Thomas Burke Foy

30 Dec 1802 - 28 Jul 1873

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Thomas Burke Foy

30 Dec 1802 - 28 Jul 1873
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SUSANNAH FOY by Leslie Tuttle Foy. 2013. Susannah Foy was the second child of Thomas Birk Foy and Catherine Fink. She was born on 4 April 1831 in Wheatfield, Indiana, Pennsylvania. She went by her nickname, Susan, for much of her life. Little did the family know then that Susan would play such a gre
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Life Information

Thomas Burke Foy

Born:
Died:

Washington City Cemetery

131 Rickie Rd
Washington, Washington, Utah
United States
Transcriber

chetman

January 5, 2012
Photographer

Catirrel

December 29, 2011

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History of Susannah Foy

Contributor: chetman Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

SUSANNAH FOY by Leslie Tuttle Foy. 2013. Susannah Foy was the second child of Thomas Birk Foy and Catherine Fink. She was born on 4 April 1831 in Wheatfield, Indiana, Pennsylvania. She went by her nickname, Susan, for much of her life. Little did the family know then that Susan would play such a great role in the eternal salvation of her ancestors, her extended family, her siblings and their descendants. Susan lived on the frontier all her life. Survival was the first order of business on the frontier. It was expected that each member of the family would work as hard as possible to insure that the family had food, shelter, and clothing for survival. Planting crops came first before a shelter would be constructed. As early as three years of age, children would have chores to do. Susan learned well from her mother. As other children came into the family Susan had to grow up fast and take on added duties. Her family moved six times before she was married and started a family of her own. Susan was only five when her parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She was not old enough to be baptized into the new Church but she was old enough to learn about its teachings. Membership brought with it new friends. Membership also brought with it prejudice and name calling that she had not experienced before. She heard stories of how some members of the Church had been driven from their homes and farms in Missouri. She heard stories of how some of the leaders of her Church had been sent to jail. When she was eight, her family moved to Illinois at the request of the leaders of her Church. They settled in the town of Warsaw, Hancock County, near the town of Nauvoo. One of the first items of business in Warsaw was to see that the two oldest children were baptized. One record shows that Susannah was confirmed on 1 January 1840. It stands to reason that may have been her baptism date also. They lived in Warsaw from 1839 to 1844. This town was the headquarters for publishing bad things against her Church. Mobs of bad men came in from Missouri and other places to make life hard for those who were members of the Church. Her parents and her older sister Elizabeth and she signed a petition that was to be taken to Washington D. C. and given to government leaders so they could stop the bad things from continuing and to see that those who had lost belongings and property would be compensated. No help was given. When living in Warsaw and after the death of the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum, it became too dangerous to live there so her family moved into the city of Nauvoo for safety. Susan was thirteen years old at the time. She had never lived as near to so many people of the same religion before. For the next two years, the people worked hard to finish building the old Nauvoo Temple. It required the efforts of all the Saints. There were no meeting houses like we have today. Church services were held in the “Grove” near the temple site. There so many members of the Church that they were divided in to units called Wards. Lasting friendships grew from associating with members of the Ward and other young people her age. Susan was aware of the great blessings that her parents had been given by the Patriarch of the Church, Hyrum Smith. Those blessings told of future temple blessings that they would receive. She was well aware of the great blessings that her parents had as they received the temple ordinances of Washing, Anointing, and the Endowment. Many of her neighbors had received the same blessings. Susan longed to have such great blessings. Then the order came again to flee the state of Illinois or be driven out. It was probably the end of May when the Foy family left in 1846. Susan would have been about fifteen years of age. We do not know how long it took her family to cross Iowa or just when they ended up in Pottawattamie County, but that is where they would call home until the spring of 1850. There were two gathering places after being driven from Nauvoo. One was on the west side of the Missouri River at the place which became known as Winter Quarters. The other was on the east side of the Missouri River near the place that was called Kanesville. It was too late in the year to try and go west. Crops had to be planted. Shelters had to be built. Livestock had to be provided for. The poor and needy had to be provided for. People were scattered in many different make shift camps the first winter. Winter Quarters would become known in later years as Florence, Nebraska. Kanesville would become known as Council Bluffs, Iowa. More people died during that first winter than at any other time in the history of the Church. It became known as the “Valley Forge of Mormonism”. Those who had left Nauvoo early were able to get further west and cross the Missouri River. This included most of the leaders of the Church. Those who came later had to stay further back. The Pottawattamie settlement was made later. It was on Indian land and arrangements had to be made for people to stay there. It was among the Pottawattamie Indians in a place called Pleasant Valley that the Foys would call their new home. While the Foys were living in Pleasant Valley, Thomas and Catherine Foy crossed the Missouri River and received their Sealing Ordinances by Heber C. Kimball. This must have made a big impression on young Susan. Since the rest of the family would need to wait until they got their temple blessings, she looked forward to the time they could be an eternal family. Many changes took place in the Foy family while they were staying in Pottawattamie County. Susan’s older sister Elizabeth was married and started her own family. Her mother Catherine had two more children. And Susan had a young man named John Peck Chidester who had been noticing her. John’s family also lived in Pottawattamie County. Both John and his father were turners. They made wood products with lathes. John Peck Chidester started west before the rest of his family in 1850 in the Warren Foot Company. He was age 18 at the time. The company left on 17 June 1850 and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley between the 17th and the 26th of September 1850. This was just a few days before the Foy family departed in the William Snow/ Joseph Young Company on the 21st of June 1850. Departures had to be made after the spring run-off on the Missouri River. The little ferry boats could only take one or two wagons at a time across the river. It was also slow getting the cattle across the river. Wagon trains were like frontier settlements on wheels. The need for food, shelter, protection of the livestock and families had to take place every night. Each member of the family was expected to work for the survival of the family. The job of children was to stay away from danger. Snakes, wolves, poison plants, rivers, quick sand, Indians, stampedes of buffalo, falling under wagon wheels, and getting lost were but a few of the things that they were constantly warned about. If the children were old enough, they gathered buffalo chips for fuel for their fires. Boys herded the pigs and sheep. Older boys tended the cattle and horses. Older girls helped with food preparation and care of the children. The oldest boys and men drove the ox teams, hunted, and stood guard duty at night. Some had to repair wagon. Women had all the above duties. Catherine Foy, Susan’s mother, became ill early on the trek. She contracted cholera and nearly died. Catherine was also expecting a child. A heavy burden was placed on Susan and her other sisters for the care of her mother and the care of the family. Susan was nineteen at the time. Thomas Ditymus was just one year old. Also great help was given by the two oldest boys, John Moroni and William Bosley. As it turned out, the family had to go into the valley before the parents because the journey in her condition was slowing them down. Catherine and her older children were re-baptized in Salt Lake City on the 12th of April, 1851. The children were Susannah, John Moroni, William Bosley, and Emma Smith. This was a common practice during the early days of the Church. It was a statement of re- commitment to one’s faith. Thomas had been re-baptized back in Nauvoo on January 31, 1842. John Peck Chidester and Susannah Foy were married on 23 October 1851 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah Territory. This was a civil wedding. Her temple blessings would come later. There would need to be a place first for this to be done. The continuing influx of pioneers into the Salt Lake valley prompted the Church leaders to encourage people to make settlements in some of the near-by valleys. John and Susan moved to what would become, Utah County. There were settlements there as early as 1850. The settlement of Palmyra was made in 1852. That is where the Chidesters made their home. John’s carpentry skills helped get the settlement started. Susan gave birth to her first child, John Foy Chidester, on 2 February 1853 in Palmyra, Utah, Utah Territory. Utah County was home to a large band of the Ute Indians. They were primarily fishers and hunters. Utah Lake and the streams that flowed into it were natural fishing places for the Utes. Conflicts soon broke out between the settlers and the Utes over water and fishing and hunting rights. The official policy for the settlers in all communities in the territory was to feed the Indians rather than to fight them. It did not always work. John and Susan made a short trip back to Salt Lake City long enough for them to be sealed on 16 November 1854. John and Susan moved again. This time a little further south to Spanish Fork, Utah which was also first settled in 1852. Two more children were born while they were living there. Mary Catherine Chidester was born 15 February 1855. She died in 1857. Because they had been sealed, this child and all others born to John and Susan were born in the covenant. Susan Emaline Chidester was born 2 December 1857. Sometime during this period, John served in the Black Hawk Indian War. Spanish Fork Canyon was the migration path for the Utes. One might wonder why so many children died during the 1850's in Utah. It must be remembered there were recurring infestations of crickets and grasshoppers that destroyed some of the crops making food supplies short. It was an unsettled life with Indian threats, and threats from the US Military. Families from the northern settlements moved south during the “Utah War”. When they moved back, John and Susan Chidester followed soon after. On 9 September 1859 Lodema Elizabeth Chidester was born in Salt Lake City. John’s parents were living in the 16th Ward in Salt Lake City. On 21 March 1860, Susan received her own endowment including the initiatory ordinances in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. This brought her not only personal joy but it set the stage for future temple work that she would be engaged in. For a brief period, John Peck Chidester and his brother-in-law William Bosley Foy were working together in Parley’s Park. This is the present day Snyderville and Park City areas. Samuel C. Snyder first settled in that area in 1853. He built a gristmill and lumber mill. A short time later he built a lath mill and a shingle mill. The area was also used as a common herding ground for cattle because of the abundant grass. It is doubtful that Susan spent the entire time at Parley’s Park because there were periodic problems with Indians. She was staying in Salt Lake City when her next child, Myron Alphonzo Chidester was born on 6 March 1862. The Journal History item #170 for October 1862 listed the names of those individuals and families who were called to the “Cotton Mission”. John M. Chidester was called. He was listed as a turner. Two of his sons were also called. David Chidester was living in the 16th Ward in Salt Lake City with is father. John Peck Chidester was also called. His residence was listed as Parley’s Park. No trade was listed for the sons. However the years of pioneering experience was most important in making the choice as to who would be called to this mission. This would be the 12th move for Susan. William Bosley Foy was also listed as living in Parley’s Park. Thomas Burk Foy was called from Ogden. William and his father Thomas were the last two to be called. No trades were listed for the Foy’s either. These families moved south to Washington, Washington, in Utah territory in 1863. Washington was the largest county in the territory. The town of Washington was the County Seat because it was the most central settlement in the County. A short time later the County Seat was changed to St. George. The purpose of the mission was to grow cotton and other crops that would help make the people of Utah self-sufficient. The Civil War was raging in the eastern half of the country. Many items were hard to get. Utah could potentially be a supplier of needed goods to California and in the east. John Peck Chidester played a key role in the construction of the cotton mill. He was the foreman in charge of the timber works for the mill. Later he played a major role in the engineering and construction of the Pile Dam on the Virgin River. Multiple problems made life difficult in this area. Several famines caused multiple deaths from lack of nourishment. Susan gave birth to Robert Edgar Chidester on 23 September 1864 in Washington, Washington, Utah Territory. He died a year later on 3 October 1865 in the same place. The saints living in the St. George area were asked to be re-baptized to show a rededication to the Church as work would soon start on the construction of the temple.. Susan was re-baptized on 5 May 1865. Susan gave birth to three more children during these hard times in Washington County. Twin daughters were born on 18 February 1868. They named the girls, Emeline and Eveline Chidester. The final child was Lucinda Jane Chidester born on 29 August 1870. Lucinda was also the name that her father Thomas chose to name his daughter who was born a few months earlier in 1870. Susan’s mother, Catherine, passed away a few months before Susan’s last child was born. Land records show that Susan and John lived very near her father and his family in Washington. The Chidesters were very kind to Thomas and his second wife and her children. After the death of Thomas Foy in 1773, they continued to give aid the family and see that they had work at the mill. The St. George Temple was competed in April 1877. Susan, acting as proxy was endowed for her sister Elizabeth Foy Digman on 25 April 1877. Susan was sealed as proxy to her husband, John Peck Chidester, for her sister Elizabeth on 26 April 1877. Susan had Elizabeth sealed to their parents on 21 October 1882. On 7 August 1877 Susan was baptized and confirmed for the following female relatives that she knew were dead and her son, John Foy Chidester, was baptized and confirmed for the following male relatives: her grandfather Frederick Foy; John Foy, William Foy, Nicolas Foy, Samuel Foy (all uncles of Susan); John Fink (grandfather of Susan); George Washington Fink, David Fink (both uncles of Susan); Thomas Didymus Foy (baby brother of Susan); her great grandfather Fink and her great grandfather Goshorn; her uncle -in-law, William Kaisley; her grandmother Elizabeth Foy, Polly Foy, Elizabeth Foy Vonn ( both aunts of Susan ); her grandmother Sarah Goshorn; Rachel Fink Kaisley (her aunt); her great grandmother Fink; her great grandmother Goshorn; and two Fink cousins. Not enough tribute can be paid to Susan and her husband, John, for having the proxy work done for so many relatives as quickly as there was a temple ready for proxy work to be done. The “Cotton Mission” as such may have failed in its objective but the building of the first temple in Utah and the first place in this dispensation where proxy work for the dead other than baptisms and confirmations could be done was worth all the sacrifices that these pioneers had to pass through.

History of Rhode Maria Foy

Contributor: chetman Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Rhode Maria Foy by Leslie Tuttle Foy. 2013. Rhode Maria Foy was the eleventh child to be born to Thomas Birk Foy and Catherine Fink Foy. She would be the last child born to Catherine. She was born on November 13, 1853 in Farmington, Davis, Utah. She was born after her parents moved from Salt Lake City and stopped for a short time in Farmington while her father did some work for Willard Richards. She would not yet be one year old when they moved on to Ogden, Weber, Utah, in a place that was called Bingham’s Fort. Unlike most of her siblings, she would not have known the Prophet Joseph Smith. She would not have experienced crossing the plains. She would have grown up as a pioneer knowing what pioneer living was all about but not have known firsthand about the restoration of the gospel as did her older siblings. She would have known many who were eye witnesses to the restoration in addition to her parents even as a child. When Rhode was still four years old, the family moved south to the Payson “bottoms” to protect themselves when word came that the US army was advancing to Utah during the period known as the Utah War. This would be the time that long time memories would start to be formed. The 1860 United States Federal Census lists Rhode as age seven. Her father Thomas had taken a second wife that year. Shortly after, they moved a few miles further north to what is known today as Slaterville. Pioneer living required the efforts of the entire family to survive. Yet she still had time to learn to swim in the Ogden, River and ride horses. Her father, Thomas, received a mission call in 1862 to go to the Dixie Mission which was also known as the “Cotton Mission”. This mission was a call to all the members of the family to relocate to Washington, Washington, Utah to live for the rest of their lives. The family left in 1863 when Rhode would have been nine. One can only think what was going through her mind when her family left good farm land to go to a red rock desert. The first few years were a time of famine. They lived on alfalfa greens and weeds for part of the time. She watched as new babies born to her father’s second wife died because of lack of nourishment. She and her sisters would swim the Virgin River to work in the cotton industry and swim back at night. Her mother, Catherine, moved to Minersville with her three youngest daughters. U. S. Marshals were looking for families living in polygamy. Catherine moved away to take the pressure off her husband and to provide a chance for a better living for her daughters. They lived with Catherine’s son, William Bosley Foy, on his ranch and dairy. By 1870, Rhode’s sisters just older than her had married. Her mother, Catherine, died in May of 1870. Rhode would have been 16 when her mother died. On the United States Federal Census, Rhode is listed as living with her sister, Catherine and her husband, Jehu Blackburn, in Minersville. Utah. Sometime after Rhode moved to Minersville, she became acquainted with the Charles Jameson family. Charles and his wife, Mary Ann Hedrik, joined the Church in 1834 in Ohio. Six of their eleven children were born in Ohio. They gathered with the saints to Missouri and were living at Haun’ Mill on Shoal Creek, Caldwell County, Missouri in 1838. This was the time that Governor Boggs of Missouri issued the extermination order. Joseph Smith advised Jackob Haun, the owner of the mill, to have all the people living there move to Far West, Missouri for safety. Haun moved there with his family but did not pass on the message. 75 Mormon families lived along the banks of Shoal Creek and about 30 of them in the immediate vicinity of Haun’s Mill. A militia of 240 men led by Colonel William Jennings attacked the mill on October 28, 1838. David Evans, a leader in the community, ran forward waving his hat and called for peace. Peace did not come. Charles ran to help David Evens to safety. (David Evans was the missionary who baptized Charles and his wife.) Charles received four musket balls which logged in his body and remained there until his death years later. 19 people were killed. 13 were injured including 3 more who were the attackers. Mary Ann Jameson gave birth to twins in 1838. The records do not show whether or not the twins were born before, during, or after the attack but they died the same year they were born. They were named Agnes and David. The survivors of Haun’s Mill move to Farr West after the mob left. Mary Ann Jameson gave birth to a daughter in Quincy, Adams, Illinois in 1840 after they were driven from Missouri. This daughter, Margaret, died the same year. Family records show that a son, Hyrum Smith Jameson, was born in Bonneville, Bone, Missouri, on March 16, 1844. The place cannot be found. It must be Boone County, Missouri which is not far from Nauvoo, Illinois. Her last child, a daughter, was born in Illinois after the death of the Prophet, Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith. Mary Ann Jameson died of Cholera in Nebraska while her husband, Charles, was away with the Mormon Battalion. He remarried in 1851 in Kanesville, Iowa. After coming to Utah they settled for a while in Provo. They then made their way to Minersville, Beaver, Utah. Charles and his second wife had six children. On October 12, 1872 Rhode Marie Foy and Hyrum Smith Jameson were married in Minersville, Beaver Utah. She was a month short of being twenty years old. He was twenty-nine. Together they had twelve children. The first eight were born in Minersville. They were: Rhoda Catherine 1873 - 1950 Hyrum Smith 1875 - 1900 Mary Arminta 1876 - 1976 Charles 1878 - 1942 Sylvester 1880 - 1946 Lula May 1882 - 1987 Emma Jane 1884 - 1974 William Alexander 1888 - 1901 The last four children were born in Loa, Wayne, Utah. They were: Delores 1890 - 1950 Mrettie (Maretta) 1892 - 1942 Lester 1895 - 1959 Susie Marie 1898 - ? The 1880 United States Federal Census was the first census taken after Rhode and Hyrum were married. Their home was listed as being in Star, Beaver, Utah. She was listed with five children. Their nearest neighbors were the Edwin Bingham family. Edwin was a rancher. The other family was the Carrell family. He was listed as a teamster. Hyrum Smith Jameson was also listed as a teamster. Goods had to be shipped to the mines and ore had to be shipped from the mines. Her sister Mary Ann Foy Richards was also living in Star, Beaver, Utah. Mary Ann’s husband was also a teamster. The Jamesons moved north east to Loa, Wayne County and the Richards moved south west to Nevada about this time. The 1890 census records were destroyed in a fire so they are not available to trace the movement of the family. However in 1900 the United States Federal Census lists the family living in Loa, Wayne, Utah. Hyrum is still listed as a teamster. He is also listed as a widower. Rhode Marie Foy died on February 28, 1898 in Loa, Wayne Utah. That is where she was buried. It should be noted that she was listed as a homemaker on all the records. Hyrum did not die until February 13, 1925. He was also buried next to Rhode. In life, she stayed close to her sisters. The Blackburns and the Foys lived in Loa. Ordinance records show that Rhode was baptized by proxy on May 26, 1969. It was more than likely done before while she was still alive. All her living children were baptized near the time that children would normally be baptized. That would suggest that their mother would have been baptized before them. Her temple ordinance of the endowment was done in Manti, at the Manti, Utah Temple on October 24, 1900. That was the time that some of her children were endowed. She was born in the covenant so she is sealed to her parents. The sealing of Rhode to her husband was done for her by proxy but while Hyrum was alive in the Manti, Utah, Temple on June 7 1922. Hyrum Smith Jameson was endowed on the same day, June 7, 1922, in the Manti Utah Temple. He was baptized in 1852.

Notes on Thomas Birk Foy

Contributor: chetman Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Notes on Thomas B. Foy Rebaptised in 20 MAY 1865 in Nauvoo, Ill. Thomas B. Foy came to Utah l850 -obtained from Church Office Jan. l, l936 from Bro. Gooslin. Was a High Priest 29 Dec. l844 Nauvoo (F page 11) a missionary to Southern Utah l863 -74 with others laid the Harrisville irrigation ditch. He was a farmer and stock raiser. Frederick L. Foy -- son of Thomas B. and Catherina (Fink) Foy – born Oct 3 l848 at Hancock Co. Illinois--came to Utah with his father--married Rachel J. Slater Dec. 25, l863 at Slatersville, Utah -- daughter of Richard Slater and Ann Corbridge of Slatersville, Utah-- pioneers l852 in Thomas Lowell Company. She was born Jan 8, l847. Their children all born in Slatersville: Frederick R. 28 Feb l865 Delila l7 Aug l87l Ida l7 May l877 Rachel 5 Jul l880 Ora 3 Jul l886 McGee Harris was sustained as President of teachers quorum -- also Thomas B. Foy and Reuben Perkins were his councilors. Obtained from Journal History l852 July to December

Thomas Birk Foy, Life Story

Contributor: chetman Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

His Story Those who lived in frontier America during the 1800's left very few footprints on the pages of history. Most had little or no education. Therefore, most could not leave any record. Most became forgotten or just a footnote mentioned in passing by someone else. So most became a fading memory to future generations. Such is the story of Thomas Birk Foy. Thomas Birk Foy Thomas was born on the 30th of December 1802 in Rapho Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania to Frederick Foy and Elizabeth Phillips Foy. This was not long after the Revolutionary War and the change from Colonial government to the creation of the United States of America. Lancaster would have been near the edge of the frontier at the time of his birth. He was the last of twelve children according to family tradition. Soon after his birth, his family moved further into the frontier to what would become Halfmoon, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Information about the Foy family in America in earlier times is very sketchy and full of speculation . Family traditions indicate that the father, Frederick Foy, came to America as an indentured servant a few years before the start of the Revolutionary War. He served as a servant for about seven years in Chester County, Pennsylvania as a cooper to pay his passage to Colonial America. Seven years was the longest period of time that a person could serve as a servant. This would mean he would have been the poorest of the poor when he came. This is our best conclusion based on what records can be found. At the end of bondage, the only choice for most was to become a hired hand. As best as we can tell, his father, Frederick, rented land to provide for his family. Frederick could be found working around mills and mines as well. Family traditions indicate that he was a maker of flour casks. Family traditions also state that he drove a wagon freighting coal or charcoal. There were several iron foundries in the region. Two of Frederick’s sons became colliers, and one was a wood chopper. Frederick’s son William was known as a master collier. Colliers would burn wood slowly to change it into charcoal to be used in the steel industry and by blacksmiths in their forges. Frederick’s son, Samuel, also did some work as a collier. Frederick owned one cow and one horse most of the time he lived in Centre County, which means they did not have much livestock. It would also show they were not well off. Thomas was only seventeen when his father died. No death record or burial record of Frederick can be found. He may have been buried on the family farm because the family stayed close by for years after his death. No church records show any close link with a particular religion. Thomas would have had no memory of having lived in Lancaster County. His earliest memories would have been those of frontier life in Centre County. As far as can be found, Thomas had no formal education. What skills he did have, he would have learned from his father and from family and friends. He grew up with his brother Samuel and his sister Polly. Some of his other siblings lived near-by in neighboring counties. The others left no record that can be found so far. An older sister, Elizabeth, married Thomas Vaughn the younger. The Vaughns were well to do and owned land in both Halfmoon and Taylor Townships. Thomas Vaughn also owned a mill. Thomas Foy’s sister’s children would have been the closest cousins that Thomas Foy would have grown up with. Theirs would be names that he would remember. One of her children married Susannah Sharrer. Her father owned a powder mill. Another married John Speer Fink. Thomas Foy ‘s older Brother William was also married and lived in near-by Huntingdon County. It appears that William’s first wife was a Fink. When she died, William married his sister’s sister-in-law, Mary Vaughn. As far as we know, these were his only siblings to have a posterity. It also shows a connection between the Foy, Vaughn, and Fink families. With few families on the frontier, neighbors married neighbors. Family names of these three families are passed on for generations. Naming patterns give us clues as to relationship and ancestry. When a boy reached manhood at twenty one, he was listed as a single freeman. This meant that he was old enough to serve in the military, to pay taxes, and to own land in Pennsylvania. He was taxed for his occupation if he did not own property. Thomas was shown being taxed for his occupation beginning in 1824 and every year after that until 1828 in Halfmoom Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania. On the 1823 tax records, he was not listed. In 1828 he was still listed as a single freeman but that he was gone. This means that he left the county. His older brother Samuel had transferred what land the family still had back to Christian Van Pool, the owner. Thomas needed to find work. In 1820 the census record for Halfmoon Township showed Samuel Foy as the head of the house. His mother is listed as living in the home. Thomas was also living there. Thomas followed the frontier west to Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Here he became acquainted with the John Fink family. Thomas met and married Catherine Fink, the daughter of John Fink and Sarah Goshorn Fink. No marriage records can be found. The census record for 1830 lists Thomas Foy living in Wheatfield, Indiana County, Pennsylvania between the ages of 20–30 with his wife, Catherine Fink Foy who was between the ages of 20–30. They had one female child under the age of 5. That would be their daughter, Elizabeth. Living next to them was John Fink, Catherine’s father and her mother Sarah. John and Sarah had 3 male children under 5, 3 female children under 5, 2 male children 5–10, 1 female child 5–10, 1 male 10–15, 1 female child 10–15, and 1 male child 15–20. It appears that the sister of Thomas Foy, Elizabeth Foy Von (Vaughn) who was a young widow, came with her youngest children and their mother, Elizabeth Phillips Foy to visit as the census was being taken. Elizabeth Vaughn and her mother returned to Centre County when the next set of records were made. Elizabeth Foy Vaughn had 3 sons and four daughters at that time. Catherine Rebecca Fink Foy No record can be found to indicate what Thomas did for work while they were living in Indiana County , Pennsylvania. His father-in-law, John Fink, was a carpenter. His grandfather-in-law, Leonard Goshorn, was a blacksmith. Family tradition indicates that Thomas became a wheelwright. A wheelwright had to combine the skills of a carpenter, a cooper, and a blacksmith to make wheels out of wood. Producing wheels required strength and ingenuity and precise skills in measuring. The skills of a wheelwright could transfer over to work needed to produce water wheels. Each place where Thomas Foy lived, was also near where mills could be found. Workmen who produced wheels would soon find themselves out of work. Once the job was done, they had to look for new opportunities for work. Conversion Family records show that the following children were born to Thomas and Catherine Foy while they were living in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. The first was Elizabeth Foy. She was born on the 30th of October 1829 at Wheatfield, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. She was named after the mother of Thomas, Elizabeth Phillips Foy. Their second child was Susannah Foy. She was born on the 4th of April 1831 in Wheatfield as well. Her name is one of the names common to the Vaughn family in Centre County, from where Thomas came. Two of the siblings of Thomas married into the Vaughn family. Their third child was named John Moroni Foy. He was born on the 6th of November 1835 in Wheatfield. He was named after his mother’s father, John Fink and after the Prophet Moroni who is mentioned in the Book of Mormon. This would indicate that Thomas and Catherine had heard of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints before John’s birth, yet they had not yet joined the Church. Because of the spacing in the birth of child number two and child number three, it appears that Catherine may have lost a child. The family next moved to Strongstown, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. That is where child number four was born. He was named William Bosley Foy. He was born on the 9th of September 1837. After the dedication of the temple in Kirtland, Ohio, missionaries such as Erastus Snow went to Pennsylvania to preach the restored gospel of Jesus Christ. Thomas and Catherine were taught the gospel in the Strongstown area and were baptized by Erastus Snow in 1836. Concerning this event, Erastus Snow recorded, “I returned to Indiana County and preached in the Court House on Friday Evening. Saturday I returned to Brush valley and Sunday I preached to an audience of between two and three hundred people, some of whom rejoiced and others were angry because their foundations shook... I returned the next day and preached in Brush valley and on Wednesday baptized three and preached again in the evening.” One of his companions was William Bosley who traveled with him to Pennsylvania in 1837. It is from this missionary that William Bosley Foy got his name. He was also named after the older brother of Thomas, William Foy. At a Conference held at Strongstown in May of 1838, Thomas was ordained a Teacher in the Aaronic Priesthood by Erastus Snow on the 26th of May 1838. Strongstown was one of the strongest branches of the Church in western Pennsylvania. On the 1st of April 1839, Thomas was ordained a Priest in the Aaronic Priesthood by William F. McIntire at Strongstown. William McIntire was probably the first convert to the Church in Indiana County. He was well known and was used as a mission companion of Erastus Snow from time to time. Thomas and Catherine joined the Church before most of the revelations in the Doctrine and Covenants were given and before it was published. It was also before the history of the “First Vision” was published. This was also a period of gathering for the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. There had been two gathering places. One was Kirtland, Ohio, and the other was Missouri. It was also a time for persecution for members of the Church wherever they had a congregation. However, the members of the Church were driven out of Missouri so Illinois became the new gathering place. Sometime between being ordained a Priest and the 6th of February 1840, Thomas and Catherine left with their small children and settled in Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois to gather with the body of the Church near Nauvoo. Elizabeth was their oldest child so she would have only been ten at the time they relocated. The early childhood memories of the children would be limited. They would have been able to remember the names of relatives, but of little else. Warsaw The move to Warsaw would have been at the request of the leaders of the Church. The Lord had commanded the members of the Church to build a temple. They needed to gather to a central location in order to do so. This move meant that Catherine was expecting her fifth child during the winter when they moved. Sara Jane Foy was born on the 6th of February 1840 at Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois. She was named after the mother of Catherine Fink Foy. There was not enough work for all who gathered at Nauvoo so many settled near by. Warsaw was a port city on the Mississippi River. It had a population of about 500 during the time that the Foy family lived there. It was a place of portage where goods had to be unloaded and then reloaded above the rapids to be shipped further up stream. The community was in direct competition for commerce and trade with the city of Nauvoo. Thomas and Catherine do not show up on the US census of 1840. They do show up on the tax records in Hancock County, Illinois, of August 1842. These records are interesting. Because most of the people listed had no real property, they listed other things that could be taxed such as wagons, livestock, clocks, watches, tools and household items. From these records we can tell that Thomas was below average in taxable personal property. There was another Foy listed on these tax records. He was Jonathan Foy of Le Harpe. Warsaw is in the far southern part of the county and Le Harpe is far to the north. Jonathan was not a member of the Church. He came from New York. Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois -- late 1840s Life in Warsaw during the 1840's for a member of the Church would have been difficult. Thomas Sharp moved to Warsaw after the Foy’s arrived there. He purchased a news paper company that would become an anti-Mormon publication. It was also a time that mobs from Missouri would freely cross the Mississippi River and created problems for the Mormons. Some property belonging to the Mormons was damaged or destroyed. Some were kidnaped and taken to Missouri. It was while they were living in Warsaw that Thomas and Catherine signed a petition by the Church listing grievances against the State of Missouri for loss or damage of property that could be presented to the US Congress for reparations. Nauvoo These hardships did not prevent Thomas and Catherine from traveling to Nauvoo and keeping close contact with the leaders of the Church and participating in meetings. These hardships did not prevent Thomas and Catherine from doing their duty and helping where they could. Some time during this period, Thomas was ordained an Elder by Willard Richards. It was not done on April 6, 1840 as one history shows. Willard Richards was still in England on his mission on that date. It could have been done after August 16, 1841 when Willard returned from England or as late as April 6, 1842 by Willard at April General Conference. Never the less, it was done by Willard Richards. Also Catherine received her Patriarchal Blessing from Hyrum Smith on October 5, 1841. This was received in conjunction with their visit to Nauvoo for the October General Conference of the Church. Hyrum had been made the Patriarch to the Church in April General Conference 1841 replacing his father, Joseph Smith Sr., after his death. She would have been one of the first to receive a blessing from Hyrum Smith. This blessing was given before much was known about ordinance work for the dead. It was given before temple ordinances for the living had been revealed. It was given at the time when Joseph revealed that baptisms for the dead should stop until the baptism font in the temple had been finished and dedicated. Joseph did say at that conference that “It is no more incredible that God should save the dead than that he should raise the dead.” The first baptisms for the dead in the Nauvoo Temple font took place on 21st November 1841. The blessing stated that Catherine had been born in Wheatfield Township, Indiana County, in the State of Pennsylvania. It listed her birth date as the 18th day of October 1810. This is a conflict. The year has also been listed as 1804, and 1809. The sextant in Minersville, Utah Territory recorded on her death certificate, that the birth date of Catherine was 1809. That seems to be the most recent and the most accurate. Her blessing gives her “a multiplicity of blessings because of your patience in tribulation and in sore afflictions and have not forsaken the Lord”. It also states that “thou art a daughter of Abraham and shall be blessed in his lineage”. Not only did she already have many tribulations but many more would yet come into her life. Some of the events leading up to the April 1841 General Conference of the Church in Nauvoo included the laying of the cornerstones of the temple. The conference in April 1842 was wet and cold. There were no meeting houses. Meetings were held outside in what was known as the grove. This may have been the time when Thomas was ordained an Elder. In March 1842 the Book of Abraham, which is now part of the Pearl of Great Price, was published in the Times and Seasons. It was also in March 1842 that the Female Relief Society was organized. Catherine was at some of these early meetings. Thomas received his Patriarchal Blessing on January 30th 1842 in Nauvoo from Hyrum Smith. It gave his birth place as the State of Pennsylvania. His blessings were to be many both in time and eternity. But he was bless to “have an inheritance with the remnants of the seed of Jacob, not in Joseph, but in Issachar, with the remnants of the seed of Jacob, in the covenant unto the House of Israel, together with your Father’s House, in the dispensation of the fullness of times , in the deliverance of the dead and the living”. On the 23rd of July 1842, Emma Smith Foy was born in Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois. Her name shows there was a close association of Catherine Foy and the Prophet Joseph’s wife Emma. Thomas and Catherine named their children in honor of those they respected so their children would always have someone to look up to in bringing honor to their name. Persecution intensified, but so did revelation and sacrifice by the members of the Church. Thomas and Catherine spent many hours working on the Nauvoo Temple. As far as we can tell, Thomas and Catherine did not do any baptisms for the dead in the Nauvoo Temple. There are records of the proxy baptisms that were done in the Nauvoo Temple by Edward Rigby for his wife’s relatives. They include the names of Edward Foy, Thomas Foy, and Sarah Foy, all of Lancashire England. This looks interesting for future research. The proxy baptisms were done on 28th of July, 1844 about a month to the day after the death of Joseph and Hyrum Smith. Thomas Sharp wrote in the “Warsaw Signal”, that “war of extermination is inevitable”, on the 12th of June 1844. He urged all the “old Citizens” of Warsaw to assist the mob in driving out the Mormons. On the evening of the 27th of June 1844, sixty men arrived for a late supper at Mrs. Fleming’s Tavern bragging about killing the Smith brothers. Thomas and Catherine Foy and their family were still living in Warsaw at that terrible time. Most of the saints who lived near-by rushed to Nauvoo to see what need to be done to protect the members of the Church and to pay their respects to their beloved leaders and their loved ones. It stands to reason that the Foys were present. Catherine gave birth to her seventh child, a son, whom they named Frederick Lehi Foy, on the 3rd of October 1844 in Warsaw. There is a conflict on his birth year. However, his baptism record in Farmington, Utah Territory, lists this as his birth date. This son was named in honor of the father of Thomas Foy and the Prophet Lehi in the Book of Mormon. Both had left their homeland for a promised land. Thomas was ordained a High Priest on the 29th of December 1844 by G. W. Harris and others in Nauvoo. He was received into the quorum on the same date. He received his license as it was called then on the 26th of January 1845. They remained true to their faith. Living in Warsaw became so dangerous for members of the Church that Thomas and Catherine moved with their family to Nauvoo for safety. We know that it was after the death of Joseph and Hyrum. We know that it was after the birth of Frederick Lehi Foy. Just when the move took place is not certain. Thomas B.Foy was the purchaser of Town Lot #2 Block #125 in the Nauvoo Plat, in the Town of Nauvoo on the 30th of May 1845 from William and Mary Ainscough for $50. William W. Phelps was the Notary Public. This move would have been during the winter season. They would not live in Nauvoo very long. Work continued on the temple as rapidly as possible. Some worked while others stood guard. It appears from looking at city maps of Nauvoo, that the Foy family in Nauvoo, would have been in the 4th Ward. Other members of that ward would be Winslow Farr and his family, Heber C. Kimball, Wilford Woodruf, Levi Hancock, Edward Partrige, Vision Kight, Francis Lyman, Philo Dibble, Lucy Smith, the families of Joseph Smith and Don Carlos Smith, Perrigrine Sessions, Shadrack Roundy, William Law, Wilson Law, George W. Harris, N. K. Whitney, Brigham Young, William Marks, and Orson Hyde. Even though these families lived near each other for just a short time, many lasting friendships grew form their association one with another. Chidester’s lived in the 1st ward. The Isaac Freeman family lived in the 3rd ward as did Edward Rigby. Nauvoo, Illinois. Color print by A. Henry Lewis. The Nauvoo Temple Endowment Register records that Thomas B. Foy and Catherine Fink were part of the first endowment session on the 22nd of January in 1846. There were 44 persons on that session. 25 were female and 19 were males. Of the males, 7 were High Priests, and 12 were Seventies. Six were from Pennsylvania. It listed Thomas as having been born on December 30, 1802 in Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Present day historians in making a modern record of the endowment record have put in the name of Harriett Foy as the wife of Thomas B. Foy. That is in error. Harriet Foy was the daughter of a William Foy who was from New Hamshire. She would have been 14 years old at the time of the endowment. Harriet was born in New York. Harriett did join the Church and did come west to Utah but she has been linked incorrectly to our line and has created a major error for researchers who follow that path of research. She is the one who goes into the Foscue line which is not our Foy line. People being endowed are done so with their birth name and not their married name. On February 4, 1846, the first wagons left Nauvoo to start their flight into the wilderness on their trek west. It was during that same time frame when the temple work for the living was being done and the start of the trek west that the Grand Jury was trying the leaders of the mob for the murders of Joseph and Hyrum Smith. None of the jurors were members of the Church. None of the witnesses for the prosecution dared to show up. The witnesses for the defense lied on the stand. The jury had no other option than to declare the defendants, to be not guilty. Jonathan Foy of Le Harpe was member of that jury. It is not known for sure when Thomas and Catherine left Nauvoo to head west. It would have taken some time to get supplies ready. Men with skills in working wood to make wagons were pressed into service helping to get wagons ready. Not much time was given to the members of the Church by the mobs. Thomas and Catherine had experienced the mobs once before in Warsaw so they would not want to take chances with them again. Most had left by May of 1846. We know that they were in the Council Bluffs area of Iowa by the 28th of March 1847 because that is when and where their eighth child, a daughter, Catherine Rebecca Foy was born. It is probable that Catherine was expecting this child as they were driven out of Nauvoo. It is also probable that Catherine’s flight west was during the winter. The daughter was named in honor of her mother, Catherine Foy. Over the Missouri There were two main temporary gathering places after the saints were driven out of Nauvoo. One was at and around Winter Quarters, Nebraska on the west side of the Missouri River. It is part of Omaha, Nebraska today. This was where the ones chosen to be part of the vanguard pioneer company camped to get a jump start to the west. The other was on the east side of the Missouri River at and around what was then known as Kanesville, Iowa and is known today as Council Bluffs, Iowa. This is where the majority of the saints gathered to prepare to go west. The Foys were located south and east of Kanesville at Pleasant Valley in Pottawattamie County, Iowa. This was still Indian Territory. It was named for the Pottawattamie Indians who lived there. The right to live in Indian Territory had to be obtained from US Government leaders. This right was granted for two years in exchange for the volunteers who served in the Mormon Battalion. It was a matter of survival for the saints to live near the Missouri River. There were few ferryboats. Most boats could take only one or two wagons across the Missouri River at a time. Crossing the river in the springtime was very dangerous because of the high water in the spring. More people died in these two locations after being driven from Nauvoo than from those who were driven from Missouri and those who crossed the wilderness to Utah by wagon or handcart combined. About 1,000 out of 12,000 died in those humble makeshift surroundings. Dwellings were what ever could be built in the short time they had after being driven from Nauvoo. Some were caves dug into the bank of a hill. Others were huts, sod houses, even wagons. Some few where able to build a cabin. Very few crops could be grown the first two years after leaving Nauvoo. Livestock was taken by the Indians for food. After the death of Joseph Smith, some would-be leaders tried to convince others to follow them. The first of these was Sidney Rigdon. Fortunately the vast majority of the saints followed the leadership of the Quorum of the Twelve. They had the keys of authority. Perhaps one of the greatest legacies left to us by Thomas and Catherine was that they remained true to the faith. They did not falter. They followed the leaders of the Church. During the time that Thomas and Catherine were members of the Church up until the time they moved to Iowa, they had never met any of the three witnesses to the Book of Mormon. Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer had been excommunicated. Martin Harris had stayed in Kirtland. In October 1848, Oliver and his wife and their daughter, came to Council Bluffs, Iowa to reconnect with the Church and to make the trek west. Orson Hyde was presiding over the branch of the Church in that area at the time. Oliver asked Orson Hyde if he could be rebaptized into the Church. At a Conference of the Church held on October 21st, the request was granted. Oliver asked, “Brethren, for a number of years I have been separated from you. I now desire to come back. I wish to come humbly and to be one in your midst. I seek no station; I only wish to be identified with you. I am out of the Church. I am not a member of the Church, but I wish to become a member of it. I wish to come in at the door. I know the door. I have not come here to seek precedence. I come humbly and throw myself upon the decisions of this body, knowing as I do that its decisions are right and should be obeyed.” George W. Harris of the high council moved that Brother Oliver Cowdery be received back into the Church. Shortly after, Oliver was baptized by Orson Hyde. Thomas and Catherine and their children would have likely been to this conference. They would have listened to the testimony of that great witness of the restoration. The Cowdery family stayed in the Council Bluffs area making preparations to go west. The following spring in 1849, they requested to take a short visit back to Richmond, Missouri so that Sister Cowdery could say goodbye to her parents before they departed for the west. It was here that Oliver died of an illness that he got during the winter. David Whitmer wrote of Oliver’s death as follows, “Oliver died the happiest man I ever saw. After kissing his wife and daughter, he said, “Now I lay down for the last time: I am going to my Savior’; and he died immediately with a smile on his face.” Pioneer Trail The vanguard pioneer company led by Brigham Young made the trek west to the Salt Lake Valley starting in the spring of 1847. They laid out the trail. They planted crops. They built some dwellings and then most of them returned to Winter Quarters. Included in that group were Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards. Upon their return, several important events took place with the Foy Family. On 24th of April 1848, Thomas and Catherine crossed the Missouri River and went to the dwelling of Willard Richards in Winter Quarters and were sealed by Heber C. Kimball. Willard Richards and Thomas Bullock acted as witnesses. The Richards home served as a home, postoffice, and Church headquarters. Also the week before the sealing on 30th of March 1848, Thomas received a second Patriarchal Blessing. This was given by Isaac Morley in the home of Jesse P. Harmon on the east bank of the Missouri River. Thomas Bullock, the official Church clerk, made the record. In the blessing it states, “thou hast had much trial and tribulation in the cause of God, yet thou shalt be blessed and numbered with the seed of Abraham, and rejoice with the sons of Isaac and Jacob...thy faith shall reach the heavens; and thine influence realized among all good men through out the world...and be an instrument in aiding and assisting in rearing temples to the most high...”. Tithing records for the Pleasant Valley Branch for 1848 reveal how poor the members of the Church were after their exodus from Nauvoo. Thomas paid the following as a tithe for the year: 10 bushels of potatoes 1.50 1 load of pumpkins 1.00 15 bushels of turnips 1.50 cucumbers & radishes .15 one days hauling 1.00 2 chickens .10 1 peck of corn meal .061/4 1 day hauling corn in shock 1.00 1 day work .75 1 cord of wood 1.00 8 bushels of corn in ear .80 Total-------------------$8.861/4 Thomas was not the poorest nor was he the wealthiest. This shows that he was a humble farmer. It shows that the food he produced was the kind that could last through much of the winter. It shows the value placed on food in relationship to a days work. John Dingman was a single man living in the same branch. He paid .50 cents tithing with 1 cord of wood cutting. Thirty-one individuals showed up on the tithing list in Pleasant Valley Branch in 1848. The next records for the branch show that four branches had been consolidated into one branch. During 1850 most of the families emigrated to Utah. On the 23rd of November 1848, the oldest daughter of Thomas and Catherine, Elizabeth Foy, was married to John BoydDingman. They were married in the Council Bluffs area of Iowa. John was a convert to the Church from Dundas, Ontario, Canada. They had three Children. The first was named Orson Hyde Dingman. , after the presiding officer of the Church in the Kanesville area of Iowa. Orson Hyde was also a member of the ward that Elizabeth lived in while the family was still in Nauvoo. This was the first grandchild for Thomas and Catherine. Both mother and daughter were having children about the same time. The other two children of Elizabeth Foy Dingman were born after her parents moved with the rest of the family to Utah. That would have been a hard parting for all. William Dingman was born the 18th of December 1850 in the Council Bluffs area of Pottawattamie County, Iowa. Her Uncle William Foy must have somehow made a lasting impression on her or her younger brother. Her third child was named Susan Dingman, after her sister. Family ties were strong. Susan Dingman was born on 18th of February 1852, at the same place in Iowa. Unfortunately, Elizabeth died on the 13th of November 1853 before their little family could go west to Utah. Crossing at Council Bluffs on the overland trail to the Far West. Frederick J. Piercy sketch. Family tradition states that Thomas Foy had been asked to stay in Iowa for a period of time helping to build wagons for those who would make the trek to Utah. Their ninth child, a son, was born during that time. He was named Thomas Didymus Foy after his father Thomas and the Apostle of Christ in the New Testament. This part of Iowa was still listed as Indian Territory. No birth date has been found but he is listed on the 1850 Census in Salt Lake City as being one year old. That means he was a baby when the Foy family made their trek west. The leaders of the Church did not want to have the members of the Church become so attached to Iowa that they would not move to the Salt Lake Valley. So in 1850, many wagon trains started west. This was also the time of the gold rush to California and the rush for free land in Oregon. According to Church records, 27 wagon companies of the Church went west in 1850. Some of those were just freight companies and some were small fast moving private groups. Thomas and Catherine Foy were in the 14th company in 1850. This was under the leadership of William Snow/ Joseph Young. It departed from Kanesville, Iowa on the 21st of June 1850. They were in the second group of fifty under the leadership of Gardner Snow. They were also in the 6th group of ten in that fifty under the leadership of Thomas Rich. Winslow Farr and his family that they lived in the same ward with them in Nauvoo were part of their group of ten. So was Amos P. Stone and his family part of this group of ten. There were 87 families, 509 people, 133 wagons, 758 cattle, 42 horses, 4 mules, and 58 sheep that started the journey in that last group of fifty. Of that number, Thomas had 1 wagon and 8 cattle and l gun. Eight are listed in the official record as being part of his family when it arrived in the Salt Lake Valley. That would be the children. Thomas and Catherine could not keep up and came into the valley in an unidentified group a short time later. Because of the large numbers of travelers on the way west, water became polluted and many died from infectious diseases such as cholera. Catherine Foy contracted this disease early, along the Platte River bottoms. Amos P. Stone had taken a course in medicine. He was able to help Catherine recover. Amos P. Stone would become a future relative. Minerva Stone wrote a letter to her family on the 4th of July 1850 which states, “Sister Foy and two sisters with Bro. Farr have had the cholera but have recovered; there have been one or two children die with it. I have heard some say that if Mr. Stone had not been there in this company, there would have been a great many more deaths. Bro. Farr says he is confident that the syringe with proper medicine has saved his life and two others in his family and he is grateful as anybody can be.” Catherine was about four months pregnant when she got cholera. All those who did keep records of this journey recorded the large number of graves that line the trail west. Utah Arrival The first ice on the water was recorded on the 12th of September 1850. The main part of the William Snow/ Joseph Young Company arrived in the Salt Lake valley between October 1st and the 4th. Because of the weakened health of Catherine because of the cholera and the advanced stages of her pregnancy, all the children went on into the valley ahead of Thomas and Catherine. They were picked up as part of an unidentified company. Elias Adams was part of that company and he made mention of Thomas and Catherine traveling with them. It would have been later in the fall that they arrive. Mary Ann Foy was born in Salt Lake City on the 13th of December 1850. It was almost the same day that Catherine’s daughter, Elizabeth Dingman gave birth to her child. This child does not show up on the 1850 census in Salt Lake City, so the family was all together in the valley at the time of the census but before the birth of Mary Ann Foy. One can not help but see the parallel between this trek through the American wilderness and the trek taken by Lehi and his family in the Book of Mormon. Their women were made strong to compensate for the hardships that they had while traveling through wilderness as well. It was almost prophetic that Thomas and Catherine had named one of their sons, Frederick Lehi Foy. One might wonder why this daughter was given the name of Mary. We can only speculate. Mary, the mother of Jesus, also had to make a long journey during the last stages of her pregnancy. Mary is the name of the second wife of William Foy. Mary is the name of the mother-in-law of Elizabeth Foy Vaughn. “Polly” is a nickname for Mary. “Polly” was the sister just older than Thomas Foy whom he grew up with. A few sisters in the same wagon company that the Foy family traveled with were named Mary Ann. This little girl had a lot of fine people to model her life after. Not much is known about where the Foy family lived in Salt Lake or how long they lived there or what Thomas did for a living. Erastus Snow was a member of the Stake Presidency. They could have lived near him. The 1850 census lists him as a farmer. Thomas was enrolled in the High Priest Quorum in Salt Lake City on the 2nd of April 1851. Catherine Foy and her older children were rebapized on 12 April 1851 in Salt Lake City. The children were Susannah, John Moroni, William Bosley and Emma Smith Foy. Rebaptism was a common practice in the early days of the Church. On October 23, 1851, Susannah Foy married John Peck Chidester. They had known each other in Nauvoo and in the Kanesville area before coming west. John Peck Chidester was in the Warren Foot wagon company in 1850. It left a few days before the one the Foy family traveled in. An article appeared in the Deseret New on Thursday October 7th 1852 which states: “General Conference was continued in Salt Lake City.... McGee Harris was sustained as President of the Teachers Quorum, also Thomas B. Foy and Reuben Perkins his counselors.” Then on April 7th 1853 the Deseret News General Conference report stated: “McGee Harris was sustained as President of the Teachers Quorum; also John Grove was voted to be his counselor in the room of Thomas B. Foy, who had moved to another valley; and Reuben Perkins second counselor.” These quorums were presided over and made up of members of the higher priesthood then. This is the time that Thomas received his third Patriarchal Blessing. This was given on the 25th of January 1853 by the Patriarch of the Church, John Smith. He was the Uncle of the Prophet Joseph Smith. Two items are noteworthy. First the blessing states; “you are of the blood of Joseph that was sold into Egypt and lawfully entitled to the priesthood and in as much as you have come up through great tribulations your robes shall be made white in the blood of the Lamb...The Lord hath designed you for a great work to save your father’s house back to the days of Noah or to where they died in the Gospel, that there shall not be a broken link in the chain from the days of righteous Able to the dispensation of the fullness of times, when all shall be gathered in one.” This second part of the blessing becomes a family responsibility to fulfill. Some time after that blessing but before April Conference, Thomas moved his family to help Willard Richards build his mill in Farmington, Davis County, Utah Territory. On the 13th of November 1853, Thomas and Catherine had their eleventh child. She would be the last for Catherine. They named her Rhoda Marie Foy in honor of the sister of Willard Richards. It appears that Thomas had worked on mills off and on through out his life. Once a mill was finished, so was the construction job. While they were living in Farmington, Frederick Lehi Foy was baptized in the Farmington Ward by William Flint and confirmed by his father Thomas B. Foy. This record gives the birth date of Frederick as the 3rd of October 1844. These ordinances were done on the 11th of December 1853. It would have been while the Foy family was living in Farmington or just after their move to Ogden, that they would have received word that their oldest daughter, Elizabeth Foy Dingman had died. This was one more hardship to bear. Yet true to their blessings, they did not murmur against the Lord or the Church. Thomas B. Foy moved his family to Bingham’s Fort, just north of the Ogden River. In 1854, there were 732 people living in the fort. Thomas Foy’s cabin was in the north west corner of the fort. Inside the fort, there was a molasses mill and a one-room school house. The Binghams would become future relatives. Also the Goodale and the Jones families would also become future relatives who lived in the fort. There was a Church census taken in 1856 in Weber County, Utah Territory. This listed the members of the Foy family that were still living at home. Sarah Jane Foy married Thomas Wilkins Jones on th 3rd of April 1856. Sarah was 16 years old. They moved into the fort that fall. John Moroni Foy married Alice Jost on the 28th of August 1856 and also live in Ogden. Emma Smith Foy married Isaac Goodale as his second wife when she was 15 years old in 1857. He was the next door neighbor to the Foy family in the fort. Sarah Jane Foy Jones The United States Government sent an Army to Utah which became know as Johnston’s Army. The event was known as the “Utah War”, although there was very little that took place other than saber ratling. The Mormons vacated their settlements and moved south to get out of the path of the Army. In the move south, young Thomas Dydymus Foy must have died. He was on the 1856 census. Yet he does not show up on any records after the brief flight from the army. After the Foy family returned from their move south during the “Utah War”, Thomas took a second wife. Her name was Louisa Potterill. She was a convert to the Church from Sacom, Herford, England. She was Christened on the 9th of February 1840. They were married on the 13th of January 1860 in Salt Lake City, Utah territory in the Office of the President. Brighan young sealed them as husband and wife. John Peck Chidester was one of the witnesses. They were sealed again on November 7, 1870 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City Utah, Territory. The 1860 census lists Thomas as 53, Catherine as 50, Louisa as 20, and the children as Fred R. age 14, Catherine L. age 13, Mary A. age 10, and Rhoda M. age 7. Notice the middle initial for Fred and Catherine were switched by the census taker. The older children were married or living away from home. Thomas Didymus Foy was not listed. The first child of Thomas and Louisa was named Mary Elizabeth Foy. She was born in Ogden on the 4th of January 1861. She died on the 11th of July that same year in Slaterville, Weber County, Utah Territory. She was named after the mothers of Louisa and Thomas. The family had moved from Ogden to Slaterville after the 1860 census. Farming was better in Slaterville than Ogden. The second child of Thomas and Louisa, Sarah Ann Foy, was born in Slatersville on the 9th of October, 1862. Cotton Mission Almost two weeks after the birth of this child, Thomas and his family received a mission call to the Cotton Mission in Southern Utah. The Deseret News reported that on Sunday October 19, 1862 the following event took place as it was recorded in the Journal History of the Church. “ The day was pleasant in Great Salt Lake City. Two meetings were held in the bowery. Elder Daniel Spencer and Heber C. Kimball preached in the forenoon and in the afternoon. Thomas Bullock read the names of 200 missionaries called to the Cotton Country, after which Elders Wilford Woodruff and Enoch Reese spoke. Following are the names of persons called to go to the Cotton Mission:...William B. Foy, Parley’s Park,... Thomas B. Foy, Ogden....(William was 199 on the list and Thomas was number 200). No trade was listed for either one. John M. Chidester and his sons David and John Peck Chidester were also listed. John had a trade as a turner. The others did not. John Peck Chidester was also listed as residing in Parley’s Park. That would be where the Syderville and Park City areas would be today. It was noted for lumbering and milling of lumber products and cattle ranching at the time. President Heber C. Kimball met with the Cotton Missionaries at 6:30 p.m. at the Tabernacle. He told them that there was not one required to go...they could go as well as not, that they were hand selected good men– not one was being sent to get rid of him, that they want a settlement down there of men who can be relied on. God is inspiring this mission, we do not know the results of it. They would not wonder if we (President Young and Kimball) would go down.” On the 24th of December 1862, William Bosley Foy, the son of Thomas and Catherine Foy married Lucinda Bingham. The Binghams and the Foys had been neighbors in Bingham’s Fort in Ogden. They had made the move south together during the Utah War. They were also neighbors in Slaterville. It may be that it was from his father-in-law that William developed an interest in the livestock industry. Both the Bingham and the Foy men helped build the canal to Plain City. Sufficient water was not obtained so the canal was later extended to the Ogden River. Erastus Bingham Jr., father of Lucinda, also was engaged in the lumber and shingle milling industries. Thomas and Catherine’s son Frederick Lehi did not make the move to the Dixie Mission in Washington County with the rest of the family in 1863. He stayed in Slaterville and married Rachel Slater. She was the daughter of Richard Slater for whom the community was named. Slaterville was only six miles north of Ogden. There was a sharp contrast between the farm the Foys left in Slaterville, and what they had to look forward to in Washington County. The 1860's was also the time that the Civil war was being fought. The supply of cotton was cut off both to the Northern States and the Western States. It seemed logical that cotton could help the economy of Utah. That is part of the reason why the Cotton Mission was established. The mail had to be protected from Indians. Frederick Lehi Foy became a part of the U. S. Army stationed in the west. Many more troops came to Utah to prevent Utah from leaving the Union. They were stationed at what is now Fort Douglas. The soldiers had nothing to do, so many became prospectors in their spare time. That started the mining industry that could be found near where the Foy families were living in Washington and Beaver Counties. They did not mine because of the directions of the Church leaders. They did profit by selling products that the miners needed. Washington is located about five miles northeast of St. George in Washington County, Utah and about 314 mile southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah. Although Brigham Young strongly believed cotton could be grown there to supply the Saints with enough cotton and be an exporter of cotton to markets in the east, the plan did not work out. Poor alkali soil, cricket and grasshopper plagues, spring floods caused small dams to burst and flood the fields, malaria, and summer droughts caused some of the settlers to leave. William Bosley Foy would moved his family to Minersville in Beaver County later on. Thomas and his family would stay. Louisa Foy gave birth to her third Child, Rachel Foy on the 25th of November 1864 in Washington, Washington County. Two months later, Rachel died on the 17th of January 1865. Conditions did not get much better. Louisa gave birth to a son, Willard Richards Foy, on the 17th of January 1867 in Washington, Washington County. Baby Willard died the same day. Then on the 31st of March 1868, a son, Joseph Foy, was born to Louisa. He died the next day. He was named after the father of Louisa. Their sixth child, a son, was named James Collin Foy. He was born on the 3rd of February 1869 and died on the 6th of February 1869. These were times of famine. All the families were starving. The families were reduced to eating alfalfa greens and pigweed for food. This may be the reason why four of the babies died. Louisa did not have enough nourishment for them. It was not only a difficult time for Thomas and his wives and children living at home, but it was just as hard for their married children living near by. William and his young wife had their first child in Washington, Washington County on January 8, 1865. They had watched as two of their father’s children died for lack of food. They moved to Minersville, Beaver County, Utah the next year where their next six children were born. Catherine and her three youngest girls move to Minersville to be near William so she could help with the grandchildren. It was too difficult to support two families in a small home in Washington anyway. U. S. Marshals were starting to look for families living together in plural marriage as well. William had learned the trade of cattle ranching for which Beaver County was much more suited. While Catherine and her girls were still living in Washington County, they worked in the cotton industry. They help pick the cotton, spin it, and weave it. Until 1869, the carding, spinning and weaving were home industries. The girls would swim the Virgin River to pick the cotton. For lunch they would eat bread made from cane seed and sorghum, syrup. Catherine Foy, the daughter of Thomas and Catherine, met and married Jehu Blackburn in 1866. Jehu had been one the first pioneers to go to Pine Valley. Pine Valley would become part of what is known as the Cotton Mission. Pine Valley is at the head waters of the Santa Clara River. Isaac Riddle, Robert Richey, Lorenzo Roundy, and Jehu Blackburn built a sawmill in Pine Valley in 1855. They supplied lumber and shingles to the residents of the Cotton Mission. Catherine Fink Foy lived out the rest of her life in Minersville with her children and grandchildren. Most of her other children lived too far away to be much of a help to them. Catherine lived long enough to see all but her last daughter get married. Catherine lived true to her blessings. She died true to the faith on May 21, 1870 and was buried in Minersville. No tribute is great enough that can be put into words for this beloved mother and grandmother. The only tribute worthy enough for her is that her posterity live the kind of lives that would bring honor to her. Minersville, Utah The seventh child of Thomas and Louisa, Lucinda Marie Foy was born on the 14th of February 1870. She was named in honor of the wife of William Bosley Foy. She survived the harshness of the desert life. When this baby was about nine months old and after the death of Catherine Fink Foy, Thomas and Louisa traveled the long distance from Washington County to Salt Lake City to the Endowment house where Louisa received her own endowment and the two were sealed on November 7, 1870. Louisa would give birth to one more daughter. Louisa Rebecca Foy was born on the 23rd of July 1873. Her father Thomas Birk Foy died on the 28th of July 1873 in Washington, Washington County, Utah just a few days after his last child was born. On March 2, 1873, Thomas received the last of his patriarchal blessings from Wm. G. Perkins. It was given as a fathers blessing. The majority of this blessing referred to a future time after this life was over. It said, “You will go to the center stake. There you will assist in building a holy temple. You will see that house finished off, and be at the dedication there of. There you will witness a great display of the power of God. There you will see brother Joseph and Hyrum with many of the Saints that have received their resurrected bodies. There your joy will be full, you will do a great work in that house for yourself and your dead. It will be common with you to see the graves open and the dead come forth. There you will see Jesus your Redeemer.” This is not the end of the story. One may wonder what was the pull that kept Thomas in Washington after the purpose of the Cotton Mission failed? Was it that he still had family and friends there? Was it that he had made commitments to the leaders of the Church that he would stay? Was it out of love and respect to Erastus Snow who had brought him into the Church and who was the presiding officer as an apostle of the Lord called to preside over this mission? Was it because he was engaged in the construction of the St. George Temple? Was it out of weariness to pick up his family and try to start over again? More than likely it was yes to all of the above. Land claims filed in the Washington County probate court show that Thomas B. Foy owned land next to Erastus Snow, John M. Chidester, and near Levi Hancock, and Brigham Young. On November 9, 1871, the site for the St. George temple was dedicated. President George A. Smith gave the dedicatory prayer. He knew of the suffering of the local saints. He knew of their faith and their dedication. He had shared many of the hardships with them. He prayed: “May thy peace be upon the pioneers of this desert and upon all those who have labored to reclaim the same; may eternal blessings rest upon them and their posterity forever. Yes, bless all thy servants who have done this great work, bless their wives, their children, their substance and do thou bless them in all their labors.” On the very same day that the dedicatory prayer was given on the construction site, work started on grading the site. This was difficult because it had to be dug out by picks and shovels. Surplus dirt was shoveled into wagons and hauled away. The foundation was dug down to twelve feet below the grade level. Digging was relatively easy. Soft sandstone was on the north side. The other three sides had mud and water. A drain was installed to dry it out. Black volcanic rock was hauled in to fill the foundation site. Other material like sandstone or limestone reacted adversely to the moisture and minerals that were present. A pile-driver was made from an old canon to drive the rock down to form a firm foundation. About the only work that Thomas could have done was to haul dirt from or rock to the foundation the foundation site. Tithing funds from all the Saints in the Cotton Mission and as far north as Beaver County were used in the construction of the temple. On March 10, 1873 the corner stones were laid. This was about a year after the High Priest Quorum compiled the history of Thomas and the year he got his last blessing. It would also be the year that Thomas died. Thomas did not live to see the temple finished but he lived long enough to know his blessings had been fulfilled as a temple builder. Thomas's Headstone Susannah Foy Chidester was also a part of the Cotton Mission. Her husband John Peck Chidester played a major part in the construction of the cotton mill. He was the foreman in charge of the timber works for the construction of the cotton mill. Later he played a major role in the engineering and construction of the Pile Dam on the Virgin River. After the temple was completed, in August of 1877 Susannah and her son John had much of the temple work done for her father’s and mother’s families. Not enough can be said for her seeing that this great work was done. The temple records give us valuable information as well. Not enough good can be said for the many who have written the biography of Thomas Birk Foy previously. This will not be the last history of him I am sure. This is a work in progress. Every effort has been made to document this history. Just because you may see the names spelled differently does not mean they are different people or that the ordinance work was done incorrectly. What is done is done. Please use this as a means to add to or update your records. Sources: Prints of Nauvoo and Council Bluffs found on Utah To Go site. Minersville photograph taken from Coldwell Bankers site. Print of Warsaw found on Uncle Dale's Old Mormon Articles site. Photograph of gravestone found on Find a Grave site. Photograph of Sarah Jane Foy provided by Jones Family.

Thomas Birk Foy

Contributor: chetman Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Thomas Birk Foy 1802-1873 Thomas Birk Foy was born December 30, 1802, in Lancaster, Lancaster County Pennsylvania. A record found in the St. George Temple during the time that the temple was being remodeled and updated, was written in Thomas’s own hand saying that he was born on the 13th of December, 1820. These same record states that his first wife, Catherine, had eleven children and his second wife, Louisa, had seven. The Family Search Ancestral File states that Catherine had twelve and Louisa had eight children. It is difficult to know which is correct. The spelling of his middle name has the same problem. In his own hand, his name is spelled Birk, the Family search it is spelled Burke, and a history compiled by Afton Ferrin is spelled Burk. It would seem correct that he knew how to spell his own name; therefore, the spelling of his middle name is spelled Birk, as spelled as he wrote it in his own hand. There are several discrepancies in the dates of when children were born and died between the Family Search record and the personal record by Thomas B. Foy. There is not much information about the youth of Thomas. He states; “The name ‘Foy’ means faith. My ancestors originated in France. One was’ burned at the stake for believing in Christianity, one was Napoleon‘s general, one married King Charles the 5th of Spain. Some of my ancestors went with the French Huguenots into Ireland some settled in Luxembourg, but my father was more adventuresome and came to America.” He further states that in 1819 the family lived in Center County, Pennsylvania. His brother, Samuel, and he moved further west to Indiana County, Pennsylvania. It was there that be met his wife to be, Catherine Rebecca Fink. She was born in 1804 and was of German descent. The next event about his life states that he is listed with his wife and four children in the 1840 census. Other than the birthdates of their children, it appears that there is no other information about their lives. It is interesting that be tells about a girl named Susan born April 4, 1831 in Pennsylvania (she is listed on the Family Search record as Susannah Foy) was a strong young lady that helped a lot in raising the family. She met a boy named John Peck Chidester in Winter Quarters and they were married in 1851 in Salt Lake City. John Peck Chidester and family with his father, John M. Chidester, came to Washington in 1863, the same time as the Foy family and it is believed that they traveled to Dixie together. John Peck Chidester became a very well known engineer in the Dixie area. The Foys became interested in a strange religion in 1835-36 and investigated and joined the “Mormon” church in 1836. They were baptized by Erastus Snow whom they would become well acquainted with when they moved to Washington, Utah. By 1840 they had moved to Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois and lived there for six years. After the death of Joseph and Hyrum Smith, they moved to Nauvoo. Thomas worked on the Nauvoo Temple and when completed, they received their blessings in the temple. They then proceeded to go west but were requested to stay in Kanesviile, Iowa, to raise food, repair wagons and help the Saints prepare to cross the plains. Thomas was chosen because he was a very good wheelwright and was capable of helping to build and repair wagons for the trip west. In 1850 the Foys started for Salt Lake City. William Snow was the real leader of the company, but it was called the Joseph Young Company. There was a little infighting in the group. Because there were so many people going west at this time, over 30,000 wagons, all of the feed, clean water, etc., was used up, and the filth left behind the groups made cholera very common. It was decided to travel on the south side of the Platte River instead of the north side where the Mormons generally traveled. Conditions were as bad, and Catherine got sick with the cholera. She was not expected to live through the night, but she did and recovered. Credit is given to a Mr. Amos P. Stone who had taken a medical course before going west and knew how to prepare different medicines. The record states: ‘There have been several cases of bowel complaints in the camp, which would have terminated in cholera, if it had not been for the medicine which we brought along, especially the third preparation of lobelia administered by injections. I have heard it said if Mr. Stone (her husband) had not been there in this company there would have been a great many more deaths.” The part stating given by injections would not have been very pleasant seeing the type of equipment they had in those days. They arrived in Salt Lake on December 13, 1850, and settled in the Ogden Valley. By 1853 the family was living in Farmington, Utah, where Thomas operated a saw mill for Willard Richards. When Johnson’s Army was coming, they moved south to the Provo or Payson area but were back in the Ogden Valley by 1860. In 1863 they traveled to Washington, Utah, to help to make the Cotton Mission a success. Thomas states that everything possible conspired to stop the cotton mission enterprise. Poor soil, grasshopper and cricket plague, floods, drought, and other problems caused some of the settlers to leave. Thomas stayed and built an adobe home at lot 3 block 17. This is on the southeast corner of the intersection of 2nd West and 1st South, This home was torn down in the 1980s. It is hard to realize that such a small house could be the home for a family with so many children. In January, 1860, Thomas married Louisa Potterill as his second wife. She bore him eight children (Family Search record). She only raised three of the children to be adults they went through all of the privations, hardships and sufferings that the pioneers did in Dixie. It was much harder there than any other place. When they left Ogden Thomas put a board in the wagon to build a coffin for Sarah for they did not think she would live to the termination of the trip. She did survive. Quoting from the Foy history again: “They went through two famines there when they only had alfalfa greens to eat without any seasoning except salt. Rachel was two and half years old during one of the famines and she starved to death as she couldn‘t digest the green. At the last she went into convulsions and died. Grandma (Lousia Potterill) always cried when she told me about her. Here is a little story which shows their neighborly spirit. When the famine first came a neighbor came to grandfather’s (Thomas) home and asked him if he would please lend him some flour as his family was hungry and they didn‘t have any bread Grandfather said that they didn‘t have any flour either but they had just one loaf of bread. He cut the loaf in two pieces and gave his neighbor one half. “ Three children died during these times living only a few days. Further quoting: “These babies died from hunger. Grandma (Lousia) didn‘t have food or milk herself so she could not nurse them and had nothing to feed them. —how Sarah ever lived through the famine as she put her to bed at night crying because she was hungry.“ By 1870 things got better and the children then born grew to adulthood. After Thomas died, in July, 1873, Lousia had to raise the children. Three of the girls went to work in the cotton factory as soon as they were old enough, which was not a very old age. She sold grapes, cut and sewed carpet rugs for people and cut and sewed quilt blocks to help out with the raising of her family. She died in 1920 in Cedar City but is buried in the Washington City Cemetery alongside her husband. Catherine died in 1870 in Minersville and is buried there. Thomas died July 28, 1873, of pneumonia in Washington, Utah. He farmed, worked at his trade as a wheelwright and was active in the community and raised a large family. He left a good name and a large posterity. Quoting Florence T. Foy, a descendant of Thomas B. Foy: “Thomas Burk Foy, A true pioneer, a good father, and a good neighbor who lived the golden rule. “ There were over 2,051 Foy descendants in 1959 living in the western states and Alaska.

THOMAS BIRK FOY, HIS STORY

Contributor: chetman Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

THOMAS BIRK FOY, HIS STORY By Leslie Tuttle Foy Those who lived in frontier America during the 1800's left very few footprints on the pages of history. Most had little or no education. Therefore, most could not leave any record. Most became forgotten or just a footnote mentioned in passing by someone else. So most became a fading memory to future generations. Such is the story of Thomas Birk Foy. Thomas was born on the 30th of December 1802 in Rapho Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania to Frederick Foy and Elizabeth Phillips Foy. This was not long after the Revolutionary War and the change from Colonial government to the creation of the United States of America. Lancaster would have been near the edge of the frontier at the time of his birth. He was the last of twelve children according to family tradition. Soon after his birth, his family moved further into the frontier to what would become Halfmoon, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Information about the Foy family in America in earlier times is very sketchy and full of speculation . Family traditions indicate that the father, Frederick Foy, came to America as an indentured servant a few years before the start of the Revolutionary War. He served as a servant for about seven years in Chester County, Pennsylvania as a cooper to pay his passage to Colonial America. Seven years was the longest period of time that a person could serve as a servant. This would mean he would have been the poorest of the poor when he came. This is our best conclusion based on what records can be found. At the end of bondage, the only choice for most was to become a hired hand. As best as we can tell, his father, Frederick, rented land to provide for his family. Frederick could be found working around mills and mines as well. Family traditions indicate that he was a maker of flour casks. Family traditions also state that he drove a wagon freighting coal or charcoal. There were several iron foundries in the region. Two of Frederick’s sons became colliers, and one was a wood chopper. Frederick’s son William was known as a master collier. Colliers would burn wood slowly to change it into charcoal to be used in the steel industry and by blacksmiths in their forges. Frederick’s son, Samuel, also did some work as a collier. Frederick owned one cow and one horse most of the time he lived in Centre County, which means they did not have much livestock. It would also show they were not well off. Thomas was only seventeen when his father died. No death record or burial record of Frederick can be found. He may have been buried on the family farm because the family stayed close by for years after his death. No church records show any close link with a particular religion. Thomas would have had no memory of having lived in Lancaster County. His earliest memories would have been those of frontier life in Centre County. As far as can be found, Thomas had no formal education. What skills he did have, he would have learned from his father and from family and friends. He grew up with his brother Samuel and his sister Polly. Some of his other siblings lived near-by in neighboring counties. The others left no record that can be found so far. An older sister, Elizabeth, married Thomas Vaughn the younger. The Vaughns were well to do and owned land in both Halfmoon and Taylor Townships. Thomas Vaughn also owned a mill. Thomas Foy’s sister’s children would have been the closest cousins that Thomas Foy would have grown up with. Theirs would be names that he would remember. One of her children married Susannah Sharrer. Her father owned a powder mill. Another married John Speer Fink. Thomas Foy ‘s older Brother William was also married and lived in near-by Huntingdon County. It appears that William’s first wife was a Fink. When she died, William married his sister’s sister-in-law, Mary Vaughn. As far as we know, these were his only siblings to have a posterity. It also shows a connection between the Foy, Vaughn, and Fink families. With few families on the frontier, neighbors married neighbors. Family names of these three families are passed on for generations. Naming patterns give us clues as to relationship and ancestry. When a boy reached manhood at twenty one, he was listed as a single freeman. This meant that he was old enough to serve in the military, to pay taxes, and to own land in Pennsylvania. He was taxed for his occupation if he did not own property. Thomas was shown being taxed for his occupation beginning in 1824 and every year after that until 1828 in Halfmoom Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania. On the 1823 tax records, he was not listed. In 1828 he was still listed as a single freeman but that he was gone. This means that he left the county. His older brother Samuel had transferred what land the family still had back to Christian Van Pool, the owner. Thomas needed to find work. In 1820 the census record for Halfmoon Township showed Samuel Foy as the head of the house. His mother is listed as living in the home. Thomas was also living there. Thomas followed the frontier west to Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Here he became acquainted with the John Fink family. Thomas met and married Catherine Fink, the daughter of John Fink and Sarah Goshorn Fink. No marriage records can be found. The census record for 1830 lists Thomas Foy living in Wheatfield, Indiana County, Pennsylvania between the ages of 20–30 with his wife, Catherine Fink Foy who was between the ages of 20–30. They had one female child under the age of 5. That would be their daughter, Elizabeth. Living next to them was John Fink, Catherine’s father and her mother Sarah. John and Sarah had 3 male children under 5, 3 female children under 5, 2 male children 5–10, 1 female child 5–10, 1 male 10–15, 1 female child 10–15, and 1 male child 15–20. It appears that the sister of Thomas Foy, Elizabeth Foy Von (Vaughn) who was a young widow, came with her youngest children and their mother, Elizabeth Phillips Foy to visit as the census was being taken. Elizabeth Vaughn and her mother returned to Centre County when the next set of records were made. Elizabeth Foy Vaughn had 3 sons and four daughters at that time. No record can be found to indicate what Thomas did for work while they were living in Indiana County , Pennsylvania. His father-in-law, John Fink, was a carpenter. His grandfather-in-law, Leonard Goshorn, was a blacksmith. Family tradition indicates that Thomas became a wheelwright. A wheelwright had to combine the skills of a carpenter, a cooper, and a blacksmith to make wheels out of wood. Producing wheels required strength and ingenuity and precise skills in measuring. The skills of a wheelwright could transfer over to work needed to produce water wheels. Each place where Thomas Foy lived, was also near where mills could be found. Workmen who produced wheels would soon find themselves out of work. Once the job was done, they had to look for new opportunities for work. Family records show that the following children were born to Thomas and Catherine Foy while they were living in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. The first was Elizabeth Foy. She was born on the 30th of October 1829 at Wheatfield, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. She was named after the mother of Thomas, Elizabeth Phillips Foy. Their second child was Susannah Foy. She was born on the 4th of April 1831 in Wheatfield as well. Her name is one of the names common to the Vaughn family in Centre County, from where Thomas came. Two of the siblings of Thomas married into the Vaughn family. Their third child was named John Moroni Foy. He was born on the 6th of November 1835 in Wheatfield. He was named after his mother’s father, John Fink and after the Prophet Moroni who is mentioned in the Book of Mormon. This would indicate that Thomas and Catherine had heard of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints before John’s birth, yet they had not yet joined the Church. Because of the spacing in the birth of child number two and child number three, it appears that Catherine may have lost a child. The family next moved to Strongstown, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. That is where child number four was born. He was named William Bosley Foy. He was born on the 9th of September 1837. After the dedication of the temple in Kirtland, Ohio, missionaries such as Erastus Snow went to Pennsylvania to preach the restored gospel of Jesus Christ. Thomas and Catherine were taught the gospel in the Strongstown area and were baptized by Erastus Snow in 1836. Concerning this event, Erastus Snow recorded, “I returned to Indiana County and preached in the Court House on Friday Evening. Saturday I returned to Brush valley and Sunday I preached to an audience of between two and three hundred people, some of whom rejoiced and others were angry because their foundations shook... I returned the next day and preached in Brush valley and on Wednesday baptized three and preached again in the evening.” One of his companions was William Bosley who traveled with him to Pennsylvania in 1837. It is from this missionary that William Bosley Foy got his name. He was also named after the older brother of Thomas, William Foy. At a Conference held at Strongstown in May of 1838, Thomas was ordained a Teacher in the Aaronic Priesthood by Erastus Snow on the 26th of May 1838. Strongstown was one of the strongest branches of the Church in western Pennsylvania. On the 1st of April 1839, Thomas was ordained a Priest in the Aaronic Priesthood by William F. McIntire at Strongstown. William McIntire was probably the first convert to the Church in Indiana County. He was well known and was used as a mission companion of Erastus Snow from time to time. Thomas and Catherine joined the Church before most of the revelations in the Doctrine and Covenants were given and before it was published. It was also before the history of the “First Vision” was published. This was also a period of gathering for the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. There had been two gathering places. One was Kirtland, Ohio, and the other was Missouri. It was also a time for persecution for members of the Church wherever they had a congregation. However, the members of the Church were driven out of Missouri so Illinois became the new gathering place. Sometime between being ordained a Priest and the 6th of February 1840, Thomas and Catherine left with their small children and settled in Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois to gather with the body of the Church near Nauvoo. Elizabeth was their oldest child so she would have only been ten at the time they relocated. The early childhood memories of the children would be limited. They would have been able to remember the names of relatives, but of little else. The move to Warsaw would have been at the request of the leaders of the Church. The Lord had commanded the members of the Church to build a temple. They needed to gather to a central location in order to do so. This move meant that Catherine was expecting her fifth child during the winter when they moved. Sara Jane Foy was born on the 6th of February 1840 at Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois. She was named after the mother of Catherine Fink Foy. There was not enough work for all who gathered at Nauvoo so many settled near by. Warsaw was a port city on the Mississippi River. It had a population of about 500 during the time that the Foy family lived there. It was a place of portage where goods had to be unloaded and then reloaded above the rapids to be shipped further up stream. The community was in direct competition for commerce and trade with the city of Nauvoo. Thomas and Catherine do not show up on the US census of 1840. They do show up on the tax records in Hancock County, Illinois, of August 1842. These records are interesting. Because most of the people listed had no real property, they listed other things that could be taxed such as wagons, livestock, clocks, watches, tools and household items. From these records we can tell that Thomas was below average in taxable personal property. There was another Foy listed on these tax records. He was Jonathan Foy of Le Harpe. Warsaw is in the far southern part of the county and Le Harpe is far to the north. Jonathan was not a member of the Church. He came from New York. Life in Warsaw during the 1840's for a member of the Church would have been difficult. Thomas Sharp moved to Warsaw after the Foy’s arrived there. He purchased a news paper company that would become an anti-Mormon publication. It was also a time that mobs from Missouri would freely cross the Mississippi River and created problems for the Mormons. Some property belonging to the Mormons was damaged or destroyed. Some were kidnaped and taken to Missouri. It was while they were living in Warsaw that Thomas and Catherine signed a petition by the Church listing grievances against the State of Missouri for loss or damage of property that could be presented to the US Congress for reparations. These hardships did not prevent Thomas and Catherine from traveling to Nauvoo and keeping close contact with the leaders of the Church and participating in meetings. These hardships did not prevent Thomas and Catherine from doing their duty and helping where they could. Some time during this period, Thomas was ordained an Elder by Willard Richards. It was not done on April 6, 1840 as one history shows. Willard Richards was still in England on his mission on that date. It could have been done after August 16, 1841 when Willard returned from England or as late as April 6, 1842 by Willard at April General Conference. Never the less, it was done by Willard Richards. Also Catherine received her Patriarchal Blessing from Hyrum Smith on October 5, 1841. This was received in conjunction with their visit to Nauvoo for the October General Conference of the Church. Hyrum had been made the Patriarch to the Church in April General Conference 1841 replacing his father, Joseph Smith Sr., after his death. She would have been one of the first to receive a blessing from Hyrum Smith. This blessing was given before much was known about ordinance work for the dead. It was given before temple ordinances for the living had been revealed. It was given at the time when Joseph revealed that baptisms for the dead should stop until the baptism font in the temple had been finished and dedicated. Joseph did say at that conference that “It is no more incredible that God should save the dead than that he should raise the dead.” The first baptisms for the dead in the Nauvoo Temple font took place on 21st November 1841. The blessing stated that Catherine had been born in Wheatfield Township, Indiana County, in the State of Pennsylvania. It listed her birth date as the 18th day of October 1810. This is a conflict. The year has also been listed as 1804, and 1809. The sextant in Minersville, Utah Territory recorded on her death certificate, that the birth date of Catherine was 1809. That seems to be the most recent and the most accurate. Her blessing gives her “a multiplicity of blessings because of your patience in tribulation and in sore afflictions and have not forsaken the Lord”. It also states that “thou art a daughter of Abraham and shall be blessed in his lineage”. Not only did she already have many tribulations but many more would yet come into her life. Some of the events leading up to the April 1841 General Conference of the Church in Nauvoo included the laying of the cornerstones of the temple. The conference in April 1842 was wet and cold. There were no meeting houses. Meetings were held outside in what was known as the grove. This may have been the time when Thomas was ordained an Elder. In March 1842 the Book of Abraham, which is now part of the Pearl of Great Price, was published in the Times and Seasons. It was also in March 1842 that the Female Relief Society was organized. Catherine was at some of these early meetings. Thomas received his Patriarchal Blessing on January 30th 1842 in Nauvoo from Hyrum Smith. It gave his birth place as the State of Pennsylvania. His blessings were to be many both in time and eternity. But he was bless to “have an inheritance with the remnants of the seed of Jacob, not in Joseph, but in Issachar, with the remnants of the seed of Jacob, in the covenant unto the House of Israel, together with your Father’s House, in the dispensation of the fullness of times , in the deliverance of the dead and the living”. On the 23rd of July 1842, Emma Smith Foy was born in Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois. Her name shows there was a close association of Catherine Foy and the Prophet Joseph’s wife Emma. Thomas and Catherine named their children in honor of those they respected so their children would always have someone to look up to in bringing honor to their name. Persecution intensified, but so did revelation and sacrifice by the members of the Church. Thomas and Catherine spent many hours working on the Nauvoo Temple. As far as we can tell, Thomas and Catherine did not do any baptisms for the dead in the Nauvoo Temple. There are records of the proxy baptisms that were done in the Nauvoo Temple by Edward Rigby for his wife’s relatives. They include the names of Edward Foy, Thomas Foy, and Sarah Foy, all of Lancashire England. This looks interesting for future research. The proxy baptisms were done on 28th of July, 1844 about a month to the day after the death of Joseph and Hyrum Smith. Thomas Sharp wrote in the “Warsaw Signal”, that “war of extermination is inevitable”, on the 12th of June 1844. He urged all the “old Citizens” of Warsaw to assist the mob in driving out the Mormons. On the evening of the 27th of June 1844, sixty men arrived for a late supper at Mrs. Fleming’s Tavern bragging about killing the Smith brothers. Thomas and Catherine Foy and their family were still living in Warsaw at that terrible time. Most of the saints who lived near-by rushed to Nauvoo to see what need to be done to protect the members of the Church and to pay their respects to their beloved leaders and their loved ones. It stands to reason that the Foys were present. Catherine gave birth to her seventh child, a son, whom they named Frederick Lehi Foy, on the 3rd of October 1844 in Warsaw. There is a conflict on his birth year. However, his baptism record in Farmington, Utah Territory, lists this as his birth date. This son was named in honor of the father of Thomas Foy and the Prophet Lehi in the Book of Mormon. Both had left their homeland for a promised land. Thomas was ordained a High Priest on the 29th of December 1844 by G. W. Harris and others in Nauvoo. He was received into the quorum on the same date. He received his license as it was called then on the 26th of January 1845. They remained true to their faith. Living in Warsaw became so dangerous for members of the Church that Thomas and Catherine moved with their family to Nauvoo for safety. We know that it was after the death of Joseph and Hyrum. We know that it was after the birth of Frederick Lehi Foy. Just when the move took place is not certain. Thomas B.Foy was the purchaser of Town Lot #2 Block #125 in the Nauvoo Plat, in the Town of Nauvoo on the 30th of May 1845 from William and Mary Ainscough for $50. William W. Phelps was the Notary Public. This move would have been during the winter season. They would not live in Nauvoo very long. Work continued on the temple as rapidly as possible. Some worked while others stood guard. It appears from looking at city maps of Nauvoo, that the Foy family in Nauvoo, would have been in the 4th Ward. Other members of that ward would be Winslow Farr and his family, Heber C. Kimball, Wilford Woodruf, Levi Hancock, Edward Partrige, Vision Kight, Francis Lyman, Philo Dibble, Lucy Smith, the families of Joseph Smith and Don Carlos Smith, Perrigrine Sessions, Shadrack Roundy, William Law, Wilson Law, George W. Harris, N. K. Whitney, Brigham Young, William Marks, and Orson Hyde. Even though these families lived near each other for just a short time, many lasting friendships grew form their association one with another. Chidester’s lived in the 1st ward. The Isaac Freeman family lived in the 3rd ward as did Edward Rigby. The Nauvoo Temple Endowment Register records that Thomas B. Foy and Catherine Fink were part of the first endowment session on the 22nd of January in 1846. There were 44 persons on that session. 25 were female and 19 were males. Of the males, 7 were High Priests, and 12 were Seventies. Six were from Pennsylvania. It listed Thomas as having been born on December 30, 1802 in Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Present day historians in making a modern record of the endowment record have put in the name of Harriett Foy as the wife of Thomas B. Foy. That is in error. Harriet Foy was the daughter of a William Foy who was from New Hamshire. She would have been 14 years old at the time of the endowment. Harriet was born in New York. Harriett did join the Church and did come west to Utah but she has been linked incorrectly to our line and has created a major error for researchers who follow that path of research. She is the one who goes into the Foscue line which is not our Foy line. People being endowed are done so with their birth name and not their married name. On February 4, 1846, the first wagons left Nauvoo to start their flight into the wilderness on their trek west. It was during that same time frame when the temple work for the living was being done and the start of the trek west that the Grand Jury was trying the leaders of the mob for the murders of Joseph and Hyrum Smith. None of the jurors were members of the Church. None of the witnesses for the prosecution dared to show up. The witnesses for the defense lied on the stand. The jury had no other option than to declare the defendants, to be not guilty. Jonathan Foy of Le Harpe was member of that jury. It is not known for sure when Thomas and Catherine left Nauvoo to head west. It would have taken some time to get supplies ready. Men with skills in working wood to make wagons were pressed into service helping to get wagons ready. Not much time was given to the members of the Church by the mobs. Thomas and Catherine had experienced the mobs once before in Warsaw so they would not want to take chances with them again. Most had left by May of 1846. We know that they were in the Council Bluffs area of Iowa by the 28th of March 1848 because that is when and where their eighth child, a daughter, Catherine Rebecca Foy was born. It is probable that Catherine was expecting this child as they were driven out of Nauvoo. It is also probable that Catherine’s flight west was during the winter. The daughter was named in honor of her mother, Catherine Foy. There were two main temporary gathering places after the saints were driven out of Nauvoo. One was at and around Winter Quarters, Nebraska on the west side of the Missouri River. It is part of Omaha, Nebraska today. This was where the ones chosen to be part of the vanguard pioneer company camped to get a jump start to the west. The other was on the east side of the Missouri River at and around what was then known as Kanesville, Iowa and is known today as Council Bluffs, Iowa. This is where the majority of the saints gathered to prepare to go west. The Foys were located south and east of Kanesville at Pleasant Valley in Pottawattamie County, Iowa. This was still Indian Territory. It was named for the Pottawattamie Indians who lived there. The right to live in Indian Territory had to be obtained from US Government leaders. This right was granted for two years in exchange for the volunteers who served in the Mormon Battalion. It was a matter of survival for the saints to live near the Missouri River. There were few ferryboats. Most boats could take only one or two wagons across the Missouri River at a time. Crossing the river in the springtime was very dangerous because of the high water in the spring. More people died in these two locations after being driven from Nauvoo than from those who were driven from Missouri and those who crossed the wilderness to Utah by wagon or handcart combined. About 1,000 out of 12,000 died in those humble makeshift surroundings. Dwellings were what ever could be built in the short time they had after being driven from Nauvoo. Some were caves dug into the bank of a hill. Others were huts, sod houses, even wagons. Some few where able to build a cabin. Very few crops could be grown the first two years after leaving Nauvoo. Livestock was taken by the Indians for food. After the death of Joseph Smith, some would-be leaders tried to convince others to follow them. The first of these was Sidney Rigdon. Fortunately the vast majority of the saints followed the leadership of the Quorum of the Twelve. They had the keys of authority. Perhaps one of the greatest legacies left to us by Thomas and Catherine was that they remained true to the faith. They did not falter. They followed the leaders of the Church. During the time that Thomas and Catherine were members of the Church up until the time they moved to Iowa, they had never met any of the three witnesses to the Book of Mormon. Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer had been excommunicated. Martin Harris had stayed in Kirtland. In October 1848, Oliver and his wife and their daughter, came to Council Bluffs, Iowa to reconnect with the Church and to make the trek west. Orson Hyde was presiding over the branch of the Church in that area at the time. Oliver asked Orson Hyde if he could be rebaptized into the Church. At a Conference of the Church held on October 21st, the request was granted. Oliver asked, “Brethren, for a number of years I have been separated from you. I now desire to come back. I wish to come humbly and to be one in your midst. I seek no station; I only wish to be identified with you. I am out of the Church. I am not a member of the Church, but I wish to become a member of it. I wish to come in at the door. I know the door. I have not come here to seek precedence. I come humbly and throw myself upon the decisions of this body, knowing as I do that its decisions are right and should be obeyed.” George W. Harris of the high council moved that Brother Oliver Cowdery be received back into the Church. Shortly after, Oliver was baptized by Orson Hyde. Thomas and Catherine and their children would have likely been to this conference. They would have listened to the testimony of that great witness of the restoration. The Cowdery family stayed in the Council Bluffs area making preparations to go west. The following spring in 1849, they requested to take a short visit back to Richmond, Missouri so that Sister Cowdery could say goodbye to her parents before they departed for the west. It was here that Oliver died of an illness that he got during the winter. David Whitmer wrote of Oliver’s death as follows, “Oliver died the happiest man I ever saw. After kissing his wife and daughter, he said, “Now I lay down for the last time: I am going to my Savior’; and he died immediately with a smile on his face.” The vanguard pioneer company led by Brigham Young made the trek west to the Salt Lake Valley starting in the spring of 1847. They laid out the trail. They planted crops. They built some dwellings and then most of them returned to Winter Quarters. Included in that group were Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards. Upon their return, several important events took place with the Foy Family. On 24th of April 1848, Thomas and Catherine crossed the Missouri River and went to the dwelling of Willard Richards in Winter Quarters and were sealed by Heber C. Kimball. Willard Richards and Thomas Bullock acted as witnesses. The Richards home served as a home, postoffice, and Church headquarters. Also the week before the sealing on 30th of March 1848, Thomas received a second Patriarchal Blessing. This was given by Isaac Morley in the home of Jesse P. Harmon on the east bank of the Missouri River. Thomas Bullock, the official Church clerk, made the record. In the blessing it states, “thou hast had much trial and tribulation in the cause of God, yet thou shalt be blessed and numbered with the seed of Abraham, and rejoice with the sons of Isaac and Jacob...thy faith shall reach the heavens; and thine influence realized among all good men through out the world...and be an instrument in aiding and assisting in rearing temples to the most high...”. Tithing records for the Pleasant Valley Branch for 1848 reveal how poor the members of the Church were after their exodus from Nauvoo. Thomas paid the following as a tithe for the year: 10 bushels of potatoes 1.50 1 load of pumpkins 1.00 15 bushels of turnips 1.50 cucumbers & radishes .15 one days hauling 1.00 2 chickens .10 1 peck of corn meal .061/4 1 day hauling corn in shock 1.00 1 day work .75 1 cord of wood 1.00 8 bushels of corn in ear .80 Total-------------------$8.861/4 Thomas was not the poorest nor was he the wealthiest. This shows that he was a humble farmer. It shows that the food he produced was the kind that could last through much of the winter. It shows the value placed on food in relationship to a days work. John Dingman was a single man living in the same branch. He paid .50 cents tithing with 1 cord of wood cutting. Thirty-one individuals showed up on the tithing list in Pleasant Valley Branch in 1848. The next records for the branch show that four branches had been consolidated into one branch. During 1850 most of the families emigrated to Utah. On the 23rd of November 1848, the oldest daughter of Thomas and Catherine, Elizabeth Foy, was married to John Boyd Dingman. They were married in the Council Bluffs area of Iowa. John was a convert to the Church from Dundas, Ontario, Canada. They had three Children. The first was named Orson Hyde Dingman. , after the presiding officer of the Church in the Kanesville area of Iowa. Orson Hyde was also a member of the ward that Elizabeth lived in while the family was still in Nauvoo. This was the first grandchild for Thomas and Catherine. Both mother and daughter were having children about the same time. The other two children of Elizabeth Foy Dingman were born after her parents moved with the rest of the family to Utah. That would have been a hard parting for all. William Dingman was born the 18th of December 1850 in the Council Bluffs area of Pottawattamie County, Iowa. Her Uncle William Foy must have somehow made a lasting impression on her or her younger brother. Her third child was named Susan Dingman, after her sister. Family ties were strong. Susan Dingman was born on 18th of February 1852, at the same place in Iowa. Unfortunately, Elizabeth died on the 13th of November 1853 before their little family could go west to Utah. Family tradition states that Thomas Foy had been asked to stay in Iowa for a period of time helping to build wagons for those who would make the trek to Utah. Their ninth child, a son, was born during that time. He was named Thomas Didymus Foy after his father Thomas and the Apostle of Christ in the New Testament. This part of Iowa was still listed as Indian Territory. No birth date has been found but he is listed on the 1850 Census in Salt Lake City as being one year old. That means he was a baby when the Foy family made their trek west. The leaders of the Church did not want to have the members of the Church become so attached to Iowa that they would not move to the Salt Lake Valley. So in 1850, many wagon trains started west. This was also the time of the gold rush to California and the rush for free land in Oregon. According to Church records, 27 wagon companies of the Church went west in 1850. Some of those were just freight companies and some were small fast moving private groups. Thomas and Catherine Foy were in the 14th company in 1850. This was under the leadership of William Snow/ Joseph Young. It departed from Kanesville, Iowa on the 21st of June 1850. They were in the second group of fifty under the leadership of Gardner Snow. They were also in the 6th group of ten in that fifty under the leadership of Thomas Rich. Winslow Farr and his family that they lived in the same ward with them in Nauvoo were part of their group of ten. So was Amos P. Stone and his family part of this group of ten. There were 87 families, 509 people, 133 wagons, 758 cattle, 42 horses, 4 mules, and 58 sheep that started the journey in that last group of fifty. Of that number, Thomas had 1 wagon and 8 cattle and l gun. Eight are listed in the official record as being part of his family when it arrived in the Salt Lake Valley. That would be the children. Thomas and Catherine could not keep up and came into the valley in an unidentified group a short time later. Because of the large numbers of travelers on the way west, water became polluted and many died from infectious diseases such as cholera. Catherine Foy contracted this disease early, along the Platte River bottoms. Amos P. Stone had taken a course in medicine. He was able to help Catherine recover. Amos P. Stone would become a future relative. Minerva Stone wrote a letter to her family on the 4th of July 1850 which states, “Sister Foy and two sisters with Bro. Farr have had the cholera but have recovered; there have been one or two children die with it. I have heard some say that if Mr. Stone had not been there in this company, there would have been a great many more deaths. Bro. Farr says he is confident that the syringe with proper medicine has saved his life and two others in his family and he is grateful as anybody can be.” Catherine was about four months pregnant when she got cholera. All those who did keep records of this journey recorded the large number of graves that line the trail west. The first ice on the water was recorded on the 12th of September 1850. The main part of the William Snow/ Joseph Young Company arrived in the Salt Lake valley between October 1st and the 4th. Because of the weakened health of Catherine because of the cholera and the advanced stages of her pregnancy, all the children went on into the valley ahead of Thomas and Catherine. They were picked up as part of an unidentified company. Elias Adams was part of that company and he made mention of Thomas and Catherine traveling with them. It would have been later in the fall that they arrive. Mary Ann Foy was born in Salt Lake City on the 13th of December 1850. It was almost the same day that Catherine’s daughter, Elizabeth Dingman gave birth to her child. This child does not show up on the 1850 census in Salt Lake City, so the family was all together in the valley at the time of the census but before the birth of Mary Ann Foy. One can not help but see the parallel between this trek through the American wilderness and the trek taken by Lehi and his family in the Book of Mormon. Their women were made strong to compensate for the hardships that they had while traveling through wilderness as well. It was almost prophetic that Thomas and Catherine had named one of their sons, Frederick Lehi Foy. One might wonder why this daughter was given the name of Mary. We can only speculate. Mary, the mother of Jesus, also had to make a long journey during the last stages of her pregnancy. Mary is the name of the second wife of William Foy. Mary is the name of the mother-in-law of Elizabeth Foy Vaughn. “Polly” is a nickname for Mary. “Polly” was the sister just older than Thomas Foy whom he grew up with. A few sisters in the same wagon company that the Foy family traveled with were named Mary Ann. This little girl had a lot of fine people to model her life after. Not much is known about where the Foy family lived in Salt Lake or how long they lived there or what Thomas did for a living. Erastus Snow was a member of the Stake Presidency. They could have lived near him. The 1850 census lists him as a farmer. Thomas was enrolled in the High Priest Quorum in Salt Lake City on the 2nd of April 1851. Catherine Foy and her older children were rebapized on 12 April 1851 in Salt Lake City. The children were Susannah, John Moroni, William Bosley and Emma Smith Foy. Rebaptism was a common practice in the early days of the Church. On October 23, 1851, Susannah Foy married John Peck Chidester. They had known each other in Nauvoo and in the Kanesville area before coming west. John Peck Chidester was in the Warren Foot wagon company in 1850. It left a few days before the one the Foy family traveled in. An article appeared in the Deseret New on Thursday October 7th 1852 which states: “General Conference was continued in Salt Lake City.... McGee Harris was sustained as President of the Teachers Quorum, also Thomas B. Foy and Reuben Perkins his counselors.” Then on April 7th 1853 the Deseret News General Conference report stated: “McGee Harris was sustained as President of the Teachers Quorum; also John Grove was voted to be his counselor in the room of Thomas B. Foy, who had moved to another valley; and Reuben Perkins second counselor.” These quorums were presided over and made up of members of the higher priesthood then. This is the time that Thomas received his third Patriarchal Blessing. This was given on the 25th of January 1853 by the Patriarch of the Church, John Smith. He was the Uncle of the Prophet Joseph Smith. Two items are noteworthy. First the blessing states; “you are of the blood of Joseph that was sold into Egypt and lawfully entitled to the priesthood and in as much as you have come up through great tribulations your robes shall be made white in the blood of the Lamb...The Lord hath designed you for a great work to save your father’s house back to the days of Noah or to where they died in the Gospel, that there shall not be a broken link in the chain from the days of righteous Able to the dispensation of the fullness of times, when all shall be gathered in one.” This second part of the blessing becomes a family responsibility to fulfill. Some time after that blessing but before April Conference, Thomas moved his family to help Willard Richards build his mill in Farmington, Davis County, Utah Territory. On the 13th of November 1853, Thomas and Catherine had their eleventh child. She would be the last for Catherine. They named her Rhoda Marie Foy in honor of the sister of Willard Richards. It appears that Thomas had worked on mills off and on through out his life. Once a mill was finished, so was the construction job. While they were living in Farmington, Frederick Lehi Foy was baptized in the Farmington Ward by William Flint and confirmed by his father Thomas B. Foy. This record gives the birth date of Frederick as the 3rd of October 1844. These ordinances were done on the 11th of December 1853. It would have been while the Foy family was living in Farmington or just after their move to Ogden, that they would have received word that their oldest daughter, Elizabeth Foy Dingman had died. This was one more hardship to bear. Yet true to their blessings, they did not murmur against the Lord or the Church. Thomas B. Foy moved his family to Bingham’s Fort, just north of the Ogden River. In 1854, there were 732 people living in the fort. Thomas Foy’s cabin was in the north west corner of the fort. Inside the fort, there was a molasses mill and a one-room school house. The Binghams would become future relatives. Also the Goodale and the Jones families would also become future relatives who lived in the fort. There was a Church census taken in 1856 in Weber County, Utah Territory. This listed the members of the Foy family that were still living at home. Sarah Jane Foy married Thomas Wilkins Jones on th 3rd of April 1856. Sarah was 16 years old. They moved into the fort that fall. John Moroni Foy married Alice Jost on the 28th of August 1856 and also live in Ogden. Emma Smith Foy married Isaac Goodale as his second wife when she was 15 years old in 1857. He was the next door neighbor to the Foy family in the fort. The United States Government sent an Army to Utah which became know as Johnston’s Army. The event was known as the “Utah War”, although there was very little that took place other than saber ratling. The Mormons vacated their settlements and moved south to get out of the path of the Army. In the move south, young Thomas Dydymus Foy must have died. He was on the 1856 census. Yet he does not show up on any records after the brief flight from the army. After the Foy family returned from their move south during the “Utah War”, Thomas took a second wife. Her name was Louisa Potterill. She was a convert to the Church from Sacom, Herford, England. She was Christened on the 9th of February 1840. They were married on the 13th of January 1860 in Salt Lake City, Utah territory in the Office of the President. Brigham Young sealed them as husband and wife. John Peck Chidester was one of the witnesses. They were sealed again on November 7, 1870 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City Utah, Territory. The 1860 census lists Thomas as 53, Catherine as 50, Louisa as 20, and the children as Fred R. age 14, Catherine L. age 13, Mary A. age 10, and Rhoda M. age 7. Notice the middle initial for Fred and Catherine were switched by the census taker. The older children were married or living away from home. Thomas Didymus Foy was not listed. The first child of Thomas and Louisa was named Mary Elizabeth Foy. She was born in Ogden on the 4th of January 1861. She died on the 11th of July that same year in Slaterville, Weber County, Utah Territory. She was named after the mothers of Louisa and Thomas. The family had moved from Ogden to Slaterville after the 1860 census. Farming was better in Slaterville than Ogden. The second child of Thomas and Louisa, Sarah Ann Foy, was born in Slatersville on the 9th of October, 1862. Almost two weeks after the birth of this child, Thomas and his family received a mission call to the Cotton Mission in Southern Utah. The Deseret News reported that on Sunday October 19, 1862 the following event took place as it was recorded in the Journal History of the Church. “ The day was pleasant in Great Salt Lake City. Two meetings were held in the bowery. Elder Daniel Spencer and Heber C. Kimball preached in the forenoon and in the afternoon. Thomas Bullock read the names of 200 missionaries called to the Cotton Country, after which Elders Wilford Woodruff and Enoch Reese spoke. Following are the names of persons called to go to the Cotton Mission:...William B. Foy, Parley’s Park,... Thomas B. Foy, Ogden....(William was 199 on the list and Thomas was number 200). No trade was listed for either one. John M. Chidester and his sons David and John Peck Chidester were also listed. John had a trade as a turner. The others did not. John Peck Chidester was also listed as residing in Parley’s Park. That would be where the Syderville and Park City areas would be today. It was noted for lumbering and milling of lumber products and cattle ranching at the time. President Heber C. Kimball met with the Cotton Missionaries at 6:30 p.m. at the Tabernacle. He told them that there was not one required to go...they could go as well as not, that they were hand selected good men– not one was being sent to get rid of him, that they want a settlement down there of men who can be relied on. God is inspiring this mission, we do not know the results of it. They would not wonder if we (President Young and Kimball) would go down.” On the 24th of December 1862, William Bosley Foy, the son of Thomas and Catherine Foy married Lucinda Bingham. The Binghams and the Foys had been neighbors in Bingham’s Fort in Ogden. They had made the move south together during the Utah War. They were also neighbors in Slaterville. It may be that it was from his father-in-law that William developed an interest in the livestock industry. Both the Bingham and the Foy men helped build the canal to Plain City. Sufficient water was not obtained so the canal was later extended to the Ogden River. Erastus Bingham Jr., father of Lucinda, also was engaged in the lumber and shingle milling industries. Thomas and Catherine’s son Frederick Lehi did not make the move to the Dixie Mission in Washington County with the rest of the family in 1863. He stayed in Slaterville and married Rachel Slater. She was the daughter of Richard Slater for whom the community was named. Slaterville was only six miles north of Ogden. There was a sharp contrast between the farm the Foys left in Slaterville, and what they had to look forward to in Washington County. The 1860's was also the time that the Civil war was being fought. The supply of cotton was cut off both to the Northern States and the Western States. It seemed logical that cotton could help the economy of Utah. That is part of the reason why the Cotton Mission was established. The mail had to be protected from Indians. Frederick Lehi Foy became a part of the U. S. Army stationed in the west. Many more troops came to Utah to prevent Utah from leaving the Union. They were stationed at what is now Fort Douglas. The soldiers had nothing to do, so many became prospectors in their spare time. That started the mining industry that could be found near where the Foy families were living in Washington and Beaver Counties. They did not mine because of the directions of the Church leaders. They did profit by selling products that the miners needed. Washington is located about five miles northeast of St. George in Washington County, Utah and about 314 mile southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah. Although Brigham Young strongly believed cotton could be grown there to supply the Saints with enough cotton and be an exporter of cotton to markets in the east, the plan did not work out. Poor alkali soil, cricket and grasshopper plagues, spring floods caused small dams to burst and flood the fields, malaria, and summer droughts caused some of the settlers to leave. William Bosley Foy would moved his family to Minersville in Beaver County later on. Thomas and his family would stay. Louisa Foy gave birth to her third Child, Rachel Foy on the 25th of November 1864 in Washington, Washington County. Two months later, Rachel died on the 17th of January 1865. Conditions did not get much better. Louisa gave birth to a son, Willard Richards Foy, on the 17th of January 1867 in Washington, Washington County. Baby Willard died the same day. Then on the 31st of March 1868, a son, Joseph Foy, was born to Louisa. He died the next day. He was named after the father of Louisa. Their sixth child, a son, was named James Collin Foy. He was born on the 3rd of February 1869 and died on the 6th of February 1869. These were times of famine. All the families were starving. The families were reduced to eating alfalfa greens and pigweed for food. This may be the reason why four of the babies died. Louisa did not have enough nourishment for them. It was not only a difficult time for Thomas and his wives and children living at home, but it was just as hard for their married children living near by. William and his young wife had their first child in Washington, Washington County on January 8, 1865. They had watched as two of their father’s children died for lack of food. They moved to Minersville, Beaver County, Utah the next year where their next six children were born. Catherine and her three youngest girls move to Minersville to be near William so she could help with the grandchildren. It was too difficult to support two families in a small home in Washington anyway. U. S. Marshals were starting to look for families living together in plural marriage as well. William had learned the trade of cattle ranching for which Beaver County was much more suited. While Catherine and her girls were still living in Washington County, they worked in the cotton industry. They help pick the cotton, spin it, and weave it. Until 1869, the carding, spinning and weaving were home industries. The girls would swim the Virgin River to pick the cotton. For lunch they would eat bread made from cane seed and sorghum, syrup. Catherine Foy, the daughter of Thomas and Catherine, met and married Jehu Blackburn in 1866. Jehu’s father, Jehu, had been one the first pioneers to go to Pine Valley. Pine Valley would become part of what is known as the Cotton Mission. Pine Valley is at the head waters of the Santa Clara River. Isaac Riddle, Robert Richey, Lorenzo Roundy, and Jehu Blackburn built a sawmill in Pine Valley in 1855. They supplied lumber and shingles to the residents of the Cotton Mission. Catherine Fink Foy lived out the rest of her life in Minersville with her children and grandchildren. Most of her other children lived too far away to be much of a help to them. Catherine lived long enough to see all but her last daughter get married. Catherine lived true to her blessings. She died true to the faith on May 21, 1870 and was buried in Minersville. No tribute is great enough that can be put into words for this beloved mother and grandmother. The only tribute worthy enough for her is that her posterity live the kind of lives that would bring honor to her. The seventh child of Thomas and Louisa, Lucinda Marie Foy was born on the 14th of February 1870. She was named in honor of the wife of William Bosley Foy. She survived the harshness of the desert life. When this baby was about nine months old and after the death of Catherine Fink Foy, Thomas and Louisa traveled the long distance from Washington County to Salt Lake City to the Endowment house where Louisa received her own endowment and the two were sealed on November 7, 1870. Louisa would give birth to one more daughter. Louisa Rebecca Foy was born on the 23rd of July 1873. Her father Thomas Birk Foy died on the 28th of July 1873 in Washington, Washington County, Utah just a few days after his last child was born. On March 2, 1873, Thomas received the last of his patriarchal blessings from Wm. G. Perkins. It was given as a fathers blessing. The majority of this blessing referred to a future time after this life was over. It said, “You will go to the center stake. There you will assist in building a holy temple. You will see that house finished off, and be at the dedication there of. There you will witness a great display of the power of God. There you will see brother Joseph and Hyrum with many of the Saints that have received their resurrected bodies. There your joy will be full, you will do a great work in that house for yourself and your dead. It will be common with you to see the graves open and the dead come forth. There you will see Jesus your Redeemer.” This is not the end of the story. One may wonder what was the pull that kept Thomas in Washington after the purpose of the Cotton Mission failed? Was it that he still had family and friends there? Was it that he had made commitments to the leaders of the Church that he would stay? Was it out of love and respect to Erastus Snow who had brought him into the Church and who was the presiding officer as an apostle of the Lord called to preside over this mission? Was it because he was engaged in the construction of the St. George Temple? Was it out of weariness to pick up his family and try to start over again? More than likely it was yes to all of the above. Land claims filed in the Washington County probate court show that Thomas B. Foy owned land next to Erastus Snow, John M. Chidester, and near Levi Hancock, and Brigham Young. On November 9, 1871, the site for the St. George temple was dedicated. President George A. Smith gave the dedicatory prayer. He knew of the suffering of the local saints. He knew of their faith and their dedication. He had shared many of the hardships with them. He prayed: “May thy peace be upon the pioneers of this desert and upon all those who have labored to reclaim the same; may eternal blessings rest upon them and their posterity forever. Yes, bless all thy servants who have done this great work, bless their wives, their children, their substance and do thou bless them in all their labors.” On the very same day that the dedicatory prayer was given on the construction site, work started on grading the site. This was difficult because it had to be dug out by picks and shovels. Surplus dirt was shoveled into wagons and hauled away. The foundation was dug down to twelve feet below the grade level. Digging was relatively easy. Soft sandstone was on the north side. The other three sides had mud and water. A drain was installed to dry it out. Black volcanic rock was hauled in to fill the foundation site. Other material like sandstone or limestone reacted adversely to the moisture and minerals that were present. A pile-driver was made from an old canon to drive the rock down to form a firm foundation. About the only work that Thomas could have done was to haul dirt from or rock to the foundation the foundation site. Tithing funds from all the Saints in the Cotton Mission and as far north as Beaver County were used in the construction of the temple. On March 10, 1873 the corner stones were laid. This was about a year after the High Priest Quorum compiled the history of Thomas and the year he got his last blessing. It would also be the year that Thomas died. Thomas did not live to see the temple finished but he lived long enough to know his blessings had been fulfilled as a temple builder. Susannah Foy Chidester was also a part of the Cotton Mission. Her husband John Peck Chidester played a major part in the construction of the cotton mill. He was the foreman in charge of the timber works for the construction of the cotton mill. Later he played a major role in the engineering and construction of the Pile Dam on the Virgin River. After the temple was completed, in August of 1877 Susannah and her son John had much of the temple work done for her father’s and mother’s families. Not enough can be said for her seeing that this great work was done. The temple records give us valuable information as well. Not enough good can be said for the many who have written the biography of Thomas Birk Foy previously. This will not be the last history of him I am sure. This is a work in progress. Every effort has been made to document this history. Just because you may see the names spelled differently does not mean they are different people or that the ordinance work was done incorrectly. What is done is done. Please use this as a means to add to or update your records. Note! It is still a work in progress. Feel free to participate.

Thomas Birk Foy by Inez Foy Barker

Contributor: chetman Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Thomas Birk Foy -Inez Foy Barker December 30,1802, about the time that Daniel Boone was making his last move west, a baby boy was born to John Frederick and Elizabeth Phillips Foy—the last of twelve children. Frederick had been working in Rapho Township Lancaster County, Pennsylvania as a furnace hand in one of the mills. He had come to America in 1773 as an indentured servant for seven years in Chester County prior to moving to Lancaster County. By the turn of the century, his three oldest sons had made their move into central Pennsylvania and Frederick took his wife, Elizabeth, and their younger children about 100 miles into the wilderness country of the Allegheny Mountains where the west branch of the Susquehannah River head to Halfmoon Valley in Centre County. The valley was a picturesque and fruitful belt of rich farmland just waiting to be cleared and farmed. The region to the south was more barren, but abounded in valuable deposits of iron ore, which had been the source of Frederick's livelyhood thus far. By 1819 (census) he owned 200_acres, quite an achievement considering there was scarcely more than an Indian trail through the valley 35 years earlier. This beautiful valley was where young Thomas grew to manhood, but he and his brother, Samuel, decided to move further west to Indiana County. Here he met his wife, Catherine Rebecca Fink, who was born October 18, 1809. Her parents, John and Sarah Goshorn Fink, both of German descent, reared 11 other children there. Her father was a carpenter by trade. Thomas and Catherine's first child, Elizabeth, vas born in Wheatfield, Indiana County in 1829. Two years later their second daughter, Susan, was born at Strongstovn. In 1833 their first son was born there. He not only carried on the Foy name, but he bore witness by his name that Thomas had heard of the strange religion being preached in the surrounding regions. They learned about the Angel Moroni who had brought the gold plates to Joseph Smith and decided to name their new baby John Moroni after his Grandfather Fink and the Angel. Elder Erastus Snow and a Brother William B. Bosley were preaching the gospel in the area and they were baptized by Elder 5now in 1836. When their next child vas born the next year, they named him William Bosley Foy. William was also the name of one of Thomas' brothers. By February 6, 1840 they had moved to Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois to be near the saints at Nauvoo, That's when their beautiful brown-eyed baby they named Sarah Jane Foy was born. She was named for Catherine's mother. Three other children were born there; Emma Smith Foy, Thomas Didymus Foy and Frederick Lehi Foy. Thomas was ordained a Teacher, May 26, 1838 by Erastus Snow; a Priest, April 7, 1839 by William McIntyre~ an Elder, April 6, 1840 at Nauvoo by Willard Richards. Catherine received her Patriarchal Blessing, October 5, 1841 at Nauvoo by Hyrum Smith. Thomas received his (the first of three), January 31,1842 at Nauvoo under the hands of Patriarch Hyrum Smith. He was told by Hyrum that he would receive his inheritance with the remnants of the Seed of Jacob, not of Joseph, but Issachar. Thomas was ordained a High Priest, December 29, 1844 under the hands of G. W. Harris and others at Nauvoo where he had moved his family after the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph and his brother, Hyrum Smith. Thomas worked on the Nauvoo Temple and he and Catherine both received their endowments there, January 22, 1846. This gave strength and courage they prepared to move west. They started west the spring of 1847. When they got to Winter Quarters, Thomas was sealed to Catherine by Willard Richards. He was also sealed to Willard Richards at the same time. This was a common practice at that early time to be sealed to the leaders. Thomas was told they needed him to stay in Iowa to help raise food for the others who would follow and as he was a good wheelwright he was able to render much Deeded help in building and repairing wagons. Catherine Rebecca, their eighth child was born while they were in Iowa. Extacts from Journal History, 1850, in Historian’s Office in Salt Lake City. In 1850, besides other companies of emigrating Saints, one company left the Missouri River under the leadership of Joseph Young and Gardiner Snow. Captain Gardiner Snow’s company of emigrating Saints, (the second fifty of William Snow's hundred), left the Missouri River for Great Salt Lake Valley l2th June, 1850. From a letter written August 28, 1850, at the upper Platte Ferry, signed Joseph Young and Gardiner Snow and addressed to the First Presidency, we cull the following: We are the second fifty of Captain Snow’s hundred; Gardiner Snow is captain: Joseph Young, president; Winslow Farr, counselor; Lucius N. Scovil and George W. Parish, marshall; Aaron M. York, John Carter, and Thomas Rich, captains of tens and Samuel Pollock, clerk of the fifty. By counsel of our brethren from the valley, we, by mutual consent, have divided our company for the convenience of traveling. Brothers Truman Leonard and Harmon Parsons are the captains of the tens that are not with us; They are in our advance and we cannot give an account of their situation. We were met by Brothers Stratton and Hanks at the branch of the La Bonta, on Tuesday, August 20. They read to us a document from the Presidency and council in the valley. We were truly thankful to hear from you and have concluded to send a messenger forthwith. Brother David Lewis, in advance of Brothers Stratton and Hanks to represent to you our situation as early as possible. When we left the Missouri River as a camp we were short of teams and had no extra ones. We have 42 wagons in our company besides those with Brother Leonard and Parsons, about 20 head of our cattle are crippled and if anymore should give out, we shall be under the necessity of leaving some of our substance by the wayside. But we feel that we need all we have, 88 we are among the poorest of our people, yet rich in faith. If you could send to our assistance as soon as possible from 12 to 16 yoke of oxen and 2 wagons, you will confer on us a lasting favor that we will duly appreciate. With such help we may extricate ourselves, our wives and our little ones from these mountains." Extracts from a letter written by Mrs. Minerva L. Jones Stone to her parents in Iowa from the Fort at Grand Island, July 16, 1850. Foys were in the same company. "This afternoon we arrived at this place. We are expecting to leave to- morrow morning, therefore I improve the present opportunity of writing you a few lines. The watchmen of this camp have just cried the hour of ten as I commence. The 4th of July we arrived at the Platt bottom. Our company of fifty divided into three companies. The first and last tens formed into one. Capt. York, Capt. of the first ten, Bro. Rich, Capt. of the fifth or last ten. He is our captain. Bro. Leonard and Bro. Peirson and Bro. John Carter were captains of the other three tens. It vas thought wisdom to divide into smaller companies in order to travel faster. Sister Foy and two sisters with Bro. Farr have had the cholera but have recovered; there have been one or tvo children die with it. July 9th, we passed an old deserted Indian Village containing 30 or 40 wigwams. The middle one was a prison where Bro. Casto and those with him were imprisoned on their return from the valley with the mail a year ago last spring. The wigwams had the appearance of being quite comfortable when in good repair. They were made of sticks, grass, and dirt, with a long, low entry made of the same material, which led into the wigwam. There were large holes in the ground where they had buried their corn. Our company found three live sheep in one of them. Some company before us had lost them. The Indians left their place last fall. I will here observe that we have traveled 237 miles and have not seen an Indian this side of the Missouri River to Fort Laramie. We have got along very slowly, but we have had a great deal of rain, consequently bad roads. ...Yesterday we had passed 55 graves. I don't know how many today. but enough probably to make near sixty. It is as Bro. Joseph Young says. “Our road is e perfect burying ground." One day we passed 15 graves. Joseph says he feels like weeping when he sees his brethren and sisters laid by the way- side by the destroyer, but it is all right. these things go to prove that Joseph Smith was a Prophet of the Lord " One of the roadside graves in Indian Territory somewhere. was the little grave of seven year old Thomas Didymus Foy. "We are daily expecting to meet Bro. Hyde on his return from the valley to the Bluffs; therefore. I improve a few moments in penning a few lines to send you. Today (Sept. ll, 1850) we have camped on Sweet Water (13 miles from South Pass) for the last time, I believe. We are 14 miles from the place where brother George A- Smith and company were caught in the snow storm last year. We have had very pleasant weather for several weeks, but as we approach the tops of the mountains we have cold nights but warm days. Last night water froze some. Yesterday we could see snow on the distant mountains -today we have had strong wind and very cold. but I must stop… Sometime before we came to Laramie, we saw thousands of buffalo. Our Company shot several of them. Buffalo beef is very nice meat, but antelope exceeds everything else of the kind I ever saw. We have seen some buffalo this side of the Black Hills, but not very many. ….Since we corralled today, Mr. Stone has been out with his gun -saw 3 antelope together, but did not have the good luck to shoot any. Meat is an article that would be very acceptable in this camp. They are mostly destitute. I don't know of any in the camp but our own. Milk is very scarce. Most of the cows are worked in the yoke. There is so much bad water and so many changes that it is necessary to boil the water or make tea or coffee. Now we have beautiful water. Sweet Water River is beautiful water. It is a beautiful stream. Sunday, Sept. 15th. We are now 125 miles from the valley on the Big Sandy River. We have crossed the pass and have had no snow storm, but could see the snow on the tops of the mountains. The weather for two or three days has been warm. We have passed a great many graves of gold hunters, mostly from Missouri. There must be, many widow and orphan back in Missouri. They left a great deal of property this season on the road, but destroyed it as much as possible. Sunday,22nd. We are now at Fort Bridger. All well and in good spirits. Sept.30th. We are just about to enter the valley " Although this company the Foys and Stones were in probably fared better than a good many others, it can be safely said that Catherine and Thomas had their troubles. Not only did she nearly lose her life with cholera, but she was expecting another child. Not only this, but they had lost their little Thomas ---buried along the way. When they finally arrived in the Salt Lake Valley they were blessed with another daughter, Mary Ann, December 13, 1850. Details of their time in Salt Lake City or the exact time they remained there are unknown, although the following two items mentioned Thomas in the ---Deseret News: Thursday, October 7, 1852. General Conference was continued in Salt Lake City McGee Harris was sustained as President of the Teachers Quorum, also Thomas B. Foy and Rueben Perkins his councelors. General Conference, April 7, 1853. McGee Harris was sustained as President of the Priests Quorum; also John Groves was voted to be his counselor in the room of Thomas B. Foy, who had moved to another valley; and Rueben Perkins second counselor. By November 13, 1853 Thomas Foy and his family were living in Farmington, Utah, because Catherine's last child, Rhoda Maria, was born there. An old timer said the Foys lived on the main street where the fire station now stands. While he was there he worked for Willard Richards running a sawmill. They did not, however, remain there long. Lasting friendships were formed by those who crossed the plains together. One day Brother Amos P. Stone returned home and told his family he had run into Brother Foy that day. They no doubt crossed paths again when Thomas took his family to Ogden to live and a couple of years later the Stones sold out in Bountiful and moved to the Ogden Valley. The first white settler in the Ogden Valley was a trapper and trader who at the time lived with a few mountaineers and half-breed Indians on the left bank of the Weber River. He claimed by virtue of a Spanish grant a large section of land extending about eight miles from north to south eastward to the base of the mountains and westward to the Great Salt Lake. President Young and his company had met him on the Bear River July 1,1847, and received much valuable information from him including an offer to sell the "Miles Goodyear Fort" for about $2000. This fort was purchased with part of the pay James Brown, Capt. collected as sick pay from the Mormon Battalion detachment who wintered at Pueblo, Colorado. This fort became known as Brown's Fort. When the city of Ogden was founded in 1850 and the settlers extended their land holdings to the north side of the Ogden River , "Farr's Fort ", “Mound Fort " and “Bingham' s Fort” came into existence . Thomas B. Foy moved to the Bingham Fort. At the close of 1854 Bingham’s Fort had a population of 732. (see map for the location of the Foys in the fort.) Located north of 2nd Street and west of Washington Boulevard, Bingham's Fort extended westward along the Harrisville road. Its east line was about 130 rods west of Washington. The fort enclosed an area of 40 acres. Its walls were built of rocks and mud, principally mud. Under the immediate supervision of Goodale, the walls were constructed, with each family who lived in the fort assigned a certain portion to build. Some of them completed their assigned work while others failed to do so. The fort walls were erected about four rods from the houses, with corrals taking up this space. Thomas Richardson,a pioneer boy who lived in Bingham'a Fort tells how the walls were constructed: "The walls were made of mud. We did not have lumber to put up to hold the mud, so we placed upright poles, tapering from about eight feet at the bottom to about three feet at the top. We set stakes between the poles and wove willows in like a willow fence, then filled the space with mud. We made a ditch nearby to run water down to wet the mud. When wet, we threw it in with shovels, spades or anything we had. We built the willow forms as the wall went up. It (the wall) was about twelve feet high." The fort had an entrance on the west side large enough to drive a teem through with a gate constructed of heavy timber which stood as high as the wall. Had it been completed,there would have been a similar gate on the east." While they were living in Ogden lasting ties were made. Part of Thomas and Catherine would forever remain there. Emma became Isaac Goodale's second wife when she was only 15 years old and Sarah Jane married Thomas Jones when she was 16. William married Lucinda Maria Bingham in 1862. Later he took her younger sister, Cedenia as his second wife. Sarah Jane and Emma lived out their lives there. John stayed sixteen years and then moved to Montana. The children were not the only ones getting married. Thomas took a young English convert Louisa Potterill, as his plural wife. A year later their first child. a little girl named Mary Elizabeth, was born. This baby died six months later. Thomas then moved to Slaterville, six miles northwest of the center of Ogden where some of the best farm land in Weber County was found. The settlement was named after one of the earliest settlers, Richard Slater. Thomas' son, Fred would later marry his daughter, Rachel, and settle there permanently. The Foys helped develop the area by farming and in the building of the Harrisville Canal or ditch. Louisa and Thomas' second child, Sarah Ann, was born there, 9 Oct. 1862. Two weeks later he was called to the Cotton Mission in Southern Utah. The following news item appeared in the October 19, 1862 issue of the Deseret News: “Sunday Qct. 19, 1862. The day was pleasant in Great Salt Lake City. Two meetings were held in the bower. Elder Daniel Spencer and President Heber C. Kimball preached in the forenoon and in the afternoon Thomas Bullock read the names of 200 missionaries called to the Cotton Country, after which Elders Wilford Woodruff and Enoch Reese spoke. Following are the names of persons called to go to the cotton mission: William B. Foy, Parley's ParK; Thomas B. Foy, Qgden… President Heber C. Kimball met with the Cotton Missionaries at 6:30 p.m. at the Tabernacle. He told them that there was not one required to go unless they could go as well as not, that they were hand selected good men--not one was being sent to get rid of him, that they want a settlement down there of men who can be relied on. God is inspiring this mission, we do not know the results of it. They would not wonder if we (President Young and Kimball) "Would go down." Brigham Young strongly believed that the southern area known as Utah's Dixie could produce enough cotton to supply cloth for all the Saints, with surplus for the eastern market. By 1864, however, it became clear that the experiment was foundering. The church leaders furnished thousands of dollars in cash, merchandise, tools, and equipment. They also provided the settlers of St. George area with a cotton factory, which began operation in 1869. Everything possible conspired to stop the cotton-growing enterprise. Poor soil, grasshopper and cricket plagues, alternating floods and drought, and other problems caused some settlers to leave. Thomas stayed. William sett1ed at Minersville. Thomas built an adobe home at Washington, which is situated in a somewhat open country, five miles northeast of St. George, about 50 miles southwest of Cedar City and 314 mi1es southwest of Salt Lake City. They got their water from springs, which gushed forth from the ground in and around the town. Under the right conditions all kinds of grain, vegetables, and fruit could be grown there. The barren desert was quite a contrast to the lush green countryside Louisa was used to in England and noticeably lacking in the forested valleys in Pennsylvania. Black volcanic hills and mountains surrounded the town site. The Virgin River is about 1 ½ miles from the town. They went through all the privations, hardships and suffering that the pioneers went through in Dixie. It was much harder there than in other places. When they left Qgden, Thomas put a board in the wagon to make a coffin for Sarah Ann for they didn't think she could make the trip as she was sick all the time. They wondered how she ever made it through the trip and then through the famine as she always went to bed crying because she was so hungry. They went through two famines with only alfalfa greens to eat without any seasoning but salt. During one of the famines their little two and a half-year-old Rachel went into convulsions and died because she couldn't digest the greens. They had three boys born to them. One lived one day, one died the same day, and the third lived one month. Their last two little girls were born in 1870 and 1873 when times were getting better, so she had no trouble raising them. 0ut of Louisa and Thomas’s eight children, she raised only three. Thomas got pneumonia and died five days after their last child was born. The three girls went to work in the cotton mill as soon as they were old enough. Catherine was getting on in age. It was tremendously hard on her. They raised cotton, spun and wove it into cloth which they made into clothing. Her daughters swam the Virgin River to pick cotton in the heat of Dixie's summer sun and lunched at noon on cane seed bread and sorghum--black, sticky sorghum. When her daughter Kate (Catherine) was old enough, she moved to Minersville to live with her brother, William. There she met Jehu Blackburn and got married. Catherine moved there and spent the last few years of her life with her children in Minersville. She died May 21,1870, Thomas died July 28, 1873 in Washington. Louisa lived until 1920.

Life Timeline of Thomas Burke Foy

1802
Thomas Burke Foy was born on 30 Dec 1802
Thomas Burke Foy was 9 years old when Charles Dickens, English novelist and critic (d. 1870) Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are still widely read today.
1812
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Thomas Burke Foy was 23 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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Thomas Burke Foy was 29 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Thomas Burke Foy was 37 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Thomas Burke Foy was 57 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Thomas Burke Foy was 58 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
1861
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Thomas Burke Foy died on 28 Jul 1873 at the age of 70
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Thomas Burke Foy (30 Dec 1802 - 28 Jul 1873), BillionGraves Record 564016 Washington, Washington, Utah, United States

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