Willard Richards

20 Jun 1804 - 11 Mar 1854

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Willard Richards

20 Jun 1804 - 11 Mar 1854
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Grave site information of Willard Richards (20 Jun 1804 - 11 Mar 1854) at Salt Lake City Cemetery in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Willard Richards

Born:
Died:

Salt Lake City Cemetery

200-250 N St
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Dr. Willard Richards A Pioneer of 1847
Transcriber

trishkovach

August 1, 2011
Photographer

Trevanh

August 1, 2011

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Mary Ann Oakes Roylance

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Mary Ann Oakes Roylance Mary was born June 22 1810 near Congleton, Cheshire, England to Randall Oakes and Mary Lucas. We do not know much of her childhood, but she did learn from her mother how to make the famous Cheshire butter and cheese. She no doubt visited her Grand parent who lived near the Roylance family. As she married John Roylance in 1830 in the Church at Great Budworth, Cheshire. The main occupation in that area was farming and dairying. Life was not easy for them they moved three times indicating it was difficult to stay employed. Five children we born to this couple Henry 1831, Ann l833, George l835 who died in 1937, Thomas 1838 and William 1840, Elders Wilford Woodruff, Orson Hyde and Willard Richards with other missionaries came to their area representing the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The Roylance family attended some of their meetings, and soon became converts. John and Mary Ann were baptized by Hiram Clark who had replaced Willard Richards in the Mission Presidency They soon became desirous Immigrate and join the Saints in America. When Hiram Clark organized a group of Saints to come to America the Roylances joined the group, in hopes to make a better life for their family. They left Liverpool on the ship Sheffield Feb. 7, 1842 their destination was New Orleans, Louisiana distance of 5000 miles. They were there 2 days site seeing and getting passage up the river. They then boarded the Moravian for their trip up the river another 1000 miles to Nauvoo. When they reached St. Louis that ship could go no farther so they boarded the Goddess O Liberty for $1.00 per person, there were not enough births for all the people and some of them had to sit up all night. Because the water was so low the ship could not go any farther. So they boarded the Otter and finally arrived at Nauvoo at midnight April 18, 1844’ they were met by the Brethren of the church and the families were taken to family homes to spend the night. The Roylance’s had traveled 6000 miles on four different boats their trip took 77 days. They settled in Montrose, Iowa I assume because of farming, when we visited there the part of town where the Mormons settled had a stream running through. They had a girl Elizabeth born there in August l842 so she was pregnant when they traveled. Later they moved to Nauvoo as Alma was born is May of l846. They attended the Conference where Brigham Young spoke and they sustained new leadership for the Church. They were also privileged to receive their Endowments in the Nauvoo temple. In the winter of l846 with a family of 6 children they crossed the Mississippi River and headed west. They settled in Mt Pisgah, Iowa, their recourses were meager as they had not had time to build up resources. Soon after John heard the call of the Church to join the Mormon Battalion and decided to go. He was 47 years old and the oldest man in the battalion. Mary Ann was assured that the Church would care for dependent wives and children. Mary Ann took in washing and ironing and house cleaning or anything she could do to support her family. At one time they had nothing to eat and she went to her bishop and he gave her 4 ears of corn, and she made porrage to feed her family. Joseph Robinson was her bishop he recorded in his journal, “We moved to Winter Quarters taking Sister Roylance and her family with us. The brethren helped me build a one room log cabin for Sister Roylance. When John finished his tour with the Battalion He came back to Utah and finding his family had not been brought west, he headed back east and found his family, they had a joyous reunion. There was no means to travel to Utah so John found employment and worked for two years until he had enough to join the saints in Utah. While at Council Bluffs, Iowa Mary Francis was born in Feb. 1849. They joined the Warren Foot wagon train and came to Utah in 1850. Their family now consisted of 7 children with a babe in arms. They had all the hardships of the trek. They were happy to reach Salt Lake City, but they were immediately sent to settle in Provo, Utah. When they arrived their group was sent on to start a new community of Springville. Their first concern was safety, so they built a fort with one room log huts lining the inside walls, each family had one room. Then in the center they built an eating room where they all ate their meals together, it was also used for church and school classes. After they had planted and harvested their first crops they started building homes outside of the fort. I am sure Mary Ann was happy to get into a small home of her own, as she had another child, Sarah Ann born 1852 and another, Olive born in l954.The lean too was added later. They were then able to start their dairy farm. Mary Ann was able to use her skills making butter and cheese. They would make trips to Salt Lake taking Butter and cheese to sell there. Mary Ann was a good homemaker and very clean with everything. It was told by a daughter she would whitewash her dirt floors every week. When they organized the first Relief Society in Springville, Mary Clyde was called as president and her first counselor was Mary Ann Roylance. One of their duties was to greet the new immigrants as they came to settle in their community, to help them with any needs they had. Mary Ann’s garden provided vegetables and butter and cheese from her store to help many. One of the families by the name of Giles she met there was a young boy 13 years old. His Mother had died and his father had remarried a woman with three children of her own. He looked so forlorn and said, that she suggested that he come home with her. This he did and he became one of her own, his name was Alfred Giles. He lived with them the rest of his life. He never married and when the others left home he stayed there and helped John and Mary Ann as they grew older. When John died he was there to run the farm. When Mary Ann died and the property was divided up he receive the same as the other children. Mary Ann was a great example of a true Pioneer Sister. .

John Watson Bell, Sr. History

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Great-Grandfather of Rose Mae Willden Beeler on the Bell line. SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF JOHN WATSON BELL, SENIOR Born 28 May, 1805 Whelpington, Northumberland Shire, England Pioneer of 1854 Compiled by Myrtle Louisa Bell Labrum Material herein taken from letters and the journal of John Watson Bell Senior: memories and life stories of other members of the family; Boyds Marriage Index and Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah. My thanks to all who have helped in anyway. Myrtle Labrum The parents of John Watson Bell, Senior were: Robert Bell, born 1765 died 1832 Alice Rutter, Bell born 1766 died 1835 Both of Northumberland Shire, England. John Watson Senior was married October 1834 to Ann Fish who was born 21 January 1812 and died in 1872. She was a daughter of Robert S. Fish who was born about 1780 and died 12 January 1866, and Dorothy Kirkup born 1788 and died 28 October 1860, both of Northumberland, England. The children of Robert Bell and Alice Rutter were: Jane Bell born b. 1800 Northumberland, England Married Jos. Edrington Anthony Bell b. 1802 Northumberland, England Married Elizabeth _____ Mary Bell born b. 1803 Northumberland, England Died 1821, single John Watson Bell Sr. b. 28 May 1805 Whelpington, Eng. Married Ann Fish William Bell (Heir) b. 1807 Whelpington, Eng. Married _____ Summerbell Hannah Bell born b. 30, May 1814 Whelpington, Eng. Married Joshua Bracken The children of John Watson Bell Senior and Ann Fish Ann Elizabeth b. 28 March 1836 Elsden, England Married Henry Reynolds Robert b. 3 April 1838 Newcastle, England Married Mary Ann Williamson Alice Jane b. 15 April 1840 Newcastle, England Married Jeel A. Bascom John Watson Jr. b. 23 June 1843 Hartland, New York Married Laura C. Roberts Emma Dorothy b. 18 March 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Married Ephraim Roberts Joseph Alma b. 6 October 1846 Farmington, Iowa Bachelor Mary Francis b. 25 December 1848 Indian Town, Iowa Married Wm. Baldwin Sarah Emily b. 4 August 1852 Council Bluffs, Iowa Died 1853 John Watson Bell Senior, the fourth in a family of eight children of Robert Bell and Alice Rutter. He was born 28 May 1805 at Whelpington, England, where he lived with his parents on his father’s estate until he was 13 years old. He then went to a village called Acomb as an apprentice to learn the tailoring trade where he remained for 6 years. Two years later at the age of 21 he commenced business for himself at Elsden, England. It was here that he met and married Ann Fish October 1834. Their first child Ann Elizabeth was born here 28 March 1836. Later this same year he, his wife and baby daughter moved to Newcastle on the Tyne River where 2 more children were born, Robert and Alice Jane. In the early summer of 1840 John Watson heard the restored gospel preached by the Elders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and (Quoting John Watson Bell) "was at once convinced of the everlasting truth." He went home and told his father of the Elder’s message and invited him to come and listen to their wonderful teachings, but the father only rebuked the son and told him to "stay clear of those evil men from America or I will disown and disinherit you." (NOTE: In Boyds Marriage Index found the following entry – 1811, Fish, Rob. S. and Dorothy Kirkup, Newcastle A. S. This proved that Robert S. Fish married Dorothy Kirkup and not “Hercup” as sometimes written. Here were quite a number of Kirkup marriages but none at all under the spelling “Hercup.”) But the son (quote) "Being convinced they had the truth went again and after hearing the second discourse was baptized 8 August 1840 by Elder Amos Fielding at Newcastle. Three days later I received the Aaronic Priesthood being ordained to the office of Priest." His wife Ann was also baptized on or near this date. From this time on their definite aim was to emigrate to America where they would be with the body of the Saints, consequently in "the spring of 1841 on the 11th day of April," John Watson, his wife and 3 children--Ann Elizabeth, age 5, Robert 3, and Alice Jane, one year old took "the cars and went to Liverpool and on the 20th of April took passage for America on the good ship Rochester in the Heber C. Kimball Co. with 128 other converts to the Gospel and 7 of the Council of the Twelve, namely, Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Orson Pratt, Wilford Woodruff, John Taylor, George A. Smith and Willard Richards. The ship arrived at New York Harbor after a passage of 128 days (May 18) and on May 20, 1841 we first set foot on American Soil." John Watson and his family stayed in New York City for four days and then "took passage on a boat up the Hudson River and Erie Canal to Johnson's Creek, town of Hartland, Niagara Co., New York." Here their second son was born, 23 June 1843 and they gave him the name of John Watson Bell, Junior. This man was the father of the writer of this sketch, Myrtle B. Labrum. They remained at Hartland until 1 September 1843 when they "emigrated to Nauvoo, Illinois, and there another daughter was born to them 18 March 1844 and they gave her the name of Dorothy Emma. Sunday, October 1843 the eighteenth quorum of Seventies was organized at Nauvoo and John Watson Bell was ordained president by Elder Joseph Young. At Nauvoo, John Watson used his skill as a tailor and helped to make the curtains and pulpit as well as helping in other ways to build the glorious Nauvoo Temple which was dedicated 5 October 1845. On January 24, 1846 he and his wife received their endowments [in the Nauvoo Temple]. While living here amid persecutions and hardships he made suits of clothes for the Prophet Joseph Smith, and his brother Hyrum and several others, doing all the sewing by hand. On the 1st of May 1846 this family moved from Nauvoo to Farmington, Van Buren Co., Iowa, on the Des Moines River. Here on October 6, Joseph Alma was born. They remained here until spring of 1848 and then moved to Indian Town, Pottawattamie Co., Iowa where they lived in bark houses which were built by the Indians and later deserted. They spent the winter here with 6 other families and during this winter of severe cold and deep snow, five babies were born, one of them being Mary Francis Bell who was born on Christmas Day, 1848. These poor people used all their flour and in order to get more it had to be brought in on snow shoes from Council Bluffs, 50 miles away [probably less considering the actual location of Mormon settlements outside Council Bluffs]. Faced with hunger, they held a prayer circle and petitioned God's help. Soon after, they found a great cache of corn which had been hidden by the Indians. They ground this by hand in small coffee mills and made corn meal for bread and cereal. When spring came, the Bells moved to Kanes¬ville, Iowa, which was a small town near Council Bluffs, rented a farm and the next four years raised some very good crops. This last summer the little mother, Ann Bell went to Council Bluffs and gave birth to their eighth and last child, Sarah Emily on 4 August 1852, and took her back to Kanesville where she died eleven months later, July 1853. John Watson suffered sunstroke in 1853 and was ill for a long time afterward, in fact, had severe headaches from then until the time of his death which he attributed to the sunstroke. Not being able to work "Brother Neil" advised him to leave his family at Kanesville and go on to the valley. This he did, arriving in Deseret 7 September 1854. His wife and seven children followed the next year, 1855, under very unusual circumstances. Before starting on this long journey across the plains, Mrs. Bell had made all arrangements to travel with a company of saints by procuring one yoke of cows, two yokes of oxen, two wagons and the necessary provi¬sions of food, clothing, etc. for the trip. She loaded all her earthly possessions that she was allowed to take into these two wagons and started out. After a day or two of travel, her cattle disappeared in the night, probably secreted away by an enemy, she thought or maybe a boy friend who did not want her to go until her husband should return for her. Any¬way the cattle were gone. The captain of the company, thinking it not wise for the whole company to be delayed while they searched for her cattle, went on without her, advising her to wait for the next company. They were yet among Saints who were living along the way. But she was very anxious to go on because her husband was out there, somewhere in the west and in poor health. In about two weeks, when her cattle were located and returned to her, she and her children started on alone, thinking that the next company would soon overtake them. The children were Elizabeth 19, Robert 17, Alice Jane 15, John Watson Jr. 13, Emma Dorothy 11, Joseph Alma 9,and Mary Francis 6. Robert and Watson were old enough to do the driving and take care of the animals. Friends of the family tried to persuade them not to start on alone but Mrs. Bell said there was no sense in them setting in their wagons waiting, and that she was going on if she landed in the Missouri River. As fate would have it, when they were being ferried across the Missouri, one of her wagons not being properly blocked rolled off backwards into the water. The wagon was recovered but she lost some of her precious provisions and clothing. But still determined, she once more started her oxen and wagons toward the West, often taking turns with the boys, walking and driv¬ing the oxen. They traveled about 2 weeks alone, when they were overtaken by a govern¬ment freight train of twenty-five men with mule teams and a number of wagons loaded with freight bound for Fort Laramie, Wyoming. They were called "Truckey’s Train." The captain, Mr. Truckey, was a Frenchman and an Indian interpreter, having lived with the Indians for 15 years. He told Mrs. Bell that it was very dangerous for her and her children to travel alone on account of the Indians, that if her oxen could keep up with their mules, she might travel along with them for protection. How fortunate that the freight wagons were so heavily loaded that the mules were unable to travel faster than the natural gait of the oxen. Perhaps it was fortunate, too, that some of her load was lost at the Missouri River. Before many days they began to have trouble with the Indians and were even approached and surrounded by them several times during the weeks that followed. But Mr. Truckey was able to keep peace with them by being friendly and giving them blankets, shirts, and food. One time the Indian Chief spread his blanket on the ground in front of the lead team in order to stop the freighters, knowing that they would not dare to drive across it. Mr. Truckey stopped the train and sat on the blanket with the chief while they smoked the "peace pipe" and talked things over. Yet another time a group of Indians seemed more determined to make trouble. Mrs. Bell and the children became frightened and knelt beside their wagon in prayer, asking their Heavenly Father for protection. The Indians saw them and rode away without making more trouble. After that the men said she was a good luck charm to have along and would not have left her for any reason. She and her family traveled with this freight train until they reached Fort Laramie where she was fortunate to join the Gilbert and Garrish Freight Company bound for Salt Lake City, with merchandise for Dilworth and Harris who were merchants in the city. After a few days travel with these freighters they overtook the Mormon emigration company who had left her near Kanesville, Iowa, when her cattle were lost. The captain of the company invited her to finish the journey with them, but Mrs. Bell said, "No thanks, you didn't wait for me and now I am not waiting for you." She went on and reached the city several days ahead of them arriving in October 1855, tired but very grateful for the assistance she had received from the two freight companies and thankful to God for protection from the Indians. Mrs. Bell and children were disappointed when they learned that their husband and father was out of the city on business, but after a few days they got permission from some farmers to glean their wheat fields. They gathered and threshed by hand 18 bushels of wheat left by the harvesters and thus secured their flour for some time to come. The following is quoted from the Journal of John Watson Bell Senior, "In the year of 1853 at Kanesville, Iowa, I was taken very sick and was unable to do anything in the shape of labor. I remained very feeble after that sickness and in June 1854, I was advised to go to the valley by Brother Neil and not being about to move my family, he advised me to go alone, which I did, leaving my family in Kanesville. I traveled with the Benjamin Clapp Company and arrived in Salt Lake Valley the 7th of September. I and several of the brethren were hired by Brother Haywood, U. S. Marshall for the territory of Utah to go as a guard with George P. Stiles, U. S. Judge for the district of Parowan who had to go and hold court in that place. We were gone 28 days at $3.00 per day. I then returned to Salt Lake and wintered there. On the 16th of May, 1855, I was hired by the same Marshall to go to Carson on a similar errand, traveling eight hundred miles on horseback. I remained at Carson all summer working at my trade or anything else I could find to do, returning to Salt Lake in the fall of the same year, where to my joy and satisfaction I found my wife and family in Salt Lake City." Mr. Bell continued his occupation as a tailor making men's and ladies suits for the four years in Salt Lake City, then moved to Provo where he continued until called by Brigham Young in 1867 to help colonize Mona, Utah. Here he lived the rest of his life, farming and tailoring. July 10, 1872 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Mr. Bell acting as proxy was endowed for his father, Robert Bell who was born in 1765, for his grandfather, Anthony Bell, born in 1733 and his grandfather William Rutter born 1736, all of Northumberland Shire, England. At the same time his sister, Hannah Bell Bracken was endowed for their mother, Alice Rutter Bell born 1766 and grandmother Jane Hall Rutter born 1737, and grandmother Hannah Yololy Ovingham Bell born 1735, all of Northumber¬land Shire, England. On this same day the following couples--Alice and Robert Bell, Anthony and Hannah Y. Ovingham Bell: William and Jane Hall Rutter were sealed. These people had been baptized by John Watson's brother William Bell [acting as proxy] at Nauvoo May 21, 1843. In the year of 1872 John Watson Bell Senior and his wife Ann were living with one of their daughters, Alice Jane Bascom at Mona, Utah. Ann became ill and passed away at the age of sixty. After this, Mr. Bell made his home with his son, John Watson Bell Junior and family who also lived at Mona. In this home he had a room by himself where he slept and carried on his work of tailoring. Across one side of this room was a large box or chest which he used as a table for cutting out suits and storing his cloth, scissors, rule, thread, needles, etc. On the opposite side of the room on the floor was his bed consisting of a straw mattress with a lovely feather bed or mattress on top. There was a large canvas on the floor underneath the bed, extending out about 2 feet to keep the bedding clean. He had no bedstead. His clothes and clean sheets he also kept in a cupboard in his room. His health was not very good; he suffered severely at times with headaches which he attributed to sunstroke received several years before while working on a farm. One night five years after the death of his mother, John Watson Bell Junior was awakened by his father moving about his room and went in to see what was the matter. His father had taken the sheets off his bed and fold¬ed them up and put clean sheets on. He was then putting on clean underwear. The son asked the father why he was changing clothes in the middle of the night and he answered, "I am going on a trip and want things clean." The son helped him back into bed and returned to his own room, got into bed and had fallen to sleep, when his wife, Laura, hearing the old gentlemen groaning, awakened her husband, who found his father lying on his bed unconscious. He died at 3 o'clock on that same night. The doctor pronounced it "heart-failure." He was 72 years old, this being the year 1877. His resting place is beside that of his wife in the Mona, Utah Cemetery. [Graves are unmarked although the location of the old cemetery is still known by the townspeople.] He was a High Priest at the time of his death. These people lived full, happy lives in spite of pioneer hardships, always faithful to the Latter-day Saint religion, loved and respected by all with whom they came in contact, leaving a large posterity who cherish and reverence their moral excellence.

Partial Life Story of George Washington Hickerson

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

This is a partial life history of George Washington Hickerson, born December 13, 1813 in Smith County Tennessee, to William Loving Hickerson and Melinda Luster Hickerson. This copy has been taken from his own history in the same grammar and word spelling as penned by Brother Hickerson. "My father in 1814 removed to Illinois where he remained until the year 1822 when he removed to Kentuckey, where he remained until about the year 1825 when he moved back to Illinois where I grew up and in 1832 went as a volunteer in the Black Hawk War; returned home the same fall and enlisted in a Volunteer Company of rangers and was stationed at Fort Leavenworth on the Missouri River. While here I passed through Independence, Jackson County, Missouri, where I first saw the Latter Day Saints and was struck with great admiration in consequence of their gathering together. Yet I was averse to them in consequence of popular rumor which was always unfavorable. Returned home in 1833. This was the fall the stars fell, or something resembling the falling of stars. "In the winter of 1834 I went boating down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans. Here I saw the first rail car. Came back again in the Spring of 1834; stopped about home and in 1836 was elected Major of the Militia in Fayette County, and on the 29th of July 1838 married Sarah Woolsey, daughter of Joseph Woolsey and Abigail Schaeffer Woolsey, born in Lexington, Kentuckey, October 2, 1820 A.D. "First child, Elizabeth Abigail was born July 22, 1839, and in August of the same year I was elected Justice of the Peace in the district where I resided. The Saints were driven from Caldwell County and from all parts of Missouri to Illinois and were in a scattered and helpless condition yet many were sent on missions to various parts of the world. "Bros. John D. Lee and Levi Stewart being also sent they came down through Illinois and left their families with their friends. John D. Lee's wife and mine being sisters, he left his family with me. "This was early in the Spring of 1839. He left some books with his wife, among the rest the Voice of Warning, which I read occasionally, and must confess, notwithstanding my prejudice, I was a little concern about the matter, and in the Summer I had a singular dream. "It happened that one of my neighbors, Joseph Bowls and myself were sitting in my own home. It was a log cabin, and an angel came down and made an opening through the top of the house near the southeast corner. The impression came with him to us so he did not have to tell us he was an angel for we knew it. He proclaimed this singular sentence, "The Heaven Church Bell is ringing" I, being somewhat concerned, was anxious to know more about it and asked, "Is it ringing for us?" At this moment my wife shook me, and I awoke which ended the dream. The interpretation is like this: 'In the fall Bro. Stewart returned from his mission and appointed a meeting at my house. He stood before a window which threw light just as it appeared when the angel came, and when I thought of my dream I looked for my neighbor, Mr. Bowls, and there he sat at my right hand just as he was when the angel appeared. You may judge my feelings were more easily felt than described, and from that time to this I have believed Mormonism.' "Yet, notwithstanding my belief, I stood out against it for over a year. The thought of losing my good name, my friends, and popularity was more than I could bear. "Time passed and 1840 rolled on and on the 28th of September Elizabeth A. died, being one year, two month and six days old. This caused me some more serious reflection, and I had nearly made up my mind to be baptized, but there was an opposite power at work. An old gentleman came very near persuading me that the world and its glory was superior to Jesus with all his promised blessings; but the Lord had prepared the way, and his elders came along just at this time and when I was in this frame of mind, and through their testimony I was persuaded to yield myself a candidate for baptism. But I cannot say as many do that I received it gladly, for these same old thoughts of the world and its glory caused me to count up the cost and to weigh the matter seriously, and I finally came to the conclusion to throw myself into the hands of the Almighty with a determination to trust in Him henceforth, and on the 19th of October 1840 both my wife and I were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Cornelius P. Lott in company with Eliezer Miller. "I had now fully made up my mind to try to be a Latter-day Saint, and knowing the prejudice that existed among the people of the world against The Saints, I soon found myself preparing to gather up with the people of God where I could worship unmolested and have a people to associate with who believed as I did. On the 28th of November 1840 Isaac Woolsey Hickerson was born, and early in the spring of 1841 I migrated to Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois where the Saints were then gathering. "It was a very sickly place, and although my family was small we were seldom if ever all well at the same time. Thus the sickness and other duties which were to be performed made it very hard for the poorer class of the people. Yet we enjoyed ourselves and rejoiced before The Lord in whom we put our trust and had partial peace for the space of two years. But when the gentiles saw that the Lord preserved and prospered the Saints, fine farms and houses opened and erected in all the country round, besides a fine city being built on the finest sight on the Mississippi, their jealousy began to be excited and they began to envy the Saints and to breed disturbances wherever an opportunity was presented. "On the 11th of December 1842 Susannah Woolsey Hickerson was born at 3:30 AM. "The Gentiles grew more and more bitter, and at length we were compelled to take up arms to defend ourselves against our enemies, and thus our difficulties increased. "Writ after writ was taken out for Brother Joseph Smith the Prophet, and thus we were under arms and harrassed by our enemies. "On the 21 of March 1845 Joseph Wm Woolsey Hickerson was born at 11:15 PM. "But e're this time the Prophet Joseph and his brother Hyrum had gone the way of al the earth, for some time in June 1844 they gave themselves up for trial through the promised protection and pledged faith of the Governor of Illinois on writs that had previously been taken out against them. "But notwithstanding the pledged honor of the executive they were shamefully abandoned to their fate and on the 27th of June about 5:00 O'clock PM they were brutally murdered in the Carthage Jail by a black mob of from 150 to 200 men. "This caused great mourning among the Saints for they were greatly beloved and were the two principal men. "And now the people were in great trouble, and many turned away, some after Rigdon, Strong and others, for they tried to set themselves up as leaders, of the Church. But the mass of the people being led by the Holy Ghost knew where and in whom the presidency existed. It existed in the Priesthood of Brigham Young the President of the twelve apostles, who took his place at the head of the Church by the voice of God and the people. And again the Church would have flourished but for the persecutions of our enemies. But notwithstanding all our troubles the Nauvoo Temple was so nearly completed that the Lord accepted it at our hands, and many received their endowments and sealings. "Our cruel enemies determined that we should not remain in peace. We, according to a treaty stipulation, began some time in February to abandon our houses and farms in the City of Nauvoo and in all the regions round about leaving our houses in the dead of winter, many very poorly clad, their sufferings were more than they were able to endure. Consequently they fell asleep, and all their sufferings were o'er. "I took my team which consisted of a span of horses and wagon and started in what was called the Guards, leaving my family in the city. But the guard being broken up in a short time O was loaded with Church property and some tools belonging to Louis the tinner. Came on to Garden Grove, helped to make that farm and then came to Pisgah, from which place I returned to Nauvoo for my family. Gathered up what little I could carry in my wagon and put out. Came back to Mt. Pisgah where we wintered. "In the spring of 1847 the United States Government not being satisfied with the impositions already heaped upon the poor distressed Saints called for 500 of our best and most able bodied men to go and fight the battles of the U.S. against Mexico, although we were in the wilderness without home and shelter. And this is the treatment we have and do receive at their hands always. "I left in the Spring of 1847 and moved to what is now called Florence on the Missouri River. Worked this summer with John D. Lee at what was called Summer Quarters about 18 miles from Florence. But this amounted to nothing and in the Fall I found myself with nothing with which to pursue my journey, and on the 15th of September 1847 George Washington Woolsey Hickerson was born at 5 PM. "And now notwithstanding my great poverty, I was not altogether discouraged. I went into Missouri and labored with all the might and power that I possessed and finally succeeded in obtaining a scant outfit with which, in the Spring of 1848 I started for Great Salt Lake Valley in the company of Elder Willard Richards one of the First Presidency of the Church, and it was not until the 4th or 5th of July that we got well under our way from Florence. It was a very hard trip on me, my wife being in very poor health, and part of the time two teams to drive with the assistance of Isaac my little son who was only about eight years old. But we arrived in the Valley on the 19th of October, and notwithstanding my scant means, I do not think we have done altogether without bread any one whole day, but we had some bread every day. "I will here make a record of our Patriarchal Blessings given under the hands of Hyrum Smith Patriarch of the Church of Jesus Christ of L.D.S., given in Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois, December 21, 1843: (Copies of Patriarchal Blessings of George Washington Hickerson and Sarah Woolsey in possession of Meridene Grant meridenegrant@yahoo.com) "The winter of 1848 and '49 we stopped in what was called the North Fort and in March 1849 we moved onto our city lot. "Now I had sold the last team I had the Fall previous and had to hire all the team work done I needed, but I pitched in with all my might and fenced for a 10 and a 5 acre lot making 15 acres in the big field, plowed the 10 acre lot and planted corn and sowed buckwheat. On the 25th of May James W. was born. In the Fall I started for California leaving my family in Great Salt Lake City and started in a train of old Pomroy, a gentile from Missouri, on the 3rd of November. We traveled the Southern route and on the 10th of March 1850 landed at Los Angeles, South California. Here four of us left the train in the premises and walked on foot to the Mariposa Mine. Here we fell in company with several of the brethern from Salt Lake, but being green miners, and not striking gold by the shovel full we left and went prospecting and in this way spent the greater part of the summer. "In the Fall I found myself on the Middle Fork of the American River. Here we might have done well if we had worked the banks, but we were still looking for the main pile, but finally we began to work the banks and made a little money. In the month of October I had a severe spell of Sickness. This used up the greater part of what I had made. "A little before I was taken sick my brother A. J. Hickerson came to me from Illinois, and after my sickness he, myself, and four others put our mites together, put up a house and kept goods and provisions and a boarding house. This we did until Spring when Wm. Woolsey and I sold out to the others and went out to Bear River and there kept a trading house until fall when we returned home on the 9th of October 1851. "The city had greatly improved, and not being used to city life I moved 30 miles north to Weber and got me a farm at what was afterwards called South Weber. On the 3rd of August 1852 Sarah Catherine was born at 1:15 O'clock A.M. "This was a pretty good place for a farmer, splendid range and I began to prosper again. On the 3rd of January 1854 Andrew Heber was born at 8:05 A.M. "Now I could have got along well here but for the prejudice of the Bishop Thomas Kington, who used his influence against me and finally succeeded in sending me on a mission to the United States. I started on the 6th of May 1854, traveled across the plains in company with a lot of other elders, separated on the Missouri River some of us going to St. Louis to get our appointments and fields of labor and others going straight on to their fields of labor. I traveled in Mississippi, Tennessee, and Illinois all alone wherever people would open their doors and ears to hear, but my health being bad, I returned home in the fall of 1856 on the 8th of September. "The winter of 1855-56 being a very severe winter, my stock had nearly all died and I found my family again in extreme poverty. But I went to work if possible with three-fold energy, striving to recover myself again from this dilemma of poverty. On the 3rd of June 1857 Mary Jane Woolsey Hickerson was born, 1:15 AM. "In this year I got a tolerable crop but our enemies came against us in the latter part of the year, and we were again under arms to defend ourselves through this fall and winter, and in the spring of 1858 we were counselled to take what we could of our effects and move south, which we did, and let the soldiers come in, which they did, under the command on one, Johnston, now a commanding General in the Rebel Army. "They were sent by Buchanan, the President of the United States. But stipulations were again entered into and peace restored. We returned to our homes some time in the latter part of July 1858, thus entirely losing one crop. Began to labor again on the farm and got a tolerable crop this year 1859. "On the 9th of November 1859 Clarissa Melissa Woolsey Hickerson was born at 5:00 P.M. "The crop of 1860 was quite light on my farm, 1861 was also light. "On the 18th of November 1861 Charles Erastus Woolsey Hickerson was born at 4:00 O'clock A.M. "1862-63 crops were somewhat better, and in 1864 we got a good crop, but while in the poverty of 1857-8-9 my oldest son left home and has not returned to this day and is now in the service of the Northern or Washington Government. We receive letters from him occasionally. It is now 1865. "On the 17th of February 1865 my next oldest son George W. Hickerson, Jr. went into the Endowment House and received his washings and annointings and ordination as an elder under the hands of ______________(not recorded). Patriarchal blessings of son Isaac Hickerson, born November 28, 1840, given March 21, 1857, and of daughter Susannah Hickerson, born Dec. 11, 1842, given March 21, 1857. Copies of above blessings are in possession of meridenegrant@yahoo.com. Susannah Hickerson, above, died 12th of November 1866 in Larrin Co., Surprise Valley, California.

Letter from Jennetta Richards, wife of Dr. Willard Richards to her parents and family, Nauvoo, Hancock County, ill July 8, 1844

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

My Dearly Beloved Parents, Sisters and Brothers, As Mr. Parsons intends leaving this place tomorrow morning for England, I embrace the opportunity of sending a few lines to you, my beloved friends. You will no doubt ere this reaches you have heard of the awful assassination of the two brothers, Hyrum and Joseph Smith: Yea the most awful murder that could be thought of in this world, two as good men as ever was on the earth, taken from their wives, children and friends, cast into prison; and because they are innocent of the crimes brought against them, they were murdered in cold blood in open daylight by a mob, June 27th, while the Governor of the State was making a speech at Nauvoo to the families and friends. They were to have had their trial on Saturday, but their enemies knew that they were innocent, and would not wait, but murdered them on the Thursday afternoon. There were about two hundred men painted red, black and yellow, and the cry was "The Mormons are coming to rescue the prisoners", when they commenced firing at the door of the jail. Mr. Richards and Mr. Taylor were with Hyrum and Joseph in the room, at the time. After the mob commenced firing, Hyrum and others held the door until the mob fired through, and Mr. Richards and Mr. Taylor took their walking sticks and struck their guns and bayonets as the mob thrust them through the doorway. Hyrum was shot through the head and fell backwards, saying, "I am a dead man, " then Mr. Taylor ran to the window to leap out, when a ball came and threw him back and had it not been for his watch, it would have gone through his heart. Joseph received one ball in the back and went to leap through the window when he received another and fell on his side dead, on the outside; about 20 feet. The mob was not satisfied with this, but some struck him on his face, damning him, cursing and swearing him after he was dead. Mr. Richards got his body half was through the window to follow after Joseph (knowing Hyrum was dead and expecting the mob in the room any moment) but seeing Joseph fall dead and more than a hundred bayonets to leap on, he retreated and found Hyrum dead and Mr. Taylor under the bed, with a ball in his left arm and three in his left limb, he ran (the mob retreated from the door when they saw Joseph leave the window which was two stories) through a passage into the dungeon to see if the door was locked; when he found it open, he ran back into the dungeon, laid him on the floor, and covered him with a straw bed, so that if the mob pursued, he might be spared to tell the story, if they did not find him; as Mr. Richards expected any moment to be shot himself. He heard the mob in the room they had just left, but suppose they were driven away before they had time to search the dungeon. Mr. Taylor and Mr. Richards were not prisoners, but only there as company. Mr. Taylor was severely wounded only a ball passed under his left ear, seared his neck and took a little off the tip of his ear. The dead bodies of Saturday, and such a time of mourning I durst say never was witnessed. There were thousands of people to see them from all parts, and I believe they all sympathized with the bereave family and friends. What a sight to see a poor aged Mother, upwards of 80, weeping over her sons who had been slain in one day. For What? For preaching the gospel. By whom? Time will tell, but I will venture to say by those whom they pleaded with and entreated to forsake their iniquities, and for whom I have heard them pray time and again. Wives and children, sisters and brothers, mourning over their nearest and dearest friends. Oh! what a sight! My heart bleeds at the thought. Those very friends who only a few years before were dragged from their bosoms by a ruthless mob, cast into a dungeon with heavy chains upon them, and human flesh offered to them to eat, yea, flesh of some of their own brethren in the gospel, who had been slain. Oh! Could I picture the whole scene to you, and could you only have been acquainted with these two men, I knew you would say with me they were men of God. They never taught me anything but what was the most virtuous principles. How many times have I heard Joseph entreat of us to watch and pray, never take God's name in vain, never using light and vain conversations that we were born of God. I wish I could see you all a little while. I should like to write to you all that has taken place here the past two months, so that you might judge for yourselves. We sent you the papers every week, but I suppose you have not received all, for the mob stopped the post at Warsaw or Carthage so that we could not hear nor send to our friends. That was the reason we did not write to you at the commencement of the trouble; Will send you the papers giving an account of the whole affair. I think I never can praise my Heavenly Father sufficiently for his mercies to me in preserving and restoring Mr. Richards safe and sound again. It seemed to me as though the children realized it in a great measure, they made so much work with him when he came home. They are both very well. Rhoda Ann grows very much like little Ann. You remember how her teeth grew; this one just looks the same, she had six when she was seven months old. I shall expect to hear from you in the fall, and my beloved friends believe me just the same as ever. Oh how I long to see you and converse with you. I did flatter myself, I should go to England soon; had not this taken place. Hyrum Smith and his family intended going next fall, or Spring, and I think very likely you would have had a visit from us, but I do not know how Mr. Richards will be situated in the future, but I hope to meet in this life, I pray my Heavenly Father we may all meet in his celestial kingdom where parting will be no more. Do write soon. Life is very uncertain and if we should never meet in this life, I pray my Heavenly Father we may all meet in his celestial kingdom, where parting will be no more. Do write soon. Little Ann would say send my love if she could speak, she is a dear little one, so still we scarcely know we have a child in the house, day or night. Enclosed you will find some of Hyrum's and Joseph's hair; I do not send it thinking there is any virtue in it, but thinking it might please you to preserve it, as there has been so much say about them. If you do not think it is, you may send it back to me in your next letter. I have also picked out some of Mr. Richards white hairs. So you may distinguish one from the other, the long light colored is Joseph's, the dark short is Hyrum's . I must conclude with our joint love to you all, and believe me ever to remain your most affectionate daughter and sister. Jennetta Richards

Deseret News 1858: History of Willard Richards

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

http://udn.lib.utah.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/deseretnews1/id/9443/show/9449/rec/3 http://udn.lib.utah.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/deseretnews1/id/9483/show/9489/rec/4

A special presentation given at the 1971 Richards Reunion by Mrs, Riley C. Richards

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

WILLARD RICHARDS (1804-1854) My early years were spent in Hopkinton. Brother Joseph was married when I was in my third year. Phinehas, father's main help, was then eighteen, but we three younger boys,. Levi and William and I, had good times playing and going to school together. When we moved west to the home father had built for us in Richmond, Levi was sixteen, William fourteen, and I eleven. The family had been members of the Congregational Church in Hopkinton, and most of them joined Rev. Mr. Dwight’s Congregation in Richmond. I had thought and wondered much about religion, and liked to read all the books I could find. Although I was somewhat careless in my dress and appearance, I studied hard to prepare myself for acceptance into the Congregation. But Mr. Dwight considered me unworthy, and feeling rejected I turned more to scientific studies, qualifying myself to become a teacher. I also gave exhibitions in elector chemistry. At this time Sister Rhoda was suffering from cancer, and there has been so much Sickness in my father 's family that I determined to take up the study of Thomsonian medicine. Brother Levi joined me in my studies. We gathered herbs, made pill, and had good success in treating ills. It was while visiting Uncle and Aunt Parker in Southborough that I first saw the Book Of Mormon, which Cousin Brigham Young had left with them. I read it through twice in ten days and knew “Either God or the devil had a hand in that book, for man never wrote it!” Then I realized God had something greater for me to do than peddle pills. I determined to go West to meet Joseph Smith, but while still in the East I suffered from a strange seizure or stroke that left me partly paralyzed. It was more than two months before I was able to return home. There Cousins Brigham and Joseph Young came to teach us the gospel. Father and mother would have none of it, but Brother Levi and I determined to go to Kirtland to meet the Prophet, and to make a home for Sister Hepsy, who also believed. On the last day of the year 1836, Levi and I were baptized in the Chagrin River by Cousin Brigham Young, and from that time until my death I devoted myself to the ministry. The account of my mission to England, where I was ordained an Apostle, and where I found my dear wife Jennetta, is told by Claire Noall in her book, Intimate Disciple, also of my return, and my service as a scribe to the Prophet in Nauvoo, of my imprisonment with him in Carthage Jail, and my effort to keep peace among our people following the martyrdom of Joseph and Hyrum Smith. As Counselor to President Brigham Young I led a company of Saints to Utah in 1848, and served as Postmaster until my early death March 11, 1854. I buried Jennetta in Nauvoo, leaving the care of our children, Heber John, and Rhoda Ann to Sister Rhoda. Eleven other good women were sealed to me as wives, and we were blessed with fifteen children. My descendants now number more than 2300.

Life and Ancestors of ALBERT Z. RICHARDS, SR.

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

by SON: A. Z. Richards, Jr. (dated June 1982) ALBERT ZABRISKIE RICHARDS was born of goodly parents in Mendon, Cache Valley, Utah on August 18, 1883. He died on December 20, 1967 after a hard day's work in his own home as he was sitting on the edge of the bed talking with his beloved wife, IRENE. She was ill and had been ailing for many months. The Lord took him instantly without pain. His son, Foley, had visited him a couple of hours earlier in the living room of their home and recalls only that "Father was very tired." A. Z. RICHARDS (as he was better known by his neighbors and business associates) was a great man, a man of God, a missionary to Scotland, a man without guile, a man pure in heart, and truly the "salt of the Earth", as spoken by the Lord in the Sermon on the Mount. His own sisters particularly remember him as the "sweetest" man they ever knew; and this can be verified by many others, including his daughters-in-law and his son-in-law. In spite of this classification of a man, A.Z.Richards made a tremendous contribution to the State of Utah in his chosen field of Civil Engineering. For brevity we are passing details of the many waterworks, dams, reservoirs, irrigation and drainage systems, etc. which he engineered and built for the people of Utah. He was the first Civil Engineering graduate of the University of Utah. Prior to 1905, when he received his B.S. degree, the University of Utah had only a course in Mining engineering. Along with his partner, Richard E. Caldwell, he organized the engineering firm of Caldwell & Richards in Salt Lake City which now, after more than 70 years of continuous operation, is known as Caldwell, Richards & Sorensen. In the year 1965, at 82 years of age, A.Z. Richards was selected as "Top Man of the Year" in the public works field by the Utah Chapter of the American Public Works Association and the Salt Lake Kiwanis Club. HIS ANCESTRY You will see in this resume that we have devoted more space to the fore-bearers of A.Z.Richards than to the man himself whom we honor; but by doing so, we much better understand the man! Before the time of the Norman Conquest, the RICHARDS name was known in Scandinavia, Germany, France and Spain, with its terminations varied according to national usage. It is probable that the ancestors of Dr. Willard Richards (father of Willard Brigham Richards and the grandfather of A.Z.Richards), came to the British Isles at approximately the time of William the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy, who defeated Harold, the last of the Saxon kings of England, and obtained control of that country (A.D.1066). The RICHARDS name is repeatedly associated with nobility and landed titles of the British Isles. Books of heraldry give no less than seventeen distinct coats of arms by the name of RICHARDS. Dr. Willard's progenitors are next to be found in New England, for he was of that sturdy Puritan stock which came to this country in quest of religious and political liberty. His earliest American ancestor, Richard Richards, settled at Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1633 - only thirteen years after the landing of the Pilgrims. The family continued to live in New England until its members became identified with the Latter-Day Saints and moved westward. Thus, in a brief paragraph or two, we dispose of centuries of Dr. Willard's ancestors - a great concourse of men and women; tall men, short men, thin men, and fat ones; the women all beautiful, either pleasingly plump or with slender line; the children interesting, obedient, mischievous, serious, and playful. In between were the youth of varying descriptions, but all exuberant with life, ambitious, hopeful, and optimistic as to what the future held for them. HIS GRANDFATHER DR. WILLARD RICHARDS' mother was Rhoda Howe, whose youngest sister, Abigal Howe, was the mother of the great pioneer leader, Brigham Young; thus making A.Z. a first cousin twice removed from Brigham Young. Joseph and Rhoda joined another ancient and honorable order - that of the large family -an order which is fast losing out in these times of ease, sophistication, and birth control. They reared a family of nine children. Of these nine children, three sons - Phinehas, Levi and Willard - became prominently identified with the Latter-Day Saints and the settlement of the West. They are the heads of the Richards family of Utah.. All three of these men were doctors of medicine. Dr. Willard, as a boy, worked on the farm. Later, he and Levi "became engaged in making lumber." And still later, like his brothers, Phinehas and Levi, he joined the medical profession and was known throughout the rest of his life as Dr. Willard Richards. Dr. Willard Richards, grandfather of the subject of this brief biography, deserves separate consideration by reason of his outstanding services to the Church in his time. Among those early church leaders, none was nearer to the Prophet nor possessed such a variety of talents. When he was ten years of age, the family moved from Hopkinton, where he was born, to Richmond, Massachusetts. Here he became interested in religion. After a careful examination of various branches of the Christian faith, he concluded that "none of them was satisfactory to him." It was when his mind was in this state that he came upon Mormonism. In 1832 his cousin, Brigham Young, and two of Young's brothers had joined the Mormons. And in 1835 Brigham, thinking that some of his relatives would be interested in the new faith, left a copy of the Book of Mormon in the home of his cousin, Lucius Parker, in Southborough, Massachusetts. It was this copy that Dr. Richards picked up while visiting there. Upon opening this volume at random, totally ignorant of its design or contents and before reading half a page, he exclaimed, "Either God or the Devil had had a hand in that book, for man never wrote it." Until this time all he had heard of Mormonism was that "Joe Smith, somewhere out west, had found a golden Bible." Never before had he been privileged to see it. In ten days, he eagerly read the book through twice. The impressions on him from reading the Book of Mormon were so strong and its message appealed to him so forcefully that he immediately decided to make a thorough investigation of the Mormon religion. Thereupon, "he settled his accounts, selling his medicines, freeing himself from every encumbrance," so that he might go to Kirkland, Ohio, seven hundred miles away, to the scene of Mormonism. At the time, he told his family and friends that he believed the Lord had some greater work for him to do than what he was then engaged in. But no sooner was he ready to leave than he was stricken with the palsy and suffered greatly. But with Willard's determination, such an affliction could do no more than postpone his plans; and the next year, 1836, in October in arrived in Kirkland, Ohio. He was accompanied by his brother, Dr. Levi Richards, who attended him as physician. there they were cordially received; and for some weeks following they enjoyed the hospitality of their cousin, Brigham Young. For most people, it is easier to accept a proposition than to investigate it. but this was not true with Dr. Willard Richards. For several months he gave Mormonism "an increasing, untiring investigation, until December 31, 1836, when he became thoroughly convinced of its truth and value." On that day he was baptized at Kirkland by Brigham Young; and on March 6, 1837, he was ordained an Elder by Alva Beeman. And then there began the life-mission of a great man in a great cause. In those early days of the church, conversion meant service. It meant offering oneself without reservation to the general good. And this is just what Dr. Richards did. It was but a few days after his ordination that he left on a mission to the Eastern States. Returning June 11, 1837, he was blessed and set apart by Joseph Smith to accompany Heber C. Kimball, Orson Hyde, and four others to England. Over there, usually amid bitter opposition, he labored with success as a missionary in Preston, Bedford, and other places. At a General Conference at Preston, England, held February 1838, he was ordained a High Priest and appointed First Counselor to Joseph Fielding, who succeeded Heber C. Kimball as Mission President. On September 23, 1838, in England, he married Jennetta Richards, daughter of the Reverend John Richards. A short time prior to the marriage, Heber C. Kimball, his missionary co-worker, had said to him, "Well, Willard, I baptized your wife today." He referred to Jennetta Richards. Later as Dr. Richards became acquainted with her, he proposed in these words, "Jennetta, I have no desire to change my name, have you?" Her answer led to the marriage altar. He continued his missionary work; and upon the arrival of the apostles from america, he was ordained to the "twelve", April 15, 1840, under the hands of Brigham Young. He had been "called by direct revelation". Willard Richards was the only apostle ordained at the request of the Prophet Joseph Smith outside the U.S.A. While in England, he assisted Parley P. Pratt in editing the Millennial Star and also for a time "performed the general duties of presiding over the mission". In February 1841, he and his wife moved from Preston to Manchester. Two months later he was released, left England, and arrived in Nauvoo on August 16, 1841, having fulfilled the longest foreign mission in the Church up to that date. Under advice of the brethren, he and his wife first located at Warsaw, Illinois. In October 1841, he was appointed recorder for the Temple, private secretary to Joseph smith, and general church clerk. He became recorder of the city council and clerk of the municipal court. In addition, he kept the prophet's private journal, making an entry only a few moments before his martyrdom. With the exception of a short mission to the East, he was with Joseph Smith until the last. No man was closer to the Prophet than was Dr. Willard Richards. He was with him when he died and has been called "the intimate disciple". Within those prison walls at Carthage, John Taylor, at Joseph's request, had twice sung "A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief" to soothe the Prophet's feelings. "The afternoon was sultry and hot. The four brethren sat listlessly about the room with their coats off; the windows of the prison were open to receive such air as might be stirring. Late in the afternoon, Mr. Stigall, the jailor, came and suggested that they would be safer in the cells. Joseph told him that they would go in after supper. Turning to Elder Richards, the Prophet said, "If we go into the cell, will you go in with us?" Then from Dr. Richards came this memorable reply: "Brother Joseph, you did not ask me to cross the river with you (referring to the time when they crossed the Mississippi en route to the West), you did not ask me to come to Carthage, you did not ask me to come to jail with you, and do you think I would forsake you now? But I will tell you what I will do. If you are condemned to be hung for 'treason', I will be hung in your stead, and you shall go free." Joseph said, "But you cannot." Willard answered, "I will." Only a few moments later, the assault of the mob on the prison was begun. Willard Richards and John Taylor gladly risked their lives in their valiant defense of the Prophet and his brother, Hyrum. But their efforts were without avail. Joseph and Hyrum were slain. "And in the face of a hundred muskets in the hands of that infernal mob", says Andrew Jensen, "he (Mr. Richards) thrust his head out of the window to catch a glimpse of his dying president, and there stood gazing intently upon the mangled body until he was satisfied the innocent spirit had fled. His parrying muskets with a walking stick is one of the most unequal contests on record. God preserved him without the loss of a drop of blood and without a hole in his robe." Immediately following this terrible tragedy and until the other apostles arrived, Dr. Willard took charge of affairs, issued orders to the Saints, pledged them to peace and calm conduct; and they obeyed. "His letters and counsels at that time indicated great self-command and judgment. His ability was happily commensurate with such an occasion." Then he personally took the dead bodies of Joseph and Hyrum to Nauvoo. Going on with this brief account, Dr. Richards continued and devoted his entire life to indispensable service to the Church. He was active in its affairs at Nauvoo till the Saints were driven in 1846 from their beautiful city into the bleak wilderness. Dr. Richards shared their fortunes and misfortunes, went to Winter Quarters, Nebraska, crossed the plains three times, and became second counselor to President Brigham Young.j In January 1843, Dr. Willard married Sarah Longstroth as his second wife. In 1847 (October 13) as Captain of a company of 169 wagons and 526 people, he arrived in the valley for the second time, after returning with his brethren to Winter Quarters for their families in the fall of 1847. As a civic officer, Dr. Willard served as secretary to the governor of the State of Deseret and "did the greatest share of the business of the Secretary of the Territory of Utah." He also presided over the legislative assembly. He was postmaster of the Great Salt Lake City to the time of his death and enjoyed the full confidence of the Postmaster General at Washington, D.C., "who respected his judgment touching postal arrangements throughout the Mountain Territory." He served efficiently as a member of the Perpetual Emigrating Fund, whose duties affected many thousands of emigrants. He was the original editor and proprietor of the Deseret News. He was general church historian and church recorder, "for which offices he was eminently gifted" He magnified his office in the First Presidency and was greatly eulogized by Brigham Young. As a public speaker, he was eloquent. Upon one occasion he was selected as orator of the day. Being a public man, naturally he did a great deal of public speaking. Those who knew him describe him as modest, always keeping his place, and never boasting of his ability or accomplishments. And anyone who has seen his portrait will readily understand that he possessed a happy, genial, even jovial disposition, a radiant personality with a million-dollar twinkle in his eye. It is said that his good nature was contagious and that people felt happy in his presence. From Andrew Jensen we quote: "He chronicled events and incidents with rare accuracy of judgment and great tenacity of memory. the number of offices (eleven or thirteen in all) which he held at the time of his death indicate the confidence which the Church and State reposed in his great integrity and varied abilities. His ardent love of truth and his intuitive perception which impelled him to investigate the cause of the Church grew with the passing years. He possessed a calm and even mind and was rather reserved and naturally diffident of his own superior ability. On great and rare occasions, his masterly energies came forth like a well-disciplined and invincible troupe". Beloved and respected, Dr. Willard Richards died in Salt Lake city on March 11, 1854, at the young age of 50 years. HIS FATHER WILLARD BRIGHAM RICHARDS (son of Dr. Willard Richards and A.Z.'s father) was born in Winter Quarters on January 25, 1847. Dr. Willard Richards' home was a rather large octagonal-shaped tent. The sides were of poles standing perpendicular, the roof very crude, the floor of good mother earth. It was in this room, called the stockade, that some of the church meetings were held. It was here that WILLARD BRIGHAM was born. In 1846 most of the Saints had come from Nauvoo to Winter Quarters or were en route. In February 1847, Brigham Young and the original Mormon pioneers, as we in Utah have read in history and heard from the lips of our own folks, made their first trip across the plains, reaching the valley in July 1847. A few weeks later, in September 1847, most of these men, Dr. Richards among them, returned to Winter Quarters to take their families to the valley the next year. A few of the company were left in Salt Lake, where they were joined late in the autumn of 1847 by the second band of pioneers, which included women and children. Dr. and Mrs. Doremus, of whom we shall speak later, belonged to that company. HIS GRANDMOTHER It was in Winter Quarters in December 1847 that the First Presidency of the Church was reorganized, with Brigham Young as President, Heber C. Kimball as First Counselor, and Willard Richards as Second Counselor. In the spring of 1848, these men and many others started with their families westward over that long, long trail to the valley of the Great Salt Lake. Included were Sarah Longstroth Richards and one-year-old baby Willard Brigham Richards (A.Z.'s father). At best the trip was a hard one, especially with womenfolk and children along. Brigham Young and the brethren of that original company dreaded it. And if the men dreaded it, what about the women? But those stout hearts, it would seem, were ready to face any human hardship. But nothing happened to Sarah to take her from that pioneer train. One late afternoon in autumn, however, Dr. Richards' wagon, the one she was in, pulled away from the others over to a little hill. There, on October 6, on the Black Fork of the Bear River, she gave birth to another child, her second son, whom they named Joseph Smith Richards. It was not long after this event that this brave mother with this babe at her breast and little Willard at her side, traveling with that Mormon Caravan, entered the Salt Lake Valley. It was October 19, 1848. RECOLLECTIONS BY HIS FATHER - WILLARD BRIGHAM RICHARDS So at the age of less than two years, Willard Brigham Richards, came into the Valley. At that time the settlement of Great Salt Lake City was but in its swaddling clothes. In 1848 there were but a few houses, most of them of primitive adobe or log. where Pioneer Square now is located, the Pioneer Fort then stood. "We never lived in the Fort", says Willard B. "We lived in Pa's wagons on the old homestead where Richards Street is now, just south of the Temple Block. We lived that way until our house was built. "Our house was made of adobe, an unburned brick, as most of the homes were. The adobe yard was down where the Denver and Rio Grande Depot now stands. You see, in those days there was no brick kiln for burning brick and no sawmill for sawing lumber. Lumber was very scarce. The first lumber was sawed by hand, one man standing above the log and the other below it in a pit. One man would pull the saw up and the other down. "In our house there were seven rooms. The house stood a little more than halfway down the block between South Temple and First South. The entrance was from Main Street about where the arcade (now between South Temple and first south streets) is. And we had a path running from the rear of the house north to the Tabernacle Block. The house was really a string of rooms running west from Main Street. First came Aunt Mary's and Aunt Susan's room, then Sister Braddock and sister Franklin's, then Aunt Nanny's, then the large kitchen-dining room, then my mother's room. Then there was a south room for Aunt Susanna, and also a little kitchen. "under a part of the house, there was a basement. Here Pa had a small bakery just for the family. One day every week a man, who came across the plains with Pa, would come and do the baking. Later on, each wife baked her own bread. There was also a big fifty-gallon kettle down there for making molasses, etc." Uncle Willard becomes reminiscent.... "We did not live in community style, excepting my mother and Aunt Nanny, who were sisters. they cooked and ate together in the large room which separated their bedrooms. This was a living room for them also. They each had children, so they were given this extra room; and they really lived together. We boys slept in this kitchen-living in trundle beds. "My mother's room was the largest home. It was about sixteen by sixteen. Pa used it for an office. "Outside we had a barn chicken coop, a granary, a dog kennel, and a workshop. My father used the work shop very little; but Uncle Levi, Pa's brother, used it a great deal. He was a mechanical genius. In Pa's little shop, he made the first washing machine in Salt Lake. And he used to make and repair furniture on a small scale and repair clocks. By the way, Grandpa Longstroth made the first fanning mill in Utah. "By the way, Pa had two wives who lived in a little house down near Main Street and First South, where the old McCormick Bank Building now stands. But they both died in childbirth. In all, he had ten wives before he was fifty; and he was nearly forty years old before he was married. His first wife Jennetta Richards died in Nauvoo. "My mother was Sarah Longstroth Richards. She was born February 19, 1826, at Annclift, Yorkshire, England. She was a beautiful woman, rather small but plump with sparking black eyes. Her face was a little broader than Aunt Nanny's. She was only thirty-two years old when she died. "Grandpa and Grandma Longstroth crossed the plains, as you know, in 1848, when my father and mother came". Now to come back to my early boyhood. We lived right across the street south from the Temple Block; and we boys used to have that place as a playground, especially after the men quit work. There were some improvements on the Temple block then - the big wall, the foundation of the Temple at the southeast corner, the endowment House at the northwest corner, the old Tabernacle where the Assembly Hall now stands, and a bowery theater about where the Bureau of Information is now. "The old Bowery was just a temporary meeting place, thrown up right after the pioneers came. It soon gave way to the old Tabernacle. That building would probably hold 700 or 800 people. I went there dozens of times. My father used to take me with him to meetings when I was three years old - up on the stand with him. I remember one time just before the meeting started in the old Tabernacle. I went to the pulpit, raised myself up so my face showed, and how the audience did laugh! It frightened me. "the Temple grounds is where we used to play. Hundreds of times have I run all over the place, over the foundation of the Temple, and around the other buildings. We boys would run around the outside wall, on top. And after they put tar in the joints for topping, we used to dig pieces out and use it for chewing gum. Our crowd consisted of Heber, Joe, myself, President Young's boys, and Heber C. Kimball's, the Pratt's, the Spencer's, and the Eldredge boys, and others. "We played games, the Pratt and the Hunter boys and others and Joseph, Cal, and myself. sometimes the girls would play with us too - Phoebe, Sarah, Polly. Heber didn't play with me very much. He was older. He had his own crowd." Willard B. seemed to grow young again as he recalled his boyhood days: "We had several games. One was "high spy, knock down the picket". It was a game like this: We would get together and decide who would be the first picket man. Then, he would stand at the corner of a barn and "blind" until we hid. (You call it "hide and go seek" these days.). The object of the game was for others to touch the picket before the picket man could. Of course, he would leave the goal and look for us when we got out of sight. He had to be pretty careful not to get too far away. the first man caught would be the next picket man. As we played it, it was lots of fun. "I was a very timid boy then. I used to get frightened when I was very young. In the evening after the smaller children were put to bed, the women folks would come to the kitchen where us boys slept and bring their sewing and knitting and sometimes a book. Maybe three or four of them would come nearly every night. Mother, Aunt Nanny, Aunt Susan, and Aunt Mary were nearly always there. Aunt Susan was quite a reader. she only had one child (Mary Ann). so she had more time to herself and fared a little better than some of the wives financially. In her spare time she made gloves and sold them to the man who drove the Overland Stage and to the local merchants. "Aunt Susan would read stories. she was very fond of ghost stories. I slept in that room. Being the oldest, except Heber John, I often sat up or stayed awake longer than the other children and listened to those stories. Before the evening was over, I would be so frightened that when I went to bed I would pull the covers over my head and go to sleep that way. "When I was eight years old," he reminisced, "I was baptized in City Creek. It was on my birthday, and the spot was on Jedidiah M. Grant's lot where the Z.C.M.I. now stands and right close to Ezra T. Benson's place. "I wasn't more than ten years old when I hauled wood from City Creek Canyon for the folks. I always went with a man. He did most of it, but I drove one team. As I recall, I started to haul wood when I was eight years old. "The year the soldiers left Camp Floyd we took two wagon-loads of apples out there and sold them to the soldiers for twenty-five cents apiece just as fast as we could make the change. And it was all in silver, and we had seamless sacks full of money. " I have sold apples on the streets of Salt Lake city at twenty-five cents each and peaches at five cents each, and they returned the peach stones. "One thing I remember very particularly. Pa had a little race horse named Pacer Dick. They had found him coming out here (crossing the plains) with a saddle on. Maybe some Indians had taken him, put a saddle on him, and then he got away from them. He was a pacer and a little fellow. He was Pa's riding horse. "One day he came home and tied him in in front of the house to one of the trees that was there. And when I came out, Pa said, 'Willard B., take Dick down to Heber and tell him to put him in the barn.' I wasn't over six years old, but I climbed on that horse and started out. John Kay, a great big man, was standing nearby. (He later married Ellen Partridge.) He called out, 'Look at that boy riding that horse alone.' But I didn't go very far, because the horse struck out for the stable; and when he got there, he went through the door and brushed me off. "My father (Dr. Willard Richards) was a very, very pleasant man, congenial, and happy. Of course, I was just a little fellow, but I can remember that he radiated sunshine whenever he came around us. We all liked to be with him; he had such a happy disposition. I don't see how anyone could have been gloomy in his presence. He was a fine-looking, handsome man, too. "He was too busy doing things for the Church to think much about money. Those eleven or thirteen offices kept him mighty busy. He didn't get paid very much. He never had much money, only just barely enough to get along on. He liked to have a good time. He went to the dances. Most of the brethren did. Pa was considered one of the best dancers. Most of the brethren were pretty good dancers. A big man but well proportioned, and very light on his feet, was my father. 'The lightest man they ever saw,' the women said. Maybe they said that about the others too. "For a year or so before he died, I remember my father used to get his whole family together every Saturday night at home in one of our big rooms for a dance. He just had the family, and they danced and had a fine jolly time. Cousin Henry P. Richards was the musician. But when he married, his wife wouldn't let him fiddle any more. I danced as a little shaver. Never danced since. "They used to go to the old social Hall for dancing. They had lots of dances there. One thing Brigham Young and the brethren believed in was recreation. It was part of their religion. Even in those strenuous times crossing the plains, they gathered in the evenings; and besides prayer, they would sing and sometimes dance. As soon as they came here, provision was made for the dance and the theatre," Willard went on...... "Speaking of the dance and the old Social hall reminds me of what occurred there one night. It was right after Parley P. Pratt lost his life. They were having a big doings there; and one of the Kimball women said, 'I don't see any of Parley P. Pratt's wives here. I wonder where they are tonight.' and Heber C. Kimball turned to her and said, 'They are at home where you women will be when I'm gone.' You see, there wasn't much social life for the women after the husband passed away. Father's wives soon found that out. "My brother Heber became a doctor this way: One time a man came through here and went to see Brigham Young and asked him how many doctors they had here. And there was only Dr. Anderson, who came from California; and he had to take care of the whole territory. Of course, a little later there were others. But this man thought we needed more doctors. He said, 'You are not doing justice to your people. why don't you select one or two of the most promising of your young men and send them East to study medicine?' So Brigham chose Heber and sent him East. I suppose the Church paid for his education - either the Church or Brigham Young." We have heard something of Willard's early life in the valley and of his recollections of doings of that period. Two tragedies came upon Willard Brigham Richards in his boyhood: First, at seven when his father (Dr. Willard Richards) died; again, at eleven when his mother passed away. WILLARD BRIGHAM RICHARDS GOES ON A MISSION When Willard Brigham was 18 years old, President Brigham Young sent him on a mission to Germany. With a group of other young missionaries, he walked on foot from Salt Lake City to Julesburg, Colorado, which was the western end of the railroad. Upon leaving Salt Lake City, his Uncle Levi gave Willard Brigham a going-away present - not a briefcase of a bible - but an old single shot rifle! Uncle Levi said he hoped that Willard would never have to use it; but if they encountered Indians, it might save his life. It was kind of a heavy addition to Willard's belongings, but fortunately there was a supply wagon with the foot party. MARRYING INTO THE DOREMUS FAMILY On the 22nd of August 1877, at the age of 30 years, Willard Brigham married Annie Fairbanks Doremus; and interestingly, Willard B.'s sister Polly Richards, married Annie Doremus' brother, Abraham Doremus. Uncle Abe was a great influence in A. Zabriskie Richards' life. This man, Abraham Doremus, was one of the great early day civil engineers in the State of Utah. He was self taught but became a highly educated man in engineering from the technical books which he obtained from every available source. As a young man, his every spare penny was sent back east to mail order houses for books on bridge building, railroad construction, mathematics, surveying, hydraulics, etc. Abe Doremus lived in Tooele, Utah, and was an important man in that county. The parents of Annie Fairbanks Doremus and her brother Abraham Doremus were people of very high calibre. Their father, Dr. Henry John Doremus (A.Z.'s other grandfather) was a medical doctor who took his training at Princeton University and practiced medicine in the state of New Jersey before being converted to the Mormon Church in the early 1830's. He moved to Kirtland, Ohio; Nauvoo, Illinois; Winter Quarters, Nebraska; and finally reached the Salt Lake Valley with the first party in 1847. After arriving in Utah, everything was different. conditions compelled him to cut down trees, hew timber into logs and lumber for his new home, and to till the soil preparatory to producing crops for food for his family. But Henry J. Doremus was educated and an educator. It was soon found in the valley that they needed him to teach school. After teaching in various other schools, in the year 1862 he was called to teach at the Union Academy, near and just east of West High School. He was a conscientious, patient, and efficient instructor to the young men and women of that period. Dr. Doremus' wife, Harriet Fairbanks Doremus, also taught school in adjacent rooms to her husband. Young and old acquired knowledge rapidly under the instruction of the Doremus team and loved and appreciated their teachers. WILLARD BRIGHAM RICHARDS HAD TWO FAMILIES On May 19, 1988 Annie Doremus Richards gave birth to her sixth child (A.Z.'s little sister, Annie. Six days later on May 25, 1988 the mother died resulting from childbirth. Mary Louis (Louie) Snelgrove was Annie's closest unmarried friend, and it was Louie Snelgrove who came into the Richards home and cared for Willard B.'s family of five living children. The oldest child was years old, and A.Z. was only 4 1/2 years old at the time of his mother's death. One year later (June 5, 1889) Willard Brigham married Louie Snelgrove, officially making her his wife, and then she raised five of her own additional children for him. To all of the children and to their descendants, Louie Snelgrove Richards will always be "Mother" and "Grandmother", respectively. she was an "angel" and cared for each child as though he was her own. We must give great credit to Louie S. Richards for her rearing of a foster family and for instilling in them great testimonies of the truthfulness of the gospel. A BOY DECIDES EARLY WHAT HE WANTS TO BE ALBERT ZABRISKIE decided, when he was a boy,that he wanted to be an engineer like his Uncle Abe. From about 1880 to 1890, Abe Doremus was the City Engineer for Salt Lake City. The monumenting of Salt Lake City streets for survey control, the building of several important aqueducts to bring water to the city and many more great improvements to this growing city were accomplished under his direction. When A.Z. was about 8 years old (about 1891) his Uncle Abe made an inspection trip through the low ceiling brick aqueduct from Parley's Canyon to the city reservoir (near 1st South and 13th East). This memorable occasion of observing firsthand an important engineering structure, made a lasting impression on the young boy, and he decided at that early age (8 years) that he wanted to be an engineer and to work with WATER. From 1902 to 1906, A.Z.'s Uncle Abe served as State Engineer of Utah. He was appointed to that position by the Governor of the State and he thus became the 3rd man to hold that office. The first was Willard Young, and the second was R.C.Gemmel. Abe Doremus can be credited with conceiving the CENTRAL UTAH WATER PROJECT which now, about 80 years later, is being built by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to bring water from the High Uinta Mountains into Salt Lake and Utah valleys. So you can see that A.Z. had an important heritage in his chosen profession that did inspire him to great service to the public and to industry in the engineering field. In 1963, an abstract of the professional life and career of A.Z. RICHARDS would have read about as follows: -- RICHARDS, ALBERT ZABRISKIE: Senior Owner, Caldwell Richards & Sorensen Inc., Consulting Engineers, 118 First Aveue, Salt Lake City, Utah; residence is Graystone Apartment No. 15-B, 1108 East 27th South St., Salt Lake city, Utah. Civil Engineer; born August 18, 1883 at Mendon Cache county, Utah; son of Willard B. and Annie (Doremus) Richards; educated at University o Utah; B.S. Civil Engineering 1905; first Civil Engineer to graduate from U. O U.; Tau Beta Phi; theta Tau. --Married December 18, 1913 to Irene Seegmiller; children A.Z.Richards Jr., Blanche R. Valle, Foley C. Richards. Field Engineer, Hydrographer for Utah State Engineer's office 1903-04; field engineer in charge of surveys in Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia (with Young & Kelsey Engineers) 1908 to 1910; partner in Caldwell & Richards consulting Engineers - the firm operated as Caldwell, Richards & Hall, a partnership; son (A.Z.Jr.) and Alton H. Sorensen were partners with Mr. Richards from 1946 to 1956 under the name of Caldwell, Richards & Sorensen, and as Consulting Engineers Mr. Richards' firm operated as Caldwell, Richards & Sorensen, Inc. a Utah Corp. -- MR. RICHARDS' specialties from 1910 to date: Water supply (municipal); hydro-electric power development; sewage, waste treatment; irrigation; wells; water rights, drainage (agricultural lands); earth dam design; general municipal engineering, estimates, appraisals, reports, inter-mountain region. --MR. RICHARDS is a Life Fellow of American Society of Civil Engineers, and a member of Timpanogas Club, Salt Lake City, Utah. ALBERT ZABRISKIE RICHARDS' and IRENE'S FAMILY The accompanying family group sheets show that A.Z.Richards, St. and Irene Seegmiller were married on the 18th of December 1913, and that they had three children: Albert Z. Richards Jr., Blanche Richards, and Foley Caldwell Richards. Albert Jr. was closely associated with his father in the engineering business from the time he was a boy. He graduated from the U of U in the 1939 with a B.S. degree in Civil engineering, also. The firm has been very successful, now employing approximately 50 employees, and doing business in several foreign countries, as well as much domestic work in Utah. ALBERT Z. JR. married VERLA ASHCRAFT, from St. Anthony, Idaho on December 24, 1943. BLANCHE married Thomas a. Valle and Tom has been a wonderful son-in-law to A.Z. and has earned an important place in the engineering firm. He is Corporation Secretary and Treasurer and Director in charge of accounting and credit management. FOLEY married Beverly Beesley and has been very successful in the "salt" business as Sales Manager for many years with American Salt Company. The RICHARDS and the VALLE families are now filling important positions in the business and industry and are proud of their heritage and appreciate their opportunities in the Church. Both Foley and Albert have fulfilled two year missions and many more years in their callings as Bishops in the Church. Together, Father A.Z. and Mother Irene have been in inspiration in the lives of their children. All were taught to enjoy hard work and to appreciate the spiritual things in life, love of family, home, and service in the L.D.S. Church. It must be said that Mother Irene's father, William Henry Seegmiller, was postmaster at Richfield, Utah and for 25 years was also L.D.S. Stake President. The children of this wonderful couple agree that their parents were the best, and they believe that their optimistic philosophies, their testimonies, their many successes, and their material welfare has largely been due to these grand people and their fore-bearers. (Signed): ALBERT Z. RICHARDS, JR. @ Salt Lake City, Utah 07/25/78 PS: We also acknowledge the writings of Claude Richards (A.Z.'s cousin) from which much of the wording on ancestors has been obtained.

MY STORY - By ALBERT Z. RICHARDS, JR.

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

By Albert Zabriskie Richards Jr. (unknown date) "ALBERT ZABRISKIE RICHARDS, Jr. - son of A. Z. RICHARDS and IRENE SEEGMILLER; born September 28, 1914 at the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah. My father was born at Mendon Utah on August 18, 1883. His father was WILLARD BRIGHAM RICHARDS. His mother was ANNIE DOREMUS. IRENE SEEGMILLER RICHARDS was born in Richfield, Utah. A.Z. RICHARDS, Jr. has one sister, BLANCHE R. VALLE, one brother, FOLEY C. RICHARDS. Blessing at home by father. Baptism on Feb. 24, 1923 at the Salt Lake Tabernacle by Joseph W. Brower. Confirmed March 4, 1923 at home at 1991 McClelland St. Salt Lake City, Utah by A.Z. RICHARDS Sr. These records can be found in the Bishops Office Records of Mt. View IV ward. No patriarchal blessing has been given. Schools attended: Forest School (1-4 grades) Douglas School (5-7 grades) Roosevelt Jr. High (8-9 grades) East High School (10-11 grades) University of Utah (graduated in June 1939 in Civil Engineering. My childhood memories are in and around Sugarhouse, playing at the lumber yard, many fields too. One serious accident I had was when I was nine years old; I was riding a sleigh behind the police station above 11th east and the sleigh ran into me and cut me under my chin. I only had one serious illness, in 1922 with kidney trouble and was out of school for six months. At this time all I could eat was cod liver oil, soda crackers, and water. I missed a grade at school but the next year made it up so I could continue with my former classmates. My family had a cabin in Mt. Air Canyon and in the summers, we had a lot of wonderful times there. I attended the old Sugar House Ward, which used to be on the site where the Irving Jr. High School is now located. Went to Primary, Sunday School, Sacrament. Later went to the new Sugar House Ward. When I was ten years old we moved to 1129 Alpine Place, and I went to the Le Grande Ward, Liberty Stake. Attended all meetings there. Belonged to the finest scout troop in the city, no.36. Ross Ramsey was scoutmaster. Went to East High Seminary at 7am. Mr. Moss, Mr. Clayson, were two of my teachers there. Also attended Garden Park Ward and was pres. of young men mutual improvement asc. Secretary of Elders quorum there. Served mission in Great Britain Nov. 1935 to Dec. 1937. Supervisor elder of Scottish district at Glasgow, Scotland. Assistant editor of the Millennial Star. In March 1941, I went to Midway Island for Pacific Naval Air Base Contractors. Was there during the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Came back May 1942. Resident engineer at Bushnell Hospital U.S.A. one year until completion. Went to Boise Idaho for Engineering Office: Morrison-Knudsen Co. Went to Boise 1st Ward, was counselor of Sunday school there. Also met VERLA ASHCRAFT while there. We were married in the Salt Lake Temple, Dec 24, 1943. ALBERT Z. RICHARDS III was born April 25, 1945 in Boise, Idaho. In Jan. 1946 we moved to Salt Lake City and bought a home at 2022 Imperial St. and we have lived here since then. We also have five girls: RUTH ELLEN born June 1947; CHRISTENA born Nov. 4, 1949; VIRGINIA born Dec. 1952; SUZANNE born March 1955; PATRICIA IRENE born Nov. 1959. We lived in old Mt. View Ward and was advisor to the Deacon's quorum. In 1953 belonged to the Monta Vista Ward, counselor to sunday school supt. under George Lawrence. Later became supt. of sunday school of this ward. July 1955, was 2nd counselor of Mt. View 4th with Marvin Pugh, Bishop and Willard Bruderer 1st counselor. In Nov. 1956 Willard Bruderer was made Bishop, and I became 1st counselor with Lorrin Wiggins 2nd counselor. I was baptized for the dead but don't know how many times. One of my favorite books was Thomas A. Edison's life story. In 1930-1955 I was a amateur radio operator, station call number W7KFK. This was a very interesting hobby. My church ordinations are: Deacon - Oct. 1926 by Wallace Winkler Teacher - Jan. 15, 1929 by Oliver J. Sorensen Priest - Jan. 24, 1932 by Ernest Marti Elder - Nov. 3, 1935 by Dee Ray Shurtliff Seventy - Aug. 17, 1951 by Bruce R. McConkie High Priest - July 17, 1955 by Mark E. Petersen I liked sports of all kinds, especially enjoyed track and swimming at High School. I have enjoyed music and play the piano. Also like photography. Have taken movies of family and friends. The most important things in my life are first my family, second, my church and third, my profession of civil engineering. My great interest in the past few years has been in the development in the salt and chemical industry of the great salt lake. I believe that someday salt lake will be the center of a great chemic industry because of the abundance supply of magnesium, potassium, calcium and many of the trace elements which are found in the great salt lake. Also, great salt lake should become a great center of recreation for the intermountain area. One of the most interesting things I have been doing in my life is the study of salt and chemical development of the great salt lake. My father being a civil engineer also took me on many trips through different parts of Utah with him and these memories with the old automobiles and bad roads and the farming communities in their early days are extremely interesting to my life."

Dr. Willard Richards - My Great-Grandfather (by Albert Z. Richards, Jr.)

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

DR. WILLARD RICHARDS' mother was Rhoda Howe, whose youngest sister, Abigal Howe, was the mother of the great pioneer leader, Brigham Young; thus making A.Z. a first cousin twice removed from Brigham Young. Joseph and Rhoda joined another ancient and honorable order - that of the large family -an order which is fast losing out in these times of ease, sophistication, and birth control. They reared a family of nine children. Of these nine children, three sons - Phinehas, Levi and Willard - became prominently identified with the Latter-Day Saints and the settlement of the West. They are the heads of the Richards family of Utah.. All three of these men were doctors of medicine. Dr. Willard, as a boy, worked on the farm. Later, he and Levi "became engaged in making lumber." And still later, like his brothers, Phinehas and Levi, he joined the medical profession and was known throughout the rest of his life as Dr. Willard Richards. Dr. Willard Richards, grandfather of the subject of this brief biography, deserves separate consideration by reason of his outstanding services to the Church in his time. Among those early church leaders, none was nearer to the Prophet nor possessed such a variety of talents. When he was ten years of age, the family moved from Hopkinton, where he was born, to Richmond, Massachusetts. Here he became interested in religion. After a careful examination of various branches of the Christian faith, he concluded that "none of them was satisfactory to him." It was when his mind was in this state that he came upon Mormonism. In 1832 his cousin, Brigham Young, and two of Young's brothers had joined the Mormons. And in 1835 Brigham, thinking that some of his relatives would be interested in the new faith, left a copy of the Book of Mormon in the home of his cousin, Lucius Parker, in Southborough, Massachusetts. It was this copy that Dr. Richards picked up while visiting there. Upon opening this volume at random, totally ignorant of its design or contents and before reading half a page, he exclaimed, "Either God or the Devil had had a hand in that book, for man never wrote it." Until this time all he had heard of Mormonism was that "Joe Smith, somewhere out west, had found a golden Bible." Never before had he been privileged to see it. In ten days, he eagerly read the book through twice. The impressions on him from reading the Book of Mormon were so strong and its message appealed to him so forcefully that he immediately decided to make a thorough investigation of the Mormon religion. Thereupon, "he settled his accounts, selling his medicines, freeing himself from every encumbrance," so that he might go to Kirkland, Ohio, seven hundred miles away, to the scene of Mormonism. At the time, he told his family and friends that he believed the Lord had some greater work for him to do than what he was then engaged in. But no sooner was he ready to leave than he was stricken with the palsy and suffered greatly. But with Willard's determination, such an affliction could do no more than postpone his plans; and the next year, 1836, in October in arrived in Kirkland, Ohio. He was accompanied by his brother, Dr. Levi Richards, who attended him as physician. there they were cordially received; and for some weeks following they enjoyed the hospitality of their cousin, Brigham Young. For most people, it is easier to accept a proposition than to investigate it. but this was not true with Dr. Willard Richards. For several months he gave Mormonism "an increasing, untiring investigation, until December 31, 1836, when he became thoroughly convinced of its truth and value." On that day he was baptized at Kirkland by Brigham Young; and on March 6, 1837, he was ordained an Elder by Alva Beeman. And then there began the life-mission of a great man in a great cause. In those early days of the church, conversion meant service. It meant offering oneself without reservation to the general good. And this is just what Dr. Richards did. It was but a few days after his ordination that he left on a mission to the Eastern States. Returning June 11, 1837, he was blessed and set apart by Joseph Smith to accompany Heber C. Kimball, Orson Hyde, and four others to England. Over there, usually amid bitter opposition, he labored with success as a missionary in Preston, Bedford, and other places. At a General Conference at Preston, England, held February 1838, he was ordained a High Priest and appointed First Counselor to Joseph Fielding, who succeeded Heber C. Kimball as Mission President. On September 23, 1838, in England, he married Jennetta Richards, daughter of the Reverend John Richards. A short time prior to the marriage, Heber C. Kimball, his missionary co-worker, had said to him, "Well, Willard, I baptized your wife today." He referred to Jennetta Richards. Later as Dr. Richards became acquainted with her, he proposed in these words, "Jennetta, I have no desire to change my name, have you?" Her answer led to the marriage altar. He continued his missionary work; and upon the arrival of the apostles from america, he was ordained to the "twelve", April 15, 1840, under the hands of Brigham Young. He had been "called by direct revelation". Willard Richards was the only apostle ordained at the request of the Prophet Joseph Smith outside the U.S.A. While in England, he assisted Parley P. Pratt in editing the Millennial Star and also for a time "performed the general duties of presiding over the mission". In February 1841, he and his wife moved from Preston to Manchester. Two months later he was released, left England, and arrived in Nauvoo on August 16, 1841, having fulfilled the longest foreign mission in the Church up to that date. Under advice of the brethren, he and his wife first located at Warsaw, Illinois. In October 1841, he was appointed recorder for the Temple, private secretary to Joseph smith, and general church clerk. He became recorder of the city council and clerk of the municipal court. In addition, he kept the prophet's private journal, making an entry only a few moments before his martyrdom. With the exception of a short mission to the East, he was with Joseph Smith until the last. No man was closer to the Prophet than was Dr. Willard Richards. He was with him when he died and has been called "the intimate disciple". Within those prison walls at Carthage, John Taylor, at Joseph's request, had twice sung "A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief" to soothe the Prophet's feelings. "The afternoon was sultry and hot. The four brethren sat listlessly about the room with their coats off; the windows of the prison were open to receive such air as might be stirring. Late in the afternoon, Mr. Stigall, the jailor, came and suggested that they would be safer in the cells. Joseph told him that they would go in after supper. Turning to Elder Richards, the Prophet said, "If we go into the cell, will you go in with us?" Then from Dr. Richards came this memorable reply: "Brother Joseph, you did not ask me to cross the river with you (referring to the time when they crossed the Mississippi en route to the West), you did not ask me to come to Carthage, you did not ask me to come to jail with you, and do you think I would forsake you now? But I will tell you what I will do. If you are condemned to be hung for 'treason', I will be hung in your stead, and you shall go free." Joseph said, "But you cannot." Willard answered, "I will." Only a few moments later, the assault of the mob on the prison was begun. Willard Richards and John Taylor gladly risked their lives in their valiant defense of the Prophet and his brother, Hyrum. But their efforts were without avail. Joseph and Hyrum were slain. "And in the face of a hundred muskets in the hands of that infernal mob", says Andrew Jensen, "he (Mr. Richards) thrust his head out of the window to catch a glimpse of his dying president, and there stood gazing intently upon the mangled body until he was satisfied the innocent spirit had fled. His parrying muskets with a walking stick is one of the most unequal contests on record. God preserved him without the loss of a drop of blood and without a hole in his robe." Immediately following this terrible tragedy and until the other apostles arrived, Dr. Willard took charge of affairs, issued orders to the Saints, pledged them to peace and calm conduct; and they obeyed. "His letters and counsels at that time indicated great self-command and judgment. His ability was happily commensurate with such an occasion." Then he personally took the dead bodies of Joseph and Hyrum to Nauvoo. Going on with this brief account, Dr. Richards continued and devoted his entire life to indispensable service to the Church. He was active in its affairs at Nauvoo till the Saints were driven in 1846 from their beautiful city into the bleak wilderness. Dr. Richards shared their fortunes and misfortunes, went to Winter Quarters, Nebraska, crossed the plains three times, and became second counselor to President Brigham Young.j In January 1843, Dr. Willard married Sarah Longstroth as his second wife. In 1847 (October 13) as Captain of a company of 169 wagons and 526 people, he arrived in the valley for the second time, after returning with his brethren to Winter Quarters for their families in the fall of 1847. As a civic officer, Dr. Willard served as secretary to the governor of the State of Deseret and "did the greatest share of the business of the Secretary of the Territory of Utah." He also presided over the legislative assembly. He was postmaster of the Great Salt Lake City to the time of his death and enjoyed the full confidence of the Postmaster General at Washington, D.C., "who respected his judgment touching postal arrangements throughout the Mountain Territory." He served efficiently as a member of the Perpetual Emigrating Fund, whose duties affected many thousands of emigrants. He was the original editor and proprietor of the Deseret News. He was general church historian and church recorder, "for which offices he was eminently gifted" He magnified his office in the First Presidency and was greatly eulogized by Brigham Young. As a public speaker, he was eloquent. Upon one occasion he was selected as orator of the day. Being a public man, naturally he did a great deal of public speaking. Those who knew him describe him as modest, always keeping his place, and never boasting of his ability or accomplishments. And anyone who has seen his portrait will readily understand that he possessed a happy, genial, even jovial disposition, a radiant personality with a million-dollar twinkle in his eye. It is said that his good nature was contagious and that people felt happy in his presence. From Andrew Jensen we quote: "He chronicled events and incidents with rare accuracy of judgment and great tenacity of memory. the number of offices (eleven or thirteen in all) which he held at the time of his death indicate the confidence which the Church and State reposed in his great integrity and varied abilities. His ardent love of truth and his intuitive perception which impelled him to investigate the cause of the Church grew with the passing years. He possessed a calm and even mind and was rather reserved and naturally diffident of his own superior ability. On great and rare occasions, his masterly energies came forth like a well-disciplined and invincible troupe". Beloved and respected, Dr. Willard Richards died in Salt Lake city on March 11, 1854, at the young age of 50 years. (Portion of Albert Z. Richards, Sr. history - Written by Albert Z. Richards, Jr. 7/25/78)

"TWO MINUTES IN JAIL" (The death of the Prophet Joseph Smith in Carthage Jail)

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

From the Life Sketch of WILLARD RICHARDS (by Orson F. Whitney: History of Utah-Vol. IV) "Possibly the following events occupied near three minutes, but I think only about two, and have penned them for the gratification of many friends." CARTHAGE, JUNE 27, 1844 "A shower of musket balls were thrown up the stairway against the door of the prison in the second story, followed by many rapid footsteps. "While Generals Joseph and Hyrum smith, Mr. Taylor and myself, who were in the front chamber, closed the door of our room against the entry at the head of the stairs, and placed ourselves against it, there being no lock on the door, and no catch that was usable. "The door is a common panel, and as soon as we heard the feet at the stair head, a ball was sent through the door, which passed between us, and showed that our enemies were desperadoes and we must change our position. "General Joseph Smith, Mr. Taylor and myself sprang back to the front part of the room, and general Hyrum Smith retreated two-thirds across the chamber in front of and facing the door. "A ball was sent through the door which hit Hyrum on the side of the nose, when he fell backwards, extended at length, without moving his feet. "From the holes in his vest (the day was warm, and no one had their coats on but myself,) pantaloons, drawers and shirt, it appears evident that a ball must have been thrown from without, through the window, which entered his back on the right side, and passing through lodged against his watch, which was in his right vest pocket, completely pulverizing the crystal and face, tearing off the hands and mashing the whole body of the watch. At the same time the ball from the door entered his nose. "As he struck the floor he exclaimed emphatically, 'I'm a dead man.' Joseph looked towards him and responded, 'Oh dear! Brother Hyrum' and opening the door two or three inches with his left hand, discharged one barrel of a six shooter (pistol) at random in the entry, from whence a ball grazed Hyrum's breast, and entering his throat passed into his head, while other muskets were aimed at him and some balls hit him. "Joseph continued snapping his revolver round the casing of the door into space as before, three barrels of which missed fire, while Mr. Taylor with a walking stick stood by his side and knocked down the bayonets and muskets which were constantly discharging through the doorway, while I stood by him, ready to lend any assistance, with another stick, but could not come within striking distance without going directly before the muzzles of the guns. "When the revolver failed, we had no more firearms, and expected an immediate rush of the mob, and the doorway full of muskets, halfway in the room, and no hope but instant death from within. "Mr. Taylor rushed into the window, which is some fifteen or twenty feet from the ground. When his body was nearly on a balance, a ball from the door within entered his leg,and a ball from without struck his watch, a patent lever, in his vest pocket near the left breast, and smashed it into 'pie', leaving the hands standing at 5 o'clock, 16 minutes, and 26 seconds, the force of which ball threw him back on the floor, and he rolled under the bed which stood by his side, where he lay motionless, the mob from the continuing to fire upon him, cutting away a piece of flesh from his left hip as large as a man's hand, and were hindered only by my knocking their muzzles with a stick; while they continued to reach their guns into the room, probably left-handed, and aimed their discharge so far round as almost to reach us in the corner of the room to where we retreated and dodged, and then I recommenced the attack with my stick. "Joseph attempted, as the last resort, to leap the same window from whence Mr. Taylor fell, when two balls pierced him from the door, and one entered the right breast from without, and he fell outward, exclaiming 'O Lord my God!' As his feet went out of the window my head went in, the balls whistling all around. He fell on his left side a dead man. "At this instant the cry was raised, 'He's leaped the window!' and the mob on the stairs and in the entry ran out. "I withdrew from the window, thinking it of no use to Smith's body. "Not satisfied with this I again reached my head out of the window, and watched some seconds to see if there were any signs of life, regardless of my own, determined to see the end of him I loved. Being fully satisfied that he was dead, with a hundred men near the body and more coming round the corner of the jail, and expecting a return to our room, I rushed towards the prison door, at the head of the stairs, and through the entry from whence the firing had proceeded, to learn if the doors into the prison were open. "When near the entry, Mr. Taylor cried out, 'Take me.' I pressed my way until I found all doors unbarred, returning instantly, caught Mr. Taylor under my arm, and rushed by the stairs into the dungeon, or inner prison, stretched him on the floor and covered him with a bed in such a manner as not likely to be perceived, expecting an immediate return of the mob. "I said to Mr. Taylor, 'This is a hard case to lay you on the floor, but if your wounds are not fatal, I want you to live to tell the story'. I expected to be shot the next moment, and stood before the door waiting the onset." END OF EXPLANATION The expected almost happened. While Willard was caring for his wounded friend in the part of the prison, a portion of the mob again rushed upstairs to finish work already more than half completed. Finding only the dead body of Hyrum Smith in the front apartment, and supposing the other prisoners to have escaped, they were again descending the stairs when a loud cry was heard. "The Mormons are coming!" Thinking the inhabitants of Nauvoo were upon them, to avenge the murder of the Prophet, the whole band of assassins broke and fled, seeking refuge in the neighboring forest. Their groundless fear was shared by the people of Carthage in general, who fled pell mell, terrified by the thought of a wrathful visitation from the betrayed and stricken community. "Dr. Richards' marvelous escape from death in the midst of the fiery shower to which his three friends succumbed, fulfilled a prediction made to him by the Prophet over a year previously, when he told him "that the time would come when the balls would fly round him like hail, and he would see his friends fall upon the right and upon the left, but there should not be a hole in his garment." As during that terrible ordeal he was the personification of calm courage and collected heroism, so in the events immediately following he manifested the highest wisdom and discretion. Writing from Carthage to Nauvoo, he advised the people to be patient, to trust God, and not seek to avenge themselves upon their enemies. He and the Prophet's brother, Samuel H. Smith, with the wounded John Taylor, then superintended the removal of the bodies of the martyrs to Nauvoo for burial.

Life Timeline of Willard Richards

1804
Willard Richards was born on 20 Jun 1804
Willard Richards was 9 years old when Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is first published in the United Kingdom. Jane Austen was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism. Her use of biting irony, along with her realism and social commentary, have earned her acclaim among critics and scholars.
1813
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Willard Richards was 21 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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Willard Richards was 28 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Willard Richards was 36 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Willard Richards died on 11 Mar 1854 at the age of 49
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Willard Richards (20 Jun 1804 - 11 Mar 1854), BillionGraves Record 78322 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

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