and cleaned rooms a couple of hours a day. We also bought our first car, an old Model A ford. We lived there about six months until we were expecting another baby and I was too sick to work. About this time, Ernie went to work in a Co op service station as manager. We moved into an unfurnished duplex up on Chase Avenue. We bought secondhand furniture a couch, a bed, a set of drawers, a breakfast set, a new mattress and springs all for about $100.00, and paid for it by the month. I bought a used sewing machine for $5.00 and made all our curtains, spreads, baby clothes, Gary's clothes, and even sewed rags and braided rugs. I had one change of maternity clothes and washed them out at night. When I was 5 months pregnant, I went to Springville and had all of my teeth out. About this time, Ernie started driving Taxi for Yellow Cab Co. part time and worked full time at the station. Just before the baby was born, Ernie lost his job due to a change of company executives, and except for odd jobs was out of work. Our second son was born at home on May 6, 1941, at 10:30 p.m. and weighed 7 lbs. Those assisting Dr. V. M Sevy were my mother, the next door neighbor, Alice Anthony, and Ernie. An interesting thing happened just 10 minutes before the baby was born: The bed broke down, the doctor lifted the mattress down on the floor and that's where the baby was born. When I looked at my baby, all I could think of was a sweet little rose bud so we started calling him Buddy. He was blessed, Buddy Lee, September 7, 1941, in the Springville Third Ward, Kolob Stake, by his father. He was a shy tender hearted child, very easy to teach and enjoyed being clean. As Buddy grew, he idolized Gary and loved waiting on him. Ernie wasn't out of work long. He soon got a job with American Express for Union Pacific Railroad. It was a good job and he was very happy with it. He also worked part time at another service station. We got along fine for a few months. We managed to get our first radio and a new living room set. Then World War II broke out and everything started changing. The shortages began; the first big one was rubber you couldn't get tires and we had been caught with very poor ones. For lack of tires and available parts, we sold the car. The young men were being drafted into the service and Ernie was draft age. My two brothers, Frank and Pierce, were both in the service as were Ernie's brothers, Lloyd and Ivan. It seemed the best thing to do was to get me and the children closer to our parents so that if Ernie had to go in the service, I could manage. We had two little boys and were expecting again. Ernie managed to transfer to the Union Pacific Railroad yards in Provo. In December, 1942, we moved to Springville into Valeria Averett's basement. Housing was scarce and we were lucky to find what we did. We had no bathroom and had coal stoves. The rationing began. We had stamps and points for scarce items. Sugar, shoes, meat, gas and many things like shortening and soap could rarely be found. Wages were good but commodities were high and scarce. There was a lot of worry and sadness all around. Our third son was born July 17, 1943, in the Payson Hospi¬tal. He was three weeks early and weighed 6 lbs. 6 oz. I felt so blessed to have my husband with me for the birth of our baby so many of the other mothers were alone. We had to get special gas rations to take me to the hospital and bring me home. We didn't have a car and had to borrow my parents' car to get back and forth. Our baby was born on Ernie's brother Lloyd's birthday so we named him Dennis Lloyd. He was blessed September 5, 1943, in the Springville First Ward, Kolob Stake, by his father. He was a small dainty baby with a big appetite. We were happy with him and very glad to have our family together. We now had three beautiful sons. As it turned out, Ernie's job was essential to the war so he was frozen to his job for the duration and was never drafted. After about a year, we found a house with a bathroom down on Main Street so we moved. While we lived here we took our first vacation. Ernie could get free passes on the Union Pacific train so we left the children with Grandma Holt and went to Hollywood to visit my sister, Grace, and her husband. We were gone less than a week, but we were sure glad to get back to the children. Ernie was bucking rivets at the railroad yards. He would often get burned and wasn't too happy with his job. Because of the men being drafted, there were job openings in the stores so Ernie took a part time job at Safeway as a food clerk. He loved that kind of work. We bought our first home in 1944 in a housing area in Springville called "Brookside". It was a 3 bedroom frame with a full basement and a coal furnace. It was a $6,000 home and we got in for $50.00 down. It was a big chance to take, and many people thought we were foolish. After living here for awhile, the war finally ended. Ernie quit his job at the rail¬road and went full time for Safeway in Springville. The child-ren were old enough to be left with a baby sitter until Ernie came home from work at night, so I got a job as a waitress at Brown's Cafe. Ernie worked days and I worked evenings. We lived there a little over two years. During that time, we took the children on their first vacation to Yellowstone Park. We both felt a need for a little more ground so we could have a garden where our boys could learn the joy of planting and raising their own vegetables. The value of our home had increased so we sold our home and bought 1/2 acre on 700 South in Springville and started to build. It was a hard struggle. Many things hadn't come back on the market since the war. We did a lot of the work ourselves and learned a lot "the hard way". We had a water right and a big garden. The back of our property joined Ernie's parents' property. We received much good advice from Grandpa Holt about planting. We also had a dog named "Cubby" and raised rabbits. I worked evenings in Kapp's Cafe. Ernie made rapid progress with Safeway. He was soon made Assistant Manager and was transferred to the Provo store. I became pregnant and got so sick I had to quit my job. Two months before the baby was due, Ernie was made Manager of the Mt. Pleasant Safeway store. He left immediately and started house hunting. I sold our home and prepared to move. We moved to a big, old fashioned home in Mt. Pleasant in June, 1949. After a long wait, our fourth baby, a lovely 8 lb 13h oz. baby boy, was born August 23, 1949, in the Mt. Pleasant Hospital. He had mucus in his lungs and we had a problem with him for about 24 hours; then he got along fine. He was a shy beautiful baby with slightly curly, golden hair. We were delighted with him and so were his brothers. I had a favorite cousin, Ray Butler, who was on a mission at the time so we named him Ray after him, and Dean because we liked it. He was blessed Ray Dean by his father on September 25, 1949, in the Mt. Pleasant South Ward, North Sanpete Stake. When the baby was six weeks old, I started having stomach problems. It turned out to be gall stones. In January, 1950, I had surgery in the Mt. Pleasant Hospital and had my gall bladder removed. It took a few months to recover. Due to the added expense of doctor bills, we got behind financially so in the Fall of 1950 Ernie and I worked in the evening for a short time at the Moroni turkey plant picking turkeys. Our stay in Mt. Pleasant was delightful. We loved the people there. The children loved school. Gary and Buddy both played baritones in the Hamilton School band. They also had paper routes. Dennis started school there and also took snare drum lessons. I was band mother and served as counselor in the Relief Society and the MIA. I was also active in civic clubs (Jaycee Ettes, LaIcos, and Lady Lions) and built floats for parades. Ernie was a counselor in the MIA and was active in the Boy Scout program. He was also president of the Junior Chamber Of Commerce and belonged to the Lions Club. In 1951 he received the DSA (Distinguished Service Award) for outstanding young man of the year. Ernie was very successful in the store. In November, 1952, he was transferred to a larger store in Springville. We had to close our home in Mt. Pleasant as there was no sale for it at that time. We bought a home back on "Brookside" again and moved back to Springville. After several months, we sold our home in Mt. Pleasant for what we owed on it. We were also expecting another baby. On March 14, 1953, our baby was born in the Payson Hospital; a lovely 6 lb. 82 oz. boy. He was born 3 weeks early, had mucus in his lungs, and was put in an air lock for 24 hours until he was breathing properly. We named him Kelly Butler because he was born so close to St. Patrick's Day, and my maiden name was Butler. He was blessed by his father May 3, 1953, in the Springville Sixth Ward, Kolob Stake. Kelly was a very good baby, smiled very easily and had a happy disposition. He brought a lot of joy to our home. While we lived there, Ernie was on the Scout council. I was a visiting teacher in Relief Society. Gary and Buddy were both active in the Boy Scouts, receiving many advancements. Buddy was made a member of the "Order of the Arrow", a very select group of Boy Scouts. We bought an accordion and Buddy started taking les¬sons. Gary graduated from Jr. High and started driving a car. He also started working for Safeway in Spanish Fork. Ernie continued to do well with Safeway. In the Spring of 1955, he was transferred to a bigger store in Tooele. We were a little reluctant to move; we had just fixed up our home, both our folks lived in Springville, and the children were doing well, but it meant a lot to him so we gave up and moved again. Our first home in Tooele was a white frame home on Parkway with a beautiful big back yard. Tooele was less than half LDS and was quite a transient community due to the Army Depot. We knew that raising children there would be quite a challenge. In November, 1955, I took Kelly and went to Seattle with my brother, Pierce, and my mother and dad to see my brother, Jay get married. On July 7, 1956, Ernie's mother, Altha Elnorah Holt, passed away. We lost a lovely mother and grandmother. We all missed her so much. The following January his father, Enoch Alphonzo Holt, got hit by a car. He ended up in the hospital with a broken lea. He was still there when he passed away on April 30, 1957, from a blood clot. In August that same Summer (1957) we took all of the chil¬dren on a camping trip up Spanish Fork Canyon. We pitched a tent, fished, and were having a delightful time when Buddy got shot in the back with a 22 short shell. In a state of panic we rushed him to the Spanish Fork Hospital. We learned the bullet had just missed his heart and had lodged in his lung. He stayed there a few days and then we transferred him to the Tooele Hos¬pital. We were so very thankful the Lord had spared our son. He carried the bullet for a year; then we had it removed in the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City. That same year on October 17, 1957, we were blessed with another beautiful 7 lb. 142 oz. baby boy, born at Tooele Valley Hospital. We named him Steven (with a "v") Wayne. He was blessed by his father December 1, 1957, in the Tooele Tenth Ward, North Tooele Stake. Stephen was my grandfather's name and we just liked Wayne. He was a good baby, loved attention, and got plenty of it. His brothers adored him and we all enjoyed spoil¬ing him. When he was 6 months old, he began having convulsions and was hospitalized. We ended up taking him to a brain special¬ist in Salt Lake. It was determined that he had a vein injury in his head at birth and would have to be under strict medication until his growth could take care of it. He was under care and medication for 2 years, but never had another convulsion after he was 9 months old. He gave us all some scary moments. Gary had reservations about leaving Utah County. He gave up a nice girl friend and a good job in Spanish Fork to move. While in Tooele, he belonged to the National Guard and drove the compressor truck and was also a member of the drill team. We watched with pride as he graduated from High School and Seminary. He was active in the church, holding the office of an Elder. He was a good boy, very independent and ambitious. He enrolled in trade school in Salt Lake but soon quit and took a full time job at Alta Ski Resort. It was there that he met Sue Pat Kingsley, the girl he married November 7, 1959. We had mixed emotions but they had our blessing. Our children are the most precious things in our lives and we had so hoped for a Temple marriage for each of them. Jobs for the youth were very scarce in Tooele. We had a good friend and neighbor, Ethel Halgren, who worked at a pub¬lishing company called "The Tooele Bulletin". She was instru¬mental in getting our boys jobs there. The oldest five boys all had turns working for them. Some delivered papers and some worked on the press. Our Stake President, Alex Dunn, owned the business. His son, Joel Dunn, managed it. These choice people provided jobs as well as counsel for our boys. We shall always be grateful for this experience. Buddy adjusted to the move a little better. He was well liked and had many friends. He was active in church and did well in school, earning his letter in tennis. He was also a repre¬sentative at Boy's State. He graduated from Seminary and High School and then went to BYU for a year. In 1960 he received a call to the North British Mission. It was something he had always wanted and we were all very happy. He left for England in mid November, 1960. Dennis didn't care much for school tho we tried very hard to keep him interested. He enjoyed being mischievous and gave us many anxious moments. I prayed constantly for him, but he didn't seem to want what we wanted for him. In his junior year of school, he quit and joined the Air Force. In 2 months he was home again with an honorable discharge. He went to work for the Tooele Smelter. By now we were grandparents; Gary and Sue had a baby girl named Gretchen. Ray was playing a baritone in the school band and Kelly was taking accordion lessons. On June 28, 1961, my father passed away. He had been ill a long time but it was so hard to give him up. We loved him so much. It was a great loss. Buddy had become very close to him while he was attending BYU. It sure was hard to tell our mis¬sionary the sad news. Ernie continued to do well with Safeway, winning many con¬tests and getting many congratulations from the company presi¬dent. On November 14, 1961, (Ernie's birthday), they opened a new supermarket and Ernie was the manager. He had reached his goal and we were all very proud of him. The Boy Scout program was very weak in our ward in Tooele. Ernie took on the job of Scoutmaster and did all he could to get it organized. I taught Primary for a while, then served as work director counselor in the Relief Society. I was also secretary of the MIA and worked in the Parent Teachers Association. In March, 1962, we moved to a beautiful new home which we had built on Brook Street. That same Summer we bought a vacation trailer. In November, 1962, Buddy returned from his mission. His girl friend, Gwen Lynn Phillips, had waited for him. On January 11, 1963, they were married in the Logan Temple. That evening they had a beautiful big church reception. In April, 1963, Dennis married Alice June Maestas. Later that same year, Gary and Sue got a divorce. There were two chil¬dren; Gretchen and Nicholas. Sue got custody of the children. In the Fall of 1963, we opened a little business called "The Spudnut Shop". I was manager; Buddy and Gwen helped me. It turned out to be a costly experience. We dumped it a year later. On January 18, 1964, my mother married Dewey 0. Nelson. She had been so lonely since Dad had passed away. Dewey was good to her and we all enjoyed his company. In the Spring of 1964, totally unexpected, Ernie was trans¬ferred to a smaller store in Magna. When school was out that year, I sold our beautiful new home and moved to Magna. While we lived there, Ray and Kelly got interested in raising racing pigeons. We would take the birds a great distance and they would always find their way home. The boys also entered them in the fairs and received some ribbons. It proved to be a great sport. On October 18, 1964, Gary married Judith Louise Schow, a girl friend from Eugene, Oregon. Ernie was in his late 40's and had a little less than 2 years to go with Safeway until he had earned "Vested Rights". This would secure our retirement and provide for the future. It didn't turn out that way. In the Summer of 1965, completely without reason, Ernie was relieved of management, reduced to a food clerk, and transferred to Orem. I've never seen him so hurt. There was a lot of prestige and good money in management. There was also a lot of pressure so maybe it was a blessing. In December, 1965, we moved to a new home in Orem. This proved to be a good move and a blessing in many ways. The chil¬dren did well in school, made good friends, and were active in the church. We took Kelly up to Kearns every week for accordion lessons for a while. He was playing in an accordion band. In the Summer of 1966, Kelly went to California to compete in the Western States Accordion Festival. The trio he played in took 3rd place. We sure enjoyed hearing him play. The children were nearly raised, so feeling a need to help supplement the income, I went back to work. I worked as a clerk at Cornet, a variety store in Orem. In 1968, Ernie quit the company he loved and went into management training for Cornet. He trained in Tooele, then managed a store in Pocatello, Idaho. In 1970, he was transferred to the Orem store. I stayed in Orem with the children and kept my job. When he got the Orem store, it was against company rules for us to be in the same store so I was let go. While Ernie was in Pocatello, Kelly had emergency surgery for release of torsion suspension. Ray graduated from Seminary and from Orem High in 1967, went to BYU for a year, then to Utah Technical School where he earned a degree in electronics. He also worked for Safeway. He was deeply religious, a clean quiet boy always respectful to us. On June 12, 1969, he married his high school sweetheart, Jeana Rose Rowley, in the Salt Lake Temple. They had a lovely garden recep¬tion that evening at her home. We enjoyed many Summer vacations most of them at Hebgen Lake in Montana. My brothers had boats and campers and we had a trailer. We would take our families and everyone that could, would go for a week every year. Four of us had motorcycles. The cousins had a great time water skiing. They loved pulling tricks on Uncle Pierce. We enjoyed fishing, gathering mushrooms, visiting around the bon¬fire, and baking goodies just unforgettable fun! This went on for over 10 years until most of the children were raised. It had been a tradition in the Butler family to camp up Spanish Fork Canyon every Fall for the deer hunt. This has been going on for over 30 years. I think it could have been my father who started it. I remember him being up there with us long after he was unable to climb the mountains. All relatives and many friends joined us from time to time. They nearly always got their deer, usually on Billy's Mountain. It was mostly a men and boys camp, but some of the women joined them for a few days every season. We'll always have some special memories of God's great outdoors and our family together. We also had many enjoyable trips with Mother and Dewey. They loved to travel, eat out, and stay in motels. We went to Las Vegas and saw some nice shows. We also went to Elko, Ely, and Jackpot many times. Every time their health would permit and we could get some time off, we would go for a couple of days. Once again I'm glad we moved to Orem and thankful we could help them enjoy their later years. In the Summer of 1970, I went to work for the W. T. Grant Co. in Provo as a clerk. I was also secretary of the Sunday School. In 1971, Kelly graduated as an honor student from Orem High and from 4 years of LDS Seminary. He received a scholarship and went to BYU for a year. A couple of years prior, he had earned his Eagle Scout award. He was working for Safeway and was very active in the church. We tried hard to live up to his expecta¬tions. We knew that he was mission material and in the Spring of 1972, he was called to the Japan Central Mission. It was quite a coincident: He already had 2 cousins in the Japan West Mission. In June he left for the LTM in Hawaii, spent 2 months there, and then went on to Japan. That same Spring, Ernie was transferred to a bigger Cornet store in Cedar City. Both Steven and I felt that we just couldn't give up everything and move down there. I kept think¬ing of the scripture "Whither Thou Goest I will go", and finally gave in to the move. We sold` our beautiful home and bought one in Cedar City. We also bought a new truck and camper. Steven worked at Cornet for his dad and made pretty good money. He got some new guns and a new motorcycle. He was lonely, didn't liket being away from his Orem friends, and didn't like school. Kelly felt that he could not return to Cedar City from his mission. Mother was sick a lot and I was going back to Springville every other week. The move to Cedar had been a costly mistake. It was decided that I would go back to Orem and make a home for the a boys, and Ernie would follow as soon as he could. In June, 1973, we sold our home in Cedar City and rented a small one in Orem while a new one was being built. We were trying so hard to get Steven interested in church and school again. In July, 1973, I went back to work for W. T. Grant Co. In October that same year I was visiting up at deer camp. I went on a motorcycle ride with Bob Parkinson (my niece's husband). We met a car on a curve and had to go over the side of the road. The motorcycle landed on my left leg. It was quite badly hurt from the knee down. It was a very painful ordeal. I was off work for 6 weeks. I ended up with an ulcer on my ankle and had it bandaged for 4 months. Because of Ernie's great concern over us and lack of interest in his store, he lost his job. We really felt like we were being tried. I was down with my leg, Ernie was out of work, it was just 6 weeks until Christmas, and we had a missionary to support. Before I got back on my feet, Mother had a bad spell with her heart and was in the hospital for some time. I remember going on crutches to see her. Ernie got another job in the Physical Plant Department at BYU. The wages were low, but we were glad to get the work and it was a job where we wouldn't be forced to move. I also went back to work and before long things were going better again. On January 4, 1974, my mother had a heart attack and passed away. What a precious person she was. Never in my whole life have I felt such a loss. God gives you one mother and when she is gone, there is nothing in this whole world to fill the empti-ness. I am so thankful that we decided to come back to Orem so that I could be near and spend more time with her. In February, 1974, we moved to our new home, which is where we are living now. We worked hard getting it landscaped and fixed up for Kelly's return. He returned from his mission in June. It was nice having him home again. He enrolled at BYU and went back to work for Safeway. On November 15, 1974, Kelly married Janese Richardson in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. She was our neighbor and had waited for Kelly while he was on his mission. The next evening they had a nice church reception. In the Spring of 1975, the W. T. Grant store closed it's doors. I didn't lose any time; I went right to work for Skaggs Drug and helped open a new store in Orem. During the next four years we enjoyed some nice trips to Reno. We would drive out there and meet Judy and Gary and spend a few days together. We stayed in motels and saw shows in Reno and Tahoe. It was a lot of fun. On April 29, 1977, Steven married Melanie Soulier, a girl he had met in high school. They were married in the LDS Church by Bishop Larry King. They had a nice church reception that same evening. All of our boys stood with Steven as he was mar-ried. It sure was a handsome sight If only it could have been in the Temple. With our last son married, we were alone now. Ernie was still working full time at BYU and part time at Norton's food store. I was still working full time at Skaggs. As for our health, I've had problems with heart fibrilation and have been hospitalized several times ('62, '67, '73, '77, '81). I've had both medical and electric conversions. I had eye surgery for a closed tear duct in 1972. In 1981, I was hospitalized with viral pneumonia in both lungs. Ernie had cataract surgery on one eye in 1967 and then had the same surgery done on the other eye in 1975. This left him with rather limited vision and a need for wearing heavy glasses. In 1981, we learned that they could implant lenses in the eye. In August of that year, he had a secondary implant on one eye, followed 2 months later by the same operation on the other eye. We were delighted with the result; He can actually see without glasses. I worked for Skaggs until September 1981. Ernie was near¬ing retirement so I started drawing Social Security in October. We hadn't looked forward to Ernie's retirement birthday but it turned out to be real special. Our children, Bud and Gwen, Dennis and Alice, Ray and Jeana, Kelly and Janese, and Steven and Melanie, took us out to dinner complete with a retirement cake. Gary and Judy live out of the state and couldn't come. We sure love and appreciate our children. On December 1, 1981, Ernie was officially retired from BYU and started drawing his Social Security. The Physical Plant at BYU gave him a nice luncheon, a wristwatch, and an engraved plaque. He couldn't have been treated nicer. We find ourselves wishing we had started working at BYU much earlier in our life. He continued to work part time at Norton's food store. A little about our children: As of Spring 1984, Gary and Judy live in Eugene, Oregon, and they have 2 children. Gary also has 2 children by his first wife. Gary is a Battalion Chief for the Eugene Fire Department. Bud and Gwen live in Tooele. They have 10 children. Bud works for the Transcript Bulletin Publishing Co. and runs a little business of his own: Holts Carpet Cleaning Service. Their oldest son, Scott, is serving a mission in Japan. Dennis and Alice live in Salt Lake City. Dennis works for the city. They have 4 children. Their oldest son, Albert, is married and has a baby boy and their second oldest son, Dennis Jr., was just recently married. Ray and Jeana live in Orem. They have 4 children. Ray is district manager for Frito Lay. Kelly and Janese live in Orem. Kelly works for Safeway. After much waiting, hoping, and praying they were blessed with a little boy. Steven and Melanie live in American Fork. Steven is working at Pacific States Steel. They have a baby girl. Since our retirement, we have been fishing and camping sev¬eral times with my brothers and their wives, and my sister and her husband. Other members of the family have joined us when they could. We've had some very enjoyable times together and hope that as more of us retire, we can get together more often. We have also driven up to Eugene, Oregon, and spent Thanksgiving with Gary and Judy and their family. We've been to Las Vegas with Grace and Hap and seen some shows. At present, we are spending our time going to church we go quite regularly. Ernie is a home teacher and I am a visiting teacher. We take a lot of walks together, work in the yard, play games, make quilts, and do other home projects. We enjoy visits from the children and grandchildren. We have 24 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild. We have a very good marriage. After all these years, I still get excited when Ernie comes home. Ernie has been a good husband and father. We've had hardships and trying times but feel we have grown because of them. Our greatest accomplishment in life is our children. May God bless each one of them to live good, clean lives and be as good a man as their father has been, and may we always be blessed with love and respect for each other. FAMILY SHEET Thelma Butler married Ernest Voyal Holt June 28, 1938 Gary Ernest Holt married Sue Pat Kingsley November 7, 1959 Gretchen Marie(Divorced) Nicholas Gary married Judith Louise Skow October 18, 1964 Lisa Ann Christopher Lee Buddy Lee Holt married Gwen Lynn Phillips January 11, 1963 Buddy Scott Cindy Lynn Kristine Michael Ernest Kerry Dean James Lee Rebecca Terisa Rachelle Debra Kay Dennis Lloyd Holt married Alice Maestri April 27, 1963 Albert DeWayne Holt married Jean Elizabeth Hardy Anthony Clark Dennis Junior married Kimberly Westerman Tina Marie Clifford Ray Ray Dean Holt married Jeana Rose Rowley June 12, 1969 Jeremy Ray Jenifer Jean Rhonda Rose Jeffrey John Kelly Butler Holt married Janese Richardson November 15, 1974 Joshua Kelly Steven Wayne Holt married Melanie Soulier April 29, 1977 Amanda Nicole 6 children 24 grandchildren 1 great grandchild OUR THOUGHTS OF MOM I have only vague memories of my early childhood when we lived in Uncle Vaughn's basement, the basement behind Grandpa Holt's house, and our first Brookside house. The times I remember more clearly about my childhood, started about the time we moved to Mr. Pleasant. I remember the big house we had and the big tree that leaned over the garage. We had many happy times there. Bud and I used to play in that tree for hours at a time. I didn't realize until many years later how much time and effort Mom and Dad devoted to their children and how blessed we kids were to have such fine parents. Mom was band mother and was the driving force behind the Hamilton School Band getting new uniforms when Bud and I were in the band. Mom and Dad were both active in church, scouts, and service organizations. I remember most of the floats Mom helped design and build would win prizes. Dad was awarded the distinguished service award. There were happy times, although we were far from rich in material things, we boys always seemed to get what we thought we needed. We had more than an ample supply of love and parental support. I remember Mom and Dad both working nights picking turkeys at a poultry plant to help make ends meet. I had a happy childhood and always felt very secure. Mom and Dad were always there when I needed them but allowed me the freedom I required to make my own decisions and mistakes. During my adolesence, I know I created some concern for Mom and Dad but, they always had patience and wisdom to help and guide me when I had problems. Even now, after being on my own for many years, I know I have their blessing and support, and can call on them if I had a problem. I have tried to use the same values and guidelines for my children that they used in raising me. I will always be grateful for their love and support. Even though distance separates us at this time, I feel a special closeness to them and know that God must have a special place in heaven for such fine parents. Gary Since I live in Oregon and Mom lives in Utah, my thoughts and memories are probably quite different from the other daughter in laws. The times we've spent together have been vacations joint trips to Reno or Disneyland, our visits to Utah, and Mom & Dad's trips to Oregon. The special characteristic I've seen in Mom has been her tremendous capacity to try, and enjoy, new things. We've spent time fishing for salmon in the Pacific Ocean, riding the sand dunes in beach buggies, going on rides at Disneyland, feeding the walrus at Sea World, feeding the slots in Reno, discovering the cemetery at Virginia City, fishing at Hebgen Lake, strolling through the Dan Diego Zoo, tromping through the forests of the Oregon Cascades, watching an outdoor play during the summer at Sundance near Orem, watching Liberace on stage at Lake Tahoe, and much, much more. However, the time I remember and cherish most comes during our visits to Utah. Every morning Mom, Gary, and I get up real early just to visit before we get involved in each hectic day. Those quiet times together have been very special and it's been when we've really gotten to know and love one another. Judy My most vivid recollections of Mom are memories of a dedicated and very efficient homemaker. I cannot remember a time when her home was anything but a place of perfect order. It seemed to be her number one i objective to make her home a nice place to be. Our clothes were always clean and pressed long before we needed them. We were never ashamed to bring friends home because we knew they would be treated well and would t enjoy being in our home. Mealtime was always something to look forward to at home. It was never treated as just 'something to get over with'. It was a special time of day and we looked forward to a special treat. For some reason it was even fun to help with dishes at home. I still consider Mom to be one of the finest cooks I know. Mom always made a fuss about occasions such as Jr. Proms and Sr. Hops. She would spend hours with us making sure we got that special white sportcoat or new suit or whatever we needed for that special night, Because of her we were always ready when that big night arrived. She was always there to make sure that everything matched and fit properly. Most important of all she was always there to tell us how great we looked before we left. When it came to doing for her boys Mom always gave 100%. (I must admit, this is much easier to see in retrospect than it was at the time.) I remember when Gary & I were in the Hamilton School Band, Mom spent many, many hours sewing band uniforms for us and the other members of the band. This was a big task, but it was important to her because it was important to us. This was typical of the support we received in everything we did whether it was music, archery, hunting, tennis, or church. We were never pressured to participate, but when we decided to, the support was there. I feel it was a great privilege to have been raised in a home like ours. We had a father who believed in the gospel of hard work. One who has always done an excellent job of supporting his family. We had a mother who centered her life around home and family. I think her crowning glory will be the fact that she made her home a nice place to be. We have been taught some great lessons on sacrifice and hard work by our parents. If everyone could be raised in a home such as this, the world would certainly be a better place in which to live. Buddy L. Holt My thoughts of Mom go back to time even before Bud do I went together. She has always seemed like such a lady to me, always in complete control of herself. I admire her for raising 6 boys and always being able to keep her t home In perfect order. I have never been in her home when anything has t been out of place. Most of all I love Mom and Dad for raising such a fine person as my husband. It is because of them that he is what he is. They must be pretty special parents to have raised such a great group of husbands for us girls. Thanks Mom and Dad. Love, Gwen About the earliest I could remember is back to when I was about 3 years old we lived in a house where our yard would connect with Grandpa Holt's yard and we had a dog his name was Cubby. He was a lot of fun. Mom was really a good cook. I think that's why we were always in good health. I loved those homemade cinnamon rolls and bread and the raison cookies and the and divinity candy and many, many other things that she would cook up. I really enjoyed eating everything she would cook. I remember many nights that Mom and I would kneel by my bedside and she would help me say my prayers. When I was about 4 1/2 years old we moved to Mt. Pleasant where Dad was the manager of Safeway. We lived in a big old house with a big back yard. We had a dog named Rags. He was a lot of fun. He could climb the tree in the back yard. I started school here at the Hamilton School and Gary and Bud were in the band. I think they played the Baritones. The Christmas's here really had a lot of meanings to me. We would spend many nights setting around our big Christmas tree and sing songs. A lot of people would go around caroling. I remember the floats that Mom used to spend so many hours working with other people to make for the parades. I remember one float especially. They took one of those deep old flour box drawers, the kind you used to have in the kitchen, and centered it on the float and filled it with candy to throw out to the people. I was the one elected for that job, but I think I was kind of selfish for I ate more than what I would throw out. It was also here in Mt. Pleasant when I learned the meaning and value of work. Gary, Bud, & I would ride bikes about 5 miles outside of town to a bar cafe about 5s00 a.m. so that we could be the first among several kids. We would wait there for 2 to 3 hours for the owner to come and pick 2 or 3 of us to clean the restaurant. We would each make 25¢ or 50¢. I remember going to the show with a quarter and have a soft drink and popcorn and a candy. It was also here during the month of August 1949 that Mom went to the hospital and returned a few days later with our baby brother Ray. He was a blessing to us all. For a long time after that I thought that Mom went to the hospital and gave the doctor her order for a baby and wait there until he could make one. I remember one time when Uncle Pierce and Aunt Elisa came out to visit. Mom was way out in the back yard and. P. H. had one of our B. B. or pellet guns, I can't remember which, but he hollered to Moan to bend over for a target. She did, and like a true hunter and sportsman he took aim, fired, and hit bonanza. I think he thought the gun was empty. We soon left Mt. Pleasant and moved back to Springville. Mt. Pleasant holds a lot of happy and loving family times for it was like living in Payton Place. I give Mom special thanks for the love and religion she placed into our lives and to Dad for his support and teachings for without them both we would only be half the men that we are today. With all my love and May God Bless Dennis L. Holt As I look back over the years, a lot of memories come back of a lot of different things. The stories that could be told are not as important as the lessons learned of which the more. Important lessons taught me by Mom are to do things myself and be held accountable for my own actions and projects. She has taught se to think things through before I act so I can be proud of my accomplishments and projects when I finish. She has taught me to respect people for what they are, and who they are. It is because of these lessons and others that I've enjoyed the success I've had in my life. Together with Dad's influence she has taught me bow to survive in what could have been a tough old world.I A grateful son Ray My thoughts of Mom are: She is always concerned about her kids and there welfare. She is always there to help them and show them love. She would do anything for her children and grandchildren. Mom has always been a wonderful cook. I remember the times she would cook a big Thanksgiving meal for her family, and how fun it was to get all together. She has always had a very clean and beautiful home. I have had many special times shopping and tieing quilts with Mom. One day when I was at the mall I ran into Mom and she bought me lunch and we talked, it was nice. When Ray and I were first married we played many card games with Mom and Dad and had a lot of fun times. One time Mom send I had to be on jury duty together and it was nice being together and we went to lunch and made a day of it. I want to thank Mom and Dad for raising such a wonderful man for me to marry, they taught him well. Thank You. Love Jeana If a person is lucky, he has the chance to grow up with both of his parents and share many of life's experiences with them. I have had that good fortune and I count it as one of my greatest blessings. For the purpose of making a contribution to this little section at the end of Mother's personal history, I would like to relate just a few experiences which I have had with Mother that really stand out in my memory. I learned about fear through an experience I had at Mom's side. I was jut a young boy in about the third grade at the time. We were living in the Parkway home in Tooele. It was early one morning, and I was home alone with mother. Dad had gone to work, my older brothers were off to school, and I was just getting ready to leave for school. Mother was in the bathroom working on her hair. Suddenly, I heard Mom moaning in pain. I went into the bathroom quickly to see what was wrong. There was a look of panic on her face which I will never forget. She told me to run next door and get Carol. I imagine I made it from our side door to Carol's back door in about two seconds: Carol was sitting at her table with one of the other neighbor ladies and I would imagine that I surprised the heck out of them as I came barging in yelling and screaming that my mom was sick. They ran back over home with me and started making phone calls and working with Mom. I remember Mom telling them that she felt as though someone was squeezing her chest and she could hardly breath. As the ladies worked with Mom and made phone calls, I slipped over to one of the chairs in the living room and started praying. This is where I learned the difference between praying out of habit and praying with real intent. I remember pleading with Heavenly Father over and over again to let my Mom be all right. Shortly, the situation calmed down quite a bit and the ladies urged me to be off to school. I remember sobbing as I walked over to school. I walked into my classroom a little bit late with red eyes. My teacher (who happened to be my cousin, Lea Mae Averett, that year) asked me what was wrong and tried to comfort me. Later in the day, Lea Mae came to me and told me she had called my home and that everything was just fine. It turned out that Mom was not seriously ill and she returned to her normal life for several weeks. For a long time after that, I didn't ever want Mom to be left alone. I remember figuring out everybody's schedule in my little mind to make sure that there would always be someone home with Mom. My little boy mind had suddenly come to realize that mothers are not invincible; They really could get seriously ill without much warning. That thought frightened me. A few years later, Mother and I shared another experience where we both shed hundreds of tears. Mom and Dad operated a Spudnut Shop at the time. I was down at the shop one evening helping Mom clean the donut racks. We got a call from Ray, who was home alone; He said that our little dog had been run over and was dead. Little dogs can be a devastating loss to a little boy: In this case, it was a major loss to our whole family. Nicki was a neat, neat dog. As Mom hung up the phone and told me the bad news, we hugged each other and cried. We cried our way through most of the rest of the evening. That was a hard experience for me to go through and I had a hurt that wouldn't go away for a long time. I'm glad that Mom was there because it helped to have someone close who shared many of the same feelings about what had happened. To share recreational activities with Mom is to have fun, fun, fun. When it's time to play, Mom really lets her hair down. Now that I'm married, most of the experiences that I have with Mom and Dad are of this type; We've had a lot of fun. If you ever hear a couple of people out in the middle of a lake whooping and hollering and carrying on, it's probably Mom and one of her brothers and they probably have two fish on at the same time, and have got their lines all tangled up. Nobody has more fun on a fishing trip than Mom. Nobody has more fun hitting a jackpot in Nevada than Mom. Nobody gets more excited about a fast game of cards than Mom. It's fun to be around her at times like I these and have some of the excitement rub off. Four or five years ago, Janese and I took an overnight trip out to Wendover with Mom and Dad to see what it was that kept drawing them out there. It only took one trip for me to see the general principle: You drive for a couple of hours, you eat a lot of good food, and you have a little fun together. Then, you drive another couple of hours to get home, but once you're home, you're much more able to cope with the worries and anxieties of everyday living. If you've never seen Mom hit a Jackpot, you need to: A couple of years ago, I was on a fishing trip with Mom and Dad and some of the aunts and uncles. Janese and I were fishing two or three hundred yards away from the campers. Mom and Dad and the aunts and uncles were over by the campers puttering around. After a while, we started hearing a little laughing which gradually turned into a lot of laughing. Within a few minutes, you could hear more cackling than you would hear in a hen house and it was all coming from inside one of the campers. It turned out that they had all jammed into the close quarters of one of the campers and were filleting a bunch of fish. They were having a ball together and it was neat for us to stand a ways away and see how much fun they have when they get together. I've been able to share hundreds of other experiences with Mom over the years. I've been glad that she was there to share some of life's hard times. And, I've been thrilled to share in her excitement over some of the fun and exciting times. I only hope that life will give us a million more experiences to share together.I Kelly Holt It seems like I have known Mom most of my life. I met her when I started dating Kelly, but really got to know her better after Kelly had gone on his mission. I used to go visit with Mom often. One time I went to see her and she was making an afghan. She showed me how to make one too. We usedI to talk about a lot of things while we worked on our afghans, including Kelly's mission and how he was doing. Shortly after Kelly went on his mission, Mom moved to Cedar City with Dad. She wasn't sure that it was the right thing to do but Dad was i promoted to a new store and Mom wanted to be as supportive of him as she could, so she moved to be by his side. I really did miss her and our visits. At Christmas time, I went to Cedar City with Ray and his family to see Mom and Dad. Bud and his family also came. I remember how Mom was busy preparing things in the kitchen and making sure that everything was all right. Most of us slept on the living room floor in sleeping bags. Mom was there to make sure everyone was comfortable. We all had a great time. I can remember when Mom came back to Orem and found a house to rent while a home was being built. Dad was still in Cedar City at the time. Mom went up to deer camp one evening and was injured while riding a motorcycle. She was on crutches for several weeks and could not work. During this time she had a lot to be concerned about. Many things seemed to be going wrong, but Mom looked at it all as a challenge. Her leg took quite a while to heal and I'm sure she was in a lot of pain, but she didn't complain. She was always trying to see the bright side of things and felt that there was a blessing in each hard experience. When Grandma Butler died, I believe it was the hardest time of Mom's life. She had spent so much time with her mother and had had so many wonderful experiences with her. One of the reasons Mom moved back to Ores was because her mother became ill and Mom wanted to be closer so that she could help her. Theirs was a special and very dear relationship and Mom felt a great loss, but she knew she had to go on with her life and she did. She has a great many wonderful memories of her mother and cherishes I each and every one. When Kelly and I were first married and we were trying so hard to have a baby, Mom shared our anxieties with us. When, after several years of trying, we did become pregnant, we couldn't wait to tell Mom and Dad. They were both so excited. Mom would come home from work from time to time with little articles of baby clothing that had come loose out of a package or were slightly soiled. She thought that we would like to have them. They were both so supportive of us. When we first brought Joshua home from the hospital, Mom came over and showed me how to bathe him. He was so small and I was so inexper¬ienced. I was grateful to have Mom there to show me what to do. She made me feel at ease. Shortly after Joshua was born, my father had a heart attack and spent some time in the hospital recovering. Mom knew that I wanted to be with him and she watched Joshua for me so that I could go. When I was threatening to miscarry, Mom was there to help. I knew that she had gone through one before and that she knew what I was going a through. She was there when I needed someone to talk to and to let my motions out. I had to go right to bed, as the doctor ordered, and Mom watched Joshua for me. When I did miscarry, mom was there again for me. She was a great comfort and I'm glad she was close by. One of the things I admire most about Mom is her complete organization. She has the ability to "get things done and tidy. She can set a goal for herself and she sticks with it until she accomplishes her goal. I have seen her do this time and again. As many birthdays and special days as there are, she has never missed a one. When we go to see "Grandma" and "Grandpa", Joshua always gets so excited. He loves to see them and considers them some of his best friends. As each day goes by and I share more experiences with Mom, I find that` she becomes more and more dear to me. I am proud and grateful to have her as a Mom. Janese Holt Mom has really helped Steve and I out in so many ways. She's a real good mother, and a very special grandmother. She has always shared a lot of love, time, and care with us. She is always there when we need her. Steve, I, and Mandy have always enjoyed going over to visit. Mom sure has a lot of patience, especially when it comes to making her great peanut brittle. She has to show me over and over again how to make it. Mom is a fantastic candy maker and good cook. Steve remembers all the special moments at home, and all their fun trips when their family would go to Hebkin, and also times when they would go to Las Vegas to Circus Circus. It meant so much to us. How she has helped us out. When we had our little girl, and the beautiful quilts she made for us. Mom sure has set a good example for all of us. Her bright smiles, her loving touch, her "I love you" always means so very much. When times get hard and we get all uptight, her special way of knowing everything will be alright. Fishing is the funnest time of the year, grab the pole and gear. Look, football is on, turn it up louder Dad so we can hear. Bring out the cards, Grace and Hap just called, they will be here in a short time. Sis and I will beat you for the 10th time. Well, thanks a lot for all you have done. Because to us, Mom, you'll always be #1. Steve & Mel Holt

A Personal History of Christopher Franklin Butler, with Addendum by Lucille Butler

Contributor: enjoying the pool Created: 2 years ago Updated: 11 months ago

Personal History of Christopher Franklin Butler I Christopher Franklin Butler was born of goodly parents on 18 Jan 1917 in a small home on the north side of the canel ¼ mile west of Grandpa Butlers home between Spanish Fork and Salem Utah. Dr. Hagen came out in a horse and buggy during a severe snowstorm to make the delivery at home. The Dr. was paid with $25.00 worth of muskrat hides. Dad did some trapping and duck hunting when he couldn’t find work or when the farm work was done. Dad and Mother salvaged the feathers from the ducks Dad killed and made feather pillows and feather mattress for the family. I was the third child of Christopher Lorenzo Butler and Reba Hutchings Butler. My older two brothers had died shortly after birth. Stephen Lorenzo was born 7 June 1913 in Hiawatha, Utah and died 8 June 1913 and was buried in Springville Utah. Milton was born 9 June 1914 in Victor Idaho and died 9 June 1914 and was buried in Victor Idaho. I was blessed in Spanish Fork Utah by Isaac E. Brockbank on 6 May 1917. After I was born Dad helped build a little larger home on a piece of ground below the canel which belonged to Grandpa Butler which caused considerable feelings in the family. I can remember we had to carry our water for everything from a spring about 200 feet from the house. Our water was heated on a wood burning stove and the washing was done on a wash board in a large tub. We had a lamb as a pet, it grew faster than I did, Dad had to dispose of it because if would bunt me in the back and knock me down, when I got up it would bunt me down again. I can remember Mother being chased by a colt in the pasture next to the house, she crawled under the fence to get away from him. Mother was trying to herd him from the garden. There was friction between my folks and the Grandparents over the property the house was built on, we moved to Victor Idaho and lied with Grandpa and Grandma Hutchings when my sister Thelma was born on 22 April 1919. Grandpa was a bishop at that time. I can remember the spanking I got when I threw a rock and broke a window in Grandpas house. The family moved back to Spanish Fork and lived in the house Dad helped build on Grandpas farm. I remember we had a good-sized patch of watermelons. We had trouble keeping people from stealing them. In the corner of the melon patch the weeds had covered a melon no one had noticed, when we found it in the fall it turned out to be several times larger than any of the others and was very delicious. I remember Dad and I taking a wagonload of very nice melons up on the highway and selling them to people going y for 10 c each. I recall going cat fishing with Dad with the horse and buggy down to Utah Lake. We brought the fish home in a gunny sack—Dad spent hours skinning them. On another occasion we went Bass fishing with the horse and buggy over to Salem pond and I stepped on a floating log while Dad was fishing and fell in. that ended the trip as Dad wrapped me in a horse blanket and took me home. My brother Pierce Hutchings was born 13 March 1921 in Spanish Fork, a year later my sister Grace was born on 21 June 1922 in Spanish Fork. For a number of years I looked forward to Grandma Butlers Christmas present. It consisted of a pair of long black wool stockings she had knitted, she would include a silver dollar in the toe. She was very proficient in her knitting and a hard worker. I remember her working in the fields along with the men, pitch hay, top beets, milk cows etc day light till dark. Grandpa and Grandma Butler were very stern and expected everyone to go the extra mile. Mother and Dad still had problems trying to get along with the Grandparents. It wasn’t long before the family moved back to Victor Idaho. Our only means of transportation was by train. This time we kids came down with the Chicken Pox on the train thus we were quarantined for some time after we got there. The folks had a hard time making ends meet, Mother washed on the washboard for the hotel and made pies for the café in the pool hall. Later we were able to get our first washing machine (used). We ran it by turning a wheel about two feet in diameter by hand. Dad worked on farms, cut timber, Forest Ranger for awhile, Powder man at a rock quarry. Here he broke his foot and was on crutches for awhile. We used wood for fuel, Dad was splitting blocks of wood when the ax handle hit a block behind him and he cut his left forefinger, I thought he had cut it off—I looked for it around the chopping block. When Dad returned from the Doctor he said he held it together with his right hand and the Doctor sewed it back on. I had a dog named Ted, Dad made a harness and we trained him to pull me around in the winter on a sleigh. One night he strayed, we found him later he had been poisoned. The winters were long and cold in Victor Idaho. On 12 Aug 1924 my brother Royal Christopher was born. He was another “blue” baby and died the next day. He was buried in the Victor Cemetery next to his brother Milton. Grandpa and Grandma Hutchings were very good to us, we went out to their place on various occasions. I can remember riding on the derick horse for Grandpa during hay time. That was when I first noticed I would get hay fever which made me somewhat inactive during the summer months. While in Victor we moved around about six times. For one season we moved over to Swan Valley on the dry farm where we raised a crop of grain. Here we had to haul all our water in big barrels in the buggy for about five miles. On one occasion Dad and I became scared as the horse almost run away when a bolt of lightening hit a big telephone pole which burst into splinters by the side of the road. I was a Trail Builder in the Primary program which I enjoyed. I started school in Victor at the age of 7, my first grade teacher was Miss Clare Adams. I was baptised 3 Oct 1925 by William H. Humble in a pond developed from a cold cold spring at my Grandpa Hutchings farm just out of Victor. I was confirmed 3 Oct 1925 by Jim Thomas. I remember Uncle Leo Hutchings, Mothers only brother, he was the first person I can think of who gave me money for doing something for him, he was the apple of my eye. Uncle Leo’s daughter Helen by his first wife and I went to school together while in Victor. I completed the first and second grades in the first year. It seemed Mother and Dad tried everything to make ends meet. They decided to manage the café (Butlers Café) part of the Killpack Hotel in Victor. Aunt Grace, Mothers sister and Uncle Harry Ballard managed the hotel part, the drug store on the corner was run by some one else. We moved into a house next door to the Café. My folks had a lady tend us while they both worked in the café. Things seemed to be better for awhile, we even bought some new furniture. There seemed to be a lot of friction between Mother and Aunt Grace, being in business close together just didn’t work out. After completing the third grade in Victor in 1926 our family sold everything and moved back to Spanish Fork Utah—we rented the “Cornaby” house in town. Once again Dad was looking for work, any kind of work. All of us tried to do what we could, we worked part time on Grandpas farm south of town, I wore out a pair of roller skates going back and forth on the new cement highway. Dad tried many things, the best one was with Willis Brockbank as a plumbers helper. Dad purchased a cow which gave us milk for the family, later he bought a Ford truck on time, he tried to pay for it by hauling produce and fruit down to Mt. Pleasant and peddling it door to door—Thelma and I helped. It didn’t turn out profitable so he turned the truck back. I attended the fourth and fifth grades at the Central School in Spanish Fork. It was the early part of 1928 when things were slim and Dad had a difficult time finding work to supply our needs. Aunt Olive, Dads only sister and Uncle Frank (Pete) Peterson who lived in Mutual Coal Camp in Carbon County where he worked in the coal mine. Uncle Pete seemed to think Dad could get on at the mine. Dad went up and went to work at the Mutual Coal Mine. After a short while Dad found two small rooms in the last house in Martin which is in the community above Mutual. Six of us moved in and a little later Uncle Alma, Dads brother, joined us in the two small rooms. Life in the coal camps was a lot different from what we were used to. The Winters up there were very severe. We had to walk every where—about two miles to the store, almost three miles to Rains to school where I went to the sixth grade. The first winter my sister Thelma got pneumonia we almost lost her. That first Christmas we had there, I received a scout knife and a pair of long black wool stockings with a silver dollar in the toe from Grandma Butler. The next summer we moved about half a mile down the canyon closer to the store where I had my first Birthday Party. A little later we moved to a four room home which was by the store and half mile from the school in Rains. In the winter time we had to obtain our drinking water from the ending on the freight train twice a week, the other water was unsafe and some times the pipes were frozen. Living accommodations for the miners were scarce so Mother had no problem in getting two boarders for awhile, the extra money sure helped our situation but it was extra work for Mother. They were looking at a 1929 chev six cylinder, we were on cloud nine. The effects of the 1930 depression were in full swing. Dad being involved in a contract in the mine didn’t get laid off. We felt blessed that Dad still had a job. On 4 March 1930 Dad was involved in a mine accident that broke his back. We didn’t realize at the time that his days of full time employment were over. He spent the next six months in the Holy Cross Hospital in Salt Lake City. Following the accident Dad was in a coma for several days, had pneumonia which settled in his back. Being no public transportation in the coal camps mother had to rely on someone to take her to Helper where she boarded the train to Salt Lake to see Dad. When she made these trips we children were left alone. It was trying times for all of us. The company let us stay in the house rent-free for over two years, the meager compensation we received monthly was our only income. Our leisure time in the coal camp was something else, no radio, TV was unheard of and no church. Our many friends were of many nationalities. Besides the household chores we played games of all kinds, went on hikes, played ball and sometimes we got in mischief such as stealing an apple or peach from the door-to-door peddler when he left his truck. I delivered the Salt Lake Tribune daily for over two years. I would walk to school then walk on the paper route, I had many blisters on my feet from walking. My earnings went to pay my dentist and for a cornet which I learned to play while attending the 7 to 9 grade at Latuda school. I enjoyed playing in the band. I played a cornet solo one year in the state music contest held at Price Utah. I was awarded second place. My sister Thelma borrowed a school instrument and played in the Latuda band. In October 1931 my sister Lois was born. It was sure different to have a baby around again, but we sure enjoyed her. Dad was home all the time now recovering from his injury. In Jan 1932 Lois got pneumonia and died. She was buried in Springville next to her brother Stephen Lorenzo. During the summer time we would hike over the hill to a stream called beaver creek. We would catch a few fish then return home. Before Dad was injured, we went over there several times with friends. In Oct that year Dad borrowed a rifle, we hiked over the hill to beaver creek to hunt deer, my first deer hunt. We stayed overnight, I remember trying to sleep in a heavy coat by the fire, while Dad kept a fire going all night, everything was covered with frost the next morning. We didn’t see any deer until we were well on the way home. We ran into the tracks of buck and doe, Dad knew what to do to intercept them in the next little draw. We had to run a little ways to get in a good spot, sure enough Dad could see them. He drew down and one shot we had a four point buck. The deer was way too big for Dad and I to drag or carry. I stayed with the deer and Dad backtracked to our trail home and intercepted two neighbors on their way home from fishing. They helped carry the deer for half of it. I had a dog named Major which we enjoyed very much, he was very playful, he would really come unglued each night as I came home from delivering papers. That winter he became sick and had distemper, Dad had to dispose of him. One of the main things we enjoyed during the winter was sleigh riding and ice skating on the snow packed roads. Under ideal conditions we could start up in Martin and go down the canyon all the way to Helper, a distance of about 8 miles. We knew it was no no but we would generally arrange to meet someone in Helper and hook a ride home behind a car. One of our friends had a sleigh large enough for five people. The year Dad was injured I fell at school and cracked my left arm. I had to carry it around for several weeks in a sling. While in the 7-9 grades I enjoyed playing marbles which took many hours of my time. Dad taught me how to shoot marbles which he enjoyed when he was growing up. We raised a few rabbits to eat until a wild bobcat broke in the pens and killed them. A few days later our Greek neighbor lost a goat to the bobcat, they set a trap and caught the cat. We would go up the mountainsides in the summer time and gather wild sweet peas, this is what we fed the rabbits. In 1932 we decided there wasn’t any future for us at Mutual so we moved to Springville Utah. We rented a four-room home on 62 West 4th North. Now we could plant a garden and have a pig which helped the food supply for the family. Dads recovery wasn’t good so the Doctors suggested they may be able to help him by performing a bone graft. They removed a bone from his leg and spliced five vertebras together. It took another year and half or more to recover from the operation. The operation was partially successful leaving him with a 60% disability. The operation and the compensation received during recovery was the final settlement with the State Industrial Commission. Now we had to face the fact that Dad would never be able to work as he once did. We did everything we could to get along. We finally had to go on state welfare, being poor was no fun. Living in Springville was the first place we lived where we could attend church. Dad had numerous little jobs but he could not qualify for any kind of steady employment. Dad was janitor of the Third Ward for several years. Being in pain much of the time Dad could only do so much. I helped with the janitor work when possible. The folks always managed to have food, clothing and a home for the family. I have often heard people say that Mothers floors were so clean that they would not hesitate to eat off them. As we kids became old enough we did all kinds of work in order to obtain things the folks couldn’t we had to work and earn our own. In March 1934 my brother Jay Paul was born. He was delivered by Dr. V M Sevy at home. I was a junior in high school. At age 15 I was ordained a Deacon in the Aaronic Priesthood by Bsp. Peter Nielson on 25 Sept 1932. I was ordained a Teacher by Charles Boyer on 29 Jan 1933. I was ordained a Priest by Joseph Harker on 4 Feb 1934. We seemed to have our ups and downs but we were always thankful and blessed with goodly parents who had faith in us and gave us guidance. My sister Thelma and I both participated in the high school band and orchestra. We took active part in the State Band Contests and the High School Opera Orchestra. I had a number of close friends such as Lamar Friel, Gene Baker, Francis Boyer, Harold Johnson, etc. My sister Thelma and I often double dated. On a number of occasions I played cornet solo’s as various functions including Seminary Graduation and church functions. On 28 Jan 1933 I was baptized for the dead for 31 people in the Salt Lake Temple. I started driving a car a Essix Teriplane in 1934 at the age of 17, it belonged to Verl Devenish. On 27 May 1935 I rode my bicycle to Provo and applied for a drivers license. I represented our Ward and Stake in a dance team for two years at the Church’s annual event at Saltair. On 13 Jan 1935 I performed my first baptism, I baptized Phyllis Diamond, Shirley Peterson (Bishops Daughter) and Glen Fred Clark in the fourth ward. I made the first radio we had in our home. I lettered in high school, had a minor lead in the Opera “Marriage of Nannette”. In April 1935 our family moved to 171 West 2nd South Springville. Shortly after Mother came down with pneumonia, she was down for several weeks we were quite concerned. In May 1935 I graduated from high school and seminary. The following month I signed up for a correspondence course in Diesel Engineering. On 30 Oct 1935 the last day of the deer hunt my brother Pierce and I went deer hunting on one bicycle. We went just East of Springville Locked the bike to a pole and hiked up to round peak. I had borrowed a 30-40 rifle with 5 shells from a neighbor. We got a late start arrived up on round peak in the afternoon. We were coming down rock canyon when we saw two deer. After I got my wind (we had been running) I shot once and I had me a buck, my first. By the time we cleaned the deer (the first one I had cleaned) it was late. We had to go down the canyon in the dark except when the steel plant dumped slag which lit up the hill side. We arrived way late, the folks were preparing to organize a search party. The next day we borrowed another neighbor’s horse to go pick up the deer. Being the horse was hard to catch and manage we were after midnight when we returned with my first deer. On 1 March 1936 I was ordained an Elder by Arthur Condie. Our Bishop wanted me to go on a mission but my folks were unable to support me, in fact, I was helping to support the family. It seemed that I always had plenty to do, if it wasn’t cutting a lawn for someone (with a push type) it was delivering papers, going on milk delivery route, working at the cannery, cleaning the furnace at the church, band practice (I was in the summer band) various church functions. In my spare time I completed a correspondence course in Diesel Engineering. The next spring I went to Los Angeles Calif. And finished the course in Sept 1936. The folks moved again to 91 East 2nd South while I was in Calif. After I completed the Diesel course I purchased my first car, a 1928 four door four cylinder Chevrolet, it cost $95.00 in Calif. On my way home to Springville I came by way of Parker Da where my Uncle Reed lived. I had hopes of finding employment there. Being no openings, I came home, on my way, I had to stop and replace the clutch in the car before I could get home. The folks moved again to Selvoy J Boyers place about ¼ mile west of town. The next move about a year later was to 180 West 2nd North, this place I bought for $1500.00 and had the family live in it. While in the service both Pierce and I helped make payments on the home until he go marries. The next year, 1937, I went all out trying to find employment. I applied for several Civil Service jobs, one in Humbolt Nev. Almost developed, it fell through the last minute. Again, I did all kinds of work, worked at the cannery, J C Pennys, Utah Idaho Sugar Co weighing beets, etc. It was about this time that I approached Mr. Earl Cook for a job. He had Ice Cream shops in Springville, Provo, Payson, Nephi, and Richfield. I started at the bottom and worked up to be manager of the Wingate-Cook Ice Cream store in Richfield. I liked the work and learned how to make many kinds of ice cream and run the business. While in Richfield I turned my 1928 Chev in on a used 1937 Chev coupe, it cost $695.00. It took me 2½ years to pay for it. In Oct. 1938 I was home long enough to go deer hunting with Dad. Pierce, Dad and I along with two friends from Salt Lake went up Hobble Creek to Palsom Park. The year before we had good luck there, this year we didn’t see a buck but we did encounter a big brown bear. Dad and I were shooting across a small canyon, we kept shooting until he stopped, I think 29 times. When we skinned him on the spot we found 14 holes, we estimated him to weight 500 lbs. I was transferred to the Provo shop as Manager of Cooks Ice Cream. Here in addition to managing I made the ice cream mix for all five shops and the Ice Cream for there. In the fall of 1939 Mr. Cook was cutting back on personnel, I was laid off and my car was not paid for. I had a struggle the next six months to finish the payments on my car. Here I was out of work again. Mother and Dad did all they could to help. We did all kinds of work, watering and topping beets, weighing beets, blood testing chickens, labeling cans at the cannery etc. Sometimes I felt Mr. Cook laid me off in hopes I would be willing to work for a lower wage in order to finish paying for my car. Christmas that year was very thin. The following spring, 1940, by car was mine. Mr. Cook came after me to go back to work at the Springville shop. I went back for Mr. Cook until April at which time I terminated and started my own ice cream business in Spanish Fork. Franks Ice Cream became a reality in May 1940. I borrowed money on my car to make a down payment on the necessary items to get started, which I called a shoestring. I leased a building at 120 North Main in Spanish Fork, the business went well until WWII broke out. Sugar was being rationed and I was subject to be drafted. While operating my ice cream business I took flying lessons and received my private pilot’s license. Before I started my business I was dating a very nice girl from Springville, Miss Louise Patrick. She was called on a LDS mission in Calif, she returned just after I started my business. We hadn’t made any specific plans for the future so upon her return she felt her companion had to be a return missionary. Being deflated, subject to the draft for the war, losing my business etc, I decided to enlist with 125 other men from Utah, my brother Pierce and I enlisted together. We were involved in establishing the 301st Ordnance Reg in Camp Sutton NC. During the early part of 1942 one of my applications for a Civil Service job became available. Mechanic Lerner at Hill Field $50 per month. I completed this course just before entering the Army. I stayed in Salt Lake close to where I went to school at West High. I would go down home on weekends and make ice cream for the week, my sister Grace and Mother kept the shop in operation during my absence that winter. My car was left at home for the folks to use. My brother and I reported for duty at Fort Douglas Utah on 28 April 1942. That night we shipped by train to Camp Sutton NC arriving there 2 May 1942. Basic Training was a new experience for all of us, KP duty, guard duty, rifle range, live in tents, hike with pack and rifle, CQ, drill, uniforms, inoculations for everything under the sun, special details of all kinds. Our folks were very thoughtful as they wrote often, we answered when possible. When Pierce and I joined the service we wore our best clothes, well we had to wear those clothes for over two weeks before we received a GI issue. We sent the clothes home, Mother nearly had a heart attack as they were in terrible condition, we had no choice. On 25 May 1942 a group of us holding the Priesthood (a large number of returned Missionaries) held our Sunday Sacrament meeting on a little hill by camp in a wheat field. We used our canteens and mess kits in passing the Sacrament. The next Sunday a visitor Hugh B. Brown one of the church authorities joined us. On 6 June 1942 I received my first pay day in the Army $23.10. On 9 June 1942 during retreat I was informed I was promoted to Private First class. On 7 July 1942 I was transferred from Camp Sutton to the Air Corp at Shaw Field SC for exams and eligibility for Glider Pilot training. I passed all the requirements and being I had a private pilot’s license I was eligible for class A glider pilot training. On 22 July 1942 I was transferred to Lockbourne Army Air Base near Columbus Ohio, awaiting Glider training. While here I received a weekend pass to visit a close girl friend in Rochester New York, Ella Matson, a nurse in the hospital there, she was originally from Brigham City Utah. We became acquainted while I was in business in Spanish Fork. On 28 Aug 1942 I was transferred to Plainview Texas for Glider training, we staying in the Hilton Hotel. I soloed 3 Sept 1942 and passed final check 18 Sept 1942. I received my Staff Sergeant rating 12 Sept 1942—I’m really in the chips now, $144.00 per month. One 27 Sept 1942 I was transferred to 29 Palms Calif. for Glider training. I soloed 16 Oct 1942 and on 11 Nov 1942 I finished Basic training and received Glider wings insignia. Whenever I could I went in to visit my sister Grace and family in Hollywood Calif., I made numerous trips while in the area. On 15 Nov 1942 I was transferred to Fort Sumner NM, was in a Glider pool waiting further training. 7 Dec 1942 I was called home on emergency furlough as Mother was ill. Pierce was called home also. While at home I went up to Salt Lake to visit an old friend from Spanish Fork, Ned Anderson who had got married since I left for the service. We decided to go to a show, I didn’t have a date so Neds wife Detta arranged for a blind date for me with her cousin Lucille Makin. I returned to Fort Sumner NM 30 Dec 1942 and on 5 Jan 1943 I was transferred to Victorville Calif. to finish my Glider training in the large CG4A Glider. Jan thru March I was in a Glider pool waiting further training. On 9 March 1943 I went home on a 7 day furlough. While home Mother had a dinner for me which I invited Lucille Makin from Salt Lake to join us. I spent a most enjoyable evening, Lucille is the most ideal girl I have ever gone with. I baptized my brother Jay Paul on 14 May 1943. Being the auxiliary fields (dry lakes) were full of water we couldn’t complete our training. I applied for cadet training, I passed the necessary exams. On 16 April 1943 I had a weekend pass—thumbed my way home, returned 18 April, seen the folks and spent an enjoyable evening with Lucille who I thought a lot of. By the time I was able to return to base I was four hours AWOL. On 19 April 1943 I was transferred to Santa Ana Cal. for Cadet Classification and a two-week pre-flight course and many hours of marching. On 29 May 1943 the folks came down to see Grace and Hap, I received an overnight pass, I went in to see them. The next day Mother, Dad, Jay, Grace, and Hap brought me out to the base and witnessed the weekly review. On 5 June 1943 I went into Los Angeles on pass. Lucille Makin a very lovely girl from Salt Lake was here on vacation. I’m afraid I’ve really fallen for her. Leaving Lucille at Grace’s I returned to base. On 11 June 1943 I purchased a diamond for my bride to be at the P X. I went into LA on pass on 12 and 13 June. On 12 June 1943 at 2200 hours Lucille and I became engaged, she returned to the base with me. Lucille stayed for the weekly review then returned to LA and then back home the next day. On 23 June 1943 I was transferred to Oxnard Calif. for Primary A/C training. Started flight training 25 June, soloed 14 July, finished 25 August 1943 in the PT13 Steerman. On 30 Aug 1943 I was transferred to Chico Calif. for Basic training. Started flying BT13 on 2 Sept 1943. Mother and Lucille came down on the bus. We were married on 22 Oct 1943 as planned in Oliver Broomheads home in Chico Calif. by bishop Clinton E. Cox. Because of several cases of mumps my squadron was restricted to the base. I was lucky to obtain a 27 hour pass to get married. The Broomhead family were of great assistance in every way. I completed my training at Chico on 31 Oct 1943 then transferred to Douglas Ariz. on 1 Nov 1943 for advanced pilot training. Lucille came down to Douglas with two other cadet wives in a private car. I had to go by train. We had a seven hour layover in LA, Lucille met me there along with Grace and Hap. We had a few hours together before I left. I arrived in Douglas Ariz. on 1 Nov 1943, Lucille arrived on Nov in private car. Lucille and I spent our first Christmas together in our one room apartment at Douglas Ariz. I graduated on 7 Jan 1943 as a Flight Officer. Lucille and I went home on leave, later I reported for duty at Deming NM on 19 Jan 1944. I found a room for us at 516 West Fine in Deming so I sent for Lucille to join me, she arrived 4 Feb. just 2 days before her birthday 6 Feb. We have a branch of the church here, we attended whenever we could. My duty at Deming was piloting AT-11 in train9ing Bombardier Navigators. Lucille went to work at Cadet Headquarters for awhile. We purchased a 1938 Ford coupe and a 14 foot house trailer, it was home to us. The Ford wasn’t satisfactory so we turned it in on a 1939 Chev Sedan which would pull the trailer. On 13 May 1944 two friends from Utah and I flew home to Salt lake, spent a few hours at home on Mother Day then returned to Deming New Mexico. I fired the 30 M1 Carbine on the range scored expert. On 19 Sept 1944 I received my Commission as 2nd Lt. AUS S/N 0926584. (one of my goals). On 19 Oct 1944 I came home on leave for 21 days, when I returned I had a new assignment at Hobbs AFB NM where I learned to fly the B-17 Bomber. I finished B-17 transition on 26 Jan 1945. I had a delay in route to my next station so we went home. On our way while driving my car we encountered slick roads, I lost control of my car and ran off the road. I fractured the bone under my left eye when my head hit the steering wheel. Dad and Ernie came down and picked us up in Moab Utah. I had the car fixed in Moab and picked it up a week later. While home this time I changed the home in Springville to Mother and Dads name. Mother felt sure if anything should happen to me they would be left out in the cold. My next station was Lincoln Neb. where I had my air crew assigned in the B-17. While here VE day took place and our assignment was cancelled. Those pilots with 4 engine time and with over 1000 hours flight time were made Airplane Commanders on the B-29. My next duty assignment was B-29 transition at Randolph Field Texas where I had my next crew assigned and completed ground school, my copilot was Russel G. Van Helen from Saginaw Michigan. We had just started flight training when VJ day took place. Being the War was over training was stopped and I was transferred to Brooks Field Tex. and assigned to a Pilot Pool. Being I decided not to stay in the service I was transferred back to Randolph Field for release of active duty, the effective was 10 Dec 1945. At the time of my release we were living in New Braunfels Texas. Before we departed I purchased a 1938 Packard, tore it down and put in new rings and bearings then drove it home. We arrived home just before Christmas. We stayed with Lucille’s folks until fall of 1946 when we purchased a small home on 4635 Boxelder Street in Murray Utah. (Murray 8th Ward) In the spring of 1946 I reported to Hill Field for reemployment after Military Service, they offered me a job at .88/hr, I couldn’t live on that so I applied for a school furlough and worked in a training capacity for 360 days at Timmins Auto Service in Salt Lake to gain more experience. Timmins Auto Service closed its doors 60 days before I finished my training. I was unemployed until I returned to HAFB in Feb 1947 at $1.05/hr as a Jr. Equipment Repairer. In Sept 1947 I was promoted to grade 15 $1.19/hr as a Automotive Equipment Repairer. I turned the Packard in on a 1940 Chev Coupe which I drove to HAFB. I later put in on a bid sale at Tooele Depot for a 1942 Plymouth and a utility trailer, I received both. The Plymouth had to be worked over. I sold the 1940 Chev and drove the Plymouth until I turned it in on a 1950 Studebaker Champion. (my first new car) On 6 June 1947 our first son was born in the LDS Hospital. All of us were thrilled including Dad, as he was the first one to carry on the Butler name. He was blessed by me on 3 Aug 1947, we named him David Franklin after me. Shortly after David was born Lucille had a nervous disorder, Mother came to our rescue and helped take care of him which we appreciated very much. While David was a baby I was involved in a minor accident at HAFB in which my left arm was broken. I was hospitalized in the Holy Cross in Salt Lake to have it pinned. Later that same year I had a appendicitis operation in the Vets Hospital. In May 1950 I changed from Automotive Equipment Repairer to Machine Tool Repair which was my line of work I was doing before I went in the service. In 1951 I changed to GS-6 Maintenance Material Clerk, then to GS-7 Production Estimator in 1953. Our second son was born 8 May 1951 in the LDS hospital. He was blessed by me on 1 July 1951 and given the name of Ronald Lynn. While living in Murray we were not very active in the ward but we did arrange to go to the Salt Lake Temple for our endowments and have our two Sons sealed to us on 22 Oct 1952 (our 9th anniversary). We were married this time by Albert J. Elgren in the Salt Lake Temple. We enjoyed taking the boys cat fishing down to Utah Lake on weekends. We would tie a rope on David to protect him from falling in the lake, Ronald was hardly walking. We also enjoyed visiting our folks here in Salt Lake and mine in Springville whenever we could. In 1952 we decided traveling back and forth to HAFB was for the birds. After considerable consideration we decided to build a home in Kaysville. After locating a lot I arranged for Van Sanders a Contractor to build us a home at 266 East 100 No. I worked with the contractor in its construction. We sold our place in Murray and moved to our new home in Kaysville in March 1953, David was attending first grade. In 1954 my job was changed from Production planner GS-6 to GS-7 then to Production Control Specialist GS-9 in 1959. Our third son was born 17 March 1954 in the LDS Hospital. I blessed him on 2 May 1954 and gave him the name of Dan William. We had a puzzling problem with him as he cried almost constantly for three months before we solved his problem, he was allergic to milk. On 31 May 1954 I was hospitalized with a [fibrillating] heart, was corrected with medication and returned home in a few days. During 1954 and 55 I constructed our two car garage, David and Ron did what they could to help. (my first major project for the family) I purchased a table saw which helped in the garage construction also later in the finishing the basement. Being no place in Kaysville to get a saw sharpened, I purchased necessary equipment to sharpen my saws and many of my neighbors and friends. I baptized David on 6 Aug 1955. I was set apart as assistant Ward Clerk in the Kaysville 3rd Ward on 28 May 1957 by Bishop RAF McCormick. On 30 April 1958 I was set apart as Ward Clerk for the Kaysville 3rd Ward by Apostle George Q. Morris under Bishop Richard C. Bowman. On 2 June 1956 Horace Makin my father in-law died in the St. Marks Hospital in Salt Lake. Sarah Makin my mother in-law moved in with us until she passed away on 12 May 1959. The last few months she required constant care. On 26 to 28 Feb 1958 David was hospitalized and operated on by Dr. R. W. Krumbach in the Dee Hospital for a urinary tract correction. On 26 May 1958 Ronald was treated by Dr. Hales for a severe ear infection, finalized with x-ray treatments. On 10 Sept 1959 we made the final payment on our home, we have been making $55.52/month payments, some months we would make a double payment. In Jan 1960 Lucille’s nervous disorder reappeared, Dr. Madsen was able to help her with medication. On 28 June 1961 my Father passed away in the Spanish Fork Hospital, he had been ill for a long time, for the last 31 years since the mine accident Dad had been in pain and was limited in doing many many things. Dad and Mother had encountered many many hardships, we loved and miss them very much. In the spring of 1960 I purchased a 1960 ½ ton Ford truck and a Fleetwood camper which we as a family enjoyed very much. After school was out we went on our first trip. We went to Disneyland, Marine Land and up the coast thru Yosemite National Park and then home. Later that year we went on our first trip to Hebegan which became our annual vacation spot for many years. On 4 June 1959 I was ordained a 70 by A. Theodore Tuttle. While I was Ward Clerk in the 3rd Ward under Bishop Bowman I ordained David a deacon on 21 June 1959 and a Teacher on 25 June 1961. In the spring of 1962 after school was out we packed the camper and went to the Worlds Fair in Seattle Washington, the family really enjoyed the outing. I sold my Studebaker and drove my father in-laws Buick until 1961 when I turned it in on a 1961 Ford Galaxie. That same year I finished the bathroom in the basement. In the fall of 1962 I went to Maryland, Alabama and Washington D C on TDY. In 1963 I was made Cub Master in the Scouting program, that was an exciting year. On 26 May 1963 I ordained Ron a Deacon. On 23 June 1963 I ordained David a Priest, our ward was changed to 8th ward under Bishop Wallace F Allen. On 21 Oct 1963 our three sons were returning home from a weekend of deer hunting, they were involved in a auto accident, David and Dan received minor injuries totaled the car, we felt blessed as they could have been injured very seriously. In July 1963 we made a fireplace in the West end of our basement later I made it into a family room. On 8 Nov 1963 Lucille had a female operation in the LDS Hospital by Dr. J. V. Stevenson. On my birthday in 1964 I purchased a new 1964 Chev Impala from Moor Motor in Coalville Utah. Also on my birthday Mother married Dewey O. Nelson in the Salt Lake Temple. Mother was very lonely since Dad had passed away, Dewey treated us all well and we enjoyed his company. Dewey was good to Mother, they did some traveling which was new for Mother. Later that year I remodeled our kitchen, installed new sink, new cabinet doors and counter top. In Sept 1965 I purchased a 17½ foot Hydroswift boat with a 75 HP motor, our family thoroughly enjoyed this boat for many years. (water skiing, fishing and boating). On 18 Sept 1966 we purchased our first Color TV from Fame S/N LK5311. In Sept 1968 we purchased our Freezer, carpet and drapes. In May 1971 I purchased a used 1970 Honda trail 90. Pierce, Jay, Ernie and I enjoyed riding them up at Hebegan every year and some times during the deer hunt. The many many escapades we had at Hebegan will never be forgotten, water skiing, fishing, hiking, visiting, bike riding, Thelma and her thermal underwear, going after wood to keep warm and dry during rainy days, teasing Pierce, cook outs around the camp fire, Lucille’s lemon pies and her hide out between the trees, mushroom hunting for a steak dinner etc. this we enjoyed with my two brothers, two sisters and their families for many years at the Spring Creek camp ground at Hebegan. On 28 May 1972 I was ordained a High Priest by Pres. Clinton D. Zollinger. On 19 Sept to 4 Oct I was on TDY to Bedford and Dedham Mass. David our first son graduated from Davis High School and Seminary in May 1965. David was a honor student, received a scholarship to Weber State. On 22 Jan 1967 I ordained David an Elder. David received a LDS Mission call on 4 Jan 1967, entered the Mission home 30 Jan. He returned from the British Mission 5 Jan 1969. His homecoming was on 12 Jan 1969. While David was on his mission we enjoyed having his girl friend Judy Denkmann join us on many occasions. Being she was a nonmember we didn’t know what the future would be. We didn’t know it at the time but she was receiving the Missionary lessons while he was away. Upon his return she was baptized and they were married in the Salt Lake Temple on 18 Dec 1969. David returned to Weber State and graduated in May 1973. David went to work for K-Mart, not caring for their lifestyle he terminated and went to work for Anderson Lumber Company. David and Judy had two beautiful daughters, Micelle and Tiffany who we love and think a great deal of watching them grow and develop into young ladies is a joy forever. Ronald our second son graduated from Davis High School and Seminary in May 1969. Ronald also was a honor student and received a Scholarship to Weber State. Shortly after Ronald started college he joined the National Guard, went to Camp Leanerdwood Mo. for Boot Camp. On 18 April 1970 I purchased a 1970 ¾ ton Ford truck from Crandall Walker in Coalville. We sold the 1960 truck and put the camper on the new truck. Lucille and I made a trip back to Camp Leanerdwood Mo. in May 1970 to pick Ronald up from boot camp. In June we replaced the camper with a new larger unit, self contained from Carl White in Farmington, I helped in its construction. After Ronald returned from boot camp he reentered college. Ronald received his LDS Mission call to Japan on 10 Oct 1970, returned 27 Oct 1972. It was a coincidence that while Ronald was there on his Mission in Japan, his cousin Kevin was there at the same time, later two more of his cousins Kelly and Todd filled Missions in Japan. In Oct 1972 Lucille and I went on a tour to Hawaii, while there Ronald joined us on his way home from Japan from his Mission. The three of us visited the four Islands on the tour. Ronald returned to Weber State and graduated in May 1976. While attending College he met Barbara Stacey they were later married in the Logan Temple on 19 June 1974. Ronald worked for several business concerns in Idaho and Utah, later he was employed by Hercules Powder Co. Ronald and Barbara had our first grandson, Christopher Ronald named after me. Later they had a lovely daughter Camille, then another precious boy Phillip Newell. On 13 June 1965 I ordained Ronald a Teacher. On 27 March 1966 I ordained Dan a Deacon. On 21 May 1967 I ordained Ronald a Priest. On 17 March 1968 I ordained Dan a Teacher. On 22 March 1970 I ordained Dan a Priest. On 13 Sept 1970 I ordained Ronald an Elder. On 11 March 1973 I ordained Dan an Elder. On 21 Dec 1980 Ronald was ordained a 70 by Floyd Gowans. Our third son Dan William graduated from Davis High School and Seminary in May 1972. Dan was a honor student along with his brothers, received scholarship to Weber State. Dan received his LDS Mission call to Oakland Calif. on 21 April 1973, returned 24 April 1975, Married his high school sweetheart Carrie Morgan in the Salt Lake Temple on 25 June 1975. Dan graduated from college in May 1978. Dan was and is dedicated to the Automotive World, his goal was to work for General Motors which became a reality. His advancements reflects his efforts and interest. Dan and Carrie had two fine sons, Matter and Adam and then welcomed daughter Kristen. After 32 years of service for Uncle Sam I retired in March 1974. My accrued leave gave me a paycheck until Dan came home from his Mission in April 1975. Being home all the time was a questionable adjustment, I utilize my time in maintaining my home, garden and equipment, a number of my neighbors seem to require help which takes a lot of my time. During my life I have held numerous church positions such as 14 ½ years as Ward Clerk under three different bishops, MIA Counselor, Cub Master, secretary of Elders Quorum, secretary of High Priest group, assistant to High Priest group leader etc. The main sports I have enjoyed and still do are fishing and hunting, generally with the family. On one occasion on a elk hunt I went along for the ride as I didn’t have a permit. I was in the truck listening to Oct Conference on Saturday morning when I could see to spike bull elk about 150 feet away standing broad side, I turned the radio off, rolled down the window and shot both from the cab, that is sure hard on the ear drums. One of our family traditions is the yearly Oct Deer Hunt. For over 30 years the family along with numerous friends have camped near Thistle Utah for the annual event. Dad, Pierce and I were involved when it was first started, we do most of our hunting on Billies Mountain. We have become very well acquainted with that area. Many many stories can be told of our experiences on Billies Mountain. On 4 Jan 1974 my Mother passed away with a heart attack just nine days before her 80th birthday. My dear Mother was the last one of our parents to pass away. She will be long remembered by us children and many of her grandchildren and many friends. Some of the highlights of my life are; our temple marriage, received a commission as a pilot in the Air Force, own my home. Retirement, having three sons who went on Missions, graduated from college, and married in the temple and today are active and hold church positions. Dan and Ronald became Eagle Scouts, David didn’t have a chance. Our grandchildren are very special to us. Our three daughter-in-laws are gems, they have helped bring about many pleasures in our life. My family as a whole are just great. David is presently manager of Anderson Lumber in Bountiful, Ronald has a substantial position with Hercules Powder Co. and Dan lives in Rochester Michigan working for General Motors Chevrolet Division as a Technical Assistant. Since my retirement we have been up to Montana several times where Dan used to live also where he lives now in Rochester Michigan. I have finished my basement, it could be used as a apartment now. Also we have replaced some of our furniture. We belong to a travel club (Davis Antelopers), a very enjoyable group. Almost every month we go somewhere over night or out to dinner, sometimes we go on a trip. Whenever we can get together we go fishing with my two brothers and two sisters and their families. We thoroughly enjoy these family get togethers. As time goes on we home to get together more often. (My two sisters have become great fisherwomen) We have had our ups and downs but generally I feel we have had a very good marriage. We are indeed grateful and blessed to have sons who we love and are so proud of Our Family is everything. I am very thankful to have had the privilege of giving each of my sons a Fathers Blessing before going on their missions. I know I have made mistakes, I feel no one is perfect. I have tried to pass on experiences etc and set examples for my sons, I hope they can add to these examples and pass on to their children as I have tried. Ever since I was a boy scout and learned about our Flag and have served my Country in War, I have a great respect for the Colors and what they represent. Every time I see Old Glory or hear our National Anthem (which I have played many times years ago on my horn) a lump forms in my throat and tears in my eyes. I guess I’m just too sentimental. When my turn comes I have a special request, I would like to have a Military Service. Addendum to C. F. Butler’s personal history as written by his wife, Lucille Butler during August, 1990. I feel I should finish this part of Frank’s life history for future generations who might read it and wonder how he left this mortal life. Frank carried High Protein in his blood for ten years and in 1985 it became active and caused him to have Multiple Myeloma (bone cancer). He was told he had Multiple Myeloma on May 8, 1985 and as the weeks went by took chemotherapy and radium treatments, and was so sick. In Sept. 1985 he was told he was terminal with one to six months to live. He was very brave and we kept him home and took care of him. It was a heartbreaking time for all of us. He suffered so much. He had a lot of faith in his Heavenly Father and was a very spiritual man. He didn’t want to leave his family and me but knew it was his Heavenly Father’s choice. Frank was a hard worker, a good provider and was never idle. He was a great handy man and his children and grandchildren thought he could fix anything. He loved to fish and hunt. He loved fishing with his sisters and brothers and the fun times we had. It broke my heart when he left this mortal life on Feb. 8, 1986. He was my sweetheart, lover, husband, best friend a wonderful father to his sons and families. We still miss him so very much, but pray that we as his family can live worthy lives in the gospel and are grateful for eternal life and look forward to seeing him again. His loving wife Lucille This poem was in Frank’s suit pocket. It gives me comfort and I hope it will you. ALTHOUGH THE CURTAIN FALLS There comes a time for all of us When we must say good-bye. But faith and hope and love and trust Can never, never die; Although the curtain falls at last Is that a time to grieve? The future’s fairer than the past If only we believe And trust in God’s eternal care— So when the master calls Let’s say that life is still more fair Although the curtain falls.

Thelma Butler

Contributor: F D Dennis Created: 2 years ago Updated: 11 months ago

Thelma Butler Holt Born April 22, 1919 Died March 12, 1995 Married Ernest Voyal Holt June 28, 1938 PERSONAL HISTORY OF THELMA BUTLER HOLT I, Thelma Butler Holt, was born April 22, 1919, in my Grandpa Hutchings' home in Victor, Teton County, Idaho. I was the fourth child and first girl born to Christopher Lorenzo Butler and Reba Hutchings Butler. My oldest two brothers had died shortly after their birth. Stephen Lorenzo was born June 7, 1913, in Hiawatha, Utah, and died June 8, 1913, and was buried in Springville, Utah. Milton was born June 9, 1914, in Victor, Idaho, and died June 9, 1914, and he was buried in Victor. My brother, Christopher Franklin was born January 18, 1917, in Spanish Fork, Utah. When I was born, my parents were living with my grandparents and Dad was helping Grandpa on the farm. I was blessed in the Victor Ward, Teton County, Idaho, on July 6, 1919, by my grandpa, Stephen Hutchings. He was bishop at that time. Shortly after I was born, my folks moved back to the farm in Spanish Fork, Utah. This farm was originally part of Grandpa Butler's farm and was located west of the highway between Spanish Fork and Salem. A few years before, my folks helped to build a small house there and had lived there for a while. On March 13, 1921, my brother, Pierce Hutchings, was born. A year later on June 21, 1922, my sister, Grace, was born. There seemed to be a little friction between my parents and grandparents over the farm property. It wasn't long before my parents gave it up and moved back up to Victor, Idaho. My folks had a hard time making a living. Dad worked on dry farms. Mother washed on the washboard for the hotel. I used to iron the pillow cases when I was only five years old. Mother also used to bake pies and sell them to the pool hall. I remember at this time Dad had a broken foot and was on crutches for quite a while. I can remember Grandpa and Grandma Hutchings and their home in Victor. Grandpa was a big impressive man. Grandma was a very small quiet woman and was always kind and gentle with me. I remember we celebrated July 4th one year. Grandpa strung red, white, and blue bunting around some trees and we made a freezer of ice cream. On August 12, 1924, my brother, Royal Christopher, was born. He was another "blue" baby and died the next day. He was buried in the Victor cemetery next to his brother, Milton. About this time, my mother's sister and brother in law, Grace and Harry Ballard, decided to manage the hotel in Victor. It was a large building that housed the hotel, a cafe, and a drug store. Mother and Dad decided to run the cafe part. We moved into a house right next door. For a while things seemed to go quite well we even got some new furniture. We had a lady tend us while Mother and Dad both worked in the cafe. I started school in Victor and went to the first grade there. I also remember going to Sunday School a few times. In the summer of 1926, my folks had a "falling out" with Aunt Grace. They sold everything and moved back to Spanish Fork, Utah. We rented the "Cornaby" house in town and Dad worked odd jobs just whatever he could find. I went to the second grade at the Thurber School. I went to the third grade at the Central School. I was baptized December 4, 1927, by Elmer Fillmore and confirmed by Gilbert A. Johnson. We spent quite a bit of time on Grandpa and Grandma Butler's farm south of Spanish Fork helping with the work. I remember picking beans, hoeing celery, separating milk, churning butter, turning the washing machine, and helping Grandma cook for threshers. Grandpa Butler was a stocky built man, very strict and set in his ways. He believed in everyone working. Grandma Butler was a German. She was a very hard worker and very bossy. It was the summer of 1928. Times were hard and Dad was having a time finding enough work. His sister and brother in law, olive and "Pete" Peterson, lived in Mutual, a coal camp, and Pete worked in the coal mine. They seemed to think Dad could get work there. Dad went up and was hired to work in the Mutual mine. Mutual was next to the last coal camp up Spring Canyon in Carbon County, Utah. After a short while, Dad was able to find just two small rooms in a house in Martin, another coal camp, for us to move to. It was the last house in the last camp going up the canyon. By winter, Dad's brother, Alma, was also working in the mines and living with us. That made seven of us in two small rooms. It was good for us to have regular income again. My parents were finally able to get me the eye glasses I had needed all my life. I was very near sighted. I'll never forget when I first got them. I could see things I had never seen before. Winters in the coal camps were very severe. We had to walk down two camps to the coal camp, Rains, to go to school. The first winter up there I got pneumonia and they nearly lost me. The next summer, we moved down the canyon to Mutual to a four room house. It was hard for the miners to find a place to stay so Mother took in two men boarders for a while. I went to the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades in Rains. We had three grades in one room. When I was in sixth grade, we had just three sixth grade students. Life in the coal camp was quite different. I had Japanese, Greek, and Italian friends. We had no car, no radio, and no church. They did organize Relief Society once and mother was a counselor, but people weren't interested and it only lasted about a year. There was a company show once a month. We played outdoor games and hiked the hills a lot. Due to boredom, we got into our share of mischief. The water in camp couldn't be used for drinking. Twice a week we had to fill containers from the train and keep it for drinking. Mother kept a very clean house. I remember bare board floors being scrubbed white. She was also a good cook and did a lot of sewing for us. We all had a lot of household chores to do. My parents were strict and made us help with the work. The affects of the depression were really being felt now. Some of the miners had been layed off. Others had been cut back. People were losing their possessions and trading work for food. We felt lucky that Dad still had a job. In March, 1930, Dad was in a mine accident that broke his back. We didn't realize at the time that his days of full time employment were over. He spent the next five months in a hospital in Salt Lake. There was no public transportation in the coal camps, so Mother had to get someone to take her to Helper to board the train to Salt Lake to see Dad. When she made these trips, we children were left alone. It was a hard period for all of us. We did get to live in our house free and receive compensation monthly from the mine. In 1931, I started the seventh grade in Latuda, the next camp down the canyon from Rains. Frank was playing cornet in the band and I was able to borrow a school instrument, so I started playing the alto horn. I really enjoyed being in the band. In October, 1931, my sister, Lois, was born. We all enjoyed her so much, especially Dad. He was home all the time still recovering from his injury. In January, 1932, Lois got pneumonia and died. She was buried in Springville next to her brother, Stephen Lorenzo. In the summer of 1932, we moved to Springville. Dad received a monthly settlement for his injury for quite a few months. He planted a garden and raised a pig to help out. We finally started going to church regular at the Springville Third Ward. Dad was janitor of the church for a while. He had several part time, easy jobs in the next few years but couldn't qualify for any kind of steady employment. He was in pain much of the time. In March, 1934, my brother, Jay Paul, was born. We all enjoyed our new baby brother. After a while, the settlement from the mine was paid in full and we didn't receive monthly checks anymore. Dad wasn't capable of working full time so we went on state welfare. We seemed to always be quite poor, tho we never wanted for a warm clean house or food to eat. If we wanted more than that, we had to work and earn our own. I did a lot of sewing and made most of my clothes. Mother taught me to cook, sew, embroider, and how to take care of things. In spite of all our problems, I always felt blessed that the Lord had given me such good parents. We had a good respectful home life. I went to school in Springville for the next five years. I became active in the band and orchestra, playing cornet and string bass. I looked forward to going to the band contests and also playing in the opera orchestra. I started dating when I was in ninth grade. I went to nearly all of the formal dances, having earned and made my own formals. I loved the ball games and played in the Pep band. I had to work much of the time. I had house cleaning jobs, did baby sitting, worked in the cannery, picked fruit, worked in the fields, and dusted school rooms. My best girl friends were Ardell Angus and Donna Harmer. We took turns sleeping at each others house and had a lot of fun together. I had several boy friends and used to love going to the dances at high schools nearby and Utahna and Rainbow Gardens in Provo. When I was a senior, I started dating Ernest Holt. He had quit school the year before, to go to work. He came back in the middle of my senior year to finish so he could graduate. School was a lot of fun after that. He walked me home after school and I used to do a lot of homework for him. We dated and went to all of the school Functions together. His folks didn't have a car and neither did mine, so we usually walked or double dated with his boy friend. I graduated from Springville High School and LDS Seminary in 1937. Just before graduation, Ernest went to Southern Utah with his father to prospect for gold. He was gone several weeks. By then our relationship was quite special, so I was real disappointed that he didn't take me to graduation. I ended up going with Les Ford, who was from Provo. In those days it was generally expected that you support yourself after you finsh Finish school. I was eager to try and wanted to go to the big city. I went to Salt Lake and got a job working in a home for five dollars a week plus board and room. During the next eight months, I worked in three different homes doing washing, ironing, cooking, and housework. I usually had a day and a half off per week. By then, Ernest had come back from his prospecting trip and was trying to find work. Jobs were scarce and it wasn't easy. He finally found one in a gas station in Salt Lake. We continued dating and had fun together. My girl friend, Ardell, had married Owen Ford and they lived in Salt Lake, so we spent a lot of time with them. In January, 1938, Ernie gave me a diamond. In the spring, Mother got sick and I felt a need to go home and help out. I also wanted to sew and get some things ready for my wedding. I was able to get a job in the Mission Cafe in Springville and move back home. Ernie quit his job and financed another prospecting trip with his father, to the Henry Mountains. His father had a claim down there and felt he would find gold. He never did. When Ernie came back, we decided things weren't getting much better so we would take our chances and get married as soon as we could. We wanted a Temple marriage and a church reception. Neither of our folks could help much financially, so we knew much of it would be up to us. I remember my brother, Frank, helped pay for the orchestra. I made my own dress. Ernie rented his clothes. We payed for much of it a whole year after we were married. It took some planning and some help from other family members. I married Ernest Voyal Holt, son of Enoch Alphonzo Holt and Altha Elnorah Turner Holt, on June 28, 1938, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple for time and eternity. George F. Richards Jr., of the Council of the Twelve, performed the ceremony. I was 19 years old Ernie was 21. The people who accompanied us to the Temple were my mother, Ernie's sister, Valeria, and her husband, Evon, and Ernie's friend and partner at work, Milton Bush, and his wife, Louisa. We were very glad to finally be married. We had gone together for two years and had been engaged for six months. We had a wedding reception the next evening in the church in Springville, Utah. I made me a nice wedding dress, rented a veil, and had bridesmaids. We had an orchestra, danced, and served refreshments. It was modest but nice. An interesting thing; after the reception, Ernie wheeled me down the middle of Main Street in a wheelbarrow, with a crowd of people following. The next morning we moved to our first home, a small fur¬nished apartment on "B" Street in Salt Lake City, Utah. The rent on this place was $27.00 a month. We had very little to start out on, less than $5.00 between us, so we had to charge our first groceries. Ernie had worked two weeks for free in order to get his first job at Mac Hale's gas station. He made $2.00 a day for 10 and 12 hour shifts and worked every day of the week. I soon discovered we were expecting a baby and we couldn't afford this place any longer, so I set out to find something less expensive. We moved several times that first year, when¬ever I could find a place that would save a few dollars. I always looked for furnished apartments within walking distance of work, sometimes as close as 3 blocks and at other times as far as 5 miles one way. We had no car or furniture, just a cedar chest. I did the laundry on the washboard in the bathtub. I Every 3 or 4 weeks I would pack the laundry in suitcases, walk to the Orem train station, and take the train to Springville to visit my parents. The Orem was a one car electric commuter train that ran on tracks from Salt Lake to Payson several times. Because of being pregnant, I was usually sick when I arrived. Mother would get me over my violent sick stomach, help me with laundry, and occasionally we would bottle fruit; then I would take the train back to Salt Lake. We didn't know how we could afford a baby on wages we were making, but the Lord does provide. Ernie got a fifty cent a day raise just before the baby was born. We lived in an apartment on Wall Street by the State Capitol for our first Christmas. I'll never forget it. We were all alone, we weren't able to go home, but we did get a nice present. We paid $5.00 down and got us a $49.00 washing machine. I think it was the most beautiful present I've ever received. We still lived on Wall Street when our first son was born. He was born at home on April 16, 1939, at 2:30 a.m. a beautiful 8 lb. boy. Those helping were Dr. V. M. Sevy, my mother, my girl friend, Ardell Ford, and Ernie. We named him Gary Ernest after his father. He was blessed August 6, 1939, in the Ninth Ward, Liberty Stake, in Salt Lake City by his father, Ernest Voyal Holt. Gary was a good natured child, very smart and eager to learn. He wasn't afraid of people. He was the first grand¬child on my side of the family. I remember my father was so proud of him that he bought him his first pair of shoes and used to show him off to everyone. We couldn't have been happier. We soon managed to buy a baby buggy on time and I would walk down and meet Ernie after work at midnight. It was about 20 blocks away. I would window shop in the downtown area until he got off work; then we would walk home wheeling our baby up Capitol Hill. Many times we had big holes in the soles of our shoes and we would wear cardboard inserts in them. Maybe once in two weeks we would splurge and buy a 5~ ice cream cone. Our recreation was mostly walking, visiting friends, and an occasional trip home on the Orem to see our folks. (Money was extremely tight in the 30's. Most everyone was in the same situation.) Mother would come up and visit whenever she could, usually riding the Orem. She loved to come to the city. Often we would sleep three in a bed because we didn't have an extra bed. After the baby was born, we felt we could get by in a smaller, less expensive place again so we moved to a one room apartment with a kitchenette where we shared the bath with three other tenants. That didn't last long; we soon found bedbugs and got out of there in a hurry. We moved to another one room place and bought a fridge. About this time Ernie changed jobs. He started driving a big gas truck, delivering gas for Co op. We also got another break; we were able to move into a nice apartment in the Wilson Hotel, and work part time for our rent. Ernie worked on the switchboard and I took my baby in a walker and cleaned rooms a couple of hours a day. We also bought our first car, an old Model A ford. We lived there about six months until we were expecting another baby and I was too sick to work. About this time, Ernie went to work in a Co op service station as manager. We moved into an unfurnished duplex up on Chase Avenue. We bought secondhand furniture a couch, a bed, a set of drawers, a breakfast set, a new mattress and springs all for about $100.00, and paid for it by the month. I bought a used sewing machine for $5.00 and made all our curtains, spreads, baby clothes, Gary's clothes, and even sewed rags and braided rugs. I had one change of maternity clothes and washed them out at night. When I was 5 months pregnant, I went to Springville and had all of my teeth out. About this time, Ernie started driving Taxi for Yellow Cab Co. part time and worked full time at the station. Just before the baby was born, Ernie lost his job due to a change of company executives, and except for odd jobs was out of work. Our second son was born at home on May 6, 1941, at 10:30 p.m. and weighed 7 lbs. Those assisting Dr. V. M Sevy were my mother, the next door neighbor, Alice Anthony, and Ernie. An interesting thing happened just 10 minutes before the baby was born: The bed broke down, the doctor lifted the mattress down on the floor and that's where the baby was born. When I looked at my baby, all I could think of was a sweet little rose bud so we started calling him Buddy. He was blessed, Buddy Lee, September 7, 1941, in the Springville Third Ward, Kolob Stake, by his father. He was a shy tender hearted child, very easy to teach and enjoyed being clean. As Buddy grew, he idolized Gary and loved waiting on him. Ernie wasn't out of work long. He soon got a job with American Express for Union Pacific Railroad. It was a good job and he was very happy with it. He also worked part time at another service station. We got along fine for a few months. We managed to get our first radio and a new living room set. Then World War II broke out and everything started changing. The shortages began; the first big one was rubber you couldn't get tires and we had been caught with very poor ones. For lack of tires and available parts, we sold the car. The young men were being drafted into the service and Ernie was draft age. My two brothers, Frank and Pierce, were both in the service as were Ernie's brothers, Lloyd and Ivan. It seemed the best thing to do was to get me and the children closer to our parents so that if Ernie had to go in the service, I could manage. We had two little boys and were expecting again. Ernie managed to transfer to the Union Pacific Railroad yards in Provo. In December, 1942, we moved to Springville into Valeria Averett's basement. Housing was scarce and we were lucky to find what we did. We had no bathroom and had coal stoves. The rationing began. We had stamps and points for scarce items. Sugar, shoes, meat, gas and many things like shortening and soap could rarely be found. Wages were good but commodities were high and scarce. There was a lot of worry and sadness all around. Our third son was born July 17, 1943, in the Payson Hospi¬tal. He was three weeks early and weighed 6 lbs. 6 oz. I felt so blessed to have my husband with me for the birth of our baby so many of the other mothers were alone. We had to get special gas rations to take me to the hospital and bring me home. We didn't have a car and had to borrow my parents' car to get back and forth. Our baby was born on Ernie's brother Lloyd's birthday so we named him Dennis Lloyd. He was blessed September 5, 1943, in the Springville First Ward, Kolob Stake, by his father. He was a small dainty baby with a big appetite. We were happy with him and very glad to have our family together. We now had three beautiful sons. As it turned out, Ernie's job was essential to the war so he was frozen to his job for the duration and was never drafted. After about a year, we found a house with a bathroom down on Main Street so we moved. While we lived here we took our first vacation. Ernie could get free passes on the Union Pacific train so we left the children with Grandma Holt and went to Hollywood to visit my sister, Grace, and her husband. We were gone less than a week, but we were sure glad to get back to the children. Ernie was bucking rivets at the railroad yards. He would often get burned and wasn't too happy with his job. Because of the men being drafted, there were job openings in the stores so Ernie took a part time job at Safeway as a food clerk. He loved that kind of work. We bought our first home in 1944 in a housing area in Springville called "Brookside". It was a 3 bedroom frame with a full basement and a coal furnace. It was a $6,000 home and we got in for $50.00 down. It was a big chance to take, and many people thought we were foolish. After living here for awhile, the war finally ended. Ernie quit his job at the rail¬road and went full time for Safeway in Springville. The child-ren were old enough to be left with a baby sitter until Ernie came home from work at night, so I got a job as a waitress at Brown's Cafe. Ernie worked days and I worked evenings. We lived there a little over two years. During that time, we took the children on their first vacation to Yellowstone Park. We both felt a need for a little more ground so we could have a garden where our boys could learn the joy of planting and raising their own vegetables. The value of our home had increased so we sold our home and bought 1/2 acre on 700 South in Springville and started to build. It was a hard struggle. Many things hadn't come back on the market since the war. We did a lot of the work ourselves and learned a lot "the hard way". We had a water right and a big garden. The back of our property joined Ernie's parents' property. We received much good advice from Grandpa Holt about planting. We also had a dog named "Cubby" and raised rabbits. I worked evenings in Kapp's Cafe. Ernie made rapid progress with Safeway. He was soon made Assistant Manager and was transferred to the Provo store. I became pregnant and got so sick I had to quit my job. Two months before the baby was due, Ernie was made Manager of the Mt. Pleasant Safeway store. He left immediately and started house hunting. I sold our home and prepared to move. We moved to a big, old fashioned home in Mt. Pleasant in June, 1949. After a long wait, our fourth baby, a lovely 8 lb 13h oz. baby boy, was born August 23, 1949, in the Mt. Pleasant Hospital. He had mucus in his lungs and we had a problem with him for about 24 hours; then he got along fine. He was a shy beautiful baby with slightly curly, golden hair. We were delighted with him and so were his brothers. I had a favorite cousin, Ray Butler, who was on a mission at the time so we named him Ray after him, and Dean because we liked it. He was blessed Ray Dean by his father on September 25, 1949, in the Mt. Pleasant South Ward, North Sanpete Stake. When the baby was six weeks old, I started having stomach problems. It turned out to be gall stones. In January, 1950, I had surgery in the Mt. Pleasant Hospital and had my gall bladder removed. It took a few months to recover. Due to the added expense of doctor bills, we got behind financially so in the Fall of 1950 Ernie and I worked in the evening for a short time at the Moroni turkey plant picking turkeys. Our stay in Mt. Pleasant was delightful. We loved the people there. The children loved school. Gary and Buddy both played baritones in the Hamilton School band. They also had paper routes. Dennis started school there and also took snare drum lessons. I was band mother and served as counselor in the Relief Society and the MIA. I was also active in civic clubs (Jaycee Ettes, LaIcos, and Lady Lions) and built floats for parades. Ernie was a counselor in the MIA and was active in the Boy Scout program. He was also president of the Junior Chamber Of Commerce and belonged to the Lions Club. In 1951 he received the DSA (Distinguished Service Award) for outstanding young man of the year. Ernie was very successful in the store. In November, 1952, he was transferred to a larger store in Springville. We had to close our home in Mt. Pleasant as there was no sale for it at that time. We bought a home back on "Brookside" again and moved back to Springville. After several months, we sold our home in Mt. Pleasant for what we owed on it. We were also expecting another baby. On March 14, 1953, our baby was born in the Payson Hospital; a lovely 6 lb. 82 oz. boy. He was born 3 weeks early, had mucus in his lungs, and was put in an air lock for 24 hours until he was breathing properly. We named him Kelly Butler because he was born so close to St. Patrick's Day, and my maiden name was Butler. He was blessed by his father May 3, 1953, in the Springville Sixth Ward, Kolob Stake. Kelly was a very good baby, smiled very easily and had a happy disposition. He brought a lot of joy to our home. While we lived there, Ernie was on the Scout council. I was a visiting teacher in Relief Society. Gary and Buddy were both active in the Boy Scouts, receiving many advancements. Buddy was made a member of the "Order of the Arrow", a very select group of Boy Scouts. We bought an accordion and Buddy started taking les¬sons. Gary graduated from Jr. High and started driving a car. He also started working for Safeway in Spanish Fork. Ernie continued to do well with Safeway. In the Spring of 1955, he was transferred to a bigger store in Tooele. We were a little reluctant to move; we had just fixed up our home, both our folks lived in Springville, and the children were doing well, but it meant a lot to him so we gave up and moved again. Our first home in Tooele was a white frame home on Parkway with a beautiful big back yard. Tooele was less than half LDS and was quite a transient community due to the Army Depot. We knew that raising children there would be quite a challenge. In November, 1955, I took Kelly and went to Seattle with my brother, Pierce, and my mother and dad to see my brother, Jay get married. On July 7, 1956, Ernie's mother, Altha Elnorah Holt, passed away. We lost a lovely mother and grandmother. We all missed her so much. The following January his father, Enoch Alphonzo Holt, got hit by a car. He ended up in the hospital with a broken lea. He was still there when he passed away on April 30, 1957, from a blood clot. In August that same Summer (1957) we took all of the chil¬dren on a camping trip up Spanish Fork Canyon. We pitched a tent, fished, and were having a delightful time when Buddy got shot in the back with a 22 short shell. In a state of panic we rushed him to the Spanish Fork Hospital. We learned the bullet had just missed his heart and had lodged in his lung. He stayed there a few days and then we transferred him to the Tooele Hos¬pital. We were so very thankful the Lord had spared our son. He carried the bullet for a year; then we had it removed in the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City. That same year on October 17, 1957, we were blessed with another beautiful 7 lb. 142 oz. baby boy, born at Tooele Valley Hospital. We named him Steven (with a "v") Wayne. He was blessed by his father December 1, 1957, in the Tooele Tenth Ward, North Tooele Stake. Stephen was my grandfather's name and we just liked Wayne. He was a good baby, loved attention, and got plenty of it. His brothers adored him and we all enjoyed spoil¬ing him. When he was 6 months old, he began having convulsions and was hospitalized. We ended up taking him to a brain special¬ist in Salt Lake. It was determined that he had a vein injury in his head at birth and would have to be under strict medication until his growth could take care of it. He was under care and medication for 2 years, but never had another convulsion after he was 9 months old. He gave us all some scary moments. Gary had reservations about leaving Utah County. He gave up a nice girl friend and a good job in Spanish Fork to move. While in Tooele, he belonged to the National Guard and drove the compressor truck and was also a member of the drill team. We watched with pride as he graduated from High School and Seminary. He was active in the church, holding the office of an Elder. He was a good boy, very independent and ambitious. He enrolled in trade school in Salt Lake but soon quit and took a full time job at Alta Ski Resort. It was there that he met Sue Pat Kingsley, the girl he married November 7, 1959. We had mixed emotions but they had our blessing. Our children are the most precious things in our lives and we had so hoped for a Temple marriage for each of them. Jobs for the youth were very scarce in Tooele. We had a good friend and neighbor, Ethel Halgren, who worked at a pub¬lishing company called "The Tooele Bulletin". She was instru¬mental in getting our boys jobs there. The oldest five boys all had turns working for them. Some delivered papers and some worked on the press. Our Stake President, Alex Dunn, owned the business. His son, Joel Dunn, managed it. These choice people provided jobs as well as counsel for our boys. We shall always be grateful for this experience. Buddy adjusted to the move a little better. He was well liked and had many friends. He was active in church and did well in school, earning his letter in tennis. He was also a repre¬sentative at Boy's State. He graduated from Seminary and High School and then went to BYU for a year. In 1960 he received a call to the North British Mission. It was something he had always wanted and we were all very happy. He left for England in mid November, 1960. Dennis didn't care much for school tho we tried very hard to keep him interested. He enjoyed being mischievous and gave us many anxious moments. I prayed constantly for him, but he didn't seem to want what we wanted for him. In his junior year of school, he quit and joined the Air Force. In 2 months he was home again with an honorable discharge. He went to work for the Tooele Smelter. By now we were grandparents; Gary and Sue had a baby girl named Gretchen. Ray was playing a baritone in the school band and Kelly was taking accordion lessons. On June 28, 1961, my father passed away. He had been ill a long time but it was so hard to give him up. We loved him so much. It was a great loss. Buddy had become very close to him while he was attending BYU. It sure was hard to tell our mis¬sionary the sad news. Ernie continued to do well with Safeway, winning many con¬tests and getting many congratulations from the company presi¬dent. On November 14, 1961, (Ernie's birthday), they opened a new supermarket and Ernie was the manager. He had reached his goal and we were all very proud of him. The Boy Scout program was very weak in our ward in Tooele. Ernie took on the job of Scoutmaster and did all he could to get it organized. I taught Primary for a while, then served as work director counselor in the Relief Society. I was also secretary of the MIA and worked in the Parent Teachers Association. In March, 1962, we moved to a beautiful new home which we had built on Brook Street. That same Summer we bought a vacation trailer. In November, 1962, Buddy returned from his mission. His girl friend, Gwen Lynn Phillips, had waited for him. On January 11, 1963, they were married in the Logan Temple. That evening they had a beautiful big church reception. In April, 1963, Dennis married Alice June Maestas. Later that same year, Gary and Sue got a divorce. There were two chil¬dren; Gretchen and Nicholas. Sue got custody of the children. In the Fall of 1963, we opened a little business called "The Spudnut Shop". I was manager; Buddy and Gwen helped me. It turned out to be a costly experience. We dumped it a year later. On January 18, 1964, my mother married Dewey 0. Nelson. She had been so lonely since Dad had passed away. Dewey was good to her and we all enjoyed his company. In the Spring of 1964, totally unexpected, Ernie was trans¬ferred to a smaller store in Magna. When school was out that year, I sold our beautiful new home and moved to Magna. While we lived there, Ray and Kelly got interested in raising racing pigeons. We would take the birds a great distance and they would always find their way home. The boys also entered them in the fairs and received some ribbons. It proved to be a great sport. On October 18, 1964, Gary married Judith Louise Schow, a girl friend from Eugene, Oregon. Ernie was in his late 40's and had a little less than 2 years to go with Safeway until he had earned "Vested Rights". This would secure our retirement and provide for the future. It didn't turn out that way. In the Summer of 1965, completely without reason, Ernie was relieved of management, reduced to a food clerk, and transferred to Orem. I've never seen him so hurt. There was a lot of prestige and good money in management. There was also a lot of pressure so maybe it was a blessing. In December, 1965, we moved to a new home in Orem. This proved to be a good move and a blessing in many ways. The chil¬dren did well in school, made good friends, and were active in the church. We took Kelly up to Kearns every week for accordion lessons for a while. He was playing in an accordion band. In the Summer of 1966, Kelly went to California to compete in the Western States Accordion Festival. The trio he played in took 3rd place. We sure enjoyed hearing him play. The children were nearly raised, so feeling a need to help supplement the income, I went back to work. I worked as a clerk at Cornet, a variety store in Orem. In 1968, Ernie quit the company he loved and went into management training for Cornet. He trained in Tooele, then managed a store in Pocatello, Idaho. In 1970, he was transferred to the Orem store. I stayed in Orem with the children and kept my job. When he got the Orem store, it was against company rules for us to be in the same store so I was let go. While Ernie was in Pocatello, Kelly had emergency surgery for release of torsion suspension. Ray graduated from Seminary and from Orem High in 1967, went to BYU for a year, then to Utah Technical School where he earned a degree in electronics. He also worked for Safeway. He was deeply religious, a clean quiet boy always respectful to us. On June 12, 1969, he married his high school sweetheart, Jeana Rose Rowley, in the Salt Lake Temple. They had a lovely garden recep¬tion that evening at her home. We enjoyed many Summer vacations most of them at Hebgen Lake in Montana. My brothers had boats and campers and we had a trailer. We would take our families and everyone that could, would go for a week every year. Four of us had motorcycles. The cousins had a great time water skiing. They loved pulling tricks on Uncle Pierce. We enjoyed fishing, gathering mushrooms, visiting around the bon¬fire, and baking goodies just unforgettable fun! This went on for over 10 years until most of the children were raised. It had been a tradition in the Butler family to camp up Spanish Fork Canyon every Fall for the deer hunt. This has been going on for over 30 years. I think it could have been my father who started it. I remember him being up there with us long after he was unable to climb the mountains. All relatives and many friends joined us from time to time. They nearly always got their deer, usually on Billy's Mountain. It was mostly a men and boys camp, but some of the women joined them for a few days every season. We'll always have some special memories of God's great outdoors and our family together. We also had many enjoyable trips with Mother and Dewey. They loved to travel, eat out, and stay in motels. We went to Las Vegas and saw some nice shows. We also went to Elko, Ely, and Jackpot many times. Every time their health would permit and we could get some time off, we would go for a couple of days. Once again I'm glad we moved to Orem and thankful we could help them enjoy their later years. In the Summer of 1970, I went to work for the W. T. Grant Co. in Provo as a clerk. I was also secretary of the Sunday School. In 1971, Kelly graduated as an honor student from Orem High and from 4 years of LDS Seminary. He received a scholarship and went to BYU for a year. A couple of years prior, he had earned his Eagle Scout award. He was working for Safeway and was very active in the church. We tried hard to live up to his expecta¬tions. We knew that he was mission material and in the Spring of 1972, he was called to the Japan Central Mission. It was quite a coincident: He already had 2 cousins in the Japan West Mission. In June he left for the LTM in Hawaii, spent 2 months there, and then went on to Japan. That same Spring, Ernie was transferred to a bigger Cornet store in Cedar City. Both Steven and I felt that we just couldn't give up everything and move down there. I kept think¬ing of the scripture "Whither Thou Goest I will go", and finally gave in to the move. We sold` our beautiful home and bought one in Cedar City. We also bought a new truck and camper. Steven worked at Cornet for his dad and made pretty good money. He got some new guns and a new motorcycle. He was lonely, didn't liket being away from his Orem friends, and didn't like school. Kelly felt that he could not return to Cedar City from his mission. Mother was sick a lot and I was going back to Springville every other week. The move to Cedar had been a costly mistake. It was decided that I would go back to Orem and make a home for the a boys, and Ernie would follow as soon as he could. In June, 1973, we sold our home in Cedar City and rented a small one in Orem while a new one was being built. We were trying so hard to get Steven interested in church and school again. In July, 1973, I went back to work for W. T. Grant Co. In October that same year I was visiting up at deer camp. I went on a motorcycle ride with Bob Parkinson (my niece's husband). We met a car on a curve and had to go over the side of the road. The motorcycle landed on my left leg. It was quite badly hurt from the knee down. It was a very painful ordeal. I was off work for 6 weeks. I ended up with an ulcer on my ankle and had it bandaged for 4 months. Because of Ernie's great concern over us and lack of interest in his store, he lost his job. We really felt like we were being tried. I was down with my leg, Ernie was out of work, it was just 6 weeks until Christmas, and we had a missionary to support. Before I got back on my feet, Mother had a bad spell with her heart and was in the hospital for some time. I remember going on crutches to see her. Ernie got another job in the Physical Plant Department at BYU. The wages were low, but we were glad to get the work and it was a job where we wouldn't be forced to move. I also went back to work and before long things were going better again. On January 4, 1974, my mother had a heart attack and passed away. What a precious person she was. Never in my whole life have I felt such a loss. God gives you one mother and when she is gone, there is nothing in this whole world to fill the empti-ness. I am so thankful that we decided to come back to Orem so that I could be near and spend more time with her. In February, 1974, we moved to our new home, which is where we are living now. We worked hard getting it landscaped and fixed up for Kelly's return. He returned from his mission in June. It was nice having him home again. He enrolled at BYU and went back to work for Safeway. On November 15, 1974, Kelly married Janese Richardson in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. She was our neighbor and had waited for Kelly while he was on his mission. The next evening they had a nice church reception. In the Spring of 1975, the W. T. Grant store closed it's doors. I didn't lose any time; I went right to work for Skaggs Drug and helped open a new store in Orem. During the next four years we enjoyed some nice trips to Reno. We would drive out there and meet Judy and Gary and spend a few days together. We stayed in motels and saw shows in Reno and Tahoe. It was a lot of fun. On April 29, 1977, Steven married Melanie Soulier, a girl he had met in high school. They were married in the LDS Church by Bishop Larry King. They had a nice church reception that same evening. All of our boys stood with Steven as he was mar-ried. It sure was a handsome sight If only it could have been in the Temple. With our last son married, we were alone now. Ernie was still working full time at BYU and part time at Norton's food store. I was still working full time at Skaggs. As for our health, I've had problems with heart fibrilation and have been hospitalized several times ('62, '67, '73, '77, '81). I've had both medical and electric conversions. I had eye surgery for a closed tear duct in 1972. In 1981, I was hospitalized with viral pneumonia in both lungs. Ernie had cataract surgery on one eye in 1967 and then had the same surgery done on the other eye in 1975. This left him with rather limited vision and a need for wearing heavy glasses. In 1981, we learned that they could implant lenses in the eye. In August of that year, he had a secondary implant on one eye, followed 2 months later by the same operation on the other eye. We were delighted with the result; He can actually see without glasses. I worked for Skaggs until September 1981. Ernie was near¬ing retirement so I started drawing Social Security in October. We hadn't looked forward to Ernie's retirement birthday but it turned out to be real special. Our children, Bud and Gwen, Dennis and Alice, Ray and Jeana, Kelly and Janese, and Steven and Melanie, took us out to dinner complete with a retirement cake. Gary and Judy live out of the state and couldn't come. We sure love and appreciate our children. On December 1, 1981, Ernie was officially retired from BYU and started drawing his Social Security. The Physical Plant at BYU gave him a nice luncheon, a wristwatch, and an engraved plaque. He couldn't have been treated nicer. We find ourselves wishing we had started working at BYU much earlier in our life. He continued to work part time at Norton's food store. A little about our children: As of Spring 1984, Gary and Judy live in Eugene, Oregon, and they have 2 children. Gary also has 2 children by his first wife. Gary is a Battalion Chief for the Eugene Fire Department. Bud and Gwen live in Tooele. They have 10 children. Bud works for the Transcript Bulletin Publishing Co. and runs a little business of his own: Holts Carpet Cleaning Service. Their oldest son, Scott, is serving a mission in Japan. Dennis and Alice live in Salt Lake City. Dennis works for the city. They have 4 children. Their oldest son, Albert, is married and has a baby boy and their second oldest son, Dennis Jr., was just recently married. Ray and Jeana live in Orem. They have 4 children. Ray is district manager for Frito Lay. Kelly and Janese live in Orem. Kelly works for Safeway. After much waiting, hoping, and praying they were blessed with a little boy. Steven and Melanie live in American Fork. Steven is working at Pacific States Steel. They have a baby girl. Since our retirement, we have been fishing and camping sev¬eral times with my brothers and their wives, and my sister and her husband. Other members of the family have joined us when they could. We've had some very enjoyable times together and hope that as more of us retire, we can get together more often. We have also driven up to Eugene, Oregon, and spent Thanksgiving with Gary and Judy and their family. We've been to Las Vegas with Grace and Hap and seen some shows. At present, we are spending our time going to church we go quite regularly. Ernie is a home teacher and I am a visiting teacher. We take a lot of walks together, work in the yard, play games, make quilts, and do other home projects. We enjoy visits from the children and grandchildren. We have 24 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild. We have a very good marriage. After all these years, I still get excited when Ernie comes home. Ernie has been a good husband and father. We've had hardships and trying times but feel we have grown because of them. Our greatest accomplishment in life is our children. May God bless each one of them to live good, clean lives and be as good a man as their father has been, and may we always be blessed with love and respect for each other. FAMILY SHEET Thelma Butler married Ernest Voyal Holt June 28, 1938 Gary Ernest Holt married Sue Pat Kingsley November 7, 1959 Gretchen Marie(Divorced) Nicholas Gary married Judith Louise Skow October 18, 1964 Lisa Ann Christopher Lee Buddy Lee Holt married Gwen Lynn Phillips January 11, 1963 Buddy Scott Cindy Lynn Kristine Michael Ernest Kerry Dean James Lee Rebecca Terisa Rachelle Debra Kay Dennis Lloyd Holt married Alice Maestri April 27, 1963 Albert DeWayne Holt married Jean Elizabeth Hardy Anthony Clark Dennis Junior married Kimberly Westerman Tina Marie Clifford Ray Ray Dean Holt married Jeana Rose Rowley June 12, 1969 Jeremy Ray Jenifer Jean Rhonda Rose Jeffrey John Kelly Butler Holt married Janese Richardson November 15, 1974 Joshua Kelly Steven Wayne Holt married Melanie Soulier April 29, 1977 Amanda Nicole 6 children 24 grandchildren 1 great grandchild OUR THOUGHTS OF MOM I have only vague memories of my early childhood when we lived in Uncle Vaughn's basement, the basement behind Grandpa Holt's house, and our first Brookside house. The times I remember more clearly about my childhood, started about the time we moved to Mr. Pleasant. I remember the big house we had and the big tree that leaned over the garage. We had many happy times there. Bud and I used to play in that tree for hours at a time. I didn't realize until many years later how much time and effort Mom and Dad devoted to their children and how blessed we kids were to have such fine parents. Mom was band mother and was the driving force behind the Hamilton School Band getting new uniforms when Bud and I were in the band. Mom and Dad were both active in church, scouts, and service organizations. I remember most of the floats Mom helped design and build would win prizes. Dad was awarded the distinguished service award. There were happy times, although we were far from rich in material things, we boys always seemed to get what we thought we needed. We had more than an ample supply of love and parental support. I remember Mom and Dad both working nights picking turkeys at a poultry plant to help make ends meet. I had a happy childhood and always felt very secure. Mom and Dad were always there when I needed them but allowed me the freedom I required to make my own decisions and mistakes. During my adolesence, I know I created some concern for Mom and Dad but, they always had patience and wisdom to help and guide me when I had problems. Even now, after being on my own for many years, I know I have their blessing and support, and can call on them if I had a problem. I have tried to use the same values and guidelines for my children that they used in raising me. I will always be grateful for their love and support. Even though distance separates us at this time, I feel a special closeness to them and know that God must have a special place in heaven for such fine parents. Gary Since I live in Oregon and Mom lives in Utah, my thoughts and memories are probably quite different from the other daughter in laws. The times we've spent together have been vacations joint trips to Reno or Disneyland, our visits to Utah, and Mom & Dad's trips to Oregon. The special characteristic I've seen in Mom has been her tremendous capacity to try, and enjoy, new things. We've spent time fishing for salmon in the Pacific Ocean, riding the sand dunes in beach buggies, going on rides at Disneyland, feeding the walrus at Sea World, feeding the slots in Reno, discovering the cemetery at Virginia City, fishing at Hebgen Lake, strolling through the Dan Diego Zoo, tromping through the forests of the Oregon Cascades, watching an outdoor play during the summer at Sundance near Orem, watching Liberace on stage at Lake Tahoe, and much, much more. However, the time I remember and cherish most comes during our visits to Utah. Every morning Mom, Gary, and I get up real early just to visit before we get involved in each hectic day. Those quiet times together have been very special and it's been when we've really gotten to know and love one another. Judy My most vivid recollections of Mom are memories of a dedicated and very efficient homemaker. I cannot remember a time when her home was anything but a place of perfect order. It seemed to be her number one i objective to make her home a nice place to be. Our clothes were always clean and pressed long before we needed them. We were never ashamed to bring friends home because we knew they would be treated well and would t enjoy being in our home. Mealtime was always something to look forward to at home. It was never treated as just 'something to get over with'. It was a special time of day and we looked forward to a special treat. For some reason it was even fun to help with dishes at home. I still consider Mom to be one of the finest cooks I know. Mom always made a fuss about occasions such as Jr. Proms and Sr. Hops. She would spend hours with us making sure we got that special white sportcoat or new suit or whatever we needed for that special night, Because of her we were always ready when that big night arrived. She was always there to make sure that everything matched and fit properly. Most important of all she was always there to tell us how great we looked before we left. When it came to doing for her boys Mom always gave 100%. (I must admit, this is much easier to see in retrospect than it was at the time.) I remember when Gary & I were in the Hamilton School Band, Mom spent many, many hours sewing band uniforms for us and the other members of the band. This was a big task, but it was important to her because it was important to us. This was typical of the support we received in everything we did whether it was music, archery, hunting, tennis, or church. We were never pressured to participate, but when we decided to, the support was there. I feel it was a great privilege to have been raised in a home like ours. We had a father who believed in the gospel of hard work. One who has always done an excellent job of supporting his family. We had a mother who centered her life around home and family. I think her crowning glory will be the fact that she made her home a nice place to be. We have been taught some great lessons on sacrifice and hard work by our parents. If everyone could be raised in a home such as this, the world would certainly be a better place in which to live. Buddy L. Holt My thoughts of Mom go back to time even before Bud do I went together. She has always seemed like such a lady to me, always in complete control of herself. I admire her for raising 6 boys and always being able to keep her t home In perfect order. I have never been in her home when anything has t been out of place. Most of all I love Mom and Dad for raising such a fine person as my husband. It is because of them that he is what he is. They must be pretty special parents to have raised such a great group of husbands for us girls. Thanks Mom and Dad. Love, Gwen About the earliest I could remember is back to when I was about 3 years old we lived in a house where our yard would connect with Grandpa Holt's yard and we had a dog his name was Cubby. He was a lot of fun. Mom was really a good cook. I think that's why we were always in good health. I loved those homemade cinnamon rolls and bread and the raison cookies and the and divinity candy and many, many other things that she would cook up. I really enjoyed eating everything she would cook. I remember many nights that Mom and I would kneel by my bedside and she would help me say my prayers. When I was about 4 1/2 years old we moved to Mt. Pleasant where Dad was the manager of Safeway. We lived in a big old house with a big back yard. We had a dog named Rags. He was a lot of fun. He could climb the tree in the back yard. I started school here at the Hamilton School and Gary and Bud were in the band. I think they played the Baritones. The Christmas's here really had a lot of meanings to me. We would spend many nights setting around our big Christmas tree and sing songs. A lot of people would go around caroling. I remember the floats that Mom used to spend so many hours working with other people to make for the parades. I remember one float especially. They took one of those deep old flour box drawers, the kind you used to have in the kitchen, and centered it on the float and filled it with candy to throw out to the people. I was the one elected for that job, but I think I was kind of selfish for I ate more than what I would throw out. It was also here in Mt. Pleasant when I learned the meaning and value of work. Gary, Bud, & I would ride bikes about 5 miles outside of town to a bar cafe about 5s00 a.m. so that we could be the first among several kids. We would wait there for 2 to 3 hours for the owner to come and pick 2 or 3 of us to clean the restaurant. We would each make 25¢ or 50¢. I remember going to the show with a quarter and have a soft drink and popcorn and a candy. It was also here during the month of August 1949 that Mom went to the hospital and returned a few days later with our baby brother Ray. He was a blessing to us all. For a long time after that I thought that Mom went to the hospital and gave the doctor her order for a baby and wait there until he could make one. I remember one time when Uncle Pierce and Aunt Elisa came out to visit. Mom was way out in the back yard and. P. H. had one of our B. B. or pellet guns, I can't remember which, but he hollered to Moan to bend over for a target. She did, and like a true hunter and sportsman he took aim, fired, and hit bonanza. I think he thought the gun was empty. We soon left Mt. Pleasant and moved back to Springville. Mt. Pleasant holds a lot of happy and loving family times for it was like living in Payton Place. I give Mom special thanks for the love and religion she placed into our lives and to Dad for his support and teachings for without them both we would only be half the men that we are today. With all my love and May God Bless Dennis L. Holt As I look back over the years, a lot of memories come back of a lot of different things. The stories that could be told are not as important as the lessons learned of which the more. Important lessons taught me by Mom are to do things myself and be held accountable for my own actions and projects. She has taught se to think things through before I act so I can be proud of my accomplishments and projects when I finish. She has taught me to respect people for what they are, and who they are. It is because of these lessons and others that I've enjoyed the success I've had in my life. Together with Dad's influence she has taught me bow to survive in what could have been a tough old world.I A grateful son Ray My thoughts of Mom are: She is always concerned about her kids and there welfare. She is always there to help them and show them love. She would do anything for her children and grandchildren. Mom has always been a wonderful cook. I remember the times she would cook a big Thanksgiving meal for her family, and how fun it was to get all together. She has always had a very clean and beautiful home. I have had many special times shopping and tieing quilts with Mom. One day when I was at the mall I ran into Mom and she bought me lunch and we talked, it was nice. When Ray and I were first married we played many card games with Mom and Dad and had a lot of fun times. One time Mom send I had to be on jury duty together and it was nice being together and we went to lunch and made a day of it. I want to thank Mom and Dad for raising such a wonderful man for me to marry, they taught him well. Thank You. Love Jeana If a person is lucky, he has the chance to grow up with both of his parents and share many of life's experiences with them. I have had that good fortune and I count it as one of my greatest blessings. For the purpose of making a contribution to this little section at the end of Mother's personal history, I would like to relate just a few experiences which I have had with Mother that really stand out in my memory. I learned about fear through an experience I had at Mom's side. I was jut a young boy in about the third grade at the time. We were living in the Parkway home in Tooele. It was early one morning, and I was home alone with mother. Dad had gone to work, my older brothers were off to school, and I was just getting ready to leave for school. Mother was in the bathroom working on her hair. Suddenly, I heard Mom moaning in pain. I went into the bathroom quickly to see what was wrong. There was a look of panic on her face which I will never forget. She told me to run next door and get Carol. I imagine I made it from our side door to Carol's back door in about two seconds: Carol was sitting at her table with one of the other neighbor ladies and I would imagine that I surprised the heck out of them as I came barging in yelling and screaming that my mom was sick. They ran back over home with me and started making phone calls and working with Mom. I remember Mom telling them that she felt as though someone was squeezing her chest and she could hardly breath. As the ladies worked with Mom and made phone calls, I slipped over to one of the chairs in the living room and started praying. This is where I learned the difference between praying out of habit and praying with real intent. I remember pleading with Heavenly Father over and over again to let my Mom be all right. Shortly, the situation calmed down quite a bit and the ladies urged me to be off to school. I remember sobbing as I walked over to school. I walked into my classroom a little bit late with red eyes. My teacher (who happened to be my cousin, Lea Mae Averett, that year) asked me what was wrong and tried to comfort me. Later in the day, Lea Mae came to me and told me she had called my home and that everything was just fine. It turned out that Mom was not seriously ill and she returned to her normal life for several weeks. For a long time after that, I didn't ever want Mom to be left alone. I remember figuring out everybody's schedule in my little mind to make sure that there would always be someone home with Mom. My little boy mind had suddenly come to realize that mothers are not invincible; They really could get seriously ill without much warning. That thought frightened me. A few years later, Mother and I shared another experience where we both shed hundreds of tears. Mom and Dad operated a Spudnut Shop at the time. I was down at the shop one evening helping Mom clean the donut racks. We got a call from Ray, who was home alone; He said that our little dog had been run over and was dead. Little dogs can be a devastating loss to a little boy: In this case, it was a major loss to our whole family. Nicki was a neat, neat dog. As Mom hung up the phone and told me the bad news, we hugged each other and cried. We cried our way through most of the rest of the evening. That was a hard experience for me to go through and I had a hurt that wouldn't go away for a long time. I'm glad that Mom was there because it helped to have someone close who shared many of the same feelings about what had happened. To share recreational activities with Mom is to have fun, fun, fun. When it's time to play, Mom really lets her hair down. Now that I'm married, most of the experiences that I have with Mom and Dad are of this type; We've had a lot of fun. If you ever hear a couple of people out in the middle of a lake whooping and hollering and carrying on, it's probably Mom and one of her brothers and they probably have two fish on at the same time, and have got their lines all tangled up. Nobody has more fun on a fishing trip than Mom. Nobody has more fun hitting a jackpot in Nevada than Mom. Nobody gets more excited about a fast game of cards than Mom. It's fun to be around her at times like I these and have some of the excitement rub off. Four or five years ago, Janese and I took an overnight trip out to Wendover with Mom and Dad to see what it was that kept drawing them out there. It only took one trip for me to see the general principle: You drive for a couple of hours, you eat a lot of good food, and you have a little fun together. Then, you drive another couple of hours to get home, but once you're home, you're much more able to cope with the worries and anxieties of everyday living. If you've never seen Mom hit a Jackpot, you need to: A couple of years ago, I was on a fishing trip with Mom and Dad and some of the aunts and uncles. Janese and I were fishing two or three hundred yards away from the campers. Mom and Dad and the aunts and uncles were over by the campers puttering around. After a while, we started hearing a little laughing which gradually turned into a lot of laughing. Within a few minutes, you could hear more cackling than you would hear in a hen house and it was all coming from inside one of the campers. It turned out that they had all jammed into the close quarters of one of the campers and were filleting a bunch of fish. They were having a ball together and it was neat for us to stand a ways away and see how much fun they have when they get together. I've been able to share hundreds of other experiences with Mom over the years. I've been glad that she was there to share some of life's hard times. And, I've been thrilled to share in her excitement over some of the fun and exciting times. I only hope that life will give us a million more experiences to share together.I Kelly Holt It seems like I have known Mom most of my life. I met her when I started dating Kelly, but really got to know her better after Kelly had gone on his mission. I used to go visit with Mom often. One time I went to see her and she was making an afghan. She showed me how to make one too. We usedI to talk about a lot of things while we worked on our afghans, including Kelly's mission and how he was doing. Shortly after Kelly went on his mission, Mom moved to Cedar City with Dad. She wasn't sure that it was the right thing to do but Dad was i promoted to a new store and Mom wanted to be as supportive of him as she could, so she moved to be by his side. I really did miss her and our visits. At Christmas time, I went to Cedar City with Ray and his family to see Mom and Dad. Bud and his family also came. I remember how Mom was busy preparing things in the kitchen and making sure that everything was all right. Most of us slept on the living room floor in sleeping bags. Mom was there to make sure everyone was comfortable. We all had a great time. I can remember when Mom came back to Orem and found a house to rent while a home was being built. Dad was still in Cedar City at the time. Mom went up to deer camp one evening and was injured while riding a motorcycle. She was on crutches for several weeks and could not work. During this time she had a lot to be concerned about. Many things seemed to be going wrong, but Mom looked at it all as a challenge. Her leg took quite a while to heal and I'm sure she was in a lot of pain, but she didn't complain. She was always trying to see the bright side of things and felt that there was a blessing in each hard experience. When Grandma Butler died, I believe it was the hardest time of Mom's life. She had spent so much time with her mother and had had so many wonderful experiences with her. One of the reasons Mom moved back to Ores was because her mother became ill and Mom wanted to be closer so that she could help her. Theirs was a special and very dear relationship and Mom felt a great loss, but she knew she had to go on with her life and she did. She has a great many wonderful memories of her mother and cherishes I each and every one. When Kelly and I were first married and we were trying so hard to have a baby, Mom shared our anxieties with us. When, after several years of trying, we did become pregnant, we couldn't wait to tell Mom and Dad. They were both so excited. Mom would come home from work from time to time with little articles of baby clothing that had come loose out of a package or were slightly soiled. She thought that we would like to have them. They were both so supportive of us. When we first brought Joshua home from the hospital, Mom came over and showed me how to bathe him. He was so small and I was so inexper¬ienced. I was grateful to have Mom there to show me what to do. She made me feel at ease. Shortly after Joshua was born, my father had a heart attack and spent some time in the hospital recovering. Mom knew that I wanted to be with him and she watched Joshua for me so that I could go. When I was threatening to miscarry, Mom was there to help. I knew that she had gone through one before and that she knew what I was going a through. She was there when I needed someone to talk to and to let my motions out. I had to go right to bed, as the doctor ordered, and Mom watched Joshua for me. When I did miscarry, mom was there again for me. She was a great comfort and I'm glad she was close by. One of the things I admire most about Mom is her complete organization. She has the ability to "get things done and tidy. She can set a goal for herself and she sticks with it until she accomplishes her goal. I have seen her do this time and again. As many birthdays and special days as there are, she has never missed a one. When we go to see "Grandma" and "Grandpa", Joshua always gets so excited. He loves to see them and considers them some of his best friends. As each day goes by and I share more experiences with Mom, I find that` she becomes more and more dear to me. I am proud and grateful to have her as a Mom. Janese Holt Mom has really helped Steve and I out in so many ways. She's a real good mother, and a very special grandmother. She has always shared a lot of love, time, and care with us. She is always there when we need her. Steve, I, and Mandy have always enjoyed going over to visit. Mom sure has a lot of patience, especially when it comes to making her great peanut brittle. She has to show me over and over again how to make it. Mom is a fantastic candy maker and good cook. Steve remembers all the special moments at home, and all their fun trips when their family would go to Hebkin, and also times when they would go to Las Vegas to Circus Circus. It meant so much to us. How she has helped us out. When we had our little girl, and the beautiful quilts she made for us. Mom sure has set a good example for all of us. Her bright smiles, her loving touch, her "I love you" always means so very much. When times get hard and we get all uptight, her special way of knowing everything will be alright. Fishing is the funnest time of the year, grab the pole and gear. Look, football is on, turn it up louder Dad so we can hear. Bring out the cards, Grace and Hap just called, they will be here in a short time. Sis and I will beat you for the 10th time. Well, thanks a lot for all you have done. Because to us, Mom, you'll always be #1. Steve & Mel Holt

A Personal History of Christopher Franklin Butler, with Addendum by Lucille Butler

Contributor: F D Dennis Created: 2 years ago Updated: 11 months ago

Personal History of Christopher Franklin Butler I Christopher Franklin Butler was born of goodly parents on 18 Jan 1917 in a small home on the north side of the canel ¼ mile west of Grandpa Butlers home between Spanish Fork and Salem Utah. Dr. Hagen came out in a horse and buggy during a severe snowstorm to make the delivery at home. The Dr. was paid with $25.00 worth of muskrat hides. Dad did some trapping and duck hunting when he couldn’t find work or when the farm work was done. Dad and Mother salvaged the feathers from the ducks Dad killed and made feather pillows and feather mattress for the family. I was the third child of Christopher Lorenzo Butler and Reba Hutchings Butler. My older two brothers had died shortly after birth. Stephen Lorenzo was born 7 June 1913 in Hiawatha, Utah and died 8 June 1913 and was buried in Springville Utah. Milton was born 9 June 1914 in Victor Idaho and died 9 June 1914 and was buried in Victor Idaho. I was blessed in Spanish Fork Utah by Isaac E. Brockbank on 6 May 1917. After I was born Dad helped build a little larger home on a piece of ground below the canel which belonged to Grandpa Butler which caused considerable feelings in the family. I can remember we had to carry our water for everything from a spring about 200 feet from the house. Our water was heated on a wood burning stove and the washing was done on a wash board in a large tub. We had a lamb as a pet, it grew faster than I did, Dad had to dispose of it because if would bunt me in the back and knock me down, when I got up it would bunt me down again. I can remember Mother being chased by a colt in the pasture next to the house, she crawled under the fence to get away from him. Mother was trying to herd him from the garden. There was friction between my folks and the Grandparents over the property the house was built on, we moved to Victor Idaho and lied with Grandpa and Grandma Hutchings when my sister Thelma was born on 22 April 1919. Grandpa was a bishop at that time. I can remember the spanking I got when I threw a rock and broke a window in Grandpas house. The family moved back to Spanish Fork and lived in the house Dad helped build on Grandpas farm. I remember we had a good-sized patch of watermelons. We had trouble keeping people from stealing them. In the corner of the melon patch the weeds had covered a melon no one had noticed, when we found it in the fall it turned out to be several times larger than any of the others and was very delicious. I remember Dad and I taking a wagonload of very nice melons up on the highway and selling them to people going y for 10 c each. I recall going cat fishing with Dad with the horse and buggy down to Utah Lake. We brought the fish home in a gunny sack—Dad spent hours skinning them. On another occasion we went Bass fishing with the horse and buggy over to Salem pond and I stepped on a floating log while Dad was fishing and fell in. that ended the trip as Dad wrapped me in a horse blanket and took me home. My brother Pierce Hutchings was born 13 March 1921 in Spanish Fork, a year later my sister Grace was born on 21 June 1922 in Spanish Fork. For a number of years I looked forward to Grandma Butlers Christmas present. It consisted of a pair of long black wool stockings she had knitted, she would include a silver dollar in the toe. She was very proficient in her knitting and a hard worker. I remember her working in the fields along with the men, pitch hay, top beets, milk cows etc day light till dark. Grandpa and Grandma Butler were very stern and expected everyone to go the extra mile. Mother and Dad still had problems trying to get along with the Grandparents. It wasn’t long before the family moved back to Victor Idaho. Our only means of transportation was by train. This time we kids came down with the Chicken Pox on the train thus we were quarantined for some time after we got there. The folks had a hard time making ends meet, Mother washed on the washboard for the hotel and made pies for the café in the pool hall. Later we were able to get our first washing machine (used). We ran it by turning a wheel about two feet in diameter by hand. Dad worked on farms, cut timber, Forest Ranger for awhile, Powder man at a rock quarry. Here he broke his foot and was on crutches for awhile. We used wood for fuel, Dad was splitting blocks of wood when the ax handle hit a block behind him and he cut his left forefinger, I thought he had cut it off—I looked for it around the chopping block. When Dad returned from the Doctor he said he held it together with his right hand and the Doctor sewed it back on. I had a dog named Ted, Dad made a harness and we trained him to pull me around in the winter on a sleigh. One night he strayed, we found him later he had been poisoned. The winters were long and cold in Victor Idaho. On 12 Aug 1924 my brother Royal Christopher was born. He was another “blue” baby and died the next day. He was buried in the Victor Cemetery next to his brother Milton. Grandpa and Grandma Hutchings were very good to us, we went out to their place on various occasions. I can remember riding on the derick horse for Grandpa during hay time. That was when I first noticed I would get hay fever which made me somewhat inactive during the summer months. While in Victor we moved around about six times. For one season we moved over to Swan Valley on the dry farm where we raised a crop of grain. Here we had to haul all our water in big barrels in the buggy for about five miles. On one occasion Dad and I became scared as the horse almost run away when a bolt of lightening hit a big telephone pole which burst into splinters by the side of the road. I was a Trail Builder in the Primary program which I enjoyed. I started school in Victor at the age of 7, my first grade teacher was Miss Clare Adams. I was baptised 3 Oct 1925 by William H. Humble in a pond developed from a cold cold spring at my Grandpa Hutchings farm just out of Victor. I was confirmed 3 Oct 1925 by Jim Thomas. I remember Uncle Leo Hutchings, Mothers only brother, he was the first person I can think of who gave me money for doing something for him, he was the apple of my eye. Uncle Leo’s daughter Helen by his first wife and I went to school together while in Victor. I completed the first and second grades in the first year. It seemed Mother and Dad tried everything to make ends meet. They decided to manage the café (Butlers Café) part of the Killpack Hotel in Victor. Aunt Grace, Mothers sister and Uncle Harry Ballard managed the hotel part, the drug store on the corner was run by some one else. We moved into a house next door to the Café. My folks had a lady tend us while they both worked in the café. Things seemed to be better for awhile, we even bought some new furniture. There seemed to be a lot of friction between Mother and Aunt Grace, being in business close together just didn’t work out. After completing the third grade in Victor in 1926 our family sold everything and moved back to Spanish Fork Utah—we rented the “Cornaby” house in town. Once again Dad was looking for work, any kind of work. All of us tried to do what we could, we worked part time on Grandpas farm south of town, I wore out a pair of roller skates going back and forth on the new cement highway. Dad tried many things, the best one was with Willis Brockbank as a plumbers helper. Dad purchased a cow which gave us milk for the family, later he bought a Ford truck on time, he tried to pay for it by hauling produce and fruit down to Mt. Pleasant and peddling it door to door—Thelma and I helped. It didn’t turn out profitable so he turned the truck back. I attended the fourth and fifth grades at the Central School in Spanish Fork. It was the early part of 1928 when things were slim and Dad had a difficult time finding work to supply our needs. Aunt Olive, Dads only sister and Uncle Frank (Pete) Peterson who lived in Mutual Coal Camp in Carbon County where he worked in the coal mine. Uncle Pete seemed to think Dad could get on at the mine. Dad went up and went to work at the Mutual Coal Mine. After a short while Dad found two small rooms in the last house in Martin which is in the community above Mutual. Six of us moved in and a little later Uncle Alma, Dads brother, joined us in the two small rooms. Life in the coal camps was a lot different from what we were used to. The Winters up there were very severe. We had to walk every where—about two miles to the store, almost three miles to Rains to school where I went to the sixth grade. The first winter my sister Thelma got pneumonia we almost lost her. That first Christmas we had there, I received a scout knife and a pair of long black wool stockings with a silver dollar in the toe from Grandma Butler. The next summer we moved about half a mile down the canyon closer to the store where I had my first Birthday Party. A little later we moved to a four room home which was by the store and half mile from the school in Rains. In the winter time we had to obtain our drinking water from the ending on the freight train twice a week, the other water was unsafe and some times the pipes were frozen. Living accommodations for the miners were scarce so Mother had no problem in getting two boarders for awhile, the extra money sure helped our situation but it was extra work for Mother. They were looking at a 1929 chev six cylinder, we were on cloud nine. The effects of the 1930 depression were in full swing. Dad being involved in a contract in the mine didn’t get laid off. We felt blessed that Dad still had a job. On 4 March 1930 Dad was involved in a mine accident that broke his back. We didn’t realize at the time that his days of full time employment were over. He spent the next six months in the Holy Cross Hospital in Salt Lake City. Following the accident Dad was in a coma for several days, had pneumonia which settled in his back. Being no public transportation in the coal camps mother had to rely on someone to take her to Helper where she boarded the train to Salt Lake to see Dad. When she made these trips we children were left alone. It was trying times for all of us. The company let us stay in the house rent-free for over two years, the meager compensation we received monthly was our only income. Our leisure time in the coal camp was something else, no radio, TV was unheard of and no church. Our many friends were of many nationalities. Besides the household chores we played games of all kinds, went on hikes, played ball and sometimes we got in mischief such as stealing an apple or peach from the door-to-door peddler when he left his truck. I delivered the Salt Lake Tribune daily for over two years. I would walk to school then walk on the paper route, I had many blisters on my feet from walking. My earnings went to pay my dentist and for a cornet which I learned to play while attending the 7 to 9 grade at Latuda school. I enjoyed playing in the band. I played a cornet solo one year in the state music contest held at Price Utah. I was awarded second place. My sister Thelma borrowed a school instrument and played in the Latuda band. In October 1931 my sister Lois was born. It was sure different to have a baby around again, but we sure enjoyed her. Dad was home all the time now recovering from his injury. In Jan 1932 Lois got pneumonia and died. She was buried in Springville next to her brother Stephen Lorenzo. During the summer time we would hike over the hill to a stream called beaver creek. We would catch a few fish then return home. Before Dad was injured, we went over there several times with friends. In Oct that year Dad borrowed a rifle, we hiked over the hill to beaver creek to hunt deer, my first deer hunt. We stayed overnight, I remember trying to sleep in a heavy coat by the fire, while Dad kept a fire going all night, everything was covered with frost the next morning. We didn’t see any deer until we were well on the way home. We ran into the tracks of buck and doe, Dad knew what to do to intercept them in the next little draw. We had to run a little ways to get in a good spot, sure enough Dad could see them. He drew down and one shot we had a four point buck. The deer was way too big for Dad and I to drag or carry. I stayed with the deer and Dad backtracked to our trail home and intercepted two neighbors on their way home from fishing. They helped carry the deer for half of it. I had a dog named Major which we enjoyed very much, he was very playful, he would really come unglued each night as I came home from delivering papers. That winter he became sick and had distemper, Dad had to dispose of him. One of the main things we enjoyed during the winter was sleigh riding and ice skating on the snow packed roads. Under ideal conditions we could start up in Martin and go down the canyon all the way to Helper, a distance of about 8 miles. We knew it was no no but we would generally arrange to meet someone in Helper and hook a ride home behind a car. One of our friends had a sleigh large enough for five people. The year Dad was injured I fell at school and cracked my left arm. I had to carry it around for several weeks in a sling. While in the 7-9 grades I enjoyed playing marbles which took many hours of my time. Dad taught me how to shoot marbles which he enjoyed when he was growing up. We raised a few rabbits to eat until a wild bobcat broke in the pens and killed them. A few days later our Greek neighbor lost a goat to the bobcat, they set a trap and caught the cat. We would go up the mountainsides in the summer time and gather wild sweet peas, this is what we fed the rabbits. In 1932 we decided there wasn’t any future for us at Mutual so we moved to Springville Utah. We rented a four-room home on 62 West 4th North. Now we could plant a garden and have a pig which helped the food supply for the family. Dads recovery wasn’t good so the Doctors suggested they may be able to help him by performing a bone graft. They removed a bone from his leg and spliced five vertebras together. It took another year and half or more to recover from the operation. The operation was partially successful leaving him with a 60% disability. The operation and the compensation received during recovery was the final settlement with the State Industrial Commission. Now we had to face the fact that Dad would never be able to work as he once did. We did everything we could to get along. We finally had to go on state welfare, being poor was no fun. Living in Springville was the first place we lived where we could attend church. Dad had numerous little jobs but he could not qualify for any kind of steady employment. Dad was janitor of the Third Ward for several years. Being in pain much of the time Dad could only do so much. I helped with the janitor work when possible. The folks always managed to have food, clothing and a home for the family. I have often heard people say that Mothers floors were so clean that they would not hesitate to eat off them. As we kids became old enough we did all kinds of work in order to obtain things the folks couldn’t we had to work and earn our own. In March 1934 my brother Jay Paul was born. He was delivered by Dr. V M Sevy at home. I was a junior in high school. At age 15 I was ordained a Deacon in the Aaronic Priesthood by Bsp. Peter Nielson on 25 Sept 1932. I was ordained a Teacher by Charles Boyer on 29 Jan 1933. I was ordained a Priest by Joseph Harker on 4 Feb 1934. We seemed to have our ups and downs but we were always thankful and blessed with goodly parents who had faith in us and gave us guidance. My sister Thelma and I both participated in the high school band and orchestra. We took active part in the State Band Contests and the High School Opera Orchestra. I had a number of close friends such as Lamar Friel, Gene Baker, Francis Boyer, Harold Johnson, etc. My sister Thelma and I often double dated. On a number of occasions I played cornet solo’s as various functions including Seminary Graduation and church functions. On 28 Jan 1933 I was baptized for the dead for 31 people in the Salt Lake Temple. I started driving a car a Essix Teriplane in 1934 at the age of 17, it belonged to Verl Devenish. On 27 May 1935 I rode my bicycle to Provo and applied for a drivers license. I represented our Ward and Stake in a dance team for two years at the Church’s annual event at Saltair. On 13 Jan 1935 I performed my first baptism, I baptized Phyllis Diamond, Shirley Peterson (Bishops Daughter) and Glen Fred Clark in the fourth ward. I made the first radio we had in our home. I lettered in high school, had a minor lead in the Opera “Marriage of Nannette”. In April 1935 our family moved to 171 West 2nd South Springville. Shortly after Mother came down with pneumonia, she was down for several weeks we were quite concerned. In May 1935 I graduated from high school and seminary. The following month I signed up for a correspondence course in Diesel Engineering. On 30 Oct 1935 the last day of the deer hunt my brother Pierce and I went deer hunting on one bicycle. We went just East of Springville Locked the bike to a pole and hiked up to round peak. I had borrowed a 30-40 rifle with 5 shells from a neighbor. We got a late start arrived up on round peak in the afternoon. We were coming down rock canyon when we saw two deer. After I got my wind (we had been running) I shot once and I had me a buck, my first. By the time we cleaned the deer (the first one I had cleaned) it was late. We had to go down the canyon in the dark except when the steel plant dumped slag which lit up the hill side. We arrived way late, the folks were preparing to organize a search party. The next day we borrowed another neighbor’s horse to go pick up the deer. Being the horse was hard to catch and manage we were after midnight when we returned with my first deer. On 1 March 1936 I was ordained an Elder by Arthur Condie. Our Bishop wanted me to go on a mission but my folks were unable to support me, in fact, I was helping to support the family. It seemed that I always had plenty to do, if it wasn’t cutting a lawn for someone (with a push type) it was delivering papers, going on milk delivery route, working at the cannery, cleaning the furnace at the church, band practice (I was in the summer band) various church functions. In my spare time I completed a correspondence course in Diesel Engineering. The next spring I went to Los Angeles Calif. And finished the course in Sept 1936. The folks moved again to 91 East 2nd South while I was in Calif. After I completed the Diesel course I purchased my first car, a 1928 four door four cylinder Chevrolet, it cost $95.00 in Calif. On my way home to Springville I came by way of Parker Da where my Uncle Reed lived. I had hopes of finding employment there. Being no openings, I came home, on my way, I had to stop and replace the clutch in the car before I could get home. The folks moved again to Selvoy J Boyers place about ¼ mile west of town. The next move about a year later was to 180 West 2nd North, this place I bought for $1500.00 and had the family live in it. While in the service both Pierce and I helped make payments on the home until he go marries. The next year, 1937, I went all out trying to find employment. I applied for several Civil Service jobs, one in Humbolt Nev. Almost developed, it fell through the last minute. Again, I did all kinds of work, worked at the cannery, J C Pennys, Utah Idaho Sugar Co weighing beets, etc. It was about this time that I approached Mr. Earl Cook for a job. He had Ice Cream shops in Springville, Provo, Payson, Nephi, and Richfield. I started at the bottom and worked up to be manager of the Wingate-Cook Ice Cream store in Richfield. I liked the work and learned how to make many kinds of ice cream and run the business. While in Richfield I turned my 1928 Chev in on a used 1937 Chev coupe, it cost $695.00. It took me 2½ years to pay for it. In Oct. 1938 I was home long enough to go deer hunting with Dad. Pierce, Dad and I along with two friends from Salt Lake went up Hobble Creek to Palsom Park. The year before we had good luck there, this year we didn’t see a buck but we did encounter a big brown bear. Dad and I were shooting across a small canyon, we kept shooting until he stopped, I think 29 times. When we skinned him on the spot we found 14 holes, we estimated him to weight 500 lbs. I was transferred to the Provo shop as Manager of Cooks Ice Cream. Here in addition to managing I made the ice cream mix for all five shops and the Ice Cream for there. In the fall of 1939 Mr. Cook was cutting back on personnel, I was laid off and my car was not paid for. I had a struggle the next six months to finish the payments on my car. Here I was out of work again. Mother and Dad did all they could to help. We did all kinds of work, watering and topping beets, weighing beets, blood testing chickens, labeling cans at the cannery etc. Sometimes I felt Mr. Cook laid me off in hopes I would be willing to work for a lower wage in order to finish paying for my car. Christmas that year was very thin. The following spring, 1940, by car was mine. Mr. Cook came after me to go back to work at the Springville shop. I went back for Mr. Cook until April at which time I terminated and started my own ice cream business in Spanish Fork. Franks Ice Cream became a reality in May 1940. I borrowed money on my car to make a down payment on the necessary items to get started, which I called a shoestring. I leased a building at 120 North Main in Spanish Fork, the business went well until WWII broke out. Sugar was being rationed and I was subject to be drafted. While operating my ice cream business I took flying lessons and received my private pilot’s license. Before I started my business I was dating a very nice girl from Springville, Miss Louise Patrick. She was called on a LDS mission in Calif, she returned just after I started my business. We hadn’t made any specific plans for the future so upon her return she felt her companion had to be a return missionary. Being deflated, subject to the draft for the war, losing my business etc, I decided to enlist with 125 other men from Utah, my brother Pierce and I enlisted together. We were involved in establishing the 301st Ordnance Reg in Camp Sutton NC. During the early part of 1942 one of my applications for a Civil Service job became available. Mechanic Lerner at Hill Field $50 per month. I completed this course just before entering the Army. I stayed in Salt Lake close to where I went to school at West High. I would go down home on weekends and make ice cream for the week, my sister Grace and Mother kept the shop in operation during my absence that winter. My car was left at home for the folks to use. My brother and I reported for duty at Fort Douglas Utah on 28 April 1942. That night we shipped by train to Camp Sutton NC arriving there 2 May 1942. Basic Training was a new experience for all of us, KP duty, guard duty, rifle range, live in tents, hike with pack and rifle, CQ, drill, uniforms, inoculations for everything under the sun, special details of all kinds. Our folks were very thoughtful as they wrote often, we answered when possible. When Pierce and I joined the service we wore our best clothes, well we had to wear those clothes for over two weeks before we received a GI issue. We sent the clothes home, Mother nearly had a heart attack as they were in terrible condition, we had no choice. On 25 May 1942 a group of us holding the Priesthood (a large number of returned Missionaries) held our Sunday Sacrament meeting on a little hill by camp in a wheat field. We used our canteens and mess kits in passing the Sacrament. The next Sunday a visitor Hugh B. Brown one of the church authorities joined us. On 6 June 1942 I received my first pay day in the Army $23.10. On 9 June 1942 during retreat I was informed I was promoted to Private First class. On 7 July 1942 I was transferred from Camp Sutton to the Air Corp at Shaw Field SC for exams and eligibility for Glider Pilot training. I passed all the requirements and being I had a private pilot’s license I was eligible for class A glider pilot training. On 22 July 1942 I was transferred to Lockbourne Army Air Base near Columbus Ohio, awaiting Glider training. While here I received a weekend pass to visit a close girl friend in Rochester New York, Ella Matson, a nurse in the hospital there, she was originally from Brigham City Utah. We became acquainted while I was in business in Spanish Fork. On 28 Aug 1942 I was transferred to Plainview Texas for Glider training, we staying in the Hilton Hotel. I soloed 3 Sept 1942 and passed final check 18 Sept 1942. I received my Staff Sergeant rating 12 Sept 1942—I’m really in the chips now, $144.00 per month. One 27 Sept 1942 I was transferred to 29 Palms Calif. for Glider training. I soloed 16 Oct 1942 and on 11 Nov 1942 I finished Basic training and received Glider wings insignia. Whenever I could I went in to visit my sister Grace and family in Hollywood Calif., I made numerous trips while in the area. On 15 Nov 1942 I was transferred to Fort Sumner NM, was in a Glider pool waiting further training. 7 Dec 1942 I was called home on emergency furlough as Mother was ill. Pierce was called home also. While at home I went up to Salt Lake to visit an old friend from Spanish Fork, Ned Anderson who had got married since I left for the service. We decided to go to a show, I didn’t have a date so Neds wife Detta arranged for a blind date for me with her cousin Lucille Makin. I returned to Fort Sumner NM 30 Dec 1942 and on 5 Jan 1943 I was transferred to Victorville Calif. to finish my Glider training in the large CG4A Glider. Jan thru March I was in a Glider pool waiting further training. On 9 March 1943 I went home on a 7 day furlough. While home Mother had a dinner for me which I invited Lucille Makin from Salt Lake to join us. I spent a most enjoyable evening, Lucille is the most ideal girl I have ever gone with. I baptized my brother Jay Paul on 14 May 1943. Being the auxiliary fields (dry lakes) were full of water we couldn’t complete our training. I applied for cadet training, I passed the necessary exams. On 16 April 1943 I had a weekend pass—thumbed my way home, returned 18 April, seen the folks and spent an enjoyable evening with Lucille who I thought a lot of. By the time I was able to return to base I was four hours AWOL. On 19 April 1943 I was transferred to Santa Ana Cal. for Cadet Classification and a two-week pre-flight course and many hours of marching. On 29 May 1943 the folks came down to see Grace and Hap, I received an overnight pass, I went in to see them. The next day Mother, Dad, Jay, Grace, and Hap brought me out to the base and witnessed the weekly review. On 5 June 1943 I went into Los Angeles on pass. Lucille Makin a very lovely girl from Salt Lake was here on vacation. I’m afraid I’ve really fallen for her. Leaving Lucille at Grace’s I returned to base. On 11 June 1943 I purchased a diamond for my bride to be at the P X. I went into LA on pass on 12 and 13 June. On 12 June 1943 at 2200 hours Lucille and I became engaged, she returned to the base with me. Lucille stayed for the weekly review then returned to LA and then back home the next day. On 23 June 1943 I was transferred to Oxnard Calif. for Primary A/C training. Started flight training 25 June, soloed 14 July, finished 25 August 1943 in the PT13 Steerman. On 30 Aug 1943 I was transferred to Chico Calif. for Basic training. Started flying BT13 on 2 Sept 1943. Mother and Lucille came down on the bus. We were married on 22 Oct 1943 as planned in Oliver Broomheads home in Chico Calif. by bishop Clinton E. Cox. Because of several cases of mumps my squadron was restricted to the base. I was lucky to obtain a 27 hour pass to get married. The Broomhead family were of great assistance in every way. I completed my training at Chico on 31 Oct 1943 then transferred to Douglas Ariz. on 1 Nov 1943 for advanced pilot training. Lucille came down to Douglas with two other cadet wives in a private car. I had to go by train. We had a seven hour layover in LA, Lucille met me there along with Grace and Hap. We had a few hours together before I left. I arrived in Douglas Ariz. on 1 Nov 1943, Lucille arrived on Nov in private car. Lucille and I spent our first Christmas together in our one room apartment at Douglas Ariz. I graduated on 7 Jan 1943 as a Flight Officer. Lucille and I went home on leave, later I reported for duty at Deming NM on 19 Jan 1944. I found a room for us at 516 West Fine in Deming so I sent for Lucille to join me, she arrived 4 Feb. just 2 days before her birthday 6 Feb. We have a branch of the church here, we attended whenever we could. My duty at Deming was piloting AT-11 in train9ing Bombardier Navigators. Lucille went to work at Cadet Headquarters for awhile. We purchased a 1938 Ford coupe and a 14 foot house trailer, it was home to us. The Ford wasn’t satisfactory so we turned it in on a 1939 Chev Sedan which would pull the trailer. On 13 May 1944 two friends from Utah and I flew home to Salt lake, spent a few hours at home on Mother Day then returned to Deming New Mexico. I fired the 30 M1 Carbine on the range scored expert. On 19 Sept 1944 I received my Commission as 2nd Lt. AUS S/N 0926584. (one of my goals). On 19 Oct 1944 I came home on leave for 21 days, when I returned I had a new assignment at Hobbs AFB NM where I learned to fly the B-17 Bomber. I finished B-17 transition on 26 Jan 1945. I had a delay in route to my next station so we went home. On our way while driving my car we encountered slick roads, I lost control of my car and ran off the road. I fractured the bone under my left eye when my head hit the steering wheel. Dad and Ernie came down and picked us up in Moab Utah. I had the car fixed in Moab and picked it up a week later. While home this time I changed the home in Springville to Mother and Dads name. Mother felt sure if anything should happen to me they would be left out in the cold. My next station was Lincoln Neb. where I had my air crew assigned in the B-17. While here VE day took place and our assignment was cancelled. Those pilots with 4 engine time and with over 1000 hours flight time were made Airplane Commanders on the B-29. My next duty assignment was B-29 transition at Randolph Field Texas where I had my next crew assigned and completed ground school, my copilot was Russel G. Van Helen from Saginaw Michigan. We had just started flight training when VJ day took place. Being the War was over training was stopped and I was transferred to Brooks Field Tex. and assigned to a Pilot Pool. Being I decided not to stay in the service I was transferred back to Randolph Field for release of active duty, the effective was 10 Dec 1945. At the time of my release we were living in New Braunfels Texas. Before we departed I purchased a 1938 Packard, tore it down and put in new rings and bearings then drove it home. We arrived home just before Christmas. We stayed with Lucille’s folks until fall of 1946 when we purchased a small home on 4635 Boxelder Street in Murray Utah. (Murray 8th Ward) In the spring of 1946 I reported to Hill Field for reemployment after Military Service, they offered me a job at .88/hr, I couldn’t live on that so I applied for a school furlough and worked in a training capacity for 360 days at Timmins Auto Service in Salt Lake to gain more experience. Timmins Auto Service closed its doors 60 days before I finished my training. I was unemployed until I returned to HAFB in Feb 1947 at $1.05/hr as a Jr. Equipment Repairer. In Sept 1947 I was promoted to grade 15 $1.19/hr as a Automotive Equipment Repairer. I turned the Packard in on a 1940 Chev Coupe which I drove to HAFB. I later put in on a bid sale at Tooele Depot for a 1942 Plymouth and a utility trailer, I received both. The Plymouth had to be worked over. I sold the 1940 Chev and drove the Plymouth until I turned it in on a 1950 Studebaker Champion. (my first new car) On 6 June 1947 our first son was born in the LDS Hospital. All of us were thrilled including Dad, as he was the first one to carry on the Butler name. He was blessed by me on 3 Aug 1947, we named him David Franklin after me. Shortly after David was born Lucille had a nervous disorder, Mother came to our rescue and helped take care of him which we appreciated very much. While David was a baby I was involved in a minor accident at HAFB in which my left arm was broken. I was hospitalized in the Holy Cross in Salt Lake to have it pinned. Later that same year I had a appendicitis operation in the Vets Hospital. In May 1950 I changed from Automotive Equipment Repairer to Machine Tool Repair which was my line of work I was doing before I went in the service. In 1951 I changed to GS-6 Maintenance Material Clerk, then to GS-7 Production Estimator in 1953. Our second son was born 8 May 1951 in the LDS hospital. He was blessed by me on 1 July 1951 and given the name of Ronald Lynn. While living in Murray we were not very active in the ward but we did arrange to go to the Salt Lake Temple for our endowments and have our two Sons sealed to us on 22 Oct 1952 (our 9th anniversary). We were married this time by Albert J. Elgren in the Salt Lake Temple. We enjoyed taking the boys cat fishing down to Utah Lake on weekends. We would tie a rope on David to protect him from falling in the lake, Ronald was hardly walking. We also enjoyed visiting our folks here in Salt Lake and mine in Springville whenever we could. In 1952 we decided traveling back and forth to HAFB was for the birds. After considerable consideration we decided to build a home in Kaysville. After locating a lot I arranged for Van Sanders a Contractor to build us a home at 266 East 100 No. I worked with the contractor in its construction. We sold our place in Murray and moved to our new home in Kaysville in March 1953, David was attending first grade. In 1954 my job was changed from Production planner GS-6 to GS-7 then to Production Control Specialist GS-9 in 1959. Our third son was born 17 March 1954 in the LDS Hospital. I blessed him on 2 May 1954 and gave him the name of Dan William. We had a puzzling problem with him as he cried almost constantly for three months before we solved his problem, he was allergic to milk. On 31 May 1954 I was hospitalized with a [fibrillating] heart, was corrected with medication and returned home in a few days. During 1954 and 55 I constructed our two car garage, David and Ron did what they could to help. (my first major project for the family) I purchased a table saw which helped in the garage construction also later in the finishing the basement. Being no place in Kaysville to get a saw sharpened, I purchased necessary equipment to sharpen my saws and many of my neighbors and friends. I baptized David on 6 Aug 1955. I was set apart as assistant Ward Clerk in the Kaysville 3rd Ward on 28 May 1957 by Bishop RAF McCormick. On 30 April 1958 I was set apart as Ward Clerk for the Kaysville 3rd Ward by Apostle George Q. Morris under Bishop Richard C. Bowman. On 2 June 1956 Horace Makin my father in-law died in the St. Marks Hospital in Salt Lake. Sarah Makin my mother in-law moved in with us until she passed away on 12 May 1959. The last few months she required constant care. On 26 to 28 Feb 1958 David was hospitalized and operated on by Dr. R. W. Krumbach in the Dee Hospital for a urinary tract correction. On 26 May 1958 Ronald was treated by Dr. Hales for a severe ear infection, finalized with x-ray treatments. On 10 Sept 1959 we made the final payment on our home, we have been making $55.52/month payments, some months we would make a double payment. In Jan 1960 Lucille’s nervous disorder reappeared, Dr. Madsen was able to help her with medication. On 28 June 1961 my Father passed away in the Spanish Fork Hospital, he had been ill for a long time, for the last 31 years since the mine accident Dad had been in pain and was limited in doing many many things. Dad and Mother had encountered many many hardships, we loved and miss them very much. In the spring of 1960 I purchased a 1960 ½ ton Ford truck and a Fleetwood camper which we as a family enjoyed very much. After school was out we went on our first trip. We went to Disneyland, Marine Land and up the coast thru Yosemite National Park and then home. Later that year we went on our first trip to Hebegan which became our annual vacation spot for many years. On 4 June 1959 I was ordained a 70 by A. Theodore Tuttle. While I was Ward Clerk in the 3rd Ward under Bishop Bowman I ordained David a deacon on 21 June 1959 and a Teacher on 25 June 1961. In the spring of 1962 after school was out we packed the camper and went to the Worlds Fair in Seattle Washington, the family really enjoyed the outing. I sold my Studebaker and drove my father in-laws Buick until 1961 when I turned it in on a 1961 Ford Galaxie. That same year I finished the bathroom in the basement. In the fall of 1962 I went to Maryland, Alabama and Washington D C on TDY. In 1963 I was made Cub Master in the Scouting program, that was an exciting year. On 26 May 1963 I ordained Ron a Deacon. On 23 June 1963 I ordained David a Priest, our ward was changed to 8th ward under Bishop Wallace F Allen. On 21 Oct 1963 our three sons were returning home from a weekend of deer hunting, they were involved in a auto accident, David and Dan received minor injuries totaled the car, we felt blessed as they could have been injured very seriously. In July 1963 we made a fireplace in the West end of our basement later I made it into a family room. On 8 Nov 1963 Lucille had a female operation in the LDS Hospital by Dr. J. V. Stevenson. On my birthday in 1964 I purchased a new 1964 Chev Impala from Moor Motor in Coalville Utah. Also on my birthday Mother married Dewey O. Nelson in the Salt Lake Temple. Mother was very lonely since Dad had passed away, Dewey treated us all well and we enjoyed his company. Dewey was good to Mother, they did some traveling which was new for Mother. Later that year I remodeled our kitchen, installed new sink, new cabinet doors and counter top. In Sept 1965 I purchased a 17½ foot Hydroswift boat with a 75 HP motor, our family thoroughly enjoyed this boat for many years. (water skiing, fishing and boating). On 18 Sept 1966 we purchased our first Color TV from Fame S/N LK5311. In Sept 1968 we purchased our Freezer, carpet and drapes. In May 1971 I purchased a used 1970 Honda trail 90. Pierce, Jay, Ernie and I enjoyed riding them up at Hebegan every year and some times during the deer hunt. The many many escapades we had at Hebegan will never be forgotten, water skiing, fishing, hiking, visiting, bike riding, Thelma and her thermal underwear, going after wood to keep warm and dry during rainy days, teasing Pierce, cook outs around the camp fire, Lucille’s lemon pies and her hide out between the trees, mushroom hunting for a steak dinner etc. this we enjoyed with my two brothers, two sisters and their families for many years at the Spring Creek camp ground at Hebegan. On 28 May 1972 I was ordained a High Priest by Pres. Clinton D. Zollinger. On 19 Sept to 4 Oct I was on TDY to Bedford and Dedham Mass. David our first son graduated from Davis High School and Seminary in May 1965. David was a honor student, received a scholarship to Weber State. On 22 Jan 1967 I ordained David an Elder. David received a LDS Mission call on 4 Jan 1967, entered the Mission home 30 Jan. He returned from the British Mission 5 Jan 1969. His homecoming was on 12 Jan 1969. While David was on his mission we enjoyed having his girl friend Judy Denkmann join us on many occasions. Being she was a nonmember we didn’t know what the future would be. We didn’t know it at the time but she was receiving the Missionary lessons while he was away. Upon his return she was baptized and they were married in the Salt Lake Temple on 18 Dec 1969. David returned to Weber State and graduated in May 1973. David went to work for K-Mart, not caring for their lifestyle he terminated and went to work for Anderson Lumber Company. David and Judy had two beautiful daughters, Micelle and Tiffany who we love and think a great deal of watching them grow and develop into young ladies is a joy forever. Ronald our second son graduated from Davis High School and Seminary in May 1969. Ronald also was a honor student and received a Scholarship to Weber State. Shortly after Ronald started college he joined the National Guard, went to Camp Leanerdwood Mo. for Boot Camp. On 18 April 1970 I purchased a 1970 ¾ ton Ford truck from Crandall Walker in Coalville. We sold the 1960 truck and put the camper on the new truck. Lucille and I made a trip back to Camp Leanerdwood Mo. in May 1970 to pick Ronald up from boot camp. In June we replaced the camper with a new larger unit, self contained from Carl White in Farmington, I helped in its construction. After Ronald returned from boot camp he reentered college. Ronald received his LDS Mission call to Japan on 10 Oct 1970, returned 27 Oct 1972. It was a coincidence that while Ronald was there on his Mission in Japan, his cousin Kevin was there at the same time, later two more of his cousins Kelly and Todd filled Missions in Japan. In Oct 1972 Lucille and I went on a tour to Hawaii, while there Ronald joined us on his way home from Japan from his Mission. The three of us visited the four Islands on the tour. Ronald returned to Weber State and graduated in May 1976. While attending College he met Barbara Stacey they were later married in the Logan Temple on 19 June 1974. Ronald worked for several business concerns in Idaho and Utah, later he was employed by Hercules Powder Co. Ronald and Barbara had our first grandson, Christopher Ronald named after me. Later they had a lovely daughter Camille, then another precious boy Phillip Newell. On 13 June 1965 I ordained Ronald a Teacher. On 27 March 1966 I ordained Dan a Deacon. On 21 May 1967 I ordained Ronald a Priest. On 17 March 1968 I ordained Dan a Teacher. On 22 March 1970 I ordained Dan a Priest. On 13 Sept 1970 I ordained Ronald an Elder. On 11 March 1973 I ordained Dan an Elder. On 21 Dec 1980 Ronald was ordained a 70 by Floyd Gowans. Our third son Dan William graduated from Davis High School and Seminary in May 1972. Dan was a honor student along with his brothers, received scholarship to Weber State. Dan received his LDS Mission call to Oakland Calif. on 21 April 1973, returned 24 April 1975, Married his high school sweetheart Carrie Morgan in the Salt Lake Temple on 25 June 1975. Dan graduated from college in May 1978. Dan was and is dedicated to the Automotive World, his goal was to work for General Motors which became a reality. His advancements reflects his efforts and interest. Dan and Carrie had two fine sons, Matter and Adam and then welcomed daughter Kristen. After 32 years of service for Uncle Sam I retired in March 1974. My accrued leave gave me a paycheck until Dan came home from his Mission in April 1975. Being home all the time was a questionable adjustment, I utilize my time in maintaining my home, garden and equipment, a number of my neighbors seem to require help which takes a lot of my time. During my life I have held numerous church positions such as 14 ½ years as Ward Clerk under three different bishops, MIA Counselor, Cub Master, secretary of Elders Quorum, secretary of High Priest group, assistant to High Priest group leader etc. The main sports I have enjoyed and still do are fishing and hunting, generally with the family. On one occasion on a elk hunt I went along for the ride as I didn’t have a permit. I was in the truck listening to Oct Conference on Saturday morning when I could see to spike bull elk about 150 feet away standing broad side, I turned the radio off, rolled down the window and shot both from the cab, that is sure hard on the ear drums. One of our family traditions is the yearly Oct Deer Hunt. For over 30 years the family along with numerous friends have camped near Thistle Utah for the annual event. Dad, Pierce and I were involved when it was first started, we do most of our hunting on Billies Mountain. We have become very well acquainted with that area. Many many stories can be told of our experiences on Billies Mountain. On 4 Jan 1974 my Mother passed away with a heart attack just nine days before her 80th birthday. My dear Mother was the last one of our parents to pass away. She will be long remembered by us children and many of her grandchildren and many friends. Some of the highlights of my life are; our temple marriage, received a commission as a pilot in the Air Force, own my home. Retirement, having three sons who went on Missions, graduated from college, and married in the temple and today are active and hold church positions. Dan and Ronald became Eagle Scouts, David didn’t have a chance. Our grandchildren are very special to us. Our three daughter-in-laws are gems, they have helped bring about many pleasures in our life. My family as a whole are just great. David is presently manager of Anderson Lumber in Bountiful, Ronald has a substantial position with Hercules Powder Co. and Dan lives in Rochester Michigan working for General Motors Chevrolet Division as a Technical Assistant. Since my retirement we have been up to Montana several times where Dan used to live also where he lives now in Rochester Michigan. I have finished my basement, it could be used as a apartment now. Also we have replaced some of our furniture. We belong to a travel club (Davis Antelopers), a very enjoyable group. Almost every month we go somewhere over night or out to dinner, sometimes we go on a trip. Whenever we can get together we go fishing with my two brothers and two sisters and their families. We thoroughly enjoy these family get togethers. As time goes on we home to get together more often. (My two sisters have become great fisherwomen) We have had our ups and downs but generally I feel we have had a very good marriage. We are indeed grateful and blessed to have sons who we love and are so proud of Our Family is everything. I am very thankful to have had the privilege of giving each of my sons a Fathers Blessing before going on their missions. I know I have made mistakes, I feel no one is perfect. I have tried to pass on experiences etc and set examples for my sons, I hope they can add to these examples and pass on to their children as I have tried. Ever since I was a boy scout and learned about our Flag and have served my Country in War, I have a great respect for the Colors and what they represent. Every time I see Old Glory or hear our National Anthem (which I have played many times years ago on my horn) a lump forms in my throat and tears in my eyes. I guess I’m just too sentimental. When my turn comes I have a special request, I would like to have a Military Service. Addendum to C. F. Butler’s personal history as written by his wife, Lucille Butler during August, 1990. I feel I should finish this part of Frank’s life history for future generations who might read it and wonder how he left this mortal life. Frank carried High Protein in his blood for ten years and in 1985 it became active and caused him to have Multiple Myeloma (bone cancer). He was told he had Multiple Myeloma on May 8, 1985 and as the weeks went by took chemotherapy and radium treatments, and was so sick. In Sept. 1985 he was told he was terminal with one to six months to live. He was very brave and we kept him home and took care of him. It was a heartbreaking time for all of us. He suffered so much. He had a lot of faith in his Heavenly Father and was a very spiritual man. He didn’t want to leave his family and me but knew it was his Heavenly Father’s choice. Frank was a hard worker, a good provider and was never idle. He was a great handy man and his children and grandchildren thought he could fix anything. He loved to fish and hunt. He loved fishing with his sisters and brothers and the fun times we had. It broke my heart when he left this mortal life on Feb. 8, 1986. He was my sweetheart, lover, husband, best friend a wonderful father to his sons and families. We still miss him so very much, but pray that we as his family can live worthy lives in the gospel and are grateful for eternal life and look forward to seeing him again. His loving wife Lucille This poem was in Frank’s suit pocket. It gives me comfort and I hope it will you. ALTHOUGH THE CURTAIN FALLS There comes a time for all of us When we must say good-bye. But faith and hope and love and trust Can never, never die; Although the curtain falls at last Is that a time to grieve? The future’s fairer than the past If only we believe And trust in God’s eternal care— So when the master calls Let’s say that life is still more fair Although the curtain falls.

Thelma Butler

Contributor: Pan Argo Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

Thelma Butler Holt Born April 22, 1919 Died March 12, 1995 Married Ernest Voyal Holt June 28, 1938 PERSONAL HISTORY OF THELMA BUTLER HOLT I, Thelma Butler Holt, was born April 22, 1919, in my Grandpa Hutchings' home in Victor, Teton County, Idaho. I was the fourth child and first girl born to Christopher Lorenzo Butler and Reba Hutchings Butler. My oldest two brothers had died shortly after their birth. Stephen Lorenzo was born June 7, 1913, in Hiawatha, Utah, and died June 8, 1913, and was buried in Springville, Utah. Milton was born June 9, 1914, in Victor, Idaho, and died June 9, 1914, and he was buried in Victor. My brother, Christopher Franklin was born January 18, 1917, in Spanish Fork, Utah. When I was born, my parents were living with my grandparents and Dad was helping Grandpa on the farm. I was blessed in the Victor Ward, Teton County, Idaho, on July 6, 1919, by my grandpa, Stephen Hutchings. He was bishop at that time. Shortly after I was born, my folks moved back to the farm in Spanish Fork, Utah. This farm was originally part of Grandpa Butler's farm and was located west of the highway between Spanish Fork and Salem. A few years before, my folks helped to build a small house there and had lived there for a while. On March 13, 1921, my brother, Pierce Hutchings, was born. A year later on June 21, 1922, my sister, Grace, was born. There seemed to be a little friction between my parents and grandparents over the farm property. It wasn't long before my parents gave it up and moved back up to Victor, Idaho. My folks had a hard time making a living. Dad worked on dry farms. Mother washed on the washboard for the hotel. I used to iron the pillow cases when I was only five years old. Mother also used to bake pies and sell them to the pool hall. I remember at this time Dad had a broken foot and was on crutches for quite a while. I can remember Grandpa and Grandma Hutchings and their home in Victor. Grandpa was a big impressive man. Grandma was a very small quiet woman and was always kind and gentle with me. I remember we celebrated July 4th one year. Grandpa strung red, white, and blue bunting around some trees and we made a freezer of ice cream. On August 12, 1924, my brother, Royal Christopher, was born. He was another "blue" baby and died the next day. He was buried in the Victor cemetery next to his brother, Milton. About this time, my mother's sister and brother in law, Grace and Harry Ballard, decided to manage the hotel in Victor. It was a large building that housed the hotel, a cafe, and a drug store. Mother and Dad decided to run the cafe part. We moved into a house right next door. For a while things seemed to go quite well we even got some new furniture. We had a lady tend us while Mother and Dad both worked in the cafe. I started school in Victor and went to the first grade there. I also remember going to Sunday School a few times. In the summer of 1926, my folks had a "falling out" with Aunt Grace. They sold everything and moved back to Spanish Fork, Utah. We rented the "Cornaby" house in town and Dad worked odd jobs just whatever he could find. I went to the second grade at the Thurber School. I went to the third grade at the Central School. I was baptized December 4, 1927, by Elmer Fillmore and confirmed by Gilbert A. Johnson. We spent quite a bit of time on Grandpa and Grandma Butler's farm south of Spanish Fork helping with the work. I remember picking beans, hoeing celery, separating milk, churning butter, turning the washing machine, and helping Grandma cook for threshers. Grandpa Butler was a stocky built man, very strict and set in his ways. He believed in everyone working. Grandma Butler was a German. She was a very hard worker and very bossy. It was the summer of 1928. Times were hard and Dad was having a time finding enough work. His sister and brother in law, olive and "Pete" Peterson, lived in Mutual, a coal camp, and Pete worked in the coal mine. They seemed to think Dad could get work there. Dad went up and was hired to work in the Mutual mine. Mutual was next to the last coal camp up Spring Canyon in Carbon County, Utah. After a short while, Dad was able to find just two small rooms in a house in Martin, another coal camp, for us to move to. It was the last house in the last camp going up the canyon. By winter, Dad's brother, Alma, was also working in the mines and living with us. That made seven of us in two small rooms. It was good for us to have regular income again. My parents were finally able to get me the eye glasses I had needed all my life. I was very near sighted. I'll never forget when I first got them. I could see things I had never seen before. Winters in the coal camps were very severe. We had to walk down two camps to the coal camp, Rains, to go to school. The first winter up there I got pneumonia and they nearly lost me. The next summer, we moved down the canyon to Mutual to a four room house. It was hard for the miners to find a place to stay so Mother took in two men boarders for a while. I went to the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades in Rains. We had three grades in one room. When I was in sixth grade, we had just three sixth grade students. Life in the coal camp was quite different. I had Japanese, Greek, and Italian friends. We had no car, no radio, and no church. They did organize Relief Society once and mother was a counselor, but people weren't interested and it only lasted about a year. There was a company show once a month. We played outdoor games and hiked the hills a lot. Due to boredom, we got into our share of mischief. The water in camp couldn't be used for drinking. Twice a week we had to fill containers from the train and keep it for drinking. Mother kept a very clean house. I remember bare board floors being scrubbed white. She was also a good cook and did a lot of sewing for us. We all had a lot of household chores to do. My parents were strict and made us help with the work. The affects of the depression were really being felt now. Some of the miners had been layed off. Others had been cut back. People were losing their possessions and trading work for food. We felt lucky that Dad still had a job. In March, 1930, Dad was in a mine accident that broke his back. We didn't realize at the time that his days of full time employment were over. He spent the next five months in a hospital in Salt Lake. There was no public transportation in the coal camps, so Mother had to get someone to take her to Helper to board the train to Salt Lake to see Dad. When she made these trips, we children were left alone. It was a hard period for all of us. We did get to live in our house free and receive compensation monthly from the mine. In 1931, I started the seventh grade in Latuda, the next camp down the canyon from Rains. Frank was playing cornet in the band and I was able to borrow a school instrument, so I started playing the alto horn. I really enjoyed being in the band. In October, 1931, my sister, Lois, was born. We all enjoyed her so much, especially Dad. He was home all the time still recovering from his injury. In January, 1932, Lois got pneumonia and died. She was buried in Springville next to her brother, Stephen Lorenzo. In the summer of 1932, we moved to Springville. Dad received a monthly settlement for his injury for quite a few months. He planted a garden and raised a pig to help out. We finally started going to church regular at the Springville Third Ward. Dad was janitor of the church for a while. He had several part time, easy jobs in the next few years but couldn't qualify for any kind of steady employment. He was in pain much of the time. In March, 1934, my brother, Jay Paul, was born. We all enjoyed our new baby brother. After a while, the settlement from the mine was paid in full and we didn't receive monthly checks anymore. Dad wasn't capable of working full time so we went on state welfare. We seemed to always be quite poor, tho we never wanted for a warm clean house or food to eat. If we wanted more than that, we had to work and earn our own. I did a lot of sewing and made most of my clothes. Mother taught me to cook, sew, embroider, and how to take care of things. In spite of all our problems, I always felt blessed that the Lord had given me such good parents. We had a good respectful home life. I went to school in Springville for the next five years. I became active in the band and orchestra, playing cornet and string bass. I looked forward to going to the band contests and also playing in the opera orchestra. I started dating when I was in ninth grade. I went to nearly all of the formal dances, having earned and made my own formals. I loved the ball games and played in the Pep band. I had to work much of the time. I had house cleaning jobs, did baby sitting, worked in the cannery, picked fruit, worked in the fields, and dusted school rooms. My best girl friends were Ardell Angus and Donna Harmer. We took turns sleeping at each others house and had a lot of fun together. I had several boy friends and used to love going to the dances at high schools nearby and Utahna and Rainbow Gardens in Provo. When I was a senior, I started dating Ernest Holt. He had quit school the year before, to go to work. He came back in the middle of my senior year to finish so he could graduate. School was a lot of fun after that. He walked me home after school and I used to do a lot of homework for him. We dated and went to all of the school Functions together. His folks didn't have a car and neither did mine, so we usually walked or double dated with his boy friend. I graduated from Springville High School and LDS Seminary in 1937. Just before graduation, Ernest went to Southern Utah with his father to prospect for gold. He was gone several weeks. By then our relationship was quite special, so I was real disappointed that he didn't take me to graduation. I ended up going with Les Ford, who was from Provo. In those days it was generally expected that you support yourself after you finsh Finish school. I was eager to try and wanted to go to the big city. I went to Salt Lake and got a job working in a home for five dollars a week plus board and room. During the next eight months, I worked in three different homes doing washing, ironing, cooking, and housework. I usually had a day and a half off per week. By then, Ernest had come back from his prospecting trip and was trying to find work. Jobs were scarce and it wasn't easy. He finally found one in a gas station in Salt Lake. We continued dating and had fun together. My girl friend, Ardell, had married Owen Ford and they lived in Salt Lake, so we spent a lot of time with them. In January, 1938, Ernie gave me a diamond. In the spring, Mother got sick and I felt a need to go home and help out. I also wanted to sew and get some things ready for my wedding. I was able to get a job in the Mission Cafe in Springville and move back home. Ernie quit his job and financed another prospecting trip with his father, to the Henry Mountains. His father had a claim down there and felt he would find gold. He never did. When Ernie came back, we decided things weren't getting much better so we would take our chances and get married as soon as we could. We wanted a Temple marriage and a church reception. Neither of our folks could help much financially, so we knew much of it would be up to us. I remember my brother, Frank, helped pay for the orchestra. I made my own dress. Ernie rented his clothes. We payed for much of it a whole year after we were married. It took some planning and some help from other family members. I married Ernest Voyal Holt, son of Enoch Alphonzo Holt and Altha Elnorah Turner Holt, on June 28, 1938, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple for time and eternity. George F. Richards Jr., of the Council of the Twelve, performed the ceremony. I was 19 years old Ernie was 21. The people who accompanied us to the Temple were my mother, Ernie's sister, Valeria, and her husband, Evon, and Ernie's friend and partner at work, Milton Bush, and his wife, Louisa. We were very glad to finally be married. We had gone together for two years and had been engaged for six months. We had a wedding reception the next evening in the church in Springville, Utah. I made me a nice wedding dress, rented a veil, and had bridesmaids. We had an orchestra, danced, and served refreshments. It was modest but nice. An interesting thing; after the reception, Ernie wheeled me down the middle of Main Street in a wheelbarrow, with a crowd of people following. The next morning we moved to our first home, a small fur¬nished apartment on "B" Street in Salt Lake City, Utah. The rent on this place was $27.00 a month. We had very little to start out on, less than $5.00 between us, so we had to charge our first groceries. Ernie had worked two weeks for free in order to get his first job at Mac Hale's gas station. He made $2.00 a day for 10 and 12 hour shifts and worked every day of the week. I soon discovered we were expecting a baby and we couldn't afford this place any longer, so I set out to find something less expensive. We moved several times that first year, when¬ever I could find a place that would save a few dollars. I always looked for furnished apartments within walking distance of work, sometimes as close as 3 blocks and at other times as far as 5 miles one way. We had no car or furniture, just a cedar chest. I did the laundry on the washboard in the bathtub. I Every 3 or 4 weeks I would pack the laundry in suitcases, walk to the Orem train station, and take the train to Springville to visit my parents. The Orem was a one car electric commuter train that ran on tracks from Salt Lake to Payson several times. Because of being pregnant, I was usually sick when I arrived. Mother would get me over my violent sick stomach, help me with laundry, and occasionally we would bottle fruit; then I would take the train back to Salt Lake. We didn't know how we could afford a baby on wages we were making, but the Lord does provide. Ernie got a fifty cent a day raise just before the baby was born. We lived in an apartment on Wall Street by the State Capitol for our first Christmas. I'll never forget it. We were all alone, we weren't able to go home, but we did get a nice present. We paid $5.00 down and got us a $49.00 washing machine. I think it was the most beautiful present I've ever received. We still lived on Wall Street when our first son was born. He was born at home on April 16, 1939, at 2:30 a.m. a beautiful 8 lb. boy. Those helping were Dr. V. M. Sevy, my mother, my girl friend, Ardell Ford, and Ernie. We named him Gary Ernest after his father. He was blessed August 6, 1939, in the Ninth Ward, Liberty Stake, in Salt Lake City by his father, Ernest Voyal Holt. Gary was a good natured child, very smart and eager to learn. He wasn't afraid of people. He was the first grand¬child on my side of the family. I remember my father was so proud of him that he bought him his first pair of shoes and used to show him off to everyone. We couldn't have been happier. We soon managed to buy a baby buggy on time and I would walk down and meet Ernie after work at midnight. It was about 20 blocks away. I would window shop in the downtown area until he got off work; then we would walk home wheeling our baby up Capitol Hill. Many times we had big holes in the soles of our shoes and we would wear cardboard inserts in them. Maybe once in two weeks we would splurge and buy a 5~ ice cream cone. Our recreation was mostly walking, visiting friends, and an occasional trip home on the Orem to see our folks. (Money was extremely tight in the 30's. Most everyone was in the same situation.) Mother would come up and visit whenever she could, usually riding the Orem. She loved to come to the city. Often we would sleep three in a bed because we didn't have an extra bed. After the baby was born, we felt we could get by in a smaller, less expensive place again so we moved to a one room apartment with a kitchenette where we shared the bath with three other tenants. That didn't last long; we soon found bedbugs and got out of there in a hurry. We moved to another one room place and bought a fridge. About this time Ernie changed jobs. He started driving a big gas truck, delivering gas for Co op. We also got another break; we were able to move into a nice apartment in the Wilson Hotel, and work part time for our rent. Ernie worked on the switchboard and I took my baby in a walker and cleaned rooms a couple of hours a day. We also bought our first car, an old Model A ford. We lived there about six months until we were expecting another baby and I was too sick to work. About this time, Ernie went to work in a Co op service station as manager. We moved into an unfurnished duplex up on Chase Avenue. We bought secondhand furniture a couch, a bed, a set of drawers, a breakfast set, a new mattress and springs all for about $100.00, and paid for it by the month. I bought a used sewing machine for $5.00 and made all our curtains, spreads, baby clothes, Gary's clothes, and even sewed rags and braided rugs. I had one change of maternity clothes and washed them out at night. When I was 5 months pregnant, I went to Springville and had all of my teeth out. About this time, Ernie started driving Taxi for Yellow Cab Co. part time and worked full time at the station. Just before the baby was born, Ernie lost his job due to a change of company executives, and except for odd jobs was out of work. Our second son was born at home on May 6, 1941, at 10:30 p.m. and weighed 7 lbs. Those assisting Dr. V. M Sevy were my mother, the next door neighbor, Alice Anthony, and Ernie. An interesting thing happened just 10 minutes before the baby was born: The bed broke down, the doctor lifted the mattress down on the floor and that's where the baby was born. When I looked at my baby, all I could think of was a sweet little rose bud so we started calling him Buddy. He was blessed, Buddy Lee, September 7, 1941, in the Springville Third Ward, Kolob Stake, by his father. He was a shy tender hearted child, very easy to teach and enjoyed being clean. As Buddy grew, he idolized Gary and loved waiting on him. Ernie wasn't out of work long. He soon got a job with American Express for Union Pacific Railroad. It was a good job and he was very happy with it. He also worked part time at another service station. We got along fine for a few months. We managed to get our first radio and a new living room set. Then World War II broke out and everything started changing. The shortages began; the first big one was rubber you couldn't get tires and we had been caught with very poor ones. For lack of tires and available parts, we sold the car. The young men were being drafted into the service and Ernie was draft age. My two brothers, Frank and Pierce, were both in the service as were Ernie's brothers, Lloyd and Ivan. It seemed the best thing to do was to get me and the children closer to our parents so that if Ernie had to go in the service, I could manage. We had two little boys and were expecting again. Ernie managed to transfer to the Union Pacific Railroad yards in Provo. In December, 1942, we moved to Springville into Valeria Averett's basement. Housing was scarce and we were lucky to find what we did. We had no bathroom and had coal stoves. The rationing began. We had stamps and points for scarce items. Sugar, shoes, meat, gas and many things like shortening and soap could rarely be found. Wages were good but commodities were high and scarce. There was a lot of worry and sadness all around. Our third son was born July 17, 1943, in the Payson Hospi¬tal. He was three weeks early and weighed 6 lbs. 6 oz. I felt so blessed to have my husband with me for the birth of our baby so many of the other mothers were alone. We had to get special gas rations to take me to the hospital and bring me home. We didn't have a car and had to borrow my parents' car to get back and forth. Our baby was born on Ernie's brother Lloyd's birthday so we named him Dennis Lloyd. He was blessed September 5, 1943, in the Springville First Ward, Kolob Stake, by his father. He was a small dainty baby with a big appetite. We were happy with him and very glad to have our family together. We now had three beautiful sons. As it turned out, Ernie's job was essential to the war so he was frozen to his job for the duration and was never drafted. After about a year, we found a house with a bathroom down on Main Street so we moved. While we lived here we took our first vacation. Ernie could get free passes on the Union Pacific train so we left the children with Grandma Holt and went to Hollywood to visit my sister, Grace, and her husband. We were gone less than a week, but we were sure glad to get back to the children. Ernie was bucking rivets at the railroad yards. He would often get burned and wasn't too happy with his job. Because of the men being drafted, there were job openings in the stores so Ernie took a part time job at Safeway as a food clerk. He loved that kind of work. We bought our first home in 1944 in a housing area in Springville called "Brookside". It was a 3 bedroom frame with a full basement and a coal furnace. It was a $6,000 home and we got in for $50.00 down. It was a big chance to take, and many people thought we were foolish. After living here for awhile, the war finally ended. Ernie quit his job at the rail¬road and went full time for Safeway in Springville. The child-ren were old enough to be left with a baby sitter until Ernie came home from work at night, so I got a job as a waitress at Brown's Cafe. Ernie worked days and I worked evenings. We lived there a little over two years. During that time, we took the children on their first vacation to Yellowstone Park. We both felt a need for a little more ground so we could have a garden where our boys could learn the joy of planting and raising their own vegetables. The value of our home had increased so we sold our home and bought 1/2 acre on 700 South in Springville and started to build. It was a hard struggle. Many things hadn't come back on the market since the war. We did a lot of the work ourselves and learned a lot "the hard way". We had a water right and a big garden. The back of our property joined Ernie's parents' property. We received much good advice from Grandpa Holt about planting. We also had a dog named "Cubby" and raised rabbits. I worked evenings in Kapp's Cafe. Ernie made rapid progress with Safeway. He was soon made Assistant Manager and was transferred to the Provo store. I became pregnant and got so sick I had to quit my job. Two months before the baby was due, Ernie was made Manager of the Mt. Pleasant Safeway store. He left immediately and started house hunting. I sold our home and prepared to move. We moved to a big, old fashioned home in Mt. Pleasant in June, 1949. After a long wait, our fourth baby, a lovely 8 lb 13h oz. baby boy, was born August 23, 1949, in the Mt. Pleasant Hospital. He had mucus in his lungs and we had a problem with him for about 24 hours; then he got along fine. He was a shy beautiful baby with slightly curly, golden hair. We were delighted with him and so were his brothers. I had a favorite cousin, Ray Butler, who was on a mission at the time so we named him Ray after him, and Dean because we liked it. He was blessed Ray Dean by his father on September 25, 1949, in the Mt. Pleasant South Ward, North Sanpete Stake. When the baby was six weeks old, I started having stomach problems. It turned out to be gall stones. In January, 1950, I had surgery in the Mt. Pleasant Hospital and had my gall bladder removed. It took a few months to recover. Due to the added expense of doctor bills, we got behind financially so in the Fall of 1950 Ernie and I worked in the evening for a short time at the Moroni turkey plant picking turkeys. Our stay in Mt. Pleasant was delightful. We loved the people there. The children loved school. Gary and Buddy both played baritones in the Hamilton School band. They also had paper routes. Dennis started school there and also took snare drum lessons. I was band mother and served as counselor in the Relief Society and the MIA. I was also active in civic clubs (Jaycee Ettes, LaIcos, and Lady Lions) and built floats for parades. Ernie was a counselor in the MIA and was active in the Boy Scout program. He was also president of the Junior Chamber Of Commerce and belonged to the Lions Club. In 1951 he received the DSA (Distinguished Service Award) for outstanding young man of the year. Ernie was very successful in the store. In November, 1952, he was transferred to a larger store in Springville. We had to close our home in Mt. Pleasant as there was no sale for it at that time. We bought a home back on "Brookside" again and moved back to Springville. After several months, we sold our home in Mt. Pleasant for what we owed on it. We were also expecting another baby. On March 14, 1953, our baby was born in the Payson Hospital; a lovely 6 lb. 82 oz. boy. He was born 3 weeks early, had mucus in his lungs, and was put in an air lock for 24 hours until he was breathing properly. We named him Kelly Butler because he was born so close to St. Patrick's Day, and my maiden name was Butler. He was blessed by his father May 3, 1953, in the Springville Sixth Ward, Kolob Stake. Kelly was a very good baby, smiled very easily and had a happy disposition. He brought a lot of joy to our home. While we lived there, Ernie was on the Scout council. I was a visiting teacher in Relief Society. Gary and Buddy were both active in the Boy Scouts, receiving many advancements. Buddy was made a member of the "Order of the Arrow", a very select group of Boy Scouts. We bought an accordion and Buddy started taking les¬sons. Gary graduated from Jr. High and started driving a car. He also started working for Safeway in Spanish Fork. Ernie continued to do well with Safeway. In the Spring of 1955, he was transferred to a bigger store in Tooele. We were a little reluctant to move; we had just fixed up our home, both our folks lived in Springville, and the children were doing well, but it meant a lot to him so we gave up and moved again. Our first home in Tooele was a white frame home on Parkway with a beautiful big back yard. Tooele was less than half LDS and was quite a transient community due to the Army Depot. We knew that raising children there would be quite a challenge. In November, 1955, I took Kelly and went to Seattle with my brother, Pierce, and my mother and dad to see my brother, Jay get married. On July 7, 1956, Ernie's mother, Altha Elnorah Holt, passed away. We lost a lovely mother and grandmother. We all missed her so much. The following January his father, Enoch Alphonzo Holt, got hit by a car. He ended up in the hospital with a broken lea. He was still there when he passed away on April 30, 1957, from a blood clot. In August that same Summer (1957) we took all of the chil¬dren on a camping trip up Spanish Fork Canyon. We pitched a tent, fished, and were having a delightful time when Buddy got shot in the back with a 22 short shell. In a state of panic we rushed him to the Spanish Fork Hospital. We learned the bullet had just missed his heart and had lodged in his lung. He stayed there a few days and then we transferred him to the Tooele Hos¬pital. We were so very thankful the Lord had spared our son. He carried the bullet for a year; then we had it removed in the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City. That same year on October 17, 1957, we were blessed with another beautiful 7 lb. 142 oz. baby boy, born at Tooele Valley Hospital. We named him Steven (with a "v") Wayne. He was blessed by his father December 1, 1957, in the Tooele Tenth Ward, North Tooele Stake. Stephen was my grandfather's name and we just liked Wayne. He was a good baby, loved attention, and got plenty of it. His brothers adored him and we all enjoyed spoil¬ing him. When he was 6 months old, he began having convulsions and was hospitalized. We ended up taking him to a brain special¬ist in Salt Lake. It was determined that he had a vein injury in his head at birth and would have to be under strict medication until his growth could take care of it. He was under care and medication for 2 years, but never had another convulsion after he was 9 months old. He gave us all some scary moments. Gary had reservations about leaving Utah County. He gave up a nice girl friend and a good job in Spanish Fork to move. While in Tooele, he belonged to the National Guard and drove the compressor truck and was also a member of the drill team. We watched with pride as he graduated from High School and Seminary. He was active in the church, holding the office of an Elder. He was a good boy, very independent and ambitious. He enrolled in trade school in Salt Lake but soon quit and took a full time job at Alta Ski Resort. It was there that he met Sue Pat Kingsley, the girl he married November 7, 1959. We had mixed emotions but they had our blessing. Our children are the most precious things in our lives and we had so hoped for a Temple marriage for each of them. Jobs for the youth were very scarce in Tooele. We had a good friend and neighbor, Ethel Halgren, who worked at a pub¬lishing company called "The Tooele Bulletin". She was instru¬mental in getting our boys jobs there. The oldest five boys all had turns working for them. Some delivered papers and some worked on the press. Our Stake President, Alex Dunn, owned the business. His son, Joel Dunn, managed it. These choice people provided jobs as well as counsel for our boys. We shall always be grateful for this experience. Buddy adjusted to the move a little better. He was well liked and had many friends. He was active in church and did well in school, earning his letter in tennis. He was also a repre¬sentative at Boy's State. He graduated from Seminary and High School and then went to BYU for a year. In 1960 he received a call to the North British Mission. It was something he had always wanted and we were all very happy. He left for England in mid November, 1960. Dennis didn't care much for school tho we tried very hard to keep him interested. He enjoyed being mischievous and gave us many anxious moments. I prayed constantly for him, but he didn't seem to want what we wanted for him. In his junior year of school, he quit and joined the Air Force. In 2 months he was home again with an honorable discharge. He went to work for the Tooele Smelter. By now we were grandparents; Gary and Sue had a baby girl named Gretchen. Ray was playing a baritone in the school band and Kelly was taking accordion lessons. On June 28, 1961, my father passed away. He had been ill a long time but it was so hard to give him up. We loved him so much. It was a great loss. Buddy had become very close to him while he was attending BYU. It sure was hard to tell our mis¬sionary the sad news. Ernie continued to do well with Safeway, winning many con¬tests and getting many congratulations from the company presi¬dent. On November 14, 1961, (Ernie's birthday), they opened a new supermarket and Ernie was the manager. He had reached his goal and we were all very proud of him. The Boy Scout program was very weak in our ward in Tooele. Ernie took on the job of Scoutmaster and did all he could to get it organized. I taught Primary for a while, then served as work director counselor in the Relief Society. I was also secretary of the MIA and worked in the Parent Teachers Association. In March, 1962, we moved to a beautiful new home which we had built on Brook Street. That same Summer we bought a vacation trailer. In November, 1962, Buddy returned from his mission. His girl friend, Gwen Lynn Phillips, had waited for him. On January 11, 1963, they were married in the Logan Temple. That evening they had a beautiful big church reception. In April, 1963, Dennis married Alice June Maestas. Later that same year, Gary and Sue got a divorce. There were two chil¬dren; Gretchen and Nicholas. Sue got custody of the children. In the Fall of 1963, we opened a little business called "The Spudnut Shop". I was manager; Buddy and Gwen helped me. It turned out to be a costly experience. We dumped it a year later. On January 18, 1964, my mother married Dewey 0. Nelson. She had been so lonely since Dad had passed away. Dewey was good to her and we all enjoyed his company. In the Spring of 1964, totally unexpected, Ernie was trans¬ferred to a smaller store in Magna. When school was out that year, I sold our beautiful new home and moved to Magna. While we lived there, Ray and Kelly got interested in raising racing pigeons. We would take the birds a great distance and they would always find their way home. The boys also entered them in the fairs and received some ribbons. It proved to be a great sport. On October 18, 1964, Gary married Judith Louise Schow, a girl friend from Eugene, Oregon. Ernie was in his late 40's and had a little less than 2 years to go with Safeway until he had earned "Vested Rights". This would secure our retirement and provide for the future. It didn't turn out that way. In the Summer of 1965, completely without reason, Ernie was relieved of management, reduced to a food clerk, and transferred to Orem. I've never seen him so hurt. There was a lot of prestige and good money in management. There was also a lot of pressure so maybe it was a blessing. In December, 1965, we moved to a new home in Orem. This proved to be a good move and a blessing in many ways. The chil¬dren did well in school, made good friends, and were active in the church. We took Kelly up to Kearns every week for accordion lessons for a while. He was playing in an accordion band. In the Summer of 1966, Kelly went to California to compete in the Western States Accordion Festival. The trio he played in took 3rd place. We sure enjoyed hearing him play. The children were nearly raised, so feeling a need to help supplement the income, I went back to work. I worked as a clerk at Cornet, a variety store in Orem. In 1968, Ernie quit the company he loved and went into management training for Cornet. He trained in Tooele, then managed a store in Pocatello, Idaho. In 1970, he was transferred to the Orem store. I stayed in Orem with the children and kept my job. When he got the Orem store, it was against company rules for us to be in the same store so I was let go. While Ernie was in Pocatello, Kelly had emergency surgery for release of torsion suspension. Ray graduated from Seminary and from Orem High in 1967, went to BYU for a year, then to Utah Technical School where he earned a degree in electronics. He also worked for Safeway. He was deeply religious, a clean quiet boy always respectful to us. On June 12, 1969, he married his high school sweetheart, Jeana Rose Rowley, in the Salt Lake Temple. They had a lovely garden recep¬tion that evening at her home. We enjoyed many Summer vacations most of them at Hebgen Lake in Montana. My brothers had boats and campers and we had a trailer. We would take our families and everyone that could, would go for a week every year. Four of us had motorcycles. The cousins had a great time water skiing. They loved pulling tricks on Uncle Pierce. We enjoyed fishing, gathering mushrooms, visiting around the bon¬fire, and baking goodies just unforgettable fun! This went on for over 10 years until most of the children were raised. It had been a tradition in the Butler family to camp up Spanish Fork Canyon every Fall for the deer hunt. This has been going on for over 30 years. I think it could have been my father who started it. I remember him being up there with us long after he was unable to climb the mountains. All relatives and many friends joined us from time to time. They nearly always got their deer, usually on Billy's Mountain. It was mostly a men and boys camp, but some of the women joined them for a few days every season. We'll always have some special memories of God's great outdoors and our family together. We also had many enjoyable trips with Mother and Dewey. They loved to travel, eat out, and stay in motels. We went to Las Vegas and saw some nice shows. We also went to Elko, Ely, and Jackpot many times. Every time their health would permit and we could get some time off, we would go for a couple of days. Once again I'm glad we moved to Orem and thankful we could help them enjoy their later years. In the Summer of 1970, I went to work for the W. T. Grant Co. in Provo as a clerk. I was also secretary of the Sunday School. In 1971, Kelly graduated as an honor student from Orem High and from 4 years of LDS Seminary. He received a scholarship and went to BYU for a year. A couple of years prior, he had earned his Eagle Scout award. He was working for Safeway and was very active in the church. We tried hard to live up to his expecta¬tions. We knew that he was mission material and in the Spring of 1972, he was called to the Japan Central Mission. It was quite a coincident: He already had 2 cousins in the Japan West Mission. In June he left for the LTM in Hawaii, spent 2 months there, and then went on to Japan. That same Spring, Ernie was transferred to a bigger Cornet store in Cedar City. Both Steven and I felt that we just couldn't give up everything and move down there. I kept think¬ing of the scripture "Whither Thou Goest I will go", and finally gave in to the move. We sold` our beautiful home and bought one in Cedar City. We also bought a new truck and camper. Steven worked at Cornet for his dad and made pretty good money. He got some new guns and a new motorcycle. He was lonely, didn't liket being away from his Orem friends, and didn't like school. Kelly felt that he could not return to Cedar City from his mission. Mother was sick a lot and I was going back to Springville every other week. The move to Cedar had been a costly mistake. It was decided that I would go back to Orem and make a home for the a boys, and Ernie would follow as soon as he could. In June, 1973, we sold our home in Cedar City and rented a small one in Orem while a new one was being built. We were trying so hard to get Steven interested in church and school again. In July, 1973, I went back to work for W. T. Grant Co. In October that same year I was visiting up at deer camp. I went on a motorcycle ride with Bob Parkinson (my niece's husband). We met a car on a curve and had to go over the side of the road. The motorcycle landed on my left leg. It was quite badly hurt from the knee down. It was a very painful ordeal. I was off work for 6 weeks. I ended up with an ulcer on my ankle and had it bandaged for 4 months. Because of Ernie's great concern over us and lack of interest in his store, he lost his job. We really felt like we were being tried. I was down with my leg, Ernie was out of work, it was just 6 weeks until Christmas, and we had a missionary to support. Before I got back on my feet, Mother had a bad spell with her heart and was in the hospital for some time. I remember going on crutches to see her. Ernie got another job in the Physical Plant Department at BYU. The wages were low, but we were glad to get the work and it was a job where we wouldn't be forced to move. I also went back to work and before long things were going better again. On January 4, 1974, my mother had a heart attack and passed away. What a precious person she was. Never in my whole life have I felt such a loss. God gives you one mother and when she is gone, there is nothing in this whole world to fill the empti-ness. I am so thankful that we decided to come back to Orem so that I could be near and spend more time with her. In February, 1974, we moved to our new home, which is where we are living now. We worked hard getting it landscaped and fixed up for Kelly's return. He returned from his mission in June. It was nice having him home again. He enrolled at BYU and went back to work for Safeway. On November 15, 1974, Kelly married Janese Richardson in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. She was our neighbor and had waited for Kelly while he was on his mission. The next evening they had a nice church reception. In the Spring of 1975, the W. T. Grant store closed it's doors. I didn't lose any time; I went right to work for Skaggs Drug and helped open a new store in Orem. During the next four years we enjoyed some nice trips to Reno. We would drive out there and meet Judy and Gary and spend a few days together. We stayed in motels and saw shows in Reno and Tahoe. It was a lot of fun. On April 29, 1977, Steven married Melanie Soulier, a girl he had met in high school. They were married in the LDS Church by Bishop Larry King. They had a nice church reception that same evening. All of our boys stood with Steven as he was mar-ried. It sure was a handsome sight If only it could have been in the Temple. With our last son married, we were alone now. Ernie was still working full time at BYU and part time at Norton's food store. I was still working full time at Skaggs. As for our health, I've had problems with heart fibrilation and have been hospitalized several times ('62, '67, '73, '77, '81). I've had both medical and electric conversions. I had eye surgery for a closed tear duct in 1972. In 1981, I was hospitalized with viral pneumonia in both lungs. Ernie had cataract surgery on one eye in 1967 and then had the same surgery done on the other eye in 1975. This left him with rather limited vision and a need for wearing heavy glasses. In 1981, we learned that they could implant lenses in the eye. In August of that year, he had a secondary implant on one eye, followed 2 months later by the same operation on the other eye. We were delighted with the result; He can actually see without glasses. I worked for Skaggs until September 1981. Ernie was near¬ing retirement so I started drawing Social Security in October. We hadn't looked forward to Ernie's retirement birthday but it turned out to be real special. Our children, Bud and Gwen, Dennis and Alice, Ray and Jeana, Kelly and Janese, and Steven and Melanie, took us out to dinner complete with a retirement cake. Gary and Judy live out of the state and couldn't come. We sure love and appreciate our children. On December 1, 1981, Ernie was officially retired from BYU and started drawing his Social Security. The Physical Plant at BYU gave him a nice luncheon, a wristwatch, and an engraved plaque. He couldn't have been treated nicer. We find ourselves wishing we had started working at BYU much earlier in our life. He continued to work part time at Norton's food store. A little about our children: As of Spring 1984, Gary and Judy live in Eugene, Oregon, and they have 2 children. Gary also has 2 children by his first wife. Gary is a Battalion Chief for the Eugene Fire Department. Bud and Gwen live in Tooele. They have 10 children. Bud works for the Transcript Bulletin Publishing Co. and runs a little business of his own: Holts Carpet Cleaning Service. Their oldest son, Scott, is serving a mission in Japan. Dennis and Alice live in Salt Lake City. Dennis works for the city. They have 4 children. Their oldest son, Albert, is married and has a baby boy and their second oldest son, Dennis Jr., was just recently married. Ray and Jeana live in Orem. They have 4 children. Ray is district manager for Frito Lay. Kelly and Janese live in Orem. Kelly works for Safeway. After much waiting, hoping, and praying they were blessed with a little boy. Steven and Melanie live in American Fork. Steven is working at Pacific States Steel. They have a baby girl. Since our retirement, we have been fishing and camping sev¬eral times with my brothers and their wives, and my sister and her husband. Other members of the family have joined us when they could. We've had some very enjoyable times together and hope that as more of us retire, we can get together more often. We have also driven up to Eugene, Oregon, and spent Thanksgiving with Gary and Judy and their family. We've been to Las Vegas with Grace and Hap and seen some shows. At present, we are spending our time going to church we go quite regularly. Ernie is a home teacher and I am a visiting teacher. We take a lot of walks together, work in the yard, play games, make quilts, and do other home projects. We enjoy visits from the children and grandchildren. We have 24 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild. We have a very good marriage. After all these years, I still get excited when Ernie comes home. Ernie has been a good husband and father. We've had hardships and trying times but feel we have grown because of them. Our greatest accomplishment in life is our children. May God bless each one of them to live good, clean lives and be as good a man as their father has been, and may we always be blessed with love and respect for each other. FAMILY SHEET Thelma Butler married Ernest Voyal Holt June 28, 1938 Gary Ernest Holt married Sue Pat Kingsley November 7, 1959 Gretchen Marie(Divorced) Nicholas Gary married Judith Louise Skow October 18, 1964 Lisa Ann Christopher Lee Buddy Lee Holt married Gwen Lynn Phillips January 11, 1963 Buddy Scott Cindy Lynn Kristine Michael Ernest Kerry Dean James Lee Rebecca Terisa Rachelle Debra Kay Dennis Lloyd Holt married Alice Maestri April 27, 1963 Albert DeWayne Holt married Jean Elizabeth Hardy Anthony Clark Dennis Junior married Kimberly Westerman Tina Marie Clifford Ray Ray Dean Holt married Jeana Rose Rowley June 12, 1969 Jeremy Ray Jenifer Jean Rhonda Rose Jeffrey John Kelly Butler Holt married Janese Richardson November 15, 1974 Joshua Kelly Steven Wayne Holt married Melanie Soulier April 29, 1977 Amanda Nicole 6 children 24 grandchildren 1 great grandchild OUR THOUGHTS OF MOM I have only vague memories of my early childhood when we lived in Uncle Vaughn's basement, the basement behind Grandpa Holt's house, and our first Brookside house. The times I remember more clearly about my childhood, started about the time we moved to Mr. Pleasant. I remember the big house we had and the big tree that leaned over the garage. We had many happy times there. Bud and I used to play in that tree for hours at a time. I didn't realize until many years later how much time and effort Mom and Dad devoted to their children and how blessed we kids were to have such fine parents. Mom was band mother and was the driving force behind the Hamilton School Band getting new uniforms when Bud and I were in the band. Mom and Dad were both active in church, scouts, and service organizations. I remember most of the floats Mom helped design and build would win prizes. Dad was awarded the distinguished service award. There were happy times, although we were far from rich in material things, we boys always seemed to get what we thought we needed. We had more than an ample supply of love and parental support. I remember Mom and Dad both working nights picking turkeys at a poultry plant to help make ends meet. I had a happy childhood and always felt very secure. Mom and Dad were always there when I needed them but allowed me the freedom I required to make my own decisions and mistakes. During my adolesence, I know I created some concern for Mom and Dad but, they always had patience and wisdom to help and guide me when I had problems. Even now, after being on my own for many years, I know I have their blessing and support, and can call on them if I had a problem. I have tried to use the same values and guidelines for my children that they used in raising me. I will always be grateful for their love and support. Even though distance separates us at this time, I feel a special closeness to them and know that God must have a special place in heaven for such fine parents. Gary Since I live in Oregon and Mom lives in Utah, my thoughts and memories are probably quite different from the other daughter in laws. The times we've spent together have been vacations joint trips to Reno or Disneyland, our visits to Utah, and Mom & Dad's trips to Oregon. The special characteristic I've seen in Mom has been her tremendous capacity to try, and enjoy, new things. We've spent time fishing for salmon in the Pacific Ocean, riding the sand dunes in beach buggies, going on rides at Disneyland, feeding the walrus at Sea World, feeding the slots in Reno, discovering the cemetery at Virginia City, fishing at Hebgen Lake, strolling through the Dan Diego Zoo, tromping through the forests of the Oregon Cascades, watching an outdoor play during the summer at Sundance near Orem, watching Liberace on stage at Lake Tahoe, and much, much more. However, the time I remember and cherish most comes during our visits to Utah. Every morning Mom, Gary, and I get up real early just to visit before we get involved in each hectic day. Those quiet times together have been very special and it's been when we've really gotten to know and love one another. Judy My most vivid recollections of Mom are memories of a dedicated and very efficient homemaker. I cannot remember a time when her home was anything but a place of perfect order. It seemed to be her number one i objective to make her home a nice place to be. Our clothes were always clean and pressed long before we needed them. We were never ashamed to bring friends home because we knew they would be treated well and would t enjoy being in our home. Mealtime was always something to look forward to at home. It was never treated as just 'something to get over with'. It was a special time of day and we looked forward to a special treat. For some reason it was even fun to help with dishes at home. I still consider Mom to be one of the finest cooks I know. Mom always made a fuss about occasions such as Jr. Proms and Sr. Hops. She would spend hours with us making sure we got that special white sportcoat or new suit or whatever we needed for that special night, Because of her we were always ready when that big night arrived. She was always there to make sure that everything matched and fit properly. Most important of all she was always there to tell us how great we looked before we left. When it came to doing for her boys Mom always gave 100%. (I must admit, this is much easier to see in retrospect than it was at the time.) I remember when Gary & I were in the Hamilton School Band, Mom spent many, many hours sewing band uniforms for us and the other members of the band. This was a big task, but it was important to her because it was important to us. This was typical of the support we received in everything we did whether it was music, archery, hunting, tennis, or church. We were never pressured to participate, but when we decided to, the support was there. I feel it was a great privilege to have been raised in a home like ours. We had a father who believed in the gospel of hard work. One who has always done an excellent job of supporting his family. We had a mother who centered her life around home and family. I think her crowning glory will be the fact that she made her home a nice place to be. We have been taught some great lessons on sacrifice and hard work by our parents. If everyone could be raised in a home such as this, the world would certainly be a better place in which to live. Buddy L. Holt My thoughts of Mom go back to time even before Bud do I went together. She has always seemed like such a lady to me, always in complete control of herself. I admire her for raising 6 boys and always being able to keep her t home In perfect order. I have never been in her home when anything has t been out of place. Most of all I love Mom and Dad for raising such a fine person as my husband. It is because of them that he is what he is. They must be pretty special parents to have raised such a great group of husbands for us girls. Thanks Mom and Dad. Love, Gwen About the earliest I could remember is back to when I was about 3 years old we lived in a house where our yard would connect with Grandpa Holt's yard and we had a dog his name was Cubby. He was a lot of fun. Mom was really a good cook. I think that's why we were always in good health. I loved those homemade cinnamon rolls and bread and the raison cookies and the and divinity candy and many, many other things that she would cook up. I really enjoyed eating everything she would cook. I remember many nights that Mom and I would kneel by my bedside and she would help me say my prayers. When I was about 4 1/2 years old we moved to Mt. Pleasant where Dad was the manager of Safeway. We lived in a big old house with a big back yard. We had a dog named Rags. He was a lot of fun. He could climb the tree in the back yard. I started school here at the Hamilton School and Gary and Bud were in the band. I think they played the Baritones. The Christmas's here really had a lot of meanings to me. We would spend many nights setting around our big Christmas tree and sing songs. A lot of people would go around caroling. I remember the floats that Mom used to spend so many hours working with other people to make for the parades. I remember one float especially. They took one of those deep old flour box drawers, the kind you used to have in the kitchen, and centered it on the float and filled it with candy to throw out to the people. I was the one elected for that job, but I think I was kind of selfish for I ate more than what I would throw out. It was also here in Mt. Pleasant when I learned the meaning and value of work. Gary, Bud, & I would ride bikes about 5 miles outside of town to a bar cafe about 5s00 a.m. so that we could be the first among several kids. We would wait there for 2 to 3 hours for the owner to come and pick 2 or 3 of us to clean the restaurant. We would each make 25¢ or 50¢. I remember going to the show with a quarter and have a soft drink and popcorn and a candy. It was also here during the month of August 1949 that Mom went to the hospital and returned a few days later with our baby brother Ray. He was a blessing to us all. For a long time after that I thought that Mom went to the hospital and gave the doctor her order for a baby and wait there until he could make one. I remember one time when Uncle Pierce and Aunt Elisa came out to visit. Mom was way out in the back yard and. P. H. had one of our B. B. or pellet guns, I can't remember which, but he hollered to Moan to bend over for a target. She did, and like a true hunter and sportsman he took aim, fired, and hit bonanza. I think he thought the gun was empty. We soon left Mt. Pleasant and moved back to Springville. Mt. Pleasant holds a lot of happy and loving family times for it was like living in Payton Place. I give Mom special thanks for the love and religion she placed into our lives and to Dad for his support and teachings for without them both we would only be half the men that we are today. With all my love and May God Bless Dennis L. Holt As I look back over the years, a lot of memories come back of a lot of different things. The stories that could be told are not as important as the lessons learned of which the more. Important lessons taught me by Mom are to do things myself and be held accountable for my own actions and projects. She has taught se to think things through before I act so I can be proud of my accomplishments and projects when I finish. She has taught me to respect people for what they are, and who they are. It is because of these lessons and others that I've enjoyed the success I've had in my life. Together with Dad's influence she has taught me bow to survive in what could have been a tough old world.I A grateful son Ray My thoughts of Mom are: She is always concerned about her kids and there welfare. She is always there to help them and show them love. She would do anything for her children and grandchildren. Mom has always been a wonderful cook. I remember the times she would cook a big Thanksgiving meal for her family, and how fun it was to get all together. She has always had a very clean and beautiful home. I have had many special times shopping and tieing quilts with Mom. One day when I was at the mall I ran into Mom and she bought me lunch and we talked, it was nice. When Ray and I were first married we played many card games with Mom and Dad and had a lot of fun times. One time Mom send I had to be on jury duty together and it was nice being together and we went to lunch and made a day of it. I want to thank Mom and Dad for raising such a wonderful man for me to marry, they taught him well. Thank You. Love Jeana If a person is lucky, he has the chance to grow up with both of his parents and share many of life's experiences with them. I have had that good fortune and I count it as one of my greatest blessings. For the purpose of making a contribution to this little section at the end of Mother's personal history, I would like to relate just a few experiences which I have had with Mother that really stand out in my memory. I learned about fear through an experience I had at Mom's side. I was jut a young boy in about the third grade at the time. We were living in the Parkway home in Tooele. It was early one morning, and I was home alone with mother. Dad had gone to work, my older brothers were off to school, and I was just getting ready to leave for school. Mother was in the bathroom working on her hair. Suddenly, I heard Mom moaning in pain. I went into the bathroom quickly to see what was wrong. There was a look of panic on her face which I will never forget. She told me to run next door and get Carol. I imagine I made it from our side door to Carol's back door in about two seconds: Carol was sitting at her table with one of the other neighbor ladies and I would imagine that I surprised the heck out of them as I came barging in yelling and screaming that my mom was sick. They ran back over home with me and started making phone calls and working with Mom. I remember Mom telling them that she felt as though someone was squeezing her chest and she could hardly breath. As the ladies worked with Mom and made phone calls, I slipped over to one of the chairs in the living room and started praying. This is where I learned the difference between praying out of habit and praying with real intent. I remember pleading with Heavenly Father over and over again to let my Mom be all right. Shortly, the situation calmed down quite a bit and the ladies urged me to be off to school. I remember sobbing as I walked over to school. I walked into my classroom a little bit late with red eyes. My teacher (who happened to be my cousin, Lea Mae Averett, that year) asked me what was wrong and tried to comfort me. Later in the day, Lea Mae came to me and told me she had called my home and that everything was just fine. It turned out that Mom was not seriously ill and she returned to her normal life for several weeks. For a long time after that, I didn't ever want Mom to be left alone. I remember figuring out everybody's schedule in my little mind to make sure that there would always be someone home with Mom. My little boy mind had suddenly come to realize that mothers are not invincible; They really could get seriously ill without much warning. That thought frightened me. A few years later, Mother and I shared another experience where we both shed hundreds of tears. Mom and Dad operated a Spudnut Shop at the time. I was down at the shop one evening helping Mom clean the donut racks. We got a call from Ray, who was home alone; He said that our little dog had been run over and was dead. Little dogs can be a devastating loss to a little boy: In this case, it was a major loss to our whole family. Nicki was a neat, neat dog. As Mom hung up the phone and told me the bad news, we hugged each other and cried. We cried our way through most of the rest of the evening. That was a hard experience for me to go through and I had a hurt that wouldn't go away for a long time. I'm glad that Mom was there because it helped to have someone close who shared many of the same feelings about what had happened. To share recreational activities with Mom is to have fun, fun, fun. When it's time to play, Mom really lets her hair down. Now that I'm married, most of the experiences that I have with Mom and Dad are of this type; We've had a lot of fun. If you ever hear a couple of people out in the middle of a lake whooping and hollering and carrying on, it's probably Mom and one of her brothers and they probably have two fish on at the same time, and have got their lines all tangled up. Nobody has more fun on a fishing trip than Mom. Nobody has more fun hitting a jackpot in Nevada than Mom. Nobody gets more excited about a fast game of cards than Mom. It's fun to be around her at times like I these and have some of the excitement rub off. Four or five years ago, Janese and I took an overnight trip out to Wendover with Mom and Dad to see what it was that kept drawing them out there. It only took one trip for me to see the general principle: You drive for a couple of hours, you eat a lot of good food, and you have a little fun together. Then, you drive another couple of hours to get home, but once you're home, you're much more able to cope with the worries and anxieties of everyday living. If you've never seen Mom hit a Jackpot, you need to: A couple of years ago, I was on a fishing trip with Mom and Dad and some of the aunts and uncles. Janese and I were fishing two or three hundred yards away from the campers. Mom and Dad and the aunts and uncles were over by the campers puttering around. After a while, we started hearing a little laughing which gradually turned into a lot of laughing. Within a few minutes, you could hear more cackling than you would hear in a hen house and it was all coming from inside one of the campers. It turned out that they had all jammed into the close quarters of one of the campers and were filleting a bunch of fish. They were having a ball together and it was neat for us to stand a ways away and see how much fun they have when they get together. I've been able to share hundreds of other experiences with Mom over the years. I've been glad that she was there to share some of life's hard times. And, I've been thrilled to share in her excitement over some of the fun and exciting times. I only hope that life will give us a million more experiences to share together.I Kelly Holt It seems like I have known Mom most of my life. I met her when I started dating Kelly, but really got to know her better after Kelly had gone on his mission. I used to go visit with Mom often. One time I went to see her and she was making an afghan. She showed me how to make one too. We usedI to talk about a lot of things while we worked on our afghans, including Kelly's mission and how he was doing. Shortly after Kelly went on his mission, Mom moved to Cedar City with Dad. She wasn't sure that it was the right thing to do but Dad was i promoted to a new store and Mom wanted to be as supportive of him as she could, so she moved to be by his side. I really did miss her and our visits. At Christmas time, I went to Cedar City with Ray and his family to see Mom and Dad. Bud and his family also came. I remember how Mom was busy preparing things in the kitchen and making sure that everything was all right. Most of us slept on the living room floor in sleeping bags. Mom was there to make sure everyone was comfortable. We all had a great time. I can remember when Mom came back to Orem and found a house to rent while a home was being built. Dad was still in Cedar City at the time. Mom went up to deer camp one evening and was injured while riding a motorcycle. She was on crutches for several weeks and could not work. During this time she had a lot to be concerned about. Many things seemed to be going wrong, but Mom looked at it all as a challenge. Her leg took quite a while to heal and I'm sure she was in a lot of pain, but she didn't complain. She was always trying to see the bright side of things and felt that there was a blessing in each hard experience. When Grandma Butler died, I believe it was the hardest time of Mom's life. She had spent so much time with her mother and had had so many wonderful experiences with her. One of the reasons Mom moved back to Ores was because her mother became ill and Mom wanted to be closer so that she could help her. Theirs was a special and very dear relationship and Mom felt a great loss, but she knew she had to go on with her life and she did. She has a great many wonderful memories of her mother and cherishes I each and every one. When Kelly and I were first married and we were trying so hard to have a baby, Mom shared our anxieties with us. When, after several years of trying, we did become pregnant, we couldn't wait to tell Mom and Dad. They were both so excited. Mom would come home from work from time to time with little articles of baby clothing that had come loose out of a package or were slightly soiled. She thought that we would like to have them. They were both so supportive of us. When we first brought Joshua home from the hospital, Mom came over and showed me how to bathe him. He was so small and I was so inexper¬ienced. I was grateful to have Mom there to show me what to do. She made me feel at ease. Shortly after Joshua was born, my father had a heart attack and spent some time in the hospital recovering. Mom knew that I wanted to be with him and she watched Joshua for me so that I could go. When I was threatening to miscarry, Mom was there to help. I knew that she had gone through one before and that she knew what I was going a through. She was there when I needed someone to talk to and to let my motions out. I had to go right to bed, as the doctor ordered, and Mom watched Joshua for me. When I did miscarry, mom was there again for me. She was a great comfort and I'm glad she was close by. One of the things I admire most about Mom is her complete organization. She has the ability to "get things done and tidy. She can set a goal for herself and she sticks with it until she accomplishes her goal. I have seen her do this time and again. As many birthdays and special days as there are, she has never missed a one. When we go to see "Grandma" and "Grandpa", Joshua always gets so excited. He loves to see them and considers them some of his best friends. As each day goes by and I share more experiences with Mom, I find that` she becomes more and more dear to me. I am proud and grateful to have her as a Mom. Janese Holt Mom has really helped Steve and I out in so many ways. She's a real good mother, and a very special grandmother. She has always shared a lot of love, time, and care with us. She is always there when we need her. Steve, I, and Mandy have always enjoyed going over to visit. Mom sure has a lot of patience, especially when it comes to making her great peanut brittle. She has to show me over and over again how to make it. Mom is a fantastic candy maker and good cook. Steve remembers all the special moments at home, and all their fun trips when their family would go to Hebkin, and also times when they would go to Las Vegas to Circus Circus. It meant so much to us. How she has helped us out. When we had our little girl, and the beautiful quilts she made for us. Mom sure has set a good example for all of us. Her bright smiles, her loving touch, her "I love you" always means so very much. When times get hard and we get all uptight, her special way of knowing everything will be alright. Fishing is the funnest time of the year, grab the pole and gear. Look, football is on, turn it up louder Dad so we can hear. Bring out the cards, Grace and Hap just called, they will be here in a short time. Sis and I will beat you for the 10th time. Well, thanks a lot for all you have done. Because to us, Mom, you'll always be #1. Steve & Mel Holt

A Personal History of Christopher Franklin Butler, with Addendum by Lucille Butler

Contributor: Pan Argo Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

Personal History of Christopher Franklin Butler I Christopher Franklin Butler was born of goodly parents on 18 Jan 1917 in a small home on the north side of the canel ¼ mile west of Grandpa Butlers home between Spanish Fork and Salem Utah. Dr. Hagen came out in a horse and buggy during a severe snowstorm to make the delivery at home. The Dr. was paid with $25.00 worth of muskrat hides. Dad did some trapping and duck hunting when he couldn’t find work or when the farm work was done. Dad and Mother salvaged the feathers from the ducks Dad killed and made feather pillows and feather mattress for the family. I was the third child of Christopher Lorenzo Butler and Reba Hutchings Butler. My older two brothers had died shortly after birth. Stephen Lorenzo was born 7 June 1913 in Hiawatha, Utah and died 8 June 1913 and was buried in Springville Utah. Milton was born 9 June 1914 in Victor Idaho and died 9 June 1914 and was buried in Victor Idaho. I was blessed in Spanish Fork Utah by Isaac E. Brockbank on 6 May 1917. After I was born Dad helped build a little larger home on a piece of ground below the canel which belonged to Grandpa Butler which caused considerable feelings in the family. I can remember we had to carry our water for everything from a spring about 200 feet from the house. Our water was heated on a wood burning stove and the washing was done on a wash board in a large tub. We had a lamb as a pet, it grew faster than I did, Dad had to dispose of it because if would bunt me in the back and knock me down, when I got up it would bunt me down again. I can remember Mother being chased by a colt in the pasture next to the house, she crawled under the fence to get away from him. Mother was trying to herd him from the garden. There was friction between my folks and the Grandparents over the property the house was built on, we moved to Victor Idaho and lied with Grandpa and Grandma Hutchings when my sister Thelma was born on 22 April 1919. Grandpa was a bishop at that time. I can remember the spanking I got when I threw a rock and broke a window in Grandpas house. The family moved back to Spanish Fork and lived in the house Dad helped build on Grandpas farm. I remember we had a good-sized patch of watermelons. We had trouble keeping people from stealing them. In the corner of the melon patch the weeds had covered a melon no one had noticed, when we found it in the fall it turned out to be several times larger than any of the others and was very delicious. I remember Dad and I taking a wagonload of very nice melons up on the highway and selling them to people going y for 10 c each. I recall going cat fishing with Dad with the horse and buggy down to Utah Lake. We brought the fish home in a gunny sack—Dad spent hours skinning them. On another occasion we went Bass fishing with the horse and buggy over to Salem pond and I stepped on a floating log while Dad was fishing and fell in. that ended the trip as Dad wrapped me in a horse blanket and took me home. My brother Pierce Hutchings was born 13 March 1921 in Spanish Fork, a year later my sister Grace was born on 21 June 1922 in Spanish Fork. For a number of years I looked forward to Grandma Butlers Christmas present. It consisted of a pair of long black wool stockings she had knitted, she would include a silver dollar in the toe. She was very proficient in her knitting and a hard worker. I remember her working in the fields along with the men, pitch hay, top beets, milk cows etc day light till dark. Grandpa and Grandma Butler were very stern and expected everyone to go the extra mile. Mother and Dad still had problems trying to get along with the Grandparents. It wasn’t long before the family moved back to Victor Idaho. Our only means of transportation was by train. This time we kids came down with the Chicken Pox on the train thus we were quarantined for some time after we got there. The folks had a hard time making ends meet, Mother washed on the washboard for the hotel and made pies for the café in the pool hall. Later we were able to get our first washing machine (used). We ran it by turning a wheel about two feet in diameter by hand. Dad worked on farms, cut timber, Forest Ranger for awhile, Powder man at a rock quarry. Here he broke his foot and was on crutches for awhile. We used wood for fuel, Dad was splitting blocks of wood when the ax handle hit a block behind him and he cut his left forefinger, I thought he had cut it off—I looked for it around the chopping block. When Dad returned from the Doctor he said he held it together with his right hand and the Doctor sewed it back on. I had a dog named Ted, Dad made a harness and we trained him to pull me around in the winter on a sleigh. One night he strayed, we found him later he had been poisoned. The winters were long and cold in Victor Idaho. On 12 Aug 1924 my brother Royal Christopher was born. He was another “blue” baby and died the next day. He was buried in the Victor Cemetery next to his brother Milton. Grandpa and Grandma Hutchings were very good to us, we went out to their place on various occasions. I can remember riding on the derick horse for Grandpa during hay time. That was when I first noticed I would get hay fever which made me somewhat inactive during the summer months. While in Victor we moved around about six times. For one season we moved over to Swan Valley on the dry farm where we raised a crop of grain. Here we had to haul all our water in big barrels in the buggy for about five miles. On one occasion Dad and I became scared as the horse almost run away when a bolt of lightening hit a big telephone pole which burst into splinters by the side of the road. I was a Trail Builder in the Primary program which I enjoyed. I started school in Victor at the age of 7, my first grade teacher was Miss Clare Adams. I was baptised 3 Oct 1925 by William H. Humble in a pond developed from a cold cold spring at my Grandpa Hutchings farm just out of Victor. I was confirmed 3 Oct 1925 by Jim Thomas. I remember Uncle Leo Hutchings, Mothers only brother, he was the first person I can think of who gave me money for doing something for him, he was the apple of my eye. Uncle Leo’s daughter Helen by his first wife and I went to school together while in Victor. I completed the first and second grades in the first year. It seemed Mother and Dad tried everything to make ends meet. They decided to manage the café (Butlers Café) part of the Killpack Hotel in Victor. Aunt Grace, Mothers sister and Uncle Harry Ballard managed the hotel part, the drug store on the corner was run by some one else. We moved into a house next door to the Café. My folks had a lady tend us while they both worked in the café. Things seemed to be better for awhile, we even bought some new furniture. There seemed to be a lot of friction between Mother and Aunt Grace, being in business close together just didn’t work out. After completing the third grade in Victor in 1926 our family sold everything and moved back to Spanish Fork Utah—we rented the “Cornaby” house in town. Once again Dad was looking for work, any kind of work. All of us tried to do what we could, we worked part time on Grandpas farm south of town, I wore out a pair of roller skates going back and forth on the new cement highway. Dad tried many things, the best one was with Willis Brockbank as a plumbers helper. Dad purchased a cow which gave us milk for the family, later he bought a Ford truck on time, he tried to pay for it by hauling produce and fruit down to Mt. Pleasant and peddling it door to door—Thelma and I helped. It didn’t turn out profitable so he turned the truck back. I attended the fourth and fifth grades at the Central School in Spanish Fork. It was the early part of 1928 when things were slim and Dad had a difficult time finding work to supply our needs. Aunt Olive, Dads only sister and Uncle Frank (Pete) Peterson who lived in Mutual Coal Camp in Carbon County where he worked in the coal mine. Uncle Pete seemed to think Dad could get on at the mine. Dad went up and went to work at the Mutual Coal Mine. After a short while Dad found two small rooms in the last house in Martin which is in the community above Mutual. Six of us moved in and a little later Uncle Alma, Dads brother, joined us in the two small rooms. Life in the coal camps was a lot different from what we were used to. The Winters up there were very severe. We had to walk every where—about two miles to the store, almost three miles to Rains to school where I went to the sixth grade. The first winter my sister Thelma got pneumonia we almost lost her. That first Christmas we had there, I received a scout knife and a pair of long black wool stockings with a silver dollar in the toe from Grandma Butler. The next summer we moved about half a mile down the canyon closer to the store where I had my first Birthday Party. A little later we moved to a four room home which was by the store and half mile from the school in Rains. In the winter time we had to obtain our drinking water from the ending on the freight train twice a week, the other water was unsafe and some times the pipes were frozen. Living accommodations for the miners were scarce so Mother had no problem in getting two boarders for awhile, the extra money sure helped our situation but it was extra work for Mother. They were looking at a 1929 chev six cylinder, we were on cloud nine. The effects of the 1930 depression were in full swing. Dad being involved in a contract in the mine didn’t get laid off. We felt blessed that Dad still had a job. On 4 March 1930 Dad was involved in a mine accident that broke his back. We didn’t realize at the time that his days of full time employment were over. He spent the next six months in the Holy Cross Hospital in Salt Lake City. Following the accident Dad was in a coma for several days, had pneumonia which settled in his back. Being no public transportation in the coal camps mother had to rely on someone to take her to Helper where she boarded the train to Salt Lake to see Dad. When she made these trips we children were left alone. It was trying times for all of us. The company let us stay in the house rent-free for over two years, the meager compensation we received monthly was our only income. Our leisure time in the coal camp was something else, no radio, TV was unheard of and no church. Our many friends were of many nationalities. Besides the household chores we played games of all kinds, went on hikes, played ball and sometimes we got in mischief such as stealing an apple or peach from the door-to-door peddler when he left his truck. I delivered the Salt Lake Tribune daily for over two years. I would walk to school then walk on the paper route, I had many blisters on my feet from walking. My earnings went to pay my dentist and for a cornet which I learned to play while attending the 7 to 9 grade at Latuda school. I enjoyed playing in the band. I played a cornet solo one year in the state music contest held at Price Utah. I was awarded second place. My sister Thelma borrowed a school instrument and played in the Latuda band. In October 1931 my sister Lois was born. It was sure different to have a baby around again, but we sure enjoyed her. Dad was home all the time now recovering from his injury. In Jan 1932 Lois got pneumonia and died. She was buried in Springville next to her brother Stephen Lorenzo. During the summer time we would hike over the hill to a stream called beaver creek. We would catch a few fish then return home. Before Dad was injured, we went over there several times with friends. In Oct that year Dad borrowed a rifle, we hiked over the hill to beaver creek to hunt deer, my first deer hunt. We stayed overnight, I remember trying to sleep in a heavy coat by the fire, while Dad kept a fire going all night, everything was covered with frost the next morning. We didn’t see any deer until we were well on the way home. We ran into the tracks of buck and doe, Dad knew what to do to intercept them in the next little draw. We had to run a little ways to get in a good spot, sure enough Dad could see them. He drew down and one shot we had a four point buck. The deer was way too big for Dad and I to drag or carry. I stayed with the deer and Dad backtracked to our trail home and intercepted two neighbors on their way home from fishing. They helped carry the deer for half of it. I had a dog named Major which we enjoyed very much, he was very playful, he would really come unglued each night as I came home from delivering papers. That winter he became sick and had distemper, Dad had to dispose of him. One of the main things we enjoyed during the winter was sleigh riding and ice skating on the snow packed roads. Under ideal conditions we could start up in Martin and go down the canyon all the way to Helper, a distance of about 8 miles. We knew it was no no but we would generally arrange to meet someone in Helper and hook a ride home behind a car. One of our friends had a sleigh large enough for five people. The year Dad was injured I fell at school and cracked my left arm. I had to carry it around for several weeks in a sling. While in the 7-9 grades I enjoyed playing marbles which took many hours of my time. Dad taught me how to shoot marbles which he enjoyed when he was growing up. We raised a few rabbits to eat until a wild bobcat broke in the pens and killed them. A few days later our Greek neighbor lost a goat to the bobcat, they set a trap and caught the cat. We would go up the mountainsides in the summer time and gather wild sweet peas, this is what we fed the rabbits. In 1932 we decided there wasn’t any future for us at Mutual so we moved to Springville Utah. We rented a four-room home on 62 West 4th North. Now we could plant a garden and have a pig which helped the food supply for the family. Dads recovery wasn’t good so the Doctors suggested they may be able to help him by performing a bone graft. They removed a bone from his leg and spliced five vertebras together. It took another year and half or more to recover from the operation. The operation was partially successful leaving him with a 60% disability. The operation and the compensation received during recovery was the final settlement with the State Industrial Commission. Now we had to face the fact that Dad would never be able to work as he once did. We did everything we could to get along. We finally had to go on state welfare, being poor was no fun. Living in Springville was the first place we lived where we could attend church. Dad had numerous little jobs but he could not qualify for any kind of steady employment. Dad was janitor of the Third Ward for several years. Being in pain much of the time Dad could only do so much. I helped with the janitor work when possible. The folks always managed to have food, clothing and a home for the family. I have often heard people say that Mothers floors were so clean that they would not hesitate to eat off them. As we kids became old enough we did all kinds of work in order to obtain things the folks couldn’t we had to work and earn our own. In March 1934 my brother Jay Paul was born. He was delivered by Dr. V M Sevy at home. I was a junior in high school. At age 15 I was ordained a Deacon in the Aaronic Priesthood by Bsp. Peter Nielson on 25 Sept 1932. I was ordained a Teacher by Charles Boyer on 29 Jan 1933. I was ordained a Priest by Joseph Harker on 4 Feb 1934. We seemed to have our ups and downs but we were always thankful and blessed with goodly parents who had faith in us and gave us guidance. My sister Thelma and I both participated in the high school band and orchestra. We took active part in the State Band Contests and the High School Opera Orchestra. I had a number of close friends such as Lamar Friel, Gene Baker, Francis Boyer, Harold Johnson, etc. My sister Thelma and I often double dated. On a number of occasions I played cornet solo’s as various functions including Seminary Graduation and church functions. On 28 Jan 1933 I was baptized for the dead for 31 people in the Salt Lake Temple. I started driving a car a Essix Teriplane in 1934 at the age of 17, it belonged to Verl Devenish. On 27 May 1935 I rode my bicycle to Provo and applied for a drivers license. I represented our Ward and Stake in a dance team for two years at the Church’s annual event at Saltair. On 13 Jan 1935 I performed my first baptism, I baptized Phyllis Diamond, Shirley Peterson (Bishops Daughter) and Glen Fred Clark in the fourth ward. I made the first radio we had in our home. I lettered in high school, had a minor lead in the Opera “Marriage of Nannette”. In April 1935 our family moved to 171 West 2nd South Springville. Shortly after Mother came down with pneumonia, she was down for several weeks we were quite concerned. In May 1935 I graduated from high school and seminary. The following month I signed up for a correspondence course in Diesel Engineering. On 30 Oct 1935 the last day of the deer hunt my brother Pierce and I went deer hunting on one bicycle. We went just East of Springville Locked the bike to a pole and hiked up to round peak. I had borrowed a 30-40 rifle with 5 shells from a neighbor. We got a late start arrived up on round peak in the afternoon. We were coming down rock canyon when we saw two deer. After I got my wind (we had been running) I shot once and I had me a buck, my first. By the time we cleaned the deer (the first one I had cleaned) it was late. We had to go down the canyon in the dark except when the steel plant dumped slag which lit up the hill side. We arrived way late, the folks were preparing to organize a search party. The next day we borrowed another neighbor’s horse to go pick up the deer. Being the horse was hard to catch and manage we were after midnight when we returned with my first deer. On 1 March 1936 I was ordained an Elder by Arthur Condie. Our Bishop wanted me to go on a mission but my folks were unable to support me, in fact, I was helping to support the family. It seemed that I always had plenty to do, if it wasn’t cutting a lawn for someone (with a push type) it was delivering papers, going on milk delivery route, working at the cannery, cleaning the furnace at the church, band practice (I was in the summer band) various church functions. In my spare time I completed a correspondence course in Diesel Engineering. The next spring I went to Los Angeles Calif. And finished the course in Sept 1936. The folks moved again to 91 East 2nd South while I was in Calif. After I completed the Diesel course I purchased my first car, a 1928 four door four cylinder Chevrolet, it cost $95.00 in Calif. On my way home to Springville I came by way of Parker Da where my Uncle Reed lived. I had hopes of finding employment there. Being no openings, I came home, on my way, I had to stop and replace the clutch in the car before I could get home. The folks moved again to Selvoy J Boyers place about ¼ mile west of town. The next move about a year later was to 180 West 2nd North, this place I bought for $1500.00 and had the family live in it. While in the service both Pierce and I helped make payments on the home until he go marries. The next year, 1937, I went all out trying to find employment. I applied for several Civil Service jobs, one in Humbolt Nev. Almost developed, it fell through the last minute. Again, I did all kinds of work, worked at the cannery, J C Pennys, Utah Idaho Sugar Co weighing beets, etc. It was about this time that I approached Mr. Earl Cook for a job. He had Ice Cream shops in Springville, Provo, Payson, Nephi, and Richfield. I started at the bottom and worked up to be manager of the Wingate-Cook Ice Cream store in Richfield. I liked the work and learned how to make many kinds of ice cream and run the business. While in Richfield I turned my 1928 Chev in on a used 1937 Chev coupe, it cost $695.00. It took me 2½ years to pay for it. In Oct. 1938 I was home long enough to go deer hunting with Dad. Pierce, Dad and I along with two friends from Salt Lake went up Hobble Creek to Palsom Park. The year before we had good luck there, this year we didn’t see a buck but we did encounter a big brown bear. Dad and I were shooting across a small canyon, we kept shooting until he stopped, I think 29 times. When we skinned him on the spot we found 14 holes, we estimated him to weight 500 lbs. I was transferred to the Provo shop as Manager of Cooks Ice Cream. Here in addition to managing I made the ice cream mix for all five shops and the Ice Cream for there. In the fall of 1939 Mr. Cook was cutting back on personnel, I was laid off and my car was not paid for. I had a struggle the next six months to finish the payments on my car. Here I was out of work again. Mother and Dad did all they could to help. We did all kinds of work, watering and topping beets, weighing beets, blood testing chickens, labeling cans at the cannery etc. Sometimes I felt Mr. Cook laid me off in hopes I would be willing to work for a lower wage in order to finish paying for my car. Christmas that year was very thin. The following spring, 1940, by car was mine. Mr. Cook came after me to go back to work at the Springville shop. I went back for Mr. Cook until April at which time I terminated and started my own ice cream business in Spanish Fork. Franks Ice Cream became a reality in May 1940. I borrowed money on my car to make a down payment on the necessary items to get started, which I called a shoestring. I leased a building at 120 North Main in Spanish Fork, the business went well until WWII broke out. Sugar was being rationed and I was subject to be drafted. While operating my ice cream business I took flying lessons and received my private pilot’s license. Before I started my business I was dating a very nice girl from Springville, Miss Louise Patrick. She was called on a LDS mission in Calif, she returned just after I started my business. We hadn’t made any specific plans for the future so upon her return she felt her companion had to be a return missionary. Being deflated, subject to the draft for the war, losing my business etc, I decided to enlist with 125 other men from Utah, my brother Pierce and I enlisted together. We were involved in establishing the 301st Ordnance Reg in Camp Sutton NC. During the early part of 1942 one of my applications for a Civil Service job became available. Mechanic Lerner at Hill Field $50 per month. I completed this course just before entering the Army. I stayed in Salt Lake close to where I went to school at West High. I would go down home on weekends and make ice cream for the week, my sister Grace and Mother kept the shop in operation during my absence that winter. My car was left at home for the folks to use. My brother and I reported for duty at Fort Douglas Utah on 28 April 1942. That night we shipped by train to Camp Sutton NC arriving there 2 May 1942. Basic Training was a new experience for all of us, KP duty, guard duty, rifle range, live in tents, hike with pack and rifle, CQ, drill, uniforms, inoculations for everything under the sun, special details of all kinds. Our folks were very thoughtful as they wrote often, we answered when possible. When Pierce and I joined the service we wore our best clothes, well we had to wear those clothes for over two weeks before we received a GI issue. We sent the clothes home, Mother nearly had a heart attack as they were in terrible condition, we had no choice. On 25 May 1942 a group of us holding the Priesthood (a large number of returned Missionaries) held our Sunday Sacrament meeting on a little hill by camp in a wheat field. We used our canteens and mess kits in passing the Sacrament. The next Sunday a visitor Hugh B. Brown one of the church authorities joined us. On 6 June 1942 I received my first pay day in the Army $23.10. On 9 June 1942 during retreat I was informed I was promoted to Private First class. On 7 July 1942 I was transferred from Camp Sutton to the Air Corp at Shaw Field SC for exams and eligibility for Glider Pilot training. I passed all the requirements and being I had a private pilot’s license I was eligible for class A glider pilot training. On 22 July 1942 I was transferred to Lockbourne Army Air Base near Columbus Ohio, awaiting Glider training. While here I received a weekend pass to visit a close girl friend in Rochester New York, Ella Matson, a nurse in the hospital there, she was originally from Brigham City Utah. We became acquainted while I was in business in Spanish Fork. On 28 Aug 1942 I was transferred to Plainview Texas for Glider training, we staying in the Hilton Hotel. I soloed 3 Sept 1942 and passed final check 18 Sept 1942. I received my Staff Sergeant rating 12 Sept 1942—I’m really in the chips now, $144.00 per month. One 27 Sept 1942 I was transferred to 29 Palms Calif. for Glider training. I soloed 16 Oct 1942 and on 11 Nov 1942 I finished Basic training and received Glider wings insignia. Whenever I could I went in to visit my sister Grace and family in Hollywood Calif., I made numerous trips while in the area. On 15 Nov 1942 I was transferred to Fort Sumner NM, was in a Glider pool waiting further training. 7 Dec 1942 I was called home on emergency furlough as Mother was ill. Pierce was called home also. While at home I went up to Salt Lake to visit an old friend from Spanish Fork, Ned Anderson who had got married since I left for the service. We decided to go to a show, I didn’t have a date so Neds wife Detta arranged for a blind date for me with her cousin Lucille Makin. I returned to Fort Sumner NM 30 Dec 1942 and on 5 Jan 1943 I was transferred to Victorville Calif. to finish my Glider training in the large CG4A Glider. Jan thru March I was in a Glider pool waiting further training. On 9 March 1943 I went home on a 7 day furlough. While home Mother had a dinner for me which I invited Lucille Makin from Salt Lake to join us. I spent a most enjoyable evening, Lucille is the most ideal girl I have ever gone with. I baptized my brother Jay Paul on 14 May 1943. Being the auxiliary fields (dry lakes) were full of water we couldn’t complete our training. I applied for cadet training, I passed the necessary exams. On 16 April 1943 I had a weekend pass—thumbed my way home, returned 18 April, seen the folks and spent an enjoyable evening with Lucille who I thought a lot of. By the time I was able to return to base I was four hours AWOL. On 19 April 1943 I was transferred to Santa Ana Cal. for Cadet Classification and a two-week pre-flight course and many hours of marching. On 29 May 1943 the folks came down to see Grace and Hap, I received an overnight pass, I went in to see them. The next day Mother, Dad, Jay, Grace, and Hap brought me out to the base and witnessed the weekly review. On 5 June 1943 I went into Los Angeles on pass. Lucille Makin a very lovely girl from Salt Lake was here on vacation. I’m afraid I’ve really fallen for her. Leaving Lucille at Grace’s I returned to base. On 11 June 1943 I purchased a diamond for my bride to be at the P X. I went into LA on pass on 12 and 13 June. On 12 June 1943 at 2200 hours Lucille and I became engaged, she returned to the base with me. Lucille stayed for the weekly review then returned to LA and then back home the next day. On 23 June 1943 I was transferred to Oxnard Calif. for Primary A/C training. Started flight training 25 June, soloed 14 July, finished 25 August 1943 in the PT13 Steerman. On 30 Aug 1943 I was transferred to Chico Calif. for Basic training. Started flying BT13 on 2 Sept 1943. Mother and Lucille came down on the bus. We were married on 22 Oct 1943 as planned in Oliver Broomheads home in Chico Calif. by bishop Clinton E. Cox. Because of several cases of mumps my squadron was restricted to the base. I was lucky to obtain a 27 hour pass to get married. The Broomhead family were of great assistance in every way. I completed my training at Chico on 31 Oct 1943 then transferred to Douglas Ariz. on 1 Nov 1943 for advanced pilot training. Lucille came down to Douglas with two other cadet wives in a private car. I had to go by train. We had a seven hour layover in LA, Lucille met me there along with Grace and Hap. We had a few hours together before I left. I arrived in Douglas Ariz. on 1 Nov 1943, Lucille arrived on Nov in private car. Lucille and I spent our first Christmas together in our one room apartment at Douglas Ariz. I graduated on 7 Jan 1943 as a Flight Officer. Lucille and I went home on leave, later I reported for duty at Deming NM on 19 Jan 1944. I found a room for us at 516 West Fine in Deming so I sent for Lucille to join me, she arrived 4 Feb. just 2 days before her birthday 6 Feb. We have a branch of the church here, we attended whenever we could. My duty at Deming was piloting AT-11 in train9ing Bombardier Navigators. Lucille went to work at Cadet Headquarters for awhile. We purchased a 1938 Ford coupe and a 14 foot house trailer, it was home to us. The Ford wasn’t satisfactory so we turned it in on a 1939 Chev Sedan which would pull the trailer. On 13 May 1944 two friends from Utah and I flew home to Salt lake, spent a few hours at home on Mother Day then returned to Deming New Mexico. I fired the 30 M1 Carbine on the range scored expert. On 19 Sept 1944 I received my Commission as 2nd Lt. AUS S/N 0926584. (one of my goals). On 19 Oct 1944 I came home on leave for 21 days, when I returned I had a new assignment at Hobbs AFB NM where I learned to fly the B-17 Bomber. I finished B-17 transition on 26 Jan 1945. I had a delay in route to my next station so we went home. On our way while driving my car we encountered slick roads, I lost control of my car and ran off the road. I fractured the bone under my left eye when my head hit the steering wheel. Dad and Ernie came down and picked us up in Moab Utah. I had the car fixed in Moab and picked it up a week later. While home this time I changed the home in Springville to Mother and Dads name. Mother felt sure if anything should happen to me they would be left out in the cold. My next station was Lincoln Neb. where I had my air crew assigned in the B-17. While here VE day took place and our assignment was cancelled. Those pilots with 4 engine time and with over 1000 hours flight time were made Airplane Commanders on the B-29. My next duty assignment was B-29 transition at Randolph Field Texas where I had my next crew assigned and completed ground school, my copilot was Russel G. Van Helen from Saginaw Michigan. We had just started flight training when VJ day took place. Being the War was over training was stopped and I was transferred to Brooks Field Tex. and assigned to a Pilot Pool. Being I decided not to stay in the service I was transferred back to Randolph Field for release of active duty, the effective was 10 Dec 1945. At the time of my release we were living in New Braunfels Texas. Before we departed I purchased a 1938 Packard, tore it down and put in new rings and bearings then drove it home. We arrived home just before Christmas. We stayed with Lucille’s folks until fall of 1946 when we purchased a small home on 4635 Boxelder Street in Murray Utah. (Murray 8th Ward) In the spring of 1946 I reported to Hill Field for reemployment after Military Service, they offered me a job at .88/hr, I couldn’t live on that so I applied for a school furlough and worked in a training capacity for 360 days at Timmins Auto Service in Salt Lake to gain more experience. Timmins Auto Service closed its doors 60 days before I finished my training. I was unemployed until I returned to HAFB in Feb 1947 at $1.05/hr as a Jr. Equipment Repairer. In Sept 1947 I was promoted to grade 15 $1.19/hr as a Automotive Equipment Repairer. I turned the Packard in on a 1940 Chev Coupe which I drove to HAFB. I later put in on a bid sale at Tooele Depot for a 1942 Plymouth and a utility trailer, I received both. The Plymouth had to be worked over. I sold the 1940 Chev and drove the Plymouth until I turned it in on a 1950 Studebaker Champion. (my first new car) On 6 June 1947 our first son was born in the LDS Hospital. All of us were thrilled including Dad, as he was the first one to carry on the Butler name. He was blessed by me on 3 Aug 1947, we named him David Franklin after me. Shortly after David was born Lucille had a nervous disorder, Mother came to our rescue and helped take care of him which we appreciated very much. While David was a baby I was involved in a minor accident at HAFB in which my left arm was broken. I was hospitalized in the Holy Cross in Salt Lake to have it pinned. Later that same year I had a appendicitis operation in the Vets Hospital. In May 1950 I changed from Automotive Equipment Repairer to Machine Tool Repair which was my line of work I was doing before I went in the service. In 1951 I changed to GS-6 Maintenance Material Clerk, then to GS-7 Production Estimator in 1953. Our second son was born 8 May 1951 in the LDS hospital. He was blessed by me on 1 July 1951 and given the name of Ronald Lynn. While living in Murray we were not very active in the ward but we did arrange to go to the Salt Lake Temple for our endowments and have our two Sons sealed to us on 22 Oct 1952 (our 9th anniversary). We were married this time by Albert J. Elgren in the Salt Lake Temple. We enjoyed taking the boys cat fishing down to Utah Lake on weekends. We would tie a rope on David to protect him from falling in the lake, Ronald was hardly walking. We also enjoyed visiting our folks here in Salt Lake and mine in Springville whenever we could. In 1952 we decided traveling back and forth to HAFB was for the birds. After considerable consideration we decided to build a home in Kaysville. After locating a lot I arranged for Van Sanders a Contractor to build us a home at 266 East 100 No. I worked with the contractor in its construction. We sold our place in Murray and moved to our new home in Kaysville in March 1953, David was attending first grade. In 1954 my job was changed from Production planner GS-6 to GS-7 then to Production Control Specialist GS-9 in 1959. Our third son was born 17 March 1954 in the LDS Hospital. I blessed him on 2 May 1954 and gave him the name of Dan William. We had a puzzling problem with him as he cried almost constantly for three months before we solved his problem, he was allergic to milk. On 31 May 1954 I was hospitalized with a [fibrillating] heart, was corrected with medication and returned home in a few days. During 1954 and 55 I constructed our two car garage, David and Ron did what they could to help. (my first major project for the family) I purchased a table saw which helped in the garage construction also later in the finishing the basement. Being no place in Kaysville to get a saw sharpened, I purchased necessary equipment to sharpen my saws and many of my neighbors and friends. I baptized David on 6 Aug 1955. I was set apart as assistant Ward Clerk in the Kaysville 3rd Ward on 28 May 1957 by Bishop RAF McCormick. On 30 April 1958 I was set apart as Ward Clerk for the Kaysville 3rd Ward by Apostle George Q. Morris under Bishop Richard C. Bowman. On 2 June 1956 Horace Makin my father in-law died in the St. Marks Hospital in Salt Lake. Sarah Makin my mother in-law moved in with us until she passed away on 12 May 1959. The last few months she required constant care. On 26 to 28 Feb 1958 David was hospitalized and operated on by Dr. R. W. Krumbach in the Dee Hospital for a urinary tract correction. On 26 May 1958 Ronald was treated by Dr. Hales for a severe ear infection, finalized with x-ray treatments. On 10 Sept 1959 we made the final payment on our home, we have been making $55.52/month payments, some months we would make a double payment. In Jan 1960 Lucille’s nervous disorder reappeared, Dr. Madsen was able to help her with medication. On 28 June 1961 my Father passed away in the Spanish Fork Hospital, he had been ill for a long time, for the last 31 years since the mine accident Dad had been in pain and was limited in doing many many things. Dad and Mother had encountered many many hardships, we loved and miss them very much. In the spring of 1960 I purchased a 1960 ½ ton Ford truck and a Fleetwood camper which we as a family enjoyed very much. After school was out we went on our first trip. We went to Disneyland, Marine Land and up the coast thru Yosemite National Park and then home. Later that year we went on our first trip to Hebegan which became our annual vacation spot for many years. On 4 June 1959 I was ordained a 70 by A. Theodore Tuttle. While I was Ward Clerk in the 3rd Ward under Bishop Bowman I ordained David a deacon on 21 June 1959 and a Teacher on 25 June 1961. In the spring of 1962 after school was out we packed the camper and went to the Worlds Fair in Seattle Washington, the family really enjoyed the outing. I sold my Studebaker and drove my father in-laws Buick until 1961 when I turned it in on a 1961 Ford Galaxie. That same year I finished the bathroom in the basement. In the fall of 1962 I went to Maryland, Alabama and Washington D C on TDY. In 1963 I was made Cub Master in the Scouting program, that was an exciting year. On 26 May 1963 I ordained Ron a Deacon. On 23 June 1963 I ordained David a Priest, our ward was changed to 8th ward under Bishop Wallace F Allen. On 21 Oct 1963 our three sons were returning home from a weekend of deer hunting, they were involved in a auto accident, David and Dan received minor injuries totaled the car, we felt blessed as they could have been injured very seriously. In July 1963 we made a fireplace in the West end of our basement later I made it into a family room. On 8 Nov 1963 Lucille had a female operation in the LDS Hospital by Dr. J. V. Stevenson. On my birthday in 1964 I purchased a new 1964 Chev Impala from Moor Motor in Coalville Utah. Also on my birthday Mother married Dewey O. Nelson in the Salt Lake Temple. Mother was very lonely since Dad had passed away, Dewey treated us all well and we enjoyed his company. Dewey was good to Mother, they did some traveling which was new for Mother. Later that year I remodeled our kitchen, installed new sink, new cabinet doors and counter top. In Sept 1965 I purchased a 17½ foot Hydroswift boat with a 75 HP motor, our family thoroughly enjoyed this boat for many years. (water skiing, fishing and boating). On 18 Sept 1966 we purchased our first Color TV from Fame S/N LK5311. In Sept 1968 we purchased our Freezer, carpet and drapes. In May 1971 I purchased a used 1970 Honda trail 90. Pierce, Jay, Ernie and I enjoyed riding them up at Hebegan every year and some times during the deer hunt. The many many escapades we had at Hebegan will never be forgotten, water skiing, fishing, hiking, visiting, bike riding, Thelma and her thermal underwear, going after wood to keep warm and dry during rainy days, teasing Pierce, cook outs around the camp fire, Lucille’s lemon pies and her hide out between the trees, mushroom hunting for a steak dinner etc. this we enjoyed with my two brothers, two sisters and their families for many years at the Spring Creek camp ground at Hebegan. On 28 May 1972 I was ordained a High Priest by Pres. Clinton D. Zollinger. On 19 Sept to 4 Oct I was on TDY to Bedford and Dedham Mass. David our first son graduated from Davis High School and Seminary in May 1965. David was a honor student, received a scholarship to Weber State. On 22 Jan 1967 I ordained David an Elder. David received a LDS Mission call on 4 Jan 1967, entered the Mission home 30 Jan. He returned from the British Mission 5 Jan 1969. His homecoming was on 12 Jan 1969. While David was on his mission we enjoyed having his girl friend Judy Denkmann join us on many occasions. Being she was a nonmember we didn’t know what the future would be. We didn’t know it at the time but she was receiving the Missionary lessons while he was away. Upon his return she was baptized and they were married in the Salt Lake Temple on 18 Dec 1969. David returned to Weber State and graduated in May 1973. David went to work for K-Mart, not caring for their lifestyle he terminated and went to work for Anderson Lumber Company. David and Judy had two beautiful daughters, Micelle and Tiffany who we love and think a great deal of watching them grow and develop into young ladies is a joy forever. Ronald our second son graduated from Davis High School and Seminary in May 1969. Ronald also was a honor student and received a Scholarship to Weber State. Shortly after Ronald started college he joined the National Guard, went to Camp Leanerdwood Mo. for Boot Camp. On 18 April 1970 I purchased a 1970 ¾ ton Ford truck from Crandall Walker in Coalville. We sold the 1960 truck and put the camper on the new truck. Lucille and I made a trip back to Camp Leanerdwood Mo. in May 1970 to pick Ronald up from boot camp. In June we replaced the camper with a new larger unit, self contained from Carl White in Farmington, I helped in its construction. After Ronald returned from boot camp he reentered college. Ronald received his LDS Mission call to Japan on 10 Oct 1970, returned 27 Oct 1972. It was a coincidence that while Ronald was there on his Mission in Japan, his cousin Kevin was there at the same time, later two more of his cousins Kelly and Todd filled Missions in Japan. In Oct 1972 Lucille and I went on a tour to Hawaii, while there Ronald joined us on his way home from Japan from his Mission. The three of us visited the four Islands on the tour. Ronald returned to Weber State and graduated in May 1976. While attending College he met Barbara Stacey they were later married in the Logan Temple on 19 June 1974. Ronald worked for several business concerns in Idaho and Utah, later he was employed by Hercules Powder Co. Ronald and Barbara had our first grandson, Christopher Ronald named after me. Later they had a lovely daughter Camille, then another precious boy Phillip Newell. On 13 June 1965 I ordained Ronald a Teacher. On 27 March 1966 I ordained Dan a Deacon. On 21 May 1967 I ordained Ronald a Priest. On 17 March 1968 I ordained Dan a Teacher. On 22 March 1970 I ordained Dan a Priest. On 13 Sept 1970 I ordained Ronald an Elder. On 11 March 1973 I ordained Dan an Elder. On 21 Dec 1980 Ronald was ordained a 70 by Floyd Gowans. Our third son Dan William graduated from Davis High School and Seminary in May 1972. Dan was a honor student along with his brothers, received scholarship to Weber State. Dan received his LDS Mission call to Oakland Calif. on 21 April 1973, returned 24 April 1975, Married his high school sweetheart Carrie Morgan in the Salt Lake Temple on 25 June 1975. Dan graduated from college in May 1978. Dan was and is dedicated to the Automotive World, his goal was to work for General Motors which became a reality. His advancements reflects his efforts and interest. Dan and Carrie had two fine sons, Matter and Adam and then welcomed daughter Kristen. After 32 years of service for Uncle Sam I retired in March 1974. My accrued leave gave me a paycheck until Dan came home from his Mission in April 1975. Being home all the time was a questionable adjustment, I utilize my time in maintaining my home, garden and equipment, a number of my neighbors seem to require help which takes a lot of my time. During my life I have held numerous church positions such as 14 ½ years as Ward Clerk under three different bishops, MIA Counselor, Cub Master, secretary of Elders Quorum, secretary of High Priest group, assistant to High Priest group leader etc. The main sports I have enjoyed and still do are fishing and hunting, generally with the family. On one occasion on a elk hunt I went along for the ride as I didn’t have a permit. I was in the truck listening to Oct Conference on Saturday morning when I could see to spike bull elk about 150 feet away standing broad side, I turned the radio off, rolled down the window and shot both from the cab, that is sure hard on the ear drums. One of our family traditions is the yearly Oct Deer Hunt. For over 30 years the family along with numerous friends have camped near Thistle Utah for the annual event. Dad, Pierce and I were involved when it was first started, we do most of our hunting on Billies Mountain. We have become very well acquainted with that area. Many many stories can be told of our experiences on Billies Mountain. On 4 Jan 1974 my Mother passed away with a heart attack just nine days before her 80th birthday. My dear Mother was the last one of our parents to pass away. She will be long remembered by us children and many of her grandchildren and many friends. Some of the highlights of my life are; our temple marriage, received a commission as a pilot in the Air Force, own my home. Retirement, having three sons who went on Missions, graduated from college, and married in the temple and today are active and hold church positions. Dan and Ronald became Eagle Scouts, David didn’t have a chance. Our grandchildren are very special to us. Our three daughter-in-laws are gems, they have helped bring about many pleasures in our life. My family as a whole are just great. David is presently manager of Anderson Lumber in Bountiful, Ronald has a substantial position with Hercules Powder Co. and Dan lives in Rochester Michigan working for General Motors Chevrolet Division as a Technical Assistant. Since my retirement we have been up to Montana several times where Dan used to live also where he lives now in Rochester Michigan. I have finished my basement, it could be used as a apartment now. Also we have replaced some of our furniture. We belong to a travel club (Davis Antelopers), a very enjoyable group. Almost every month we go somewhere over night or out to dinner, sometimes we go on a trip. Whenever we can get together we go fishing with my two brothers and two sisters and their families. We thoroughly enjoy these family get togethers. As time goes on we home to get together more often. (My two sisters have become great fisherwomen) We have had our ups and downs but generally I feel we have had a very good marriage. We are indeed grateful and blessed to have sons who we love and are so proud of Our Family is everything. I am very thankful to have had the privilege of giving each of my sons a Fathers Blessing before going on their missions. I know I have made mistakes, I feel no one is perfect. I have tried to pass on experiences etc and set examples for my sons, I hope they can add to these examples and pass on to their children as I have tried. Ever since I was a boy scout and learned about our Flag and have served my Country in War, I have a great respect for the Colors and what they represent. Every time I see Old Glory or hear our National Anthem (which I have played many times years ago on my horn) a lump forms in my throat and tears in my eyes. I guess I’m just too sentimental. When my turn comes I have a special request, I would like to have a Military Service. Addendum to C. F. Butler’s personal history as written by his wife, Lucille Butler during August, 1990. I feel I should finish this part of Frank’s life history for future generations who might read it and wonder how he left this mortal life. Frank carried High Protein in his blood for ten years and in 1985 it became active and caused him to have Multiple Myeloma (bone cancer). He was told he had Multiple Myeloma on May 8, 1985 and as the weeks went by took chemotherapy and radium treatments, and was so sick. In Sept. 1985 he was told he was terminal with one to six months to live. He was very brave and we kept him home and took care of him. It was a heartbreaking time for all of us. He suffered so much. He had a lot of faith in his Heavenly Father and was a very spiritual man. He didn’t want to leave his family and me but knew it was his Heavenly Father’s choice. Frank was a hard worker, a good provider and was never idle. He was a great handy man and his children and grandchildren thought he could fix anything. He loved to fish and hunt. He loved fishing with his sisters and brothers and the fun times we had. It broke my heart when he left this mortal life on Feb. 8, 1986. He was my sweetheart, lover, husband, best friend a wonderful father to his sons and families. We still miss him so very much, but pray that we as his family can live worthy lives in the gospel and are grateful for eternal life and look forward to seeing him again. His loving wife Lucille This poem was in Frank’s suit pocket. It gives me comfort and I hope it will you. ALTHOUGH THE CURTAIN FALLS There comes a time for all of us When we must say good-bye. But faith and hope and love and trust Can never, never die; Although the curtain falls at last Is that a time to grieve? The future’s fairer than the past If only we believe And trust in God’s eternal care— So when the master calls Let’s say that life is still more fair Although the curtain falls.

Life timeline of Thelma B. Holt

Thelma B. Holt was born on 22 Apr 1919
Thelma B. Holt was 10 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
Thelma B. Holt was 20 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
Thelma B. Holt was 25 years old when World War II: The Allied invasion of Normandy—codenamed Operation Overlord—begins with the execution of Operation Neptune (commonly referred to as D-Day), the landing of 155,000 Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy in France. The Allied soldiers quickly break through the Atlantic Wall and push inland in the largest amphibious military operation in history. The Allies of World War II, called the United Nations from the 1 January 1942 declaration, were the countries that together opposed the Axis powers during the Second World War (1939–1945). The Allies promoted the alliance as a means to control German, Japanese and Italian aggression.
Thelma B. Holt was 36 years old when Disneyland Hotel opens to the public in Anaheim, California. The Disneyland Hotel is a resort hotel located at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, owned by the Walt Disney Company and operated through its Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products division. Opened on October 5, 1955, as a motor inn owned and operated by Jack Wrather under an agreement with Walt Disney, the hotel was the first to officially bear the Disney name. Under Wrather's ownership, the hotel underwent several expansions and renovations over the years before being acquired by Disney in 1988. The hotel was downsized to its present capacity in 1999 as part of the Disneyland Resort expansion.
Thelma B. Holt was 50 years old when During the Apollo 11 mission, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the Moon. Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two people on the Moon. Mission commander Neil Armstrong and pilot Buzz Aldrin, both American, landed the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at 20:17 UTC. Armstrong became the first person to step onto the lunar surface six hours after landing on July 21 at 02:56:15 UTC; Aldrin joined him about 20 minutes later. They spent about two and a quarter hours together outside the spacecraft, and collected 47.5 pounds (21.5 kg) of lunar material to bring back to Earth. Michael Collins piloted the command module Columbia alone in lunar orbit while they were on the Moon's surface. Armstrong and Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface before rejoining Columbia in lunar orbit.
1977
Thelma B. Holt was 58 years old when Star Wars is released in theaters. Star Wars is a 1977 American epic space opera film written and directed by George Lucas. It is the first film in the original Star Wars trilogy and the beginning of the Star Wars franchise. Starring Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Peter Cushing, Alec Guinness, David Prowse, James Earl Jones, Anthony Daniels, Kenny Baker, and Peter Mayhew, the film focuses on the Rebel Alliance, led by Princess Leia (Fisher), and its attempt to destroy the Galactic Empire's space station, the Death Star.
Thelma B. Holt was 70 years old when The tanker Exxon Valdez spilled 10.8 million US gallons (260,000 bbl; 41,000 m3) of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska, causing one of the most devastating man-made maritime environmental disasters. A tanker is a ship designed to transport or store liquids or gases in bulk. Major types of tankship include the oil tanker, the chemical tanker, and gas carrier. Tankers also carry commodities such as vegetable oils, molasses and wine. In the United States Navy and Military Sealift Command, a tanker used to refuel other ships is called an oiler but many other navies use the terms tanker and replenishment tanker.
Thelma B. Holt died on 12 Mar 1995 at the age of 75
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Thelma B. Holt (22 Apr 1919 - 12 Mar 1995), BillionGraves Record 28693698 Springville, Utah, Utah, United States

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