Thomas John Foote

4 Nov 1860 - 7 May 1936

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Thomas John Foote

4 Nov 1860 - 7 May 1936
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Biography Of THOMAS JOHN FOOTE “NATIVE” Born 4 November 1860, Spanish Fork, Utah Died 14 May 1936, Provo, Utah Married Sarah Louisa Haws, 12 November 1884 Written By Merle Snyder Foote Daughter-in-law Camp Pleasant View North Center Utah County Provo, Utah THOMAS JOHN (T. J.) FOOTE Thomas John (
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Life Information

Thomas John Foote

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

vkanarr

February 20, 2012
Photographer

lisalund

February 19, 2012

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Sketch of Life of Thomas John Foote and Sarah Louisa Haws

Contributor: vkanarr Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Sketch of the life of Thomas John Foote and of his wife Sarah Louisa Haws This personal history was dictated by T. J. Foote himself, and was composed by his wife. I was born at Spanish Fork, Utah, November 4, 1860. I am the second child of my parents who had 4 sons and 2 daughters. My father, Thomas Foote, was born at Frome, Summersetshire, England, about December 24, 1824: I am not sure of exact date. His father’s name was John Foote; his mother’s given name was Martha but I do not know her maiden name. My lineage on father’s side going back is Thomas John Foote, son of Thomas Foote, son of John Foote and Martha his wife. My mother was born March 16, 1837, at Pontipool, South Wales. Her parents are William Barrett and Susan James. When mother was 2 years old her mother died leaving 3 children – 2 boys and herself; she being the youngest. My earliest remembrance is of Spanish fork and how mother would leave the baby with we older children while she went to glean wheat or any other work she could get to do. By working steady at gleaning she would get from ¼ to ½ bushel each day. When I was 6 years old, mother was at work in the field one day and we children were cutting willows for the fire at night – they with sage brush being our fuel. My oldest brother challenged me to see which could cut a length off the quickest. He had an old grub hoe and I an ax. Our contest ended quickly for he hit me in the head with the hoe; he knew enough to apply water but it left a scar which I still carry. Sometime after this father bought a pair of boots for him (my brother) and when he tried to put them on they were too small; so, to his sorrow and my joy, the boots fell to me. Soon after this, (my parents being anxious to have their endowments) father made arrangements with a neighbor for his wagon and oxen to take them to Salt lake City to the Endowment house. It took them most of two weeks to make the trip, there and back; as it rained much of the time and roads were just the natural soil; no grading or gravel or anything but a track. There was no bridge at the time over Provo river, so it had to be forded. When they arrived at the river on their return it was quite high, due to the rain. The oxen were young steers and not too well broke. When they were part way across, the wagon box came off the running gears and floated down stream with mother in the box. It finally lodged on a drift of brush. Alfred Newell saw the accident and carried mother out. When the weight was taken from the box it floated down stream and they never saw it or its contents again. Mother had been riding with her shoes off. She had a new pair with the other things she had bought in Salt Lake City. These things, with the bedding and camping outfit, were all lost and mother went home barefooted. The steers got out with the front wheels and the back wheels were found down the river next day. This accident and misfortune worked quite a hardship on the family. Besides what was lost in the box, father had to pay for the box and all the damages. Father heard talk of the Provo Woolen Mills being built and moved to Provo thinking he would get employment. He went to Echo Canyon that winter. It was a severe winter. We had all the corn bread that winter we wanted but very little wheat bread. The next summer I went with father to the West side of Utah Lake to Pelican Point to burn lime for Edison Whipple. I had a good time on this trip. I could ride the horses to water and we had all the bread, molasses and crust coffee we wanted. The next summer father took the town herd to care for which was work at which I was good help. Every morning we would drive the cows over to what is now Lake View, but at that time was open country; the ground covered with sage brush and grass. We walked there every morning and back at night driving from 150 to 250 head of cows. The round trip was about 10 miles; besides the running we did during the day to keep the cows from straying. When night came I was ready for bed. We drove the herd two summers when Father got work at making the Provo Woolen Mills water race. I was about 10 years old when my brother and I took sick with a fever – when I had my first testimony of power of the Lord thru the administration of his servants. I was helped immediately and this testimony has remained with me thru life. When the mills began operating father was hired as night watchman. I was about 14 years old when I began working in the spinning room of the institution. I will just state here: I worked in this room until I became foreman of the spinning room which was soon after I got married or 1855. When I quit I was given a certificate showing my ability and proficiency along this line. This paper was given to me by Reed Smoot who was then superintendent of the mills. Father working at night and I in the day time, we would not see each other for a week at a time; unless it was when we passed each other in going to and from work. As a general thing, when Sunday morning came, he would talk to us and advise and council us for our good. I was 15 years of age when father contracted a cold which developed into asthma from which he died November 7, 1875. We had our home paid for (a 2 room house) but we had to depend entirely on our own labor for a living. After father’s death I was permitted to do just about as I wanted to. There were no restrictions on me. Just so I did my days work I did as I pleased other ways. I had no chance to go to school for the temporal welfare of the family depended on me. The older I got the more they depended on me. I was let go never receiving any council or advice until I sometimes wonder I turned out as well as I did. I was never wicked. I naturally had a desire to live honorable. Yet boy like, I drifted with a rough element. I smoked and swore some. I give Brother A. M. Wilde credit for bringing me to a knowledge of the folly of my way of living. He worked in the Mills and he was president of the Deacon’s quorum. He talked to me and finally asked me to go to Deacon’s meeting. I went. The next week he asked me to go again and I went. The third time I went and this night there was a vacancy to be filled. Brother Wilde needing a councilor asked the Deacons who they wanted: They all called out “Tom Foote”. I considered it a great honor to be called to this position and accepted it. (I will say here that the second time I went I was ordained a Deacon.) It was this night I had a testimony to the extent of knowing there is an adversary and evil spirits, and that a higher power controls and rebukes them. I was now about 20 years old. That night I went home and had only got into bed when I heard someone walk around the house and I wondered who it could be at such a time. Pretty soon the outside door opposite to the bed opened and there stood a person. He looked at me and grinned. I could neither move or speak. I seemed to be bound and had no power to move. I began to pray, and was immediately released. The door closed and he was gone. Some folks have tried to make me think I had the nightmare while asleep. But I know I had just gone to bed and was not asleep. Mother heard me groan and said I had only just gone to bed. I say I am sure I saw Satan that night and felt his influence. I continued to work in the Deacon’s quorum and finally became president which position I held for 3 years. I was baptized on May 21, 1881 by George Meldrum and confirmed by Andrew Watson. I was desirous of owning some land and tried to get my older brother to cooperate with me in obtaining it. I proposed that he go away to work to get money to pay for the land and I would stay home and support the family. He agreed so I bargained for 5 acres for which I was to pay 25 dollars per acre. He went away and was gone all summer making good wages and came home broke. The same thing happened the next summer so the land was never bought. Those days real money was not known in Provo. They had a commodity in place of money called script. We never (or at least very seldom) saw real money. I never handled any of my wages. My pay envelope was taken home unopened and given to mother. If I had a dance ticket I had to ask her for the pay. Once in a while I made a dollar calling for dances. Mother had all my wages until a month before I was married. We were paid every 2 weeks. I kept 15 dollars for 2 pays before getting married which was 30 dollars for a wedding stake. At this time my 2 sisters were working in the factory. (They were the youngest of the family.) I have told this to show that I did not have an even chance financially with other boys who were free handed, on account of me having to support the family. The factory was run by water. As soon as freezing weather set in at winter it would have to close down. Therefore the winter of 1883 and 1884 I went to Schofield to work. I contracted a cold while in Schofield which brought on a severe attack of Inflamatory Rhumatism. I came back home and was sick for a couple of months. This was the second spell I had on this disease, having been sick 2 or 3 years before. I was bedfast for 2 or 3 weeks. A man by the name of John Evans then living at our place waited on me and was so kind and good that he naturally gained my confidence. Sometime after I got well I was sitting on the doorstep thinking of a dream I had the night before about this man. He was away at the time. I felt so friendly toward him that I did not want to believe the dream. Mother began to tell me his history. I stopped her and told her I could tell her all about him. I told her he was an ex-convict. He had killed a man tho in self defense and he had served 10 years time for the deed. She said “it was all true”. But I also saw in the dream the officers came to arrest him and I helped him get away. He now had the agency for selling buggies and wagons. He had sold a buggy and a wagon in Spanish Fork and had used the money to put a patent thru the office thinking he would get it thru in time to pay the wagon company the money. But he never did. His plans failed and the company retrieved the vehicles and he was notified to appear in court at Spanish Fork the next day at 10 A.M. He had a buggy at our place and I had a horse. Instead of his going to court we got in the buggy and rode all night thru rain and arrived at Draper at daylight. I borrowed $10.00 before leaving home. I gave him this and a new overcoat with the understanding he was going to work and pay me back and also the wagon company. I also left the horse and come home on the train. I never heard from him for 8 or 10 years and when I did he was in England. I am sure that dream was given me as a warning. On Wednesday, November 12, 1884, I married Sarah Louisa Haws at the Logan Temple. She being the youngest daughter of Amos Whitcomb Haws and Mary Elizabeth Bean Haws. We were married by Apostle Mariner W. Merritt. Sketch of the life of Sarah Louisa Haws, by herself, from her childhood until married when it takes up the life of her husband and children and becomes the family history of Thomas John Foote and family. I was born April 20, 1866 at Provo, Utah. My birth place was an adobe house of 5 rooms on the corner of University Ave. and 2nd North street. Just north of where the Hatch Undertaking Parlors now are. This house was at one time the largest house in Provo. About the first I remember is when but a small child of lying of an evening on the floor before the fire place with my father and of his singing for me “Hard times come again no more.” No doubt this being the reason of it being one of my favorite songs. I was not very strong in my early childhood: in fact I have been told I was quite delicate in health all thru my child and early girlhood. I would have nose bleeds several times a day. The first I remember of importance is a very severe sick spell I had when it was thot I could not get well. Father asked me who I wanted to come and administer to me. I replied: “I do not care who else you get but bring Brother Cluff: referring to Harvey H. Cluff then a member of the 4th Ward Bishopric. He with others came on Sunday evening after meeting. The next morning when I was raised up I threw up ½ basin full of what looked like thick, dark congealed blood. From that time I recovered rapidly and have always remembered this to be the most remarkable healing power of our Father thru his servants, and of the personal blessing which I received. As a child I suppose I had faith in the man and did not fully realize it was God’s power; but as I grew in knowledge I realized and knew the source of the power that healed me. I have been healed instantly several times but as I look back I think I was more impressed with this remarkable healing to me. I was about 7 years old when I had my first ride on the railway cars. I had gone to the depot with the older children to take father’s dinner, he being at work at the building the depot house. While there a freight train came in and while it was switching father took me in his arms and jumped on the car so that I could have it to say I had rode on the train. I remember the first coal oil lamp our folks bought. It was not a very large one either; but I thought we were quite up to date. But we still used the tallow candle for common use. As I grew older I helped make candles. Mother always tried to keep a supply of candles on hand. However some times we would be without. The I have seen her put a wick in a cup and fill it with tallow and light it. My first school teacher was John E. Booth. He taught a primary grade on the stage at what was then known as the Timpanogos school. It was also the only theatre in Provo. It was at the corner of Center and 3rd West street, where the Farmers and Merchants Bank stands. This school was afterward the Brigham Young Academy which afterwards burned down. Each member of the class was called on to read. (Students were judged those days mostly by their ability to spell and read.) I had taken my first reader having been taught to read some by my mother and older sisters. After hearing me read he (Booth) told me to take my first reader home and bring a second next day. It was all readers and classes those days and not grades. I tell this to show what can be done with Children in regards to teaching them at home. I was baptized on September 20, 1874, by William W. Haws, an uncle, and was confirmed by William G. Lewis on the same day. All thru my early life I had a very good memory and I do not consider it so bad at the present time. One circumstance I have always remembered. I was sent to the drug store for Lobelia, Leptandrum and Podaphilin. The druggist asked me if I remembered all that without a note. I said “yes”. He says: “Well you sure have a remarkable memory.” I was about 11 years old now. The next teacher I had was a mrs. Martha Watson. I still remember of going to the head of the class 2 days handrunning on the words ewe 8 scissors. My memory serving well in this case. My next teacher was J. B. Walton who I liked very much as a teacher. The next was Rheinard Maeser. All of these were district school teachers. Afterward I attended the old B.Y. Academy before it burned down. My teachers here were Milton H. Hardy, Myron Tanner and Karl G. Maeser. My most interesting studies were reading, spelling and grammar, especially the composition writing as we called it those days. Now it is termed “themes” or “papers”. I can still remember Bro. Maeser holding my paper up before the class and saying how it pleased him when he read it. I did not take interest in arithmetic or geography of which fact I have always been sorry. I never graduated from any grade but had only a common school education. When a girl about 10 years old my brother-in-law, Arthur P. Newell, homesteaded a quarter section of land on Provo Bench. There were only 6 or 8 log houses on the Bench. He had a yolk of oxen and worked in the canyon getting his winter wood. They would come for me to go and stay with sister while he was gone. We would start the middle of the afternoon, in summer, in order to get there in time to do chores. At this time Jack stones was quite a fad with kiddies. His oxen would stray off for a mile or over sometimes and Arthur would tell me he would play me a certain number of games of jacks if I would go drive in the oxen. Of course I went as I was crazy over the game. We had only slates and slate pencils those days. Lead pencils were not known in school and were quite expensive. As a childish notion I always had a desire to own a led pencil. I went home from school one day and found a lead pencil on the table where my older sister had been marking out some work. (She was not home at the time.) I wanted that pencil; so I took it and bit it all round the top thinking the teeth marks would prove it mine. When she came in I showed it to her and said I found it. When father heard of what I had done he gave me a certain length of time to confess I had taken it. Well of course all during that time I was in torture for what I had done and before the time allotted me I had sorely repented and when he asked me again about it I confessed I had taken it. He then showed how I had done wrong by taking it and also the falsehood I had told, and also the consequences of yielding to temptation which was a lesson I have never forgotten. I tell this to show how parents who are watchful of their children and who do not turn a deaf ear and a blind eye to their doings can detect little failings in their children and most always put them straight. Where if they are not corrected the evil tendency will perhaps grow and the child go from small misdemeanors to deeds of wickedness. I did not have the advantages the young folks have now in regards to making money. There was nothing to do. There were no fruit, beets, berries, telephones, offices, candy factories, stores, or any way for a girl to earn a dollar except by gleaning wheat, picking ground cherries or by doing house work: not much of the latter as all people were very much alike by doing their own work unless in a case of real necessity and then never paying more than from $1.50 to $2.50 per week, this being a high price. I remember when there was but one strawberry patch in Provo of about 6 to 10 rows through a city lot. I remember when there were but 3 double buggies and 1 single buggy in Provo and who owned them. There were no offices, cafes, garages or library. At this time there were but 3 adobe houses of 1 room each and at a slope at the back, on the block where the Commercial Bank now stands: there of course were no electric lights and no picture shows. I remember when mother first put fresh fruit for winter use. She had 1 gallon crockery jars which were filed with the fresh fruit and placed the crockery lid on and filled it over with a preparation made of rosin and beeswax and poured it over the top of the jar to seal it (and the fruit was bottled.) The next way was 5 gallon coal oil cans thoroughly cleansed. A hole was cut in the top and the fruit put in. A piece of tin was placed over the opening and soldered into place. Most every one had a solder iron those days. After this we had 1 quart and 2 quart tin cans. Previous to this and when folks first began raising fruit it was nearly all dried for winter use. Their surplus was dried and sold to the stores. The way some people would get a quantity of fruit cut was by having “cutting bees”. They would invite a crowd of young folks of an evening: give each one a pan and a knife. The peaches or apples (as the fruit might be) were brought in and they would sit and cut for an hour or two when it would all be cleared away and they would spend the rest of the evening in games. Refreshments would be served which would be cake and pie or else they would make molasses candy. The next morning the fruit, if peaches, would have to be placed cut side up on scaffolds in the sun to dry. This would be quite a chore as they would sometimes have from 6 to 8 bushels to spread. I forgot to say there were but 2 small dwellings, the tithing office and co-op store on the block where the Paramount theatre now stands. Generally we had no amusements only as we made the fun ourselves. Our dancing was limited to 2 or 3 during the Christmas Holiday and a dance on the 4th and 24th of July. Each Summer the Sunday School would have an outing to what was then Baums grove and was a very pretty place at that time. This land we now own, tho the grove is gone and it is now farm ground. We always went on this picnic in wagons; just as many as could get in: because “needs must” we had no better way of going. We would have as many as 4 spring seats on one wagon and go riding those days that way in crowds. That is the way we went to funerals. When a child 11 years old I went to my grandfather’s funeral sitting in the wagon box with about 25 other grand children. The first party ever in my honor was when I was 16 years old. It being my birthday, Bell Williams (now aunt Belle Haws) got a surprise on me to celebrate the occasion. The following 4th of July Tom asked me to go to the dance with him. About this time I was chosen secretary of the Y.L.M.I.A. of the 4th Ward. Emily G. Cluff was then President. Tom and I kept company for over 2 years when we decided to get married. When he asked father for me he (father) said he had no objections but would like us to marry the right way. We had already decided that going to the temple was the correct and proper way to take the step we were contemplating so there was no trouble there. We finally decided on the 12th of November as our wedding day. About the 1st of October our Bishop’s (J.E. Boothe) wife died, on account of which he was called home from his mission to the Southern states. While helping to clean the meeting house ready for the funeral I got my foot wet. I had on colored hose and having a small scratch on my toe the color poisoned the toe and it became inflamed and pained so badly that for 3 weeks I suffered tortures; it finally got better but I could not wear anything but an old shoe with the toe cut out when the time came for us to go to Logan. I suppose it was like the song says: “I must and will get married for the fit comes on me now.” Then folks tried to work on our superstition telling us that delayed marriages were unlucky. On Sunday morning, Nov. 9, we started for Logan. The Endowment House had closed and of course the Salt Lake Temple was not completed. Mary Harris and Walter Corbett went at the same time. The boys hired a livery stable team and father had a 2 seated rig that we went in. We were 3 days going and 3 days coming home and one day in the Temple making just a week for the trip. We stopped over night both going and coming home one night each in Salt Lake and Ogden. The evening we should have arrived at Logan the driver took a long road over a sandy bench instead of a shorter one thru a short canyon. The horses being tired we got stranded about 10 o’clock at night and stopped and fed the team. We 4 people sat in the buggy. It was awful cold and we were not prepared for such time. We called it the Accidental Hotel: and had lots of sport about it then and afterward. We stayed there until about 4 a.m. when a man came along going to the canyon. We were directed which way to go and were also bawled out and we got to a hotel in time to get ready for the Temple at 8 a.m. During the night the toe had pained me as bad as it had ever done and I was sure I was in for another time with it and felt quite discouraged. But the Lord surely blessed me that day not only with a husband but I received a blessing and another testimony of His power to those who believe and who will depend on Him. The toe never bothered me again: that week the Mutual had a dance for we 4 and also Bro. T.H. Cluff and wife who had been married a week previous. I put on my good shoe, went to the dance and danced all evening and never knew I had a sore toe. The nail gradually grew off but it never hurt me any. We were married by Apostle M.W. Merrill at Logan Temple, Nov. 12, 1884. Just 3 weeks after we were married the factory closed down for the winter. The factory at that time was run by water. There was what was known then as the factory store of dry goods and groceries, a store for the benefit of their employees. We went in debt all winter for provisions; besides we had gone in debt for the furniture we had got and also all that winter our rent bill was running up. However they (the woolen mills Co.) allowed us to get what we needed out of the store and we had it to pay for when work started in the Spring. We were renting a 2 room house of Prof. J.B. Boshards wife; he being on a mission at the time in Germany. Before the winter was gone this house leaked so bad we had to move. We moved in another 2 room house on 1st East and 2nd North St. just South of where the Parker school now stands. This school house was erected the following summer. This was the birth place of our 1st child, Earl. He was born Nov. 5, 1885 and of course we thought him the only child in Provo at the time. He was blessed when 8 days old by Bishop John E. Booth: He coming to the house and Dr. M. H. Hardy took it in shorthand and writing us a copy. It was Dr. Hardy’s house we lived in at the time: He living in a new one just South of us. Earl was about 4 months old when I had my first and only experience with a U.S. Officer. The baby was propped in his high chair and I was trying to amuse him at the same time doing my work when a knock came on the kitchen door. I opened it and there stood Charlie Redfield, a U.S. Deputy marshal. I had seen him pass the house here several times the day before but had no idea he was watching me. When I opened the door he took a paper out of his pocket and began reading it. It was a supeona telling me to appear at a certain day in the court at Salt Lake City as the plural wife of Elias Morris a prominent business man of Salt Lake. I was only a girl in years not yet 20 years old and of course this about scared me silly. Mrs. Dr. hardy stood on her porch and listened to it all and when he was thru reading it she ridiculed him and scoffed at him; she said, “Why Redfield don’t you know who this girl is? She was born and raised here in Provo: she is Amos Haws’ daughter and Tom Footes wife. You will have to go somewhere else for your second wife.” He only said that I had heard the endictment and would be expected to obey it. After he had gone I bundled up the baby and away I went across the lot to father and told him what had occurred. He went and had a talk with Judge J. E. Booth, who said he would fix it up with Redfield. I never saw or heard any more of him or Elias Morris. That spring, 1886, we bought a lot of father on what is now 1st West St. , between 6 and 7 North Street. It was then just field or land. We built one large adobe room and added a lumber lean for a summer kitchen. We moved into it on the 5th of June, 1886; the day Earl was 7 months old. We were sure proud of our little home and it was one of our happiest days when we moved into it. We had our little family, a home and Tom had good work and we were very happy in all this. Tho the home was not yet paid for we felt we had a start and we could pay for what would be ours in the long run instead of paying rent. We were very happy in our effort to improve the surroundings in planting berries and fruit trees. The following Spring father gave us a cow and of course this was another cause of rejoicing to us. But we had her but a few weeks when she got bloated and died. We felt the loss of the milk, and it was not long before we bought another one. On August 1, 1887 we had another member added to our family when Ina was born. I was very sick for 3 or 4 weeks. She was an extremely small and very delicate baby having been a premature birth and I look back and think of the suffering I passed thru those weeks. I had no use of myself: for about 10 days I could not turn without help. Those days we knew nothing of having a nurse; the midwife would come every day for 9 days and look after the mother and child and after that we depended on the hired girl for all attention. At this time I sure had a good hired girl. Ann Kimber was her name. She would refuse to go out with her chums as long as we needed her, which I consider very kind in her. I want too to give Grandma Rawlings the credit of giving me every attention at all times when we had her. She especially was very attentive to me at this particular occasion. After I was well on the road to getting well she told me she had been much worried about me. The latter part of October (when Ina was 3 months old) she and Earl both took Whooping cough and had it all winter. I would never have believed a delicate baby could endure so much if I had not seen her do it. Father used to say he “wondered what she was saved for.” I often think now if he could see the family she is rearing he would see why she was saved. When Spring came the cough had left her so weak we still did not know which side the balance would go. She was so weak in the back that she did not sit alone until she was 16 months old. That Spring 1888 father met with the accident that caused his death. In 1890 we added 2 rooms and a pantry to our house. We rented one of these rooms the next winter to a couple of Lehi girls who were attending B. Y. University. Their names were Belle Gibbs and Angie Webb. In the Spring of 1891 Valera was born. She was 3 or 4 days old when Earl and Ina took the measles; they were not bad and the baby did not take the disease. This summer 1891 we sold our home to Benjamin Bennett and built a brick house of 3 rooms and pantry on 1st East between 6 and 7 North streets. This was one of our many mistakes. Because we built on a small piece of ground 3 X 9 rods and we soon saw we could have neither garden, fruit, chickens or anything but a house and that is not always a home. This summer, 1891, Tom quit the Woolen Mills and got him a team. He had worked over 21 years at the mills and it was right here we began to see harder times financially than we had ever had since we were married. Tom had not had much experience with work other than in the mills and folks seemed to think he could not work on the outside and times being none too bright we missed the pay day for a while. We were hardly settled when we wished we had gone where we could have more land and all the things around a home we had been used to. In the Spring of 1892 Tom went up Spanish Fork canyon to get out cedar posts for S. S. Jones a merchant of Provo. He was gone a couple of months and finished the summer in Provo doing what he could get to do. Eldred was born Dec. 19, 1892. I was sick all during this Winter and Spring with stomach trouble and became to thin I would hardly make a shadow and became so discouraged on account of the extreme suffering I went thru, that I would have hardly turned my hand as to whether I lived or died. Then I would think of my children and make another effort to get well and finally began to improve. I forgot to say that in the Summer of 1892 we went to visit my sister Ellen at Vernal, Uintah Co. While there Tom bargained for a piece of land with the intention of moving there and making our home there. When we arrived back home we could not sell our place so we had to give up the bargain and have never moved from Provo. In the Spring of 1893 Tom decided to get a place out of town and bought 2 acres in Pleasant View Ward from Earnest Ekins. We built a 2 room concrete house and moved in June of 1893. From then I improved in health. Tom worked for people on their farms and also rented some ground. He also did quite a lot of canyon work. I have many times got breakfast and saw him off to the canyon and then sat and knit until daylight. About this time we lost our only cow 3 times in succession. The third time there was a movement underway to collect means by subscription to buy us a cow but we heard of it and vetoed it. I suppose we were poor and proud; anyway we felt we were not yet candidates for charity. We appreciated the sympathy and thotfulness of our friends, but felt we could get along. The summer we moved to this place we were tormented with a plague of fleas. We would have to get up two or three times of a night and hunt and kill fleas or we could not rest. It was a common thing to catch from 4 to 8 or 10 fleas at one hunting. After that summer we never saw another flea and never was bothered with them again. In 1894 Tom bargained with James Bonnett for 10 acres of oak brush land on the Green Bench next to the mountains at 15 dollars per acre. Until he got this land cleaned he never lacked for a job. Of course he had to have water for the land and gave John Meznen 80 dollars for water for it. Mr. Bonnett was to have taken 50.00 dollars of the amount for the land on the Smoot Lumber Co. and was to call at our house for the certificate of transfer. He neglected to come until finally the Lumber Co. went broke and we lost it and had to rustle the 50 dollars other ways. But about 1895 father’s estate was settled and we got 3 or 4 hundred dollars in cash and this helped us to get straight with the world. About 1897 Tom was set apart as councilor in the Y.M.M.I.A. of Pleasant View. About 1898 I was chosen president of Y.L.M.I.A. and acted in this position a little over 3 years. About this time Tom and Wm. Scott bought a molasses mill situated on the canal South of our place. They kept the mill 2 years and became quite proficient in the art of making molasses. On July 9, 1900, Ina, Valera and I had our Patriarchal blessing under the hands of patriarch Jesse B. Martin. In 1901 Valera had Typhoid fever. In 1902 Eldred had the Typhoid fever. In 1903 some of our very intimate friends and associates of the ward and also Brother June, moved to Canada. Also Bro. & Sister A. M. Wilde and family. We had been very chummy with Lawrence Peterson and his wife Minnie and sure missed them when they went. On the 12th of November, 1904, we celebrated the 20th anniversary of our wedding by many friends and relatives coming to supper and a social evening which was spent in music, songs, readings etc. During 1904 I was councilor in Pleasant View Relief Society. On Sunday 26 Feb., 1905 I was set apart as secretary of Relief Society, Sister Colvin being set apart as President. I resigned Jan. 1, 1916, have been secretary 11 years. On the 5th of Sept. 1905, Earl left for the Southern Sates mission. He lacked 2 months of being 20 years old. This was the first break in our family and home life; none of the children ever having been away for more than a day or two at a time until now. We were glad and proud that he was considered worthy of this call and wanted him to go. Yet it was a trial for the reason that he was so young and never having been from home any we wondered if he would be able to stand the trials of a missionary. Apostle Orson F. Whitney set him apart to his mission and when I heard him say that “He should go in peace and return in safety” I never had a doubt but he would do so; tho it was a trial for him to go. However our feelings were just the opposite when he returned on Christmas day in 1907 having been gone a little over 2 years and 3 months. His mission was rather a financial trial to us. Our whole thot and aim was to get the money to send him every month, from 20 to 30 dollars a month. The second summer he was away we rented the Burridge fruit orchard. Tom peddled and paid the hands we had to hire. The children and I worked in the fruit hardly taking time to eat for fear the peaches would get too ripe. We shipped thru the Utah County Association and when it came pay day we did not get any pay. If we had not paid our hired help out of Toms trips as we went along we would have sure been in a bad fix that fall, for we got nothing out of our summers work. Earl labored in the State of Georgia. The Spring after Earl got back his father got a contract on a canal and made good wages. It happened they got their contract on a certain part of the canal where the soil was of a nature that they did well while other contractors did not make anything. Some of the men said “They were not sure but what it paid to go on a mission.” In the winter of 1906, Tom went to town one day in the bob sleigh and took a crowd of our aged friends for a sleigh ride: in the company were John R. Booth & wife, Bro. & Sister David Thomas, Bro. & Sister H. B. Smart, Bro. Wm. Buckley, sister Eliza Gledhill, Sisters Martha Duke, Lizzie Twelves, His (Toms) mother Eliza Foote and Wm C. Foote and wife. Total 14. They are all dead except Mrs. Wm. C. Foote (1929) He brought them home with him. I had a warm supper ready for them. After supper they spent the evening in song, social chat, telling jokes, etc. At a late hour he took them home. They all voted they had had the best time of the winter. It sure did us good to see them have such a good time. In the Spring of 1907 Valera had a very severe spell of Scarlet Fever. On the 5th of January 1908, Tom was ordained a high Priest by Benjt Johnson Jr. He gets his authority as follows: Tracing T. J. Foote, Benjt Johnson Jr., John Henry Smith, Wilford Woodruff, Joseph Smith. In the Spring of 1910, I had an acute attack of gall stones. I suffered extreme pain from early morning until late in the evening when we called the Elders and they administered to me. They had only left the house when I raised up and felt a weight drop from the pit of the stomach. It seemed to fall for an inch or two. The doctor came in and gave me a hyperdermic which I now think I did not need and would have got along just as well or better without. The next morning there passed a gall stone one inch long and about 1 ½ inches in diameter. I have saw many gall stones that have been taken from people thru operations but I never saw one as large and rough as that one. From the time I felt it give way to the present time I have never had any more pain from gall stones. I was quite sick for a while with fever but never any pain. The idea I have is this: by the power of the Lord thru his servants that stone passed; in doing so the gall duct was distended and stretched until any stones that form (if any do form) are passed without pain. I have always given the credit to my Heavenly Father that I was so miraculosly relieved of this trouble without have to resort to an operation. On the 10th of April, 1910 Tom had his Patriarchal blessing under the hands of Patriarch Albert Jones. In the Spring of 1911 Tom got an infection in one of his eyes and we were very much alarmed that he would lose the sight. The one eye got some better and the trouble went to the other. The doctor thot it a very serious case. They were bad all Spring and most of the summer when they began to get better. They never have been as good as before the trouble with them. On June 21, 1911 Ina was married to Thomas J. Lewis by Joseph B. Keeler. We had a reception that evening. The only thing we had against the marriage was that it was not a Temple marriage. Ina had always taken a very active part in the Ward which made us very much surprised and grieved that she would consent to marry the way she did. We have hope they will yet go and have their family sealed to them. 21 March, 1912 our first grandchild (Norma) was born. August 1913, Sister Alice Fausett, Tom and I took a trip to Canada. Having many friends and relatives there we had a real good trip and visit. We were gone about 4 weeks and returned home arriving on the 7th of Sept. On the 11th of Sept. 1913 Max T. Lewis was born. In October of the same year, 1913, Earl went to Canada and was gone 1 year returning home October 1914. He started to school at the B. Y. U. and finished the Normal course. On the 11th of July, 1917 he married Merle Snyder in the Manti Temple. We entertained at a shower before they were married. Grandma Foote died Feb. 14, 1915 (Eliza Barrett Foote) November 22, 1915, Afton Lewis was born. December 28, 1917, Eldon f. Lewis was born. In the early Spring of 1916 Eldred started to Canada with Jesse Wilde and his sister Leah who had been here on a visit. They started out in an automobile and got up in Idaho when they had to take the train and leave the car on account of bad weather and roads. He returned home in the winter of 1918 and in the Spring of 1919, March 19th, was married to Letha Smith. She was teaching school at the time. Eldred left for Canada again and she finished her school year when she and Valera went to Canada. Valera had broken her arm by cranking the ford. She said her arm would get well just as well if she went as if she did not, so she went with Letha. All during these years since 1900 Tom had been hauling fruit most of the time going to Park City. All during the war we did our part in buying liberty bonds, and in accordance with the law in conserving the food. Pa had an affidavit made out and sent to the government showing where Eldred was, so that he could not be accused of trying to shirk the law and his duty. In the fall of 1918 Earl’s and Ina’s family both had the flu. There were sic of Ina’s (all of the family) down at the same time. Pa, Valera and I were the only well ones of the family and did not take it. I think this was the gloomiest month that I ever waw. People were dying all around us and nearly all of our folks sick and Ina and Merle very sick. But we were greatly blessed once more. George s. Taylor was acting Bishop at the time the Priesthood held prayer at different homes where there were no sickness in behalf of the sick. They had prayer a time or two at our house we (Valera and I) being away as it was thought no wisdom for the well to go to the sick to administer. While our folks were at the worst of the sickness the Armistice was signed. On Oct. 30, 1919 Nedra Lewis was born. May 9, 1920, Clell S. Foote born in Welling, Alberta, Canada, died May 15, 6 days old. In September 1919, we bought the Pleasant View grocery from C. J. Huff. We remodeled the house and moved about the 1st of Nov. We sold our old home during the winter to Wm. T. Thacker. We did very well financially with the store but soon concluded it was too tying for folks of our years. On May 22, 1920 Elwood Earl Foote was born. On Nov. 21, 1923, Valera was married to Edgar Hall, in the Salt Lake Temple. Earl gave a dance to most of our relatives and friends in the Pleasant View Meeting house. Punch and refreshments were served. I will say now that our children are now gone from their childhood home and began life on their own account; They have none of them given us any real sorrow. We have at times been anxious and troubled in our minds when they have been away as parents will be, but they have all married honorably; all are members of the Church and active in it; all keep the word of Wisdom so far as tea, coffee, tobacco and liquor goes; all are respected men and women. We do not say this to brag but tell it in humbleness and are thankful for these blessings and ever praying they may continue. Guy S. Foote born on 14 January. Guy S. Foote was born at Provo, Utah. In the summer of 1924, Pa and I went thru Yellowstone Park. On February 14, 1925, Donna Lou hall was born at Bingham Canyon. In 1925 we again sold our home and with it the store to Nephi Nielson. We built a 4 room bungalow just south on the lot adjoining the one we sold. In the spring of 1926 the ward was divided and Earl was chosen as a councilor to Bishop Sidney Cluff. On 18 May, 1926, Edgar F. Hall was born at Bingham Canyon. In August of 1926, I in company with Beatrice Smith (Letha’s sister) went again to Canada. We were gone a month and visited with all old friends, Brother June, and our son Eldred. I sure enjoyed my trip. In the spring of 1927 the Pleasant View meeting house was torn down and the erecting of a new modern church was begun. We were assessed $400.00. We paid our last years assessment and expect to pay the rest this year. (all paid) In 1927 we bought a new Chevrolet closed roadster. January 28, 1928, Bernard F. Hall was born at Bingham Canyon. Tom and I went to the Salt Lake Temple and did endowments for 2 people, sealing 6 couples, husbands and wives and two families parents and children. On May 15, 1928, Pa and I started on a trip to Southern Utah. We went as far as St. George. We were endowed in the Temple for 1 person each on the 15 of May. On our way back we stopped at the Manti Temple and on the 17th of May we went thru the Temple and were endowed for 1 person each. A. A. Haws who was working at the Temple and I were sealed for 41 people that day. 1928, Aileen Foote born at Lethbridge, Alberta Canada. In the Winter of 1928 Ina developed a condition where she took dizzy spells which would cause her to fall and in a couple of instances in falling she hurt herself quite seriously. She was advised at the L.D.S. hospital at Salt Lake to go to Rochester, Minn. To the Mayo Clinic and Hospital as they considered it a case for an operation and they were not prepared for so delicate an operation as they thought it was a growth back of the inner ear and it was beginning to crowd the brain which caused the dizzy spells. I think she was in a very serious condition. They, Tom L. and Ina started on the 14th of July by train. I accompanied them and it took us about 40 hours to get there. I will say that Ina had been administered to by those holding the priesthood. They had fasted and held a prayer meeting in her behalf. Our many friends and relatives in Canada had also fasted especially and prayer for her. When we arrived at Rochester it took 5 days of about 2 ½ hours each day to get thru the clinic. When thru and the case advised on they decided if a tumor was there it had not developed enough to justify an operation. They gave a course of treatment to allay the dizzy spells and we came home having been gone 2 weeks. Ina has been getting better ever since. The spells are not so severe and not nearly so frequent for which I surely give the credit to our Heavenly Father and thank Him that he was so merciful and kind as to make his power manifest to those who sought Him in Faith and that Ina was given back to her family and able to do for them temporally and with her intellect normal. March 13, 1929, Duane F. Hall born at Bingham Canyon. April 5, 1929 During last night and today it has snowed about 14 inches and it looks like it might be Christmas time. Pa and I went to Ina’s and heard all the conference sermons on the 5,6, and 7 of April. (over the radio.) April 9, 1929. It snowed last night 5 or 6 inches. At the present time we have 19 grand-children as follows. Earl 3, Ina 7, Valera 4 and Eldred 4 living, they having lost their first child. June 1929. In June, Tom Lewis came down with the Small Pox. He was at the ranch at the time of taking the disease and got along fine. Aug. 5, 1929. Eldred and family arrived from Canada to make us a visit. They came in their car. They only stayed two weeks; leaving for home on the 19th. They could not stay longer on account of their crops being ready for harvesting. We were glad for even this short visit, but it was too short. While here Glenna gave me her first piece of embroidery work that she ever did when she was between 6 and 7 years old. I have pasted it in the back of this book. September 3rd Tom and I started on a trip to Bryce and Grand Canyons. We were sure delighted with the trip and with the scenery and many wonderful sights. We were gone 5 days arriving home on the 8th of September. Dec. 1, 1929. I was presented with a book called “The American Government”, for correctly repeating the 13 Articles of our Faith in Sunday School. The book was presented by our Sunday School Superintendent, G. T. Harrison. January, 1930. Valera’s little boy, Bernard, broke his leg by jumping from a chair. He lacked a few days of being 2 years old. William Chauncy McEwan died in Provo, March 26, 1930. This is my Nephew, my sister Ellen’s oldest son. Pa went to Salt lake to the Centennial conference of the Church, and the opening of a 4 day conference. I heard all the sermons of every session of this great conference over the radio. April 10, 1930. Pa and I went to Salt Lake City to the great church pagent, “The Message of the Ages”, which was a wonderful performance. 1931 This spring Valera and family bought a small place in this ward (Pleasant View) and moved here. The summer of ‘31, Eldred’s whole family (in Canada) had whooping cough. Letha was confined at the time. She had the cough and of course the baby took it. The baby died with whooping cough pneumonia when but a week or two old. This is the second child they (Eldred) have lost. The first having died when a few days old. This summer (1931) Eldred’s boy Guy was run over by a loaded truck and hurt severely in the hips and lower part of the body. Also Melvin, the second boy broke his wrist so close to the hand it was decided it could not be set without putting a plate in it, but through the faith of the Elders and the Power of the Lord they were both healed and restored without inserting the silver plate. In December of ’31, Valera went to the hospital for an operation for Appendicitis. It proved to be Gall stones instead. They took a stone as large as a medium sized hen egg. She got along very well and is about as well as ever at this time. (6 months later) This winter Tom was quite under the weather the fore part of the winter with soreness and pain in the side of the stomach. He gradually got better until fully restored. In the early spring, April of 1932, Earl developed blood poison in his right hand. His hand swelled and the flesh dropped out between the thumb and front finger. He suffered extreme pain and it kept breaking out in small patches up his arm. We were all very much worried as to whether his hand could be saved. But this is another case where the power of the Lord was shown through the prayers of the family and friends. It eventually began to heal and at this date (June 8) is almost healed up but he is not able to use his hand much. I feel to thank our heavenly Father for His mercy and blessings (in all these cases of sickness: Ina’s, Eldred’s family, Valera and Earl) of restoring them to their wanted health and strength as well as for all past blessings previous to these that I have recorded. For I know of a surety that it was the Lord’s blessings that was the means of these healings. I say this with a humble feeling and with thankfulness that we as a people have this great source of comfort and strength to depend on. On Sunday, June 5, 1932, the new Pleasant View church was dedicated. President Heber J. Grant offered the dedicatory prayer. Thomas John Foote died on May 14, 1936 in Provo, Utah. Sarah Louisa Haws Foote died on June 25, 1934 in Provo, Utah Note: The grammar, punctuation and spelling have been left as Grandma Sarah Louisa Haws originally wrote.

T. J. Foote by Thomas John Foote

Contributor: vkanarr Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

I was born at Spanish Fork, Utah, November 4, 1860. I am the second child of my parents, who had four sons and two daughters. My father, Thomas Foote, was born at Frome, Somersetshire, England about December 24, 1824. I am not sure of the exact date. His Father's name was John Foote; his mother's name was Martha, but I do not know her maiden name. My mother was born March 16, 1837 at Pontipool, South Wales. Her parents are William Barrett and Susan James. When mother was two years old, her mother died, leaving three children, two boys and herself, she being he youngest. Father and mother came to America in the Spring of 1857, and were married May 2, 1857 at Williamsburg, New York. They came to Utah in September 1858 in the Horton D. Haight company and located in Spanish Fork. My earliest remembrance is of Spanish Fork and how mother would leave the baby with us older children while she went to glean wheat or other work she could get to do. By working steadily at gleaning, she would acquire from one-fourth to one-half bushel each day. My father made arrangements with a neighbor for his wagon and oxen to take them to Salt Lake City t the endowment house. It took them almost two weeks to make the round trip, and it rained much of the time on the muddy unimproved roads. The was no bridge over Provo River, and when they arrived at the river on the return trip it was quite high. The oxen were young steers and not too well broken. When they were partly across, the wagon box came off the running gears and floated down stream with mother in the box, finally lodging on a drift of brush. Alfred Newell saw the accident and rescued mother. When the weight was taken of the box if floated down stream and they never saw it or its contents again. Mother had been riding with her shoes off. She had a new pair, with other things she had bought in Salt Lake City. These things, with bedding and camping equipment were all lost and mother went home barefooted. The steers got out with the front wheels, and the back wheels were found down the river the next day. This accident worked quite a hardship on the family. Besides what was lost in the box, father had to pay for the box and all damages. Father heard talk of the Provo woolen mills being built and moved to Provo, thinking he would get employment. He went to Echo Canyon that winter. It was a severe winter. We had all the corn bread we wanted but very little wheat bread. Two summers later, father took the town herd to care for. Every morning we would drive the cows over to what is now Lake View. We walked there every morning with the 150 to 250 cows, and returned every evening, a distance of about ten miles. I was about ten years when my brother and I took sick with a fever when I had my first testimony of the power of the Lord through the administration of his servants. I was helped immediately and this testimony has remained with me through life. When the mills began operating, father was hired as night watchman. I was about fourteen years old when I began working in the spinning room of this institution. I will just state here I worked in this room until I became foreman of the spinning room, which was soon after I got married, or 1885. With father working at night and I in the day time, we wouldn't see each other for a week at a time unless it was when we passed each other in goring to or from work. As a general thing, when Sunday morning came he would take to us and council us for our good. When I was fifteen, father contracted a cold which developed into Asthma from which he died November 7, 1875. We had our home paid for (a two-roomed house) but we had to depend entirely on our own labor for a living. After father's death, I was permitted to do just about what I wanted to do. There were no restrictions on me, just so I did my day's work. I had no chance to go to school, for the temporal welfare of the family depended upon me. I was let go, never receiving any council or advice until sometimes I wonder why I turned out as well as I did. I was never wicked, naturally having a desire to live honorably, yet boylike, I drifted with a rough element. I smoked and swore some. I give brother A. M. Wilde credit for bringing me to a knowledge of the folly of my ways. We worked in the Mills and he was President of the Deacon's quorum. He talked to me and finally asked me to go to meeting. I went. The next week he asked me again, and again I went. The third time I went there was a vacancy to be filled; Brother Wilde needed a counselor and asked the Deacons who they wanted. They all called out "Tom Foote." I considered it a great honor to be called to this position and accepted it. (I will say here that the second time I went I was ordained a deacon.) I continued to work in the Deacon's quorum and finally became president, which position I held for three years. I desired to own some land and tried to get my older brother to cooperate with me in obtaining it. I proposed that he go away to work to get money to pay for the land and I would stay home and support the family. He agreed, so I bargained for five acres for which I was to pay twenty-five dollars per acre. He was gone all summer, making good wages, and came home broke. The same thing happened the next summer, so the land was never bought. I never handled any of my wages. My pay envelope was taken home and given to mother. If I needed a dance ticket, I had to ask her for it. Once in a while I made a dollar calling at dances. Mother had all my wages until a month before I was married, except for the last two days when I saved $30 for a wedding stake. I tell this to show that I did not have an even chance financially with other boys. A man by the name of John Evans, then living at our place was so kind to me that he naturally gained my confidence. One day I was sitting on the doorstep thinking of a dream I had about this man, who was away at the time. Mother began to tell me the man's history, I stopped her and told her I could tell her about him. I told her that he was an ex-convict. He had killed a man in self-defense and served ten years time for the deed. She said it was all true, but I also saw in the dream the officers come to arrest him, and I helped him to get away. He had the agency for selling buggies and wagons, and had sold a wagon in Spanish Fork and used the money to put a patent through the office, thinking he would get it through in time to pay the wagon company the money, but he never did. The company took back the vehicles and he was notified to appear in court. Instead of him going to court, he got in a buggy he had at our place and rode all night through the rain and arrived at Draper at daylight. I borrowed $10 before leaving home and gave him this and a new overcoat with the understanding he was going to work and would pay me back. I also left my horse with him and came home on the train. I never heard from him for eight or ten years, and then he was in England. I am sure that dream was given me as a warning. On Wednesday, November 12, 1884 I married Sarah Louisa Haws at the Logan Temple.

Thomas John Foote by Merle Snyder Foote

Contributor: vkanarr Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Biography Of THOMAS JOHN FOOTE “NATIVE” Born 4 November 1860, Spanish Fork, Utah Died 14 May 1936, Provo, Utah Married Sarah Louisa Haws, 12 November 1884 Written By Merle Snyder Foote Daughter-in-law Camp Pleasant View North Center Utah County Provo, Utah THOMAS JOHN (T. J.) FOOTE Thomas John (T.J.) Foote, was born in Spanish Fork, Utah, a son of Thomas and Eliza Ann Barrett Foote, 4 Nov. 1860. The children In this family were: William Charles, born in Ohio April 9, 1859, married Emma Jemima Twelves, died in Provo, May 11, 1922; Thomas John, born 4 Nov. 1860, married Sarah Louisa Haws, died May 14, 1936 in Provo; George Edwin born Aug. 12, 1864 in Spanish Fork, married Dora Elizabeth White, died Jan. 27, 1944 in Provo; John Samuel born May 18, 1866 in Spanish Fork, died Feb. 17, 1870; Eliza Ann, born Dec. 3, 1870 in Provo, married Thomas Shipley, died Aug. 1, 1939, Salt Lake; Martha, born Dec. 8, 1872, Provo, married Lawrence Thomas Walter, died Dec. 10, 1959, Provo. After the death of the father in 1876, the three boys had to find work to support the family in those hard times. Thomas John, who was known as T.J. or Tom, worked at the Provo Woolen Mills or factory, which provided long hours of employment for numerous people. Although the pay was low, it kept the wolf from the door. On the fourth of July 1882 T. J. Foote invited Louisa Haws to Provo’s annual holiday dance. Both liked to dance, so they went together to the community and ward dances and parties for more than two years, then decided to be married. They were good L.D.S. church members and wanted to go to a temple. Two of their friends, Walter S. and Mary Harris Corbett, also were engaged to be married, so both couples left for the Logan temple in a two seated buggy.(or light wagon) which belonged to Louisa’s father, Amos Haws, and a team of horses rented from a livery stable by the future bride grooms. Louisa wrote the following: “On Sunday morning Nov. 9, we started for Logan. The Endowment house had closed and of course the Salt Lake temple was not completed. We were three days going, three days coming home and one day in the temple, making a week for the trip. The evening we should have arrived in Logan, the driver took a long road over a sandy bench instead of a shorter one through a canyon. The horses were tired and we became stranded about 10 o'clock at night. We stopped and fed the horses then the four of us sat in the buggy. It was awfully cold and we were not prepared for such a time; we called it the "Accidental Hotel" and had lots of sport about it then and afterwards. We stayed there until about 4 a.m. when a man came along going to the canyon. We were directed which way to go, also we were ’bawled out.’ We got to a hotel in time to get ready for the temple at 8 a.m. We were married by Apostle M. W. Merrill, Nov. 12, 1884.” That week the Provo Fourth ward M.I.A. gave a dance honoring the newly wed Footes, Corbetts and also Thaddeus and Rachel Thomas Cluff, who were married the week previous. All three couples later were Pleasant View ward members for many years. Tom and Louisa Foote bought a plot of ground in Provo Fourth ward where they built one large adobe room with a lumber lean-to and moved in their first owned home June 1886. In 1891 they sold this house and built a three room and pantry brick house on a small city lot, but were disappointed because there was not room for a garden, a cow and chickens which they felt was necessary for a small family. After working at the factory or woolen mills more than 21 years, T. J. Foote quit, as there was always a lay off every winter. He bought a team of horses and did any kind of work available, such as: hauling wood or fence posts from the canyons. In 1893 the Footes bought two acres of land in the Pleasant View ward where they built a two room house at 2120 N. 150 E. As soon as they were financially able, they improved the house and acquired more land, a few acres at a time and planted fruit trees and strawberries. T. J. took loads of this fruit to the mining camps where he peddled it from door to door. Also he worked long hours clearing scrub oak and cottonwood trees from the new land, so he was always busy. He enjoyed dances and parties. He was caller at the Pleasant View dances in the old meeting house when quadrilles were popular. Many times he was asked to tap dance at these programs. T.J. Foote was a counselor In M.I.A. from 1896 to Sept. 1903, he was a Sunday School counselor from May 1901 to may 1903 and supt. from May 1903 to July 191l; also counselor Dec. 1917 to Jan. 1920. In 1919 the Footes sold their home and bought the Pleasant View grocery store which was a brick home with a store in a large north room. They owned this store until 1925 when they sold it and built a new brick house north of the Pleasant View meeting house where they lived the remainder of their lives. T.J. Foote enjoyed having his wife read to him, newspapers, stories and books. They spent many winter evenings In this entertaining way. William S. and Alice Payne Fausett were special friends of the Footes and the two couples visited at each other's homes many Sunday evenings after church where they always had something good to eat. Both women were excellent cooks. T.J. Foote had two severe falls after he was seventy years old. A horse he was riding threw him off, injuring his head; then later he walked off a high unlighted porch one night at a relatives home and hurt his back and cut his head, but after a few weeks in bed, he recovered. He was not tall, but he always stood and walked as erect as a young man. It was reported that he had been a very good wrestler when he was young. T.J. and Louisa Haws Foote's children were: Thomas Earl, born Nov. 5, 1885, married Merle Snyder, died Oct. 12, 1966; Ina (Mrs. Thomas J. Lewis) born Aug. 1, 1887, died May 8, 1965; Valera (Mrs. Edgar Hall) born May 10, 1891, died Jan. 22, 1942; Amos Eldred, born Dec. 19, 1892, married to Letha Smith and after her death he married Cecilia Fossey Dudley. After the death of Louisa Foote, June 25, 1934, T.J. Foote's health failed and he died two years later, May 14, 1936, at the home of his son T. Earl Foote. They were native Utah pioneers and did much pioneering in the Pleasant View area where they had lived more than 40 years.

Life Timeline of Thomas John Foote

1860
Thomas John Foote was born on 4 Nov 1860
Thomas John Foote was 19 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1879
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Thomas John Foote was 25 years old when Louis Pasteur successfully tests his vaccine against rabies on Joseph Meister, a boy who was bitten by a rabid dog. Louis Pasteur was a French biologist, microbiologist and chemist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of diseases, and his discoveries have saved many lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. He is regarded as one of the three main founders of bacteriology, together with Ferdinand Cohn and Robert Koch, and is popularly known as the "father of microbiology".
1885
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Thomas John Foote was 34 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
1894
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Thomas John Foote was 43 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
1903
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Thomas John Foote was 56 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
1917
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Thomas John Foote was 69 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
1929
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Thomas John Foote died on 7 May 1936 at the age of 75
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Thomas John Foote (4 Nov 1860 - 7 May 1936), BillionGraves Record 734186 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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