Samuel Kendall Gifford

11 Nov 1821 - 26 Jun 1907

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Samuel Kendall Gifford

11 Nov 1821 - 26 Jun 1907
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The following is taken from a biographical encyclopedia. Samuel Kendall Gifford, a Patriarch in the St. George Stake of Zion, (Utah), was born November 11, 1821, at Milo, Yates county, New York, the son of Alpheus Gifford and Anna Nash. He was baptized in the spring of 1833 in Jackson county, Missou
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Life Information

Samuel Kendall Gifford

Born:
Died:

Shunesburg Cemetery

Ranch Road
Shunesburg, Washington, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Very restricted access to Private Land Not sure if dates are correct. Marker very dim Notice name on large stone marker linked to. Large stone marker with all names of persons known to be buried in this Pioneer cemetery.
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Hope Welch

July 24, 2013
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Hope Welch

July 20, 2013

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Samuel Kendall Gifford Life History

Contributor: Hope Welch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

The following is taken from a biographical encyclopedia. Samuel Kendall Gifford, a Patriarch in the St. George Stake of Zion, (Utah), was born November 11, 1821, at Milo, Yates county, New York, the son of Alpheus Gifford and Anna Nash. He was baptized in the spring of 1833 in Jackson county, Missouri, ordained a Teacher in 1844 by Isaac Morley; ordained a Seventy of the 26th quorum in 1845 by Joseph Young; became president of the 28th quorum of Seventy in 1857 and was ordained a Patriarch in September, 1902, by Matthias F. Cowley. Elder Gifford passed through the drivings and mobbings to which the Saints were exposed prior to their coming to Utah. He was one of the early pioneers of Utah and one of the founders of Manti, Sanpete county. In 1863 he removed to southern Utah and passed through all the trying scenes in the early days, of that country, while building up the Dixie mission. For several years he acted as presiding Elder of the Shonesburg branch of the Rockville Ward, and also acted as superintendent of the Springdale Sunday school for many years. As a military man he saw rough service in the field, and served as captain of a company during the Walker war; later he served in the Navajo Indian war in southern Utah. October 1, 1848, he married Lora Ann Demill, by whom he had ten children. Patriarch Gifford died June 26, 1907. ******************** FAMILY HISTORY OF SAMUEL KENDALL GIFFORD A short biography of Samuel Kendall Gifford, son of Alpheus Gifford and Ann Nash. Born 11th November 1821, Milo Yate County New York dictated by himself and written by his granddaughter, Hannah Jane Gifford. My father was the son of Noah, who was the son of Peleg Gifford, they were born in Barnstable County Massachusetts. My father on hearing concerning Joseph Smith, the Prophet who had lain the foundation of a New Church, and who was every where spoken evil of, was prompted by the spirit to go to Palmira where the church was organized, where he learned the truth, was baptized. This was late in 1830 or very early in 1831. I was told by my uncle that it was in 1831, but President Young told me afterwards that it was 1830. He was ordained a Priest and returned home in company with Enos Curtis who accompanied him to Palmira and also received the gospel. Father brought home with him five books of Mormon, and was full of joy and thanksgiving. He preached the gospel until the church moved from New York to Ohio, when he and several others went to Kirtland to again visit the Prophet. That was in 1831. Father was there ordained an Elder. He returned again to Pennsylvania in connection with his brethren for that was their home. Mother also received the gospel. Early in the spring of 1832 we started on a slow journey for Jackson County Missouri, traveled by team one hundred miles to a place called Olean point on the Allegheny River. Where they built a flat boat, that is, the brethren who had gathered there built a flat boat with a cabin on it, and four families as follows: Alpheus Gifford, my father, My uncle Judith Gifford, Abram Brown, and Isaac Fhumabelt, and their families, floated down the river. My father having to work his way to procure something to eat and wear made our journey very slow. We reached Cincinnati, Ohio in the fall of 1832, where Elizah Newman had followed our boats five miles down to the city. He, having been informed by Lyman Lenard that a preacher by the name of Alpheus Gifford would come on such a boat and would perhaps winter in Cincinnati, found that he was not mistaken. He procured ropes and men enough to tow our boat up the river, five miles to his place of residence, where we spent the winter with Brother Newman. Going five miles on the Sabbath day to meet with a branch of the church that had been organized in Cincinnati. Early in the Spring of 1833, Elias Higbee, Isaac Higbee and John S. Higbee, chartered a steam boat in which they went with their substance and took my father and family with them down the Ohio River and up the Mississippi River to St. Lewis in the State of Missouri, from here they traveled by team to Independence, where we arrived early in the spring, of that year. We settled first on the Blue River, later in what was known as Balson Settlement, presided over by Peter Dustin, and later in another part where we lived in a old log house without a floor, until the 13th of November of the same year 1833. When we were driven by a ruthless mob and were obliged to leave the County. My self, my brothers Ichabod, William, and Henry and my sister Rhoda had been baptized by Saloman Hancock. In the spring or early summer of that year. On the night of the 13th while camping on the banks of the Missouri River, we beheld that beautiful phenomenon known as the falling of the stars which was one of the most beautiful scenes I ever beheld. On the 14th we crossed the river into Clay County, went about two miles from the river, where a branch of the church was organized with John Lowry as President. We remained there, often being threatened by mobs, stirred up by men from Jackson County, who were not satisfied with driving them from Jackson County. In 1844, Joseph Smith with some hundred and fifty men came up from the East in what is known as the Zion's Camp. Failing to agree upon terms with the people of Jackson County, to have the saints restored to their home in Jackson County as the people of Clay County, and Jackson County together had threatened the utter destruction of the Saints if they did not leave Clay County, a treaty was entered unto by which the Saints were permitted to remove to a portion of Ray County that was taken from Ray County and called Caldwell County, where a city was laid off and named Far West. Here I was enrolled in the first company, I believe, of Militia that was ever organized by the Latter Day Saint, and here I first saw the Prophet Joseph Smith, and I saw the chief corner stone placed in its place of the Temple that will some day be built in Far West. But the people of Missouri were not satisfied to let the Saints have a resting place and remain in peace in that State. Mobs were constantly disturbing the Saints. Men and women were massacred. The chief Apostle, David Patten was slain and finally by the exterminating order by governor Lillburn W. Boggs, and army of two or three thousands were sent to Far West. At the time they arrived at Far West my uncle way - Levi, two of my cousins and my self were five miles east of Far West on our way to the city and consequently obliged to stop and go no farther. We were taking a load of corn from our home on Log Creek which we had to abandon for safety nearby where we were stopping my Uncle Levi and Old father Tanner were standing together talking when an army of the mob who had discovered them, they ran to get away from them but father Tanner was caught and his skull broke by the butt of a gun. Uncle Levi escaped that day by hiding under a bank of a creek, but next day was caught and taken to the camp of the enemy. I need not speak of what took place by the treachery of lieutenant George M. Hinckle, whom I had previously looked upon as a man of God. All these things are written in the History of the church. We were driven in the dead of Winter in 1838-39 and had to travel from the west end of Missouri to its eastern line, through mud and snow poorly clad and nearly barefooted, four families to the wagon all having to go on foot that were able to walk that whole distance. When we arrived at the Mississippi River opposite of Quincy, Illinois, we had to stay there some time in order to get a chance to cross the river for there was so many to cross and but one ferry-boat. Finally my father and some others cut down two very large cotton-wood trees and dug them out like canoes excepting they were square and each end like troves, these they pinned together with cross pieces at the proper distance apart to contain the wheels of the wagons, and in this way we crossed the river that was over a mile wide when cakes of ice were floating, that would sometimes almost upset our double barreled ferryboat. We were received with kindness by the citizens of Quincy. After a time my father and others moved some twenty miles up the river near the town of Limy and settled where some were in Adams County and some in Hancock County. Across the line, and heard a branch of the church was organized, presided over by Isaac Morley. We remained here in peace for a short time, again I was enrolled in a military company belonging to the Nauvoo Legion. Saloman Hancock was our Mayor, Steven Markum was our Corlnet. I attended every general training in the city of Nauvoo which was 30 miles above the Morley Settlement. I attended the first conference that was held in the city of Nauvoo. Presided over b y the Prophet Joseph Smith. After the conference was over my father and I met with a lot of the brethren in the house of Joseph Smith. The Prophet talked to us for some time upon our persecutions and drivings from our homes and property and said he was going to the city of Washington to lay our grievances before the President of the United States. This was in October 1839 and said he, "I have a garden in which I have some corn standing and the hogs are getting in destroying my corn and if any of you will stop the hog holes in my garden fence and thereby save my corn I will gain redress for all our grievances in the state of Missouri" One man arose up and said I believe I know what President Smith means by the Hog Holes. He says I went over the river the other day into the island and got in to a beautiful grove of timber which through my greediness I blazed a lot of the trees and wrote my name on them so as to claim the whole grove I believe such as this is what the prophet means by the Hog Holes. The Prophet then arose and said you may take it just as you please but I mean just what I say. If any of you will stop the hog holes in my garden fence and therefore save my corn I will gain redress for all our grievances in the state of Missouri. Another man arose and said, "Brother Joseph has a good crib supposing we gather his corn and put in into his crib." The Prophet again arose and repeated the same words concerning the hog holes making the same promise. A person unknown to anybody in the house arose and said "I and my son will stop the hog holes in your garden tomorrow morning, that seemed to settle the question. Soon after this while the Prophet was talking a person somewhere near the middle of the house got up and walked out of the house, the door being opened. The Prophet went around and inquired of everyone in the house if they knew who it was that went out. No one could tell but all saw him go. As my father and I had to go the next day 30 miles on foot we supposed that all would be right. We learned afterwards that no one came to stop the hog holes and I have always believed that the stranger that left the house whether he was a real man or a devil was the one that promised to stop the hog holes. I can not add anything to the history of the church for it is plainly written by many. But I left Nauvoo and traveled in the first camp, in the spring of 1846, where we traveled through deep mud and snow, stopping for three weeks at a time for storm to clear away. I went with the camp as far as Garden Grove in the state of Iowa, where the saints made a stopping place, leaving a few. The camp moved on a little farther to a place called Mount Pisgah. I returned to Nauvoo with some others, stayed but a day or two then crossed over into Iowa again, went to Farmington some twenty miles, up the Des Moines River where I spent the summer. Then went to winter quarters where I spent the winter. Heard the Revelation known as the Word and will of the Lord. In the winter quarters of the Saints. by President Brigham Young, the first time it was read in public. I made a trip or two down into the state of Missouri for provisions then living with Father Morley in winter quarters. I made some chairs took them down to St. Joseph and sold them for store goods, worked a month in St. Joseph in a wagon shop, took a trip to St. Lewis and back on a steamboat. Returned to Pisgah in the fall of 1847, where I remained manufacturing chairs, and so forth, until the spring of 1850, when I crossed the plains witnessing a awful calamity caused by the Cholera. Both saints sinners were left upon the plains by the hundreds. Arrived in Salt Lake Valley about the eleventh of September. Was called to Sanpete where I arrived in November. In the spring of 1851, was again enrolled in a military company belonging to the Nauvoo Legion. I was first elected third Corporal and gradually promoted until the walker war broke out when I held the office of orderly Sergeant. The duties of which office I performed during the war. Then was gradually promoted till I held the position of first Lieutenant. Syremus Taylor who was then captain soon died. I then was elected and received a captain commission afterwards was elected Major, but soon removed to Southern Utah and did not obtain a commission. I had served six years in the city council in Manti City. I acted for some time as counselor and spokesman to Gad Yale who presided over the mass quorum of Seventies. On May 16, 1857 was ordained one of the presidents of the forty eighth quorum of Seventies by President Joseph Young. I acted as teacher for many years in Manti, had charge of the first teachers ward. I belonged to the Manti Trespen Society for many years. At the time of Reformation for more than one month attended from one to three meetings a day, was teacher in the first Sunday School that was organized in Manti. In November 1862 visited Southern Utah to which place I removed in November 1863 settled in Shonesburg, where I continued my labors as a ward teacher of the Rockville Ward, and also was superintendent of the Sabbath School. Manufactured a great many chairs done some farming, raising fruit and so forth. Again acted as orderly Sergeant in the Militia. In 1866 was again called to serve in the Indian War. Known as the Navaho or piede war. Afterwards I again received a first Lieutenant commission, which office I held until bearing arms was forbidden by a wicked governor. On the sixth day of April 1870 my wife died and was buried near my two sons who had previously died. I was appointed by president Jacob Gates to preside over the seventies of the Rockville Ward then consisting of four settlements, namely Rockville, Grafton, Shonesburg, and Springdale. At the time of the localizing the quorums of Seventies, I was set apart under the directions of President Gates, as one of the Presidents of the Ninth quorum of Seventies with head quarters at Toquerville. I traveled with Brothers Dodge and Savage from Settlement to settlement to complete the organization of the quorums and to stir up the seventies by way of their duties and to prepare them for missionary labor. I performed some home missionary labor in the St. George Stake of Zion. When the united order was organized I took great interest in laboring for the benefit of the community until the order was dissolved. Soon after President Brigham H. Roberts counseled the old men of the Seventies to go into the High Priest quorum I obeyed the council and was ordained by Daniel Duncan McArthur. I have attended many Conferences in St. George, attended the conference in Salt Lake City at the time of the dedication of the temple in April 1893. I had previously witnessed the laying of the corner stones of that great temple on the sixth of April 1853, just forty years previous to the time of it's dedication, I had attended a number of general conferences in Salt Lake previous to this time. I had the privilege of attending one celebration of the 24th of July twenty miles up Big Cotton Wood Canyon with president Young's party. I assisted what I was able to in building the St. George Temple also the Manti Temple. And the great temple of Salt Lake. I have spent a great deal of time means considering what little means I possessed in gathering records and laboring for the benefit of the living and the redemption of the dead. On the sixth day of September 1902, I was ordained a Patriarch by Apostle Matthias F. Cowley, have blessed up to date (March 5, 1904) 301 persons, including all of my posterity that are still living excepting two little babies. I have been afflicted in many ways, my second wife who had been sealed to me in the endowment house in Salt Lake City on the second day of January 1871 died on the twentieth of June 1902. On the 26th or 27th of April 1881 I was seized with a terrible pain in my right eye, which continued to grow worse until I was nearly blind. On the first day of May I met Robert Pickton at Rockville and started on the home mission to travel around the Stake, suffered immensely with my head and eyes would scarcely see anybody or anything but filled my mission, did not miss one meeting, and spoke to the people on the principles of tithing and the sacrament of the Lord's Supper, for that was the mission that was given us, I returned home on the first day of June. When I returned home I was in great misery but after using two or three bottles of Ray ways read relief, I got so I could do a little work but continued to suffer with my head and eyes my right going entirely blind, and my left eye blind by spells, until eight years ago this month I became entirely blind to see no more in the life. Have come near to the brink of the grave a number of times but through the fulfillment of the promises of the servants of God I have been able to do considerably work in the temple, and am still anxious to labor in the temple, I have a great work before me which I would like to perform before I pass away, but oh how long shall I have to wait for help. I have labored from one day to each week at a time as time would permit since the temple was opened for endowments it has now been six months since I have been to the temple, and can not go without assistance and my pleadings are in vain, I am now eighty two and about four months and would like to complete my work for the dead. Comments taken from Early Church records on Micro Fiche at the Family History Center in Cody, Wyoming. Comment #1. In 1850, Samuel had a household of 3 and a real wealth of $100. In 1860, he had a household of 8, and a real wealth of $525, and a personal wealth of $200. Reference: Utah Federal Census; Year: 1851, 1860. Comment #2. Samuel was a Patriarch in the St. George Stake of Zion. He became the President of the 28th Quorum of Seventy in 1857. Elder Gifford passed through the drivings and mobbings to which th Saints were exposed prior to their coming to Utah. He was on e of the early pioneers of Utah and one of the founders of Manti, San Pete County. In 1863, he removed to Southern Utah and passed through all the trying scenes in the early days of that country while building up the Dixie mission. For several years he acted as presiding Elder of the Shonesburg Branch of the Rockville Ward. He also acted as Superintendent of the Springdale Sunday School for many years. As a military man he saw rough service in the field, and served as a captain of a company during the Walker War. He later served in the Navajo Indian War in Southern Utah. Reference: LDS Biographical Encyclopedia. Jenson, Andrew. 1951 Volume 2 Page 194. Comment #3. This is an excerpt from the journal of Samuel Kendall Gifford: "Journal 1 Book by Samuel Kendall Gifford commencing September 3, 1864 containing a short Genealogy of his forefathers for three generations back and also a short history of his Father and an abridgement of a Journal as taken from old Books." Father joined LDS Church while living in Tioga County, PEnnsylvania, spring 1830, Father baptized Heber C. Kimball. Author born in Milo Township, Yates County, New York, 1821. Started for Missouri in 1831 but spent two years at Maryette, Ohio, arriving in Independence, 1833. Moved to Batson Settlement. Persecution. To Clay County. Great deal said at time about return to Jackson County; some thought it would take place immediately or within a few years. To Far West. Joined a military company, 1837. Trouble with mobs. To Quincy, Illinois, 1839. Settled at Morley Settlement, near Lima. Father moved to Nauvoo and died there, 1841. Worked in Missouri. Spent one winter at Winter Quarters. Came to Utah in 1850. Only violin player in the valley. Consecrated property to Church, 1855. Mormon Reformation. Seventies meetings. Attended phonography school, 1857. Re-elected to Manti City Council. A president in 48th Quorum of Seventies. Gifford genealogy. Reference: Guide to Mormon Diaries & Autobiographies. Bitton, Davis. Comment #4. Samuel was in the expulsion from Jackson County, MO in 1833. Reference: Mormon Manuscripts to 1846. Andrus, Hyrum. 1977. Comment #5. Samuel was a member of the Nauvoo 2nd Ward. Reference: Nauvoo: Early Mormon....Series 1839-46 Platt, Lyman. 1980. Comment #6. Samuel was sealed to Orpha Demille, a childhood sweetheart who was dead. Reference: Family Group Sheet - Self.

THOMAS HARRISON WINDER

Contributor: Hope Welch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

HISTORY OF THOMAS HARRISON WINDER Winder, Thomas Harrison History of Thomas Harrison Winder Written by Jane Wilson Winder Thomas Harrison Winder’s parents (John Thomas Winder and Ida Hope Harrison) came to America from Holland on April 7 in the year 1828. They went from the immigration center in New York City to Era, Pennsylvania. There Thomas’s father made his residence. Not long after they moved to Era Grandfather was born. He was born on April 17, in 1834. His father died when he was two years old. His mother married another man by the name of William Johnsten. They had two children, a boy and a girl. Thomas lived at his parent’s home until he was 17 years of age. His mother died when he was 19 and he helped raise the children and also helped his step-father run their little store. He later married his cousin, Hannah Shreeves. They had three children, William born at Era, Pennsylvania, and two others which were later to be born in Salt Lake City, Utah. Hannah and Grandfather decided that they should go across the plains to the Great Salt Lake Valley. They got their belongings together and started from Era in the summer of 1858. He joined another wagon train that was heading West also. They were two years crossing the great plains. They endured many hardships and sufferings. They didn’t have much trouble with the Indians on the way but they did have one little skirmish with Blackhawk and his people. The incident took place when Grandfather and the wagon train were stopped by Blackhawk and his people. To stop the shooting and killing Grandfather stood by a white flag of truce. Blackhawk called a halt to the Indians and rode forward to see what was the matter and who was standing by the white flag. When he got there he was surprised to find his playmate and hunting partner from Pennsylvania where they grew up together. They talked about old times and how they were getting along, then Blackhawk said in the presence of every one that no man would have been brave enough to stand by the white flag than Grandfather. He also said that no other man could shoot as straight and as fast as Grandfather could. Blackhawk told his Indians to hold for a peace and to let the wagon train alone. The Indians then left and only took a few things which Blackhawk quickly made them give the stolen articles back. After that one incident Grandfather was then called Wild Eagle by all the Indians. Grandfather and the rest of the people knelt down and prayed to the Lord and thanked him for their good fortune. They traveled on to Salt Lake without further trouble from Indians. Grandfather and Grandmother made their residence in Salt Lake City and had two other children born to them, Charley and Ida. They were only in Salt Lake City for a short time when President Brigham Young asked for volunteers to go and help the settlers around St. George. The Indians had become troublesome Winder, Thomas Harrison so grandfather and his family packed their belongings together again and traveled with some other families to St. George. Grandfather lived down there for about two years. They lived in a little three cornered log hut at the northwest corner of St. George. He had port holes for windows on all sides of his house. Two or three times his life was in danger because men were jealous of his marksmanship. They would knock on his door and say that he was needed at headquarters. Grandfather had left word at headquarters how to reach him so he knew that the men were lying to him. So he told the men that were outside if they didn’t leave him alone he would shoot them down like saplings. Many men got what they needed in those days. The men also tried to burn his house when he wasn’t home but his neighbors caught the fire in time and put it out. Grandfather always said after that, he had good neighbors. There were five families living around him at that time and they helped one another out a great deal. Grandfather was also a good doctor. He would have graduated if he had stayed in college back East but he wanted to come to Utah and try his luck. He has helped many folks back to health when they were given up by the other doctors. Grandfather had strong faith in his Lord and that is how he healed most of his patience. One night a man came and knocked on his door and said that his wife was very sick and dying with pain and wanted grandfather to come and help her. Grandfather thought this over for a minute and then asked the man what his wife’s name was but before the man thought he said that he didn’t have a wife. Grandfather quickly shot out the door with his pistol and men went yelling every which way. So with faith in the Lord his live was saved again. In the winter of 1866 his wife was very sick when a knock came on the door. Grandfather said, “Who’s there?” Outside the door came the reply, “You are wanted over at the square.” Grandfather said back, “I can’t go because my wife is very sick.” Hannah Shreeves passed away before morning. She was buried at St. George, Utah. She left three children, William, Charley and Ida. Grandfather stayed at St. George only a short time. He took his children back to Salt Lake City. There he let the children go to some people he knew at Springville, Utah. Grandfather helped out the best he could with the children. Not long after that he married again to Mahala Ruth Durfee, daughter of Abraham Durfee and Ursula Curtis. They had two children, Ursula Ett, born August 28, 1868, and John Augusta, born March 21, 1870. Mahala Ruth wanted to go to Southern Utah where her mother lived but Grandfather said that he didn’t want to go back there because he had already lost one wife down there living on sorghum and corn bread. So Mahala insisted that she go so she got her things together, bundled the children together and went to live with her mother and step-father, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Kendal Gifford. She wasn’t there long when she married again to Samuel Parker. They had one Winder, Thomas Harrison so grandfather and his family packed their belongings together again and traveled with some other families to St. George. Grandfather lived down there for about two years. They lived in a little three cornered log hut at the northwest corner of St. George. He had port holes for windows on all sides of his house. Two or three times his life was in danger because men were jealous of his marksmanship. They would knock on his door and say that he was needed at headquarters. Grandfather had left word at headquarters how to reach him so he knew that the men were lying to him. So he told the men that were outside if they didn’t leave him alone he would shoot them down like saplings. Many men got what they needed in those days. The men also tried to burn his house when he wasn’t home but his neighbors caught the fire in time and put it out. Grandfather always said after that, he had good neighbors. There were five families living around him at that time and they helped one another out a great deal. Grandfather was also a good doctor. He would have graduated if he had stayed in college back East but he wanted to come to Utah and try his luck. He has helped many folks back to health when they were given up by the other doctors. Grandfather had strong faith in his Lord and that is how he healed most of his patience. One night a man came and knocked on his door and said that his wife was very sick and dying with pain and wanted grandfather to come and help her. Grandfather thought this over for a minute and then asked the man what his wife’s name was but before the man thought he said that he didn’t have a wife. Grandfather quickly shot out the door with his pistol and men went yelling every which way. So with faith in the Lord his live was saved again. In the winter of 1866 his wife was very sick when a knock came on the door. Grandfather said, “Who’s there?” Outside the door came the reply, “You are wanted over at the square.” Grandfather said back, “I can’t go because my wife is very sick.” Hannah Shreeves passed away before morning. She was buried at St. George, Utah. She left three children, William, Charley and Ida. Grandfather stayed at St. George only a short time. He took his children back to Salt Lake City. There he let the children go to some people he knew at Springville, Utah. Grandfather helped out the best he could with the children. Not long after that he married again to Mahala Ruth Durfee, daughter of Abraham Durfee and Ursula Curtis. They had two children, Ursula Ett, born August 28, 1868, and John Augusta, born March 21, 1870. Mahala Ruth wanted to go to Southern Utah where her mother lived but Grandfather said that he didn’t want to go back there because he had already lost one wife down there living on sorghum and corn bread. So Mahala insisted that she go so she got her things together, bundled the children together and went to live with her mother and step-father, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Kendal Gifford. She wasn’t there long when she married again to Samuel Parker. They had one Winder, Thomas Harrison daughter named Mahala Strong Parker. Mahala Ruth didn’t live very long after that. She died July 9, 1875. Her mother took care of the three children. Grandfather was quite bitter about this separation. He later married again to Mary Elizabeth (Samson) Killian. They had one son which they called Daniel Winder, born January 23, 1869. Grandfather was always gone so much from home Indian Scouting and hunting. The last excursion he was on he was gone two years. When he came back to his home his wife had died. He got married again to a Mrs. Caroline (Person) Olson. She had one son by her former marriage, his name was Edwin Olson, born January 23, 1866. Grandfather and Caroline had ten children born to them. They are: 1. Hannah Eliza Winder April 17, 1871 April 19, 1934 2. Ann Eliza Winder May 7, 1874 10 May, 1874 3. Alice Jeanette Winder May 7, 1874 10 May, 1874 4. David Winder March 6, 1876 October 2, 1890 5. Thomas Harrison Winder November 24, 1878 March 7, 1960 6. Ida Mae Winder June 12, 1879 October 10, 1884 7. George Winder October 30, 1880 January 9, 1947 8. Della Winder June 6, 1882 August 3, 1883 9. Unknown Baby June 6, 1882 June 6, 1882 10. Lewis Winder July 6, 1884 April 5, 1933 Trouble came to his family again when his wife took ill and had to be put in the Provo Infirmary. She was there 12 years and in that time Grandfather married again to Clersey Meekham. They lived at Nephi, Utah. Grandfather was arrested for having two wives at the same time. He was put in the State Penitentiary at Salt Lake City. Grandfather led a colorful life after that and later came to Idaho where he made his residence at Grant in the year 1888. Caroline Parson (Olson) Winder died in the Infirmary at Provo, Utah, on November 4, 1903, and was buried at the Grant Cemetery in Idaho. Grandfather lived a few more years after she died which he spent visiting all of his children which lived in Utah and Idaho. He had been living with his son and his wife Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Harrison and Dorbuary Jane (Wilson) Winder. Grandfather died April 14, 1914. He was buried beside his last wife, Caroline Parson (Olson) Winder in Grant, Idaho. Here ends the colorful history of one of our ancestors Thomas Harrison Winder Sr.

The Life Story of Samuel Kendall Gifford (1821-1907)

Contributor: Hope Welch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Samuel Kendall Gifford was the second husband of our grandmother, Ursula Curtis. They had been good friend since their childhood in Tioga County, Penn. When both their fathers (Alpheus Gifford and Enos Curtis) heard about the new prophet who had found a "golden bible", but of which much "bad" was reported about the lad, Ursula's and Samuel's fathers were prompted by the "Spirit" to go see the "new Prophet" themselves. So, the men went to Palmyra where they learned the truth, were baptized, and ordained Priests. They returned home "rejoicing!" These, same two fathers were instrumental in the conversion of Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball. Again in the Spring of 1831, these same men again sought out the Prophet Joseph Smith, but this time the Church was now located in Kirtland. The inquiring men were this time ordained Elders. Our Grandmother, Ursula Curtis, obtained permission from the church authorities to divorce her first husband (our grandfather), Abraham Durfee after he had been excommunicated. He had been excommunicated prior to 23 Jun 1861. Evidently this grandfather was not repentant and he never came back into the Church during his life. It is said that one of his other wives had his work done after his death. Ursula's life-long friend, Samuel Kendall Gifford (who had been converted at the same time as she was; whose father, with her father had converted church leaders; whom had traveled to Missouri together and had there suffered severe mobbings and hardships; whom was driven out of Missouri into Illinois—living as neighbors again in the Morley's Settlement; whom was driven out of Illinois at the same time; whom lived and worked together in Mr. Pisgah; and whom traveled to Utah together as separate families) about this time lost his first wife, Lora Ann Demill in Apr of 1870. She left a family of seven living children with the youngest only a few months old. Ursula Curtis was living in Springville, Utah and was asked by this dear old friend to be his wife and mother to his children. And so, these two choice, spiritual people were Sealed on 2 Jan 1871 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. They were probably married early in 1870, however. Later, all her children from her first husband, Abraham Durfee, were Sealed to Samuel and Ursula Curtis Gifford. It has been said that Ursula's children loved Samuel very much and they desired to be Sealed to him. All of them were old enough to know what they were doing. It appears, then, that we have lost the "Durfee Birthright" and we now belong to the Giffords by adoption. After studying the life and ancestry of the Giffords, I am proud to belong to them. They were stalwart and prominent people with strong, active testimonies ofthe Gospel. They were loving and gentle people. I trust! my great-great-grandmother, Ursula Curtis, with her delicate decision to be Sealed to another man other than her own children's father. I trust her daughter, my great-grandmother, Ursula Jane Durfee, for her choice to be Sealed to her stepfather. We, their decedents, do not know the reasons, and therefore we must not judge nor feel sorry for the loss of our "supposed birthright," But we must be grateful for the love, care, and protection our "new" grandfather gave to our grandmother and her family. It appears to be that our grandmother, Ursula Curtis, was herself, a spiritual person ofa seemingly "Celestial" nature and therefore could only give herself to someone worthy of the Celestial Kingdom. Of course she would want those same blessings for her children and her posterity. I am comforted to know that in the "Here-after" we will be happy and contented with our adopted Sealings. There are several good histories written about this good man, but to summarize, let me mention the following things. Samuel and his family were expelled from Missouri and later from Nauvoo, 111. He and some of his relatives and their families were asked to stay at Mt. Pisgah and till the soil, plant crops, and build temporary houses for the Saints who were to follow. The Giffords stayed there until they made the trip across the plains to the Great Salt Lake Valley in the Spring of 1850. The Durfees were also at Mt. Pisgah and accompanied the Giffords in the trek across the plains. The group arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in the Fall of 1850, having suffered the hardships of pioneer travel across the plains, although a wellmarked path had been cut into the prairies by the companies who had crossed the plains during the past few years. The Durfees were sent to Springville in Utah County and the Giffords were sent to Sanpete County where the Saints had established a settlement known as Manti. In Manti the family met with many hardships in establishing a home in that desolate country. The Indians were extremely troublesome and one ofthe small Gifford children was stolen by the Indians and kept for three weeks before Samuel was able to trade him back for a horse. Samuel K. Gifford was one of Dixie's earliest pioneers. In 1863, he moved his family to Shonesburg and Rockville where they probably had a house at each place. He planted one ofthe first and finest orchards in this area with a nice variety of fruits and flowers. Samuel had moved to Utah's Dixie partly because ofthe hardwood trees to be found in the canyons that were so good for his use in making chairs, as he was a chairmaker. He also made cabinets as well as other furniture-he even made some shoes. He and his sons set up a chair business. In 1873 after Samuel married Ursula, they moved to Springdale which is very close to Rockville and Shonesburg. This is where the family stayed from then on. This is where the chair business or shop finally ended up and continued after Samuel's death by his son, Alpheus. In making chairs, they had very little machinery so most ofthe work had to be done by hand. They had a lathe that was operated with a treadbar. The seats in the chairs were made of rawhide. They used to soak the hides in lime and ashes to get the hair off. They say it smelled awful! the hides would then be stretched out on the floor and tacked down solid. Starting from the middle with a sharp knife, they would cut long strips of hide. These strings would be woven into seats for the chairs. The scraps of hide were boiled and made into glue. Many a family member can boast of owning one ofthe "Gifford chairs." Samuel tells us in his own words how he became a chairmaker: When I was about 13 years of age: my father being gone from home and my elder brothers seemed to care nothing but play, I took it upon myself to follow my father's trade (basket making). I took two of my younger brothers and went down into the Missouri bottoms, cut down a hackberry tree and pounded off a lot of splints which we carried home little by little, showing my mother. I commenced making baskets which I sold to the neighbors around for corn, meat, old clothes, etc. I continued making baskets until I believe I made all, or most every kind of baskets that could be made from oak, ash, or hackberry splints, from a school boy's dinner basket to a ladies clothes basket or open work basket. I made baskets in Clay County, Cowell County, Illinois, Mt. Pisgah, and a few in the valleys ofthe mountains. While in Cowell County, I took a notion I wanted some chairs. I procured an old had saw, shaving knife, butcher knife, a half inch auger and giniblets. Those were my tools and with plenty of good Hickory timber...made a few chairs for my own folks. The neighbors came and wanted me to make chairs for them, but I was hindered by the mobings. After settling in 111., I continued basket making and bottoming chairs, etc. When I was about 18 years of age, Father Morley and Charles Patton made a large batch of chairs which I got the privilege of bottoming. Chancy Whiting and his brothers had commenced to chair business in earnest. They sent for me to come and bottom chairs for them. I accepted the offer. I could bottom two chairs to either o£them one. The father ofthe young men, Elisha Whiting, who was a wagon maker himself, offered to teach me the trade of chair making from the turning ofthe timber to the painting ofthe chairs if I would work for him for six months, when they would give me a suit of clothes, a turning gouge and chisel. I accepted the offer and when my time was up, I went to Nauvoo where my folks had previously settled. Put me up a foot lathe, worked there about a year making chairs, then went back to the Morley settlement. I worked at the chair business 'till the time of the burning, then we were driv 1 into Nauvoo at a loss of nearly everything we had. In 1846 we were driven out. This was the 5th time that I have been driven. I made a great many hundred chairs in Mt. Pisgah; hauled them two hundred and 50 miles to Quincy where I had a regular market for them at 62 1/2 cents a piece. My load generally consisted of 140 large chairs, tables and rocking chairs, some baby rockers packed in among them, with baskets enough to bear expenses. I made a good many hundred chairs in Manti, and worked at the business in Southern Utah until I became unable to do so. His grandchildren remember how in those days a fine clay was dug from the hills west of Rockville. The clay was made into putty to be used in the chair making. The finished chairs when freshly puttied and painted were placed outside to dry. It has been said that "many a traveler will remember the chairs gleaming brightly in the sunlight." The Giffords were, most of them, musically inclined. They played many different instruments and the talent seemed to come quite naturally to them~it has carried down through the generations—even on Ursula's side. From the Crawford and Fairbanks book of Springdale they say: ...Often people would carry out all the furniture in their small cabins and hold dances in their homes. Samuel K. Gifford, Alpheus Gifford, David Lemmon and Byron Millet were some of the musicians who furnished music for the dances. There was always room for one more at the table. It's a frequent story of how Brigham Young told the Branch that he must visit Sister Gifford (this could have been Samuel's first wife) because she never failed to find some cool buttermilk for him. It is to be remembered that there was a tie between Samuel, Ursula, and Brigham Young, for it had been Samuel and Ursula's fathers who had been instrumental in Brigham Young's conversion to the Gospel. That church leader visited in their town several times on his many trips to his winter home in St. George. He often stayed with the Giffords in their home. He was on familiar terms with them. Samuel did not distinguish between his and Ursula's children and grandchildren—he loved and treated them all the same—with the utmost love and consideration. As he got older, Samuel became blind and unable to do some of his regular tasks. It is told of how this good man would take any and all of the little ones and sing to them and play the violin for them to entertain them—keeping them quite & good while Ursula did the work that he wished he could still do. It didn't take long after they were married for the Gifford home to be filled—but as mentioned before-there was always room for one more. Samuel and his first wife, Lora Ann Demill, had a family often children; three had married and three had died, and so there were four left still unmarried and in need of a mother when Ursula came into the household. Ursula had six children. Four came to Southern Utah with her and two had died previously. The oldest son of Ursula, Abraham Agustus (Gus) Durfee lost his wife soon after she had given birth, and so Gus brought his tiny daughter, Maria, to live with his mother and step-father. Maria stayed until she had grown and married. And then Ursula's daughter, Mahala Ruth (who had married a Winder and then a Parker), passed away and her three children came to live with the Giffords, also. By 1875, there were ten children who were living in this good home and they were: Ursula Jane Durfee, 16; Freeborn Gifford, 15; Enos Durfee, 14; Adelia Gifford, 13; Ursula Ette Winder, 7 (Mahala's dau); Moses Elias Gifford, 6; John Augustus Winder, 5 (Mahala's son); Mahala Parker, 2 (Mahala's last dau.); and Maria Durfee, almost 2 (Gus's dau.). Mahala and Maria were almost like twins in age and in caring for them. Samuel K. Gifford enrolled in the first company of militia that was ever organized by the Latter-day Saints in Missouri and he remained in the militia until "a wicked governor" forbade bearing arms. He was elected Third Corporal and promoted up the ranks until he became Captain. He also was elected mayor of Manti and also served six years in the City Council. This is when he moved to Southern Utah. It can truly be said that "like his father before him and like his sons after him," Samuel K. Gifford became an instrument in the hands of the Lord to serve and preach the Gospel and this he did all the days of his life with vigor and testimony. Reading his history written by himself, the duties and jobs he held in civics as well as religiously are impressive. From soldier, mayor, councilman, and schoolteacher, to missionary, genealogist, Branch President, to Patriarch he served faithfully. When the United Order was organized, he says he "took great interest in laboring for the benefit to the community until the Order was dissolved." Another example of his faith was when his step-daughter, Ursula Jane Durfee Hadlock had given birth. Ursula Jane's oldest son, Frank, writes: ...there was something wrong and the doctor told my father that in cases like that, either the child or the mother usually died—most often it was the child—or else the baby wouldn't live until he was six months old. Both mother and baby lived. The baby was strong and husky and we were happy with him. When he was six months old, we decided the doctor had not known for sure about those things. We had moved back to the Dixie country and when the baby was six months old, he took sick suddenly. He died while he lay in mother's arms. Everyone could see the child was dead, but they still tried moving his little legs and they had no life. We could all see he was gone, but my step-grandfather, Samuel K. Gifford, said they would give the baby a blessing and ask for his life to be restored. He said we would have prayer first. He asked my grandmother, Ursula Curtis Durfee Gifford, to offer the prayer. I thought if we took that much longer, there would be no chance to bring him back to life. But my step-grandfather knew best, and after grandmother offered a prayer to bless us in our efforts and bless the baby and grandfather, he, my grandfather, gave the baby a blessing-asking our Father-in-Heaven to restore the baby's breath back in his little body and the child was restored back to life and health through our faith and prayers. He grew to be a strong and healthy man and he raised a fine family. Samuel attended the laying ofthe cornerstone ofthe great Temple in Salt Lake City and also attended the dedication forty years later. He sates: I assisted what I was able to in building the St. George Temple, also the Manti Temple and the Salt Lake Temple and in gathering recordslaboring for the benefits ofthe living and the redemption ofthe dead. On the 6th of Sep 1902, Samuel was ordained a Patriarch by Apostle Mathias F. Cowley. By 5 Mar 1904, he states that he had blessed 301 persons including all of his posterity that are living except for two babies. Of his last days on earth I will quote from his exact words so that the reader may have a glimpse of his personality: ...On the 26th of Apr, 1881 I was seized with a terrible pain in my right eye, which continued to grow until I was nearly blind. On the first day of May I met Robert Pickerton at Rockville and started on the home mission to travel around the stakes. Suffered immensely with my head and eye—could scarcely see anybody—but filled my mission; I did not miss one meeting and spoke to the people on the principles of tithing and the Sacrament ofthe Lord's Supper. For that was the mission given to us. I returned home on the 3rd of June. When I returned home I was in great misery, but after using three bottles of "Ray Ways Ready Relief," I got so I could do a little work but continued to suffer with my head and eyes. My right eye entirely blind and my left eye blind by spells until entirely blind in 1893 to see no more in this life. Have come near to the brink of the grave a number of times but through fulfillment ofthe promises ofthe servants of God, I have been able to do considerable work in the Temple and am still anxious to labor in the Temple. I have a great deal of work before me which I would like to perform before I pass away—but oh, how long shall I have to wait for help. I have labored from one day to eight weeks at a time as time would permit since the Temple was opened for endowments. It has now been six months since I have been to the Temple and cannot go without assistance and my pleadings are in vain. I am now eighty-two years and about four months and would like to complete my work for the dead. The first work I did for the dead was Dec. 1861.1 stood for my father in having he and mother Sealed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. The Sealing was done by President Brigham Young 2 Jan 1878. Samuel indicates that his wife, Ursula, or one of his daughters assist him in the Temple. He mentions being afflicted by having his second wife, Ursula, taken away from him in death 20 Jun 1902. Although blind in one eye most of his life, this man was an earnest student of not only the Holy Scriptures, but also other good literature. He was noted by his library collection and his affiliation with literary organizations. His granddaughter, Hannah Gifford Tuttle, recalls of how he could recite whole sections of the Doctrine and Covenants without a mistake. It has been said that Samuel was such an ardent reader that he literally "read himself blind." The loss of one's eyesight could be devastating to someone who had enjoyed books as Samuel had done; however this good man turned his interests to other positive things such as genealogy, temple work, as well as his religious duties as Patriarch and being a grandfather. Samuel Gifford was also poetically inclined. Among his manuscripts was found this hymn of praise: Once with joy along the Virgin River I did freely roam, Singing praises to my God The giver of my fair Dixie home. Once I climbed upon the lofty mountains, Wonders to descry. Once I bathed within the snow fed fountains, Here 'neath the clear blue sky. But, alas! Thos days are oyer, Shall I roam no more- Scales of darkness now my eyes do cover, I am both blind and sore. The lines were composed after Mr. Gifford had lost his sight, having battled for years against the constant deepening twilight that enveloped him and deprived him of his greatest consolation, the pleasure of his books. This great man and pioneer passed away 26 Jun 1907 at the age of 85.

Life Timeline of Samuel Kendall Gifford

1821
Samuel Kendall Gifford was born on 11 Nov 1821
Samuel Kendall Gifford was 10 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Samuel Kendall Gifford was 19 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Samuel Kendall Gifford was 38 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Samuel Kendall Gifford was 41 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1862
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Samuel Kendall Gifford was 58 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1879
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Samuel Kendall Gifford was 60 years old when The world's first international telephone call is made between St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, and Calais, Maine, United States. A telephone call is a connection over a telephone network between the called party and the calling party.
1881
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Samuel Kendall Gifford was 74 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
1895
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Samuel Kendall Gifford died on 26 Jun 1907 at the age of 85
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Samuel Kendall Gifford (11 Nov 1821 - 26 Jun 1907), BillionGraves Record 4533024 Shunesburg, Washington, Utah, United States

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