David Evans

27 Oct 1804 - 23 Jun 1883

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David Evans

27 Oct 1804 - 23 Jun 1883
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Grave site information of David Evans (27 Oct 1804 - 23 Jun 1883) at Lehi Cemetery in Lehi, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Life Information

David Evans

Born:
Married: 23 Nov 1841
Died:

Lehi Cemetery

1098 N 400 E St
Lehi, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Bishop of the 11th Ward in Nauvoo Illinois And First Bishop of Lehi

Headstone Description

- Born 1804 Cecil County, Maryland - Married Mary Beck 1826; later practiced plural marriage; forty-one children - Baptized 1833 - Ordained Elder 1833 - Zions Camp 1834 - Ordained Seventy and called to First Quorum of Seventy 1835 - Ordained High Priest and called as Bishop of Eleventh Ward in Nauvoo, Illinois - Trekked west with saints, arriving in Utah in 1850 - Settled in Lehi, Utah where he was Bishop, Mayor, etc. - Died 1883 Lehi, Utah
Transcriber

SGirton

November 21, 2011
Photographer

Chris_Madsen

November 19, 2011

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David Evans obituary from Deseret News

Contributor: SGirton Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

The following obituary published in the Deseret News in 1883 was titled “Sketch of the Life and Ministry of Bishop David Evans” and does well at summarizing the life of David Evans: father, religious leader, pioneer and statesman. “David Evans the son of Israel and Abigail Evans, was born in Cecil County, Maryland, October 27th, 1804. When a small boy his parents moved to Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1826, when he was married to Mary Beck and moved to Richland County, Ohio. Here he bought and opened up a new farm, where he lived until he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, April 6th, 1833. On the 11th of the same month he was ordained a Priest and immediately commenced traveling and preaching, selling his farm to enable him to prosecute his missionary labors. He was ordained to the office of an Elder on the 21st of July the same year.” “In 1834 he went in Zion's camp from Ohio to Missouri, with Joseph Smith the Prophet, for the redemption of Zion, and received his ordination to the First Quorum of Seventy, under the hands of Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon, April 29th, 1835. He attended the School of the Prophets in Kirtland, in the winter of 1835 and 1836, and on May 20th, 1836, left Ohio for Missouri, in charge of a company of saints, most of whom he baptised himself. He settled on Shoal Creek, Caldwell County, buying some land and again making him a home; was with the saints through all their persecutions in Missouri among which was the barbarous massacre at Haun's Mill. In December he was compelled to leave the State without his family, who shortly after followed, leaving all their property behind. Arriving at Payson, Adams County, Ill., in the spring of 1839, he commenced preaching and baptised many persons, some of whom are now prominent members in the Church. He lost his wife June 20th, 1841, after which he moved to Nauvoo and married Barbara Ann Ewell, November 23rd, 1841, she being a member of a family he had baptised in Missouri. In 1842, when Nauvoo was organized into wards, he was ordained a Bishop, August 21st, to preside over the Eleventh Ward. He remained here until the Saints were driven from Nauvoo, when he was appointed Captain of company, many of the members remaining with the company until its arrival in the Valleys, September 15th, 1850.” “Moved to Lehi February 15th, 1851, over which place he was appointed to preside as Bishop, the duties of which he faithfully performed for 28 years, tendering his resignation, on account of old age and failing health, August 24th, 1879. He located the City of Lehi and laid it off into blocks and lots with a pocket compass, tape line and square. Was elected to the first legislature in Utah and acted for many years in connection with that body. He was Colonel of Militia, served as Major of Lehi Military District several terms, and held other responsible positions. His death occurred June 23rd, 1883, at 12:30 p.m. For several days he was not well, and on Tuesday, June 19, at 1 p.m., he received a heavy paralytic stroke which completely paralyzed his whole right side rendering him helpless and speechless, in which condition he remained until death.” “The funeral services were held in the Lehi Tabernacle at 3 p.m., Sunday June 24th, 1883. A special train was dispatched from Salt Lake City, for the benefit of his friends and acquaintances, among whom were President Woodruff, Bishop Hunter and others; also many came from Provo and adjacent settlements. The services were conducted by President Smoot and addresses were made by Bishop Hunter, President Woodruff, Bishops Hardy, Burten and others. After the services the remains were carried to the cemetery followed by a numerous procession, numbering 115 vehicles containing the relatives and friends of the deceased, this being the largest funeral cortage ever formed in Lehi.”1 ____________________ 1. Deseret News (Salt Lake City, Utah) 2? June 1883, as quoted in The Bishop David Evans Family Association, Bishop David Evans and His Family (Provo, Utah: J. Grant Stevenson, 1972), pp. 43-44.

DAVID EVANS ‑ PIONEER 1804 ‑ 1883

Contributor: SGirton Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

"Happy is he who remembers his progenitors with pride, who relates with pleasure, to the listener, the story of the greatness of their deeds, and silently rejoicing sees himself linked to the end of this goodly chain." CGoethe It is with these thoughts in mind that I remember my great‑great grandfather, David Evans, and relate to the reader of this paper some of the important deeds and experiences of a man whose name is closely identified with the early history of the church. As an associate of the Prophet Joseph Smith, military officer, spiritual leader, missionary, town‑planner, territorial legislator, and patriarch to his family, he deserves to be recognized as a pioneer leader by at least those people who see themselves "linked to the end of this goodly chain." When a son was born to Israel and Abigail Evans, in Cecil County, Maryland, October 27, 1804, they chose for him the Biblical name of David.1 Soon after the birth of their son the Evans family sought new opportunity in Pennsylvania, considered at that time as part of the new nation's frontier. During his early life in this primitive region, David developed the spiritual and physical ruggedness which prepared him for the trials and challenges that were to follow on other frontiers. Conversion and Missionary Labors In 1826 David Evans married Mary Beck and the couple purchased a large farm in Richland County, Ohio. Not far away in another section of the state, the leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter‑day Saints were intensifying proselyting efforts, in order to swell the ranks of the new church organization. Responding favorably to the message of the gospel, delivered to them by the L.D.S. missionaries, David and Mary were baptized into the church on its third anniversary. Willingness to give their all for the church was evidenced when just five days after their entrance into the Church, the Evans= sold their farm so that David would have sufficient funds to perform missionary labors.2 This was the beginning of service to the church as a missionary. David later filled a mission to Iowa in 1841 being called by the Council of the Twelve for that purpose.3 In 1844 he went as a missionary to Virginia.4 As a result of a revelation, the Prophet Joseph Smith organized the School of the Prophets at Kirtland, Ohio, in 1832. The main objective of the school was to prepare the membership of the church to carry the gospel to the world. David's effectiveness as a missionary was, no doubt, influenced by his attendance at these class sessions. When the body of the church later left for Missouri, the leaders of the church placed David in charge of a company of Saints. Most of these Saints were people that he had converted and baptized The Call to Leadership In Kirtland, Joseph Smith heard that hundreds of Saints were experiencing great trials as a result of expulsion from their homes in Jackson County, Mo., in 1833‑34. The Prophet organized a group of some 200 volunteers to march to the aid of these distressed Saints. This organization came to be known as Zion's Camp. David Evans volunteered to make the 1,000 mile march with the other members of this armed body.6 Even though Zion's Camp failed in its mission the experiences gained from the march provided the participants with knowledge which proved valuable in the exodus from Nauvoo to the Rocky Mountains. From among those willing to make the march, the Lord chose His First Quorum of Twelve Apostles and First Council of Seventy. Joseph Smith and his two counselors, Sidney Rigdon and Oliver Cowdery, set apart David Evans as a member of this First Council of Seventy on Feb, 27, 1835.7 Ten years later, in 1845, when it became apparent that the church would need to move to the West, Brigham Young appointed David as a captain of one of the pioneer companies of Saints. The training which David Evans received on the Zion's Camp march equipped him well for this particular assignment.8 Persecutions in Missouri Along with other faithful Ohio Saints, David heeded the admonition of the church leaders to move his family to Missouri during the middle 1830's. Like most of the Saints in this area, the Evans= suffered persecution at the hands of lawless mobs. Probably the best-known example of brutality and murder in Missouri occurred at Haunts Mill on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1838. The following is taken from Joseph Young's narrative of the massacre. It was about 4:00 o'clock, while sitting in my cabin, with my babe in my arms, and my wife standing by my side, the door being open, I cast my eyes on the opposite bank of Shoal Creek and saw a large company of armed men, on horses, directing their course towards the mill with all possible speed. As they advanced through the scattering trees that stood on the edge of the prairie they seemed to form themselves into a three square position, forming a vanguard in front. At this moment David Evans, seeing the superiority of their numbers, (there being 240 of them, according to their own account), swung his hat, and cried for peace. This not being heeded they continued to advance. . .9 During the ensuing scene of bloodshed, eighteen or nineteen lives were snuffed out. Hiding in the brush, David's wife and family escaped without harm. On another occasion, David Evans was preaching in the home of a man named Charles Jameson whom he had converted in Ohio several years previous. At the close of the meeting ten men intruded with the intent of tarring and feathering David. At this point Charles stepped between his good friend and the mob saying, "The first man that lays a hand on David Evans will have to walk over the body of Charles Jameson." The mob retreated fearfully.10 Throughout the winter of 1838‑39 such lawlessness continued among the scattered settlements of Mormons in Northern Missouri. Unable to endure terrible treatment further, the Saints again abandoned their homes and property to the mobs and located themselves in the Western part of Illinois. Experiences in Illinois Leaving behind their home in Missouri, the Evans family settled in Adams County, Illinois, where David actively engaged in missionary work among the local settlers. However, when death took his wife Mary, David moved to Nauvoo. On the twenty‑third of November 1841, David married my great‑great grandmother, Barbara Ann Ewell, in Nauvoo. She was a girl whom he had converted and baptized in Ray County, Missouri, four years previously.11 For the next forty‑two years, Barbara Evans endured the trials and hardships required of the wife of a pioneer leader. She deserves to be revered as a chosen and faithful daughter of Israel, especially by those who descend from the fifteen children she bore. At the age of seventy‑five, she offered this fervent testimony, "I feel thankful through all the meandering and shifting scenes of mortal life that I have been preserved thus far in the faith of the gospel, and can testify that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God."12 Several new opportunities and experiences came to David Evans during his five-year residence in Nauvoo. When Joseph Smith organized the city into ecclesiastical units, David became the bishop of the South side Eleventh Ward. He received his ordination under the hands of the Prophet on Aug. 20, 1842. At one time Bishop Evans had to deal with a member of his ward who worked with witches, divining rods and burning boards used for healing the sick.13. At another time he entertained Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball who visited the ward to solemnize a marriage.14 Those who are acquainted with the Nauvoo period of church history know that many outward as well as underlying problems led to the martyrdom of the Prophet and the expulsion of the Saints from Nauvoo. However, the Nauvoo Expositor affair brought the trouble to a head. Shortly after this disturbance, Joseph Smith organized delegates and sent them into the surrounding towns and villages to explain that the situation in Nauvoo was under control and that mob action was uncalled for. Along with several other brethren, Bishop Evans filled one of these peace making assignments.15 As history records, all efforts to avert trouble failed and the Prophet Joseph Smith fell martyr to the cause of the gospel. The death of their leader came as a blow to the Saints, but at the same time, most of the church members felt that God had not forsaken them. Bishop Evans' wife expressed her feelings this way. I saw Joseph and Hyrum Smith after their martyrdom. It was a solemn day among the Saints. We felt like a flock of sheep without a shepherd, but the Lord had another shepherd to lead his Saints. It was Brigham Young. I was present the day he was set apart to lead the church. No Saint could dispute it, for it did seem when he spoke as though it was Joseph's own voice that was addressing us. I never shall forget that day nor how the Spirit of the Lord was poured out upon the people; it came so mild, yet so penetrating that every heart beat with joy to know we had a man of God to lead the Saints. Oh, what a consolation it was to know we were not forgotten.16 Along with other officers of the church, David Evans received a sustaining vote from the membership of the church as Bishop of the Eleventh Ward at the October General Conference of the church following the martyrdom of Joseph Smith17 Expulsion from Nauvoo, As it became apparent that their beloved city of Nauvoo would have to be forsaken, the Saints made preparations for the trek west. Barbara Evans gave this account. I remained in Illinois until the exodus from that state, which was in 1846. Some of the Saints had neither teams nor wagons. The brethren united together and made wagons for those that had none; by that means all had wagons, but not teams, and we were obliged to get away, as the mob was howling around, and Nauvoo was threatened. So my husband, being bishop of the Eleventh Ward, concluded to take the teams they had and move as many as they could, We made a start with what teams we had, crossed the Mississippi River, went a day's journey, and set the families down on the prairie. The next day they took the teams and brought the rest, When the Saints reached Council Bluffs, Iowa, the United States government asked them for soldiers to fight in the war in Mexico. Anxious to be a member of the Mormon Battalion, the Evans' eighteen year old son, Israel, got into line with the intention of joining up. The recruiting officer turned him down as being too small. Unwilling to accept this reason as valid, young Israel made his way to the other end of the line and stood on a tree stump behind a friend. This time the recruiting officer signed him up as a member of Company B. Many years later he was asked why he was so eager to enlist. He answered, "My enlistment saved some man with a family, and if I had stayed my father might have been compelled to go. That would have been a tragedy.@19 Staying in Missouri from 1847‑50 to prepare for the journey west, David Evans, at the head of fifty‑four wagons, including his own, set out for Salt Lake valley on June 15, 1850 from Kanesville, Iowa. Three months to the day, the company set foot in the city of Salt Lake.20 The stay in Salt Lake Valley proved to be of short duration for the David Evans family. In February 1851, Brigham Young called David to take charge of the little colony that had settled at Dry Creek in Utah Valley. Packing up their belongings in midwinter, the family headed for the area located thirty‑two miles to the south. I, Lehi, Having Been Born of Goodly Pioneers It would be interesting to know the thoughts of David Evans as the wagon entered the small encampment that cold February day. Would this settlement be a temporary one like those in Ohio? Would persecutions come to them as they did in Missouri? Or would they be allowed to build a beautiful city only to abandon it as they did in Nauvoo? Is it possible that David envisioned a permanent and prosperous city, ever growing from the sturdy foundations that he helped to build? Shortly after the arrival of the Evans family, Apostle George A. Smith visited the little colony and organized Dry Creek Ward of the church. David Evans was appointed Bishop. In this capacity he faithfully performed his duties for twenty‑eight years.21 For a while a ward organization sufficed in taking care of civil and ecclesiastical demands. Later on the citizens felt that a town should be properly organized and named. Accordingly, early in 1852, David Evans, elected a member of the first territorial legislature for Utah County, presented a petition to the legislature requesting that Dry Creek be incorporated. With the granting of this petition came also the christening of Lehi, the sixth city in Utah to be incorporated.22 Knowing well that a city must grow out of more than mere legislative action, the Lehi citizens considered their most important needs. The town desperately required more water. Dry Creek was just what its name implied. In February of 1852, Bishop Evans steered a bill through the territorial legislature granting to the people of Lehi one third of the waters of American Fork Creek.23 Under the direction of David Evans, the mammoth task of digging a canal the seven miles from American Fork Creek to Lehi began. With poor tools, the job of digging in the cobblestone formation was difficult. Poorly fed and clothed, the workers would have abandoned the project except for the “good humor and tact of their leader”.24 Water began pouring into Lehi before the summer's end, insuring future growth and development of the city. Not so long out of Nauvoo that they couldn't remember the beautiful physical arrangement and order of that city, the Lehi settlers wanted as much for their own community. Lack of proper instruments did not prevent them from having their wish granted. Bishop Evans with the aid of a pocket compass, carpenter's square, and tape line, laid out the city in blocks and lots.25 Passing through Lehi in May of 1854, on a return trip from making a peace treaty with the Ute war chief, Walker, Brigham Young advised the people of Lehi to build a fort. Following this counsel, Bishop Evans supervised the construction of a fort and stationed guards at all gates for protection against marauding Indians. This guard lasted for two years. It must have been effective, since the very night that it stopped an Indian broke into the fort and stole two of the best horses.26 Early in 1853, Lehi made communication with the outside world when the citizens established a post office in the community. They appointed David Evans as Postmaster with an office conveniently located in one part of his home.27 The town residents rejoiced when, in 1870, Lehi broadened its communication facilities with the initiation of the telegraph. Until it was discontinued two years later, due to financial troubles, Bishop Evans' residence housed the telegraph. His daughter Barbara operated the telegraph. She employed the special training that she had learned in Lehi and in Farmington.28 On March 6, 1854, the second municipal election in Lehi was held, with David Evans winning the Mayor's Post unopposed. He served two successive later terms in this position. In addition, David Evans later belonged to the city council and was made judge of elections. Industry and Business Enterprises Although business and industry played lesser roles in the establishment of communities in the early history of Utah, David Evans became involved with a number of different enterprises. Soon after arriving in Lehi, David took advice from Brigham Young and engaged in home manufacturing ventures, as evidenced by the following article which appeared in the Deseret News on January 10, 1852. Capt. David Evans, Representative from Utah County, has made his appearance in the Representatives' Hall, clad in his own family manufactured habiliments, worthy the imitation of a nabob. We understand his wife cut and made his garments as well as spun and wove the cloth. Mrs. Evans is worthy to stand by the side of the lady in the buckskin sack, whose name will be forthcoming by and by. Legislators, what say you for home productions?29 With two partners, David began operating a threshing machine and fanning mill in the summer of 1854. Although the machines were crude in operation, the settlers appreciated any mechanical help they could get to help harvest their crops.30 Several years later David and Canute Peterson built a small tannery in Lehi. The townspeople found many uses for the leather produced by the workman, Jonas Holdsworth, who had learned the trade in England. The tannery operated until 1870.31 The first cooperative store in Utah came about as the result of an idea brought to Lehi from England from Bishop Evans' son, Israel. Fresh home from a mission, Israel felt that an experiment he had studied while on a mission could be practiced profitably by the people in Lehi. The project, called Lehi Union Exchange was launched in 1868, with David elected as the first president. The enterprise met with immediate success and after six months of business, paid a dividend of $28 per share. The Lehi business later became linked with Zion's Cooperative Mercantile Institution in Salt Lake City. The latter business was organized in 1869.32 The success of several Cooperatives throughout Utah, spurred Brigham Young to the organization of his long‑dreamed-of United Order. Under the Order, the whole community would be working and sharing alike. At a mass meeting held in April 1874, Provo voted to live within the United Order, with A. O. Smoot elected as president. David Evans served as one of the directors. The Order failed in all of the more populated centers, but succeeded temporarily in the rural towns of central and Southern Utah.33 Military Activities Very early in the history of Utah, a territorial militia, known as the Nauvoo Legion was organized with military districts in each settlement. Lehi District comprised all of Utah County north of Provo. Brigham Young commissioned David Evans a Major with the Legion on March 11, 1852. In the summer of 1857, President James Buchanan ordered United States troops under the command of Sidney Johnston to Utah to put down an alleged rebellion. To brace the various settlements against this outside intrusion, General Daniel H. Wells, commander of the militia ordered each district to make ready. Major Evans assumed command of the Lehi District. At first the Mormons decided to resist the army at all costs. This plan however, gave way to one of evacuation of the people North of Provo to southern areas. Lehi played a major role in assisting thousands of refugees along the way.34 Fortunately, open warfare between the Saints and the army did not result due to negotiations between opposing factions. During the summer of 1858, the dislocated Saints returned to their homes. The army, stationed just eighteen miles from Lehi at Camp Floyd, seemed at first to pose a threat to the settlers. However, the military installation proved to be an economic blessing in disguise to Lehi since it furnished Lehi with many badly‑needed articles in exchange for farm produce. This trade continued until the abandonment of the camp in 1861, at the time of the outbreak of the Civil War. Lehi obtained a large share of the materials and equipment from the camp which went for sale at this time. In company with George A. Smith, David Evans visited the camp in 1861, for the purpose of purchasing supplies.35 Explorations Various duties and responsibilities kept David Evans tied pretty close to his beloved Lehi most of the time. However, occasionally, at the request of Brigham Young, David headed exploration parties throughout the territory of Utah. One such venture took place in 1853 when Brigham Young sent David to the Southwest in search of a fertile country which Brigham felt would support 500,000 people. David failed to find the region described. Brigham Young felt that David had not penetrated far enough into the interior, and in March 1858, he sent other parties to make more extensive explorations. These parties found no such place for habitation for a multitude of people as President Young had hoped for, but confirmed the correctness of Bishop Evans= previous report.36 On May 22, 1855, under the authority of the First Presidency of the Church, David Evans led an exploration party to White Mountain (Nevada) to find a suitable settling place for the Saints and to open up a mission to the Indians. James Harwood, a member of the party, recorded the following. A tribe of Indians camped with us, made themselves quite at home, and enjoyed our rations exceedingly. After a few days, the Bishop took a small party of men and explored the White Mountain country. After being at the spring about a month, we received orders from Church headquarters to abandon the idea of making a settlement and to return home. The Indians were quite disappointed at our departure.37 Following orders, the party returned to Lehi on July 17, 1855. In April of 1857, President Brigham Young and a caravan of 142 people, including David Evans and Ann, one of his plural wives, explored the country to the North. The company reached the Mormon settlement and Indian mission at Fort Lemhi, Idaho, on the Salmon River on May 8. The group returned to Utah again on May 26. Due to Indian hostilities this Indian mission was closed in the spring of 1858.38 Family Life Entering the patriarchal order of marriage, David Evans married seven wives and fathered forty‑one children. Even though many responsibilities made demands on the time and energies of Bishop Evans, still he found time for his family. As a member of the legislature, he wrote this letter to his wife Barbara. Great Salt Lake City December 30, 1856 Dear Companion: I take this opportunity of writing to you to let you know that I am well, and enjoying myself every day as either Brother Brigham or Brother Heber and the twelve are with us almost every day‑‑preach to us the principles of the Reformation and the unsearchable riches of Jesus, and the mysteries of the Kingdom. We feast here every day, and the fire of God is burning in our hearts, and we have good times here in the midst of blessings. I think of my family, and pray for you daily, that the Reformation may sink deep into each of your hearts, and the Lord bless you all with understanding hearts that you may understand some of the things that are coming upon the earth, and also upon the Saints if they repent not. When I come home, I shall endeavor to proceed further in setting my family in order that the fire of the Lord may be kindled in every heart in my house and round about it, and that our habitation may be a habitation of health and peace, and wickedness and evil spirits have no place with us, and not only with us but in our City, that our City even the City of Lehi may be cleansed with the spirit of judgment and burning, and every soul therein that will not worship the Lord, our God, shall die. Dear wives and children, remember this, the admonition of your husband and father and act accordingly, and the Lord will bless you. Read this to Brother Able and Brother Thomas, and all my family, and all who may wish to hear from me, for the day to trifle with this people is gone by, and they must repent or be damned. Come down in about two weeks from New Year's Day, and stay until I return. I remain as ever your husband in the bonds of the new and everlasting covenant. (Signed) David Evans39 Though the message of this letter is somewhat stern, it manifests the spirit of a man's concern for the spiritual welfare of his family during the Reformation period in Utah. The following account from a member of Johnston's army, Lt. Jesse A. Gove, who visited the Evans family in June of 1858, gives us a glimpse into the Bishop's home life. Bishop Evans was our host. He is the highest church dignitary in the place and keeps a sort of hotel. The bishop is a corpulent and quite sociable old man. A multitude of children were running about the house. They were very well behaved, made no noise, kept out of the way, and bore a very retiring disposition. They took care of each other, the elder ones acting as matrons to their younger relatives...40 It seems that Bishop Evans' well‑ordered home made an impression on the lieutenant. Mrs. C. E. Peterson tells the story of how one of David Evans' sons learned a valuable lesson from his father. Mrs., Peterson, the granddaughter of David Evans, says that her grandfather had assigned some work for his sons Edwin and Azer to do. Edwin worked longer than Azer and expected more pay for his work. When it came time to settle up, Grandfather Evans gave the two boys equal amounts of money. Edwin expressed anger at his brother. Grandfather Evans then, without speaking a word, took Edwin's money and gave it to his brother Azer. Edwin received a valuable lesson that lasted throughout his life. He says, "Never act in anger or in haste." Remembering this incident, Edwin grew up to be one of Utah=s finest artists and art teachers.41 Death and Funeral Following a long and eventful life, David Evans passed away on June 23, 1883 as he neared his eightieth birthday. From near and far came people to pay their respects to the pioneer colonizer. Family and friends alike mourned their loss. President Woodruff and other church officials accompanied a special mourning train from Salt Lake City to attend and speak at the funeral. The funeral procession consisted of 115 vehicles, the largest line ever formed in Lehi.42 "Only in a thoughtless temper would an intelligent man declare that it mattered nothing to him who were his ancestors, nor what his relationship might be to those coming after him." ‑‑Henry Kendall

BISHOP DAVID EVANS - From book, Bishop David Evans & His Family

Contributor: SGirton Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

David Evans From book, Bishop David Evans & His Family, published in 1972 by J. Grant Stevenson David Evans, the second child of Israel Evans and Abigail Alexander, was born in Cecil County, Maryland the 27th of October 1804. Of his father, Israel, we have but traditional information as to his parentage - Welsh father and a German mother - that he was born about 1770 on the ocean while coming to the American Colonies from Wales. Israel is said to have spoken on various occasions of his being the 21st child in his father's family. Nothing thereafter is known until the Cecil County marriage records list Israel Evans to Abby Alexander, 4 October 1802. History of David's mother is somewhat more complete. She was the third child of Josiah Alexander and his wife, Elizabeth. Their children, seven in all, were James, Nancy, Abigail, Ester, Henry, Jane, and Margaret. The father, Josiah, was born 3 Oct 1752 in Cecil County, Maryland, and died in 1818 in Centre Hall, Centre, County, Pennsylvania. Nothing is known of Elizabeth, his wife, except her death, 1825, in Centre Hall, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Josiah's father, James Alexander, was born about 1690 again in the old home in Cecil County, Maryland. James was the father, by his first wife Margaret McKnitt, of sons who are associated with the drafting and signing of the Mecklinberg Declaration of Independence. Josiah was of his father's second family. His mother's name was Abigail. Students of the Alexander family claim Abigail to have been the sister of Margaret, James' first wife. James Alexander was the son of Joseph Alexander, born about 1660, possibly at Raphoe, Ulster, Ireland, and died 1730 in Cecil County, Maryland, and of Abigail, thought to have been a sister of John McKnitt Sr. Joseph, together with six brothers and two sisters, appears to have been children of the Reverend James Alexander, of Raphoe, Ireland - of the Laggan Presbytery. The Reverend James was born about 1625 - it is not known whether in Ireland or Scotland. However, it is known that he was of Scotch extraction. The property of Abby's father, Josiah, was the original "holdin's" of Grandfather Joseph, surveyed from the wilderness by George Talbot, Surveyor - General "for a certain Edwin O'Dwire and fifteen other Irishmen," and later purchased by them from Thomas Stevenson. It was a tract of 128 acres on the east side of Big Elk River that overlapped into Pennsylvania along what later became the Mason and Dixon Line. The country through which this tract - known as the New Munster strip - was surveyed is of rolling hills drained by the Big Elk, primarily a spring fresh. Through the years the areas that were formed not only gave their fertility to their crops but by the washing of the rains to the gullies and the streams. The thin mantle of soil overlaying a rocky foundation gradually gave way to this erosion sifting up the rocky subsoil and leaving a rocky scrabble over the surface. In the flatter areas back from the faster drainage, or where the ground has been protected by native growth as under the wooded thickets along the gully bottoms and sides, may be found myrtle and ivy in matted profusion. The soil here attests to the native fertility when surveyed by Talbot. With the depletion of the soil over a large portion of the farm - and with distinct advantages in the water of the Big Elk, Josiah established a mill and by the building of a dam and millrace, and by the frugal use of the limited waters of the stream, he became a successful miller. It was into this setting that Israel moved upon his marriage to Abby. It was here that his first two children were born. The first a daughter, Eliza, 3 Aug 1803, followed by David, 27 Oct 1804. We are led to believe that it was here that Israel learned the miller's trade from his father-in-law. In 1795, prior to the marriage of Israel and Abby, the oldest brother James reviewed the advantages and disadvantages of the rocky Maryland soil against the claims of available rich land in Central Pennsylvania. While he recognized the disadvantages of living in Indian country he moved to Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. In 1800 that part of Mifflin County, where James lived, together with portions of several other counties were organized into Centre County. As the family of father Josiah married, the advantages of farms in Central Pennsylvania attracted them, and as James was settled and able to help in finding a new home and land it was only natural to choose Centre County as the place to settle. Sometime after David's birth, Israel and Abby decided to move westward. About thirty miles west and south of Centre Hall they found a place on Spruce Creek about a mile above its confluence with the Juniata River. This strip of Spruce Creek furnished a connecting valley for routes between the east and the fertile soil of the Ohio and Michigan valleys. To take advantage of this movement Israel built a one-room log structure that he operated as a tavern. (Israel Evans - son of David - recorded in his journal dated 16 November 1869: "I walked to the old tavern stand, one mile up Spruce Creek where grandfather once lived and kept tavern. Father - David Evans - was reared there.") It was in these surroundings that David grew to manhood. In such a background, the "home spun" was a way of life. It is to the credit of Israel and Abby that son David, together with the other children, gained a readin' and writin' education that, together with his frontier practicality sustained him in his many and varied pursuits throughout a long and eventful life. It was at Spruce Creek that Jesse, a son, was born, 29 May 1811, followed by Nancy, a second daughter, 26 May 1814. It is at present believed that the last child, a son Israel, was born in 1823. While this may have been at Centre Hall it is almost certain that it was not at Chatham, Ontario, Canada as previously recorded in some of the genealogical sheets. On the 23rd of March 1816, Josiah sold his land in Cecil County, Maryland, and he and his wife, Elizabeth, moved to Centre Hall, Centre County, Pennsylvania to be with their family. Father Josiah was in poor health and passed away in the early part of 1818. (His will dated 10 Feb 1818 was executed 14 July 1818.) Mother Elizabeth died in Centre County in 1825. (Her will is dated 4 June 1819 and executed 22 Nov 1825.) The death of the parents and the maturity of the first two of Israel's and Abby's children, together with a decline in the tavern business, triggered a family separation. Israel and Abby gave up their holdings on Spruce Creek and went to McGregors Mills. In 1830 they purchased land on the McGregor Stream and helped in establishing the town of Chatham, Ontario, Canada. Israel was very successful in Chatham as he there established the first carding and grist mills. They were powered by a team of horses on a treadmill. He established and operated the Cross Keys Tavern, hotel property, etc. David married, 25 July 1826, Mary Beck, the daughter of Henry and Margaret Beighel Beck, of Pennsylvania. Shortly after his marriage he took up ground near Hanoverton, Columbiana County, Ohio where his first two children were born, Eliza Jane, 16 April 1827, and Israel, 2 October 1828. Sometime shortly after this they moved to a new farm near Worthington, Richland County, Ohio, where David broke prairie ground with its first plowing. It was here that Henry, 25 Oct 1830, and Mary Ann, 2 September 1832, were born. On the 6th of April 1833, David and his family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, commonly called the Mormons. This was on the third anniversary of the organization of what will hereafter be spoken of as "the Church." With David, this conversion became his way of life. Indeed, there are few people in the stream of humanity that can point to an event and associate with it with such commitment or singleness of purpose. It may truly be said of David, and the Mormon religion, that the time, the place and the girl were well met. His lamp was trimmed and filled with oil and the new movement swept him into service, sacrifice, and a life of leadership and colonization. On the 11th of April 1833, just five days after baptism, he was ordained a Priest. Responding to the call of the Elders, he sold his farm and commenced his missionary labors. On the 21st of July 1833 he was ordained an Elder in the Church and continued his neighborhood missionary endeavors as well as provide for his family. At this time, members of the Church in Jackson County, Missouri, were experiencing great trial as the result of expulsion from their homes by mobs incited to violence by enemies of the Church. In the spring of 1834 the Prophet and President of the Church called for volunteers to go to Missouri in an effort to aid the "Saints" and to endeavor to relieve them of their sufferings. David joined in this movement which was called "Zions Camp," and made the long march with wagons of clothing, food and relief materials. The route, about a thousand miles, required roughly thirty days for a team and light wagon. The roads were poor and through areas that were unfriendly to the Church. The men within the Camp were not all ready for the hardships and sickness they would have to endure, and the march became, truly, a test of faith. While some relief was given to the "Saints" in Missouri, the movement failed to return them to their homes and Zion's Camp was considered a failure and disbanded 3 July 1834. The long trek back to their homes occupied an additional month leaving added feeling of disenchantment for those weak in the faith. So it was that Zion's Camp movement justified itself in disclosing the willingness of the faithful to service. In November of 1834, final preparations were made for a School of the Elders (invited from the ranks of the Zions Camp members) which continued through January of 1835. In fulfillment of a revelation of June 1829 the Prophet (on 8 "Feb 1835) "expressed a desire to see those brethren together who went up to Zion in the camp and previous summer" for, he said, "I had a blessing for them." A meeting was appointed for 14 February 1835 at which the Twelve Apostles were chosen and instructed, and from this organization and revelations on the Priesthood the Seventies Quorum was organized 28 Feb 1835. There is every reason to believe that David Evans was in attendance at these events for he was ordained to the first Quorum of Seventy on the 29th of February 1835. Being fired with missionary zeal he went into his area of labor - writing back to the Kirtland brethren the following: Perry, April 19, 1835 Dear Brother: -- As many reports have gone out about the downfall of this church, and that it is decreasing in place of increasing, I have thought it would be encouraging to our brethren to hear from us; therefore, I wrote to you these few lines: the church, where I reside, in the township of Perry, Richland County numbers at this time 36 members, in good standing; five of whom have been baptized within seven days, and 4 about two months before, and some others that appear to be believing, which we trust and pray may come in. Pray for us, that the work of the Lord may continue to prosper with us, as well as all other places. This from yours, & c. David Evans On May 2, 1835 the Council of Twelve and Seventies, in meeting assembled, were called to their various missionary endeavors. David Evans, in his calling as a Seventy, was there and in a letter dated 24 May 1835 reports the following to the brethren at Kirtland: Columbiana County, May 24, 1835 Dear Brother:-- I take this opportunity of writing to you to inform you where I am, and what I am pursuing. I left Kirtland on the 3rd of May, and came to Gorgetown, Columbiana County, before I commenced to proclaim the gladsome news of the everlasting gospel. I endeavored to have a congregation convene to preach to, but could not get one in this place. I was sent by a landlord to a Methodist Preacher, who, he said, managed the preaching in that place. I desired of him to let me preach. He replied, he would not at the same time making many objections--such as deceivers, false prophets, & c. However, he challenged me for a debate; and finding that I could not get any other way to preach to the people of that place--I thought it proper to accept the challenge--feeling confident that after the debate I would get an invitation. We met on the 11th inst. and held the debate upon the principles of religion. After the debate was over, I was invited to preach, and made an appointment the same evening--compared the Methodist Episcopal discipline with the sacred scriptures. Since then I have been informed that all the citizens of that place decided in my favor, with the exception of two individuals. From this place I pursued my journey; came to Hanover, and preached several times. Here I found two that I had baptized last spring, who were strong in the faith. From thence I journeyed and came to Manervy, proclaimed on Sabbath on the Sandy planes and was opposed by some of the Campbellites, and was challenged for another debate, which I again accepted: which debate lasted one day. We had our Moderators chosen. The decision was in favor of the Latter-day Saints. A few days after, I preached again in the same place; and after I was through, a Campbellite preacher stood up to oppose my sentiments. After he was through, another of his brother preachers arose and declared, that if there could be no better arguments raised against Mormonism, it would sweep the land. And spoke in favor of many points relative to the fair principles of Mr. Evans' arguments. I then came to a three days' meeting in Hanover, held by the Campbellites, and on Sabbath the 23d inst. desired the privilege of making a reply to Campbellism, but was refused by the leaders. Notwithstanding this, some of the people requested me to go to the woods (a short distance from this place) which I accepted and about two-thirds of the assembly followed. After the discourse was ended, I gave an invitation for baptism, and one came forward--and many were affected, and the Spirit of the Lord fell upon the people, and some were convinced. We have a great range of country to preach in, and large congregations attend our meetings. David Evans To O. Cowdery, Esq. During these busy missionary activities the birth of their daughter, Margaret, occurred 3 January 1835 near Perry, Richland County, Ohio. On the 24th September 1835 at Kirtland, a covenant to work for the redemption of Zion (the area around Independence, Jackson County, Missouri being so named) was drawn up and subscribed to by the brethren. A prayer was also given for immigrants to go up to Zion the following spring. David responded to this call and with his family, he being called to serve as Captain of the Company, moved to Missouri where they established themselves along Shoal Creek in Caldwell County. This group was made up largely of converts from David's missionary labors. The Missouri period was one of persecution and hardship for the settlers. Not only were they molested by ruthless mobsters but sorrowed at the death of their baby Margaret on the 27 August 1836 near Shoal Creek. Harassment of members of the Church by their enemies did not deter David from his missionary labors and after preaching and teaching we find him, on 10 June 1837, baptizing members of the Pleasant Ewell family into the Church. This occurred in Ray County, Missouri, which was central to the various areas of greatest persecution at that time, namely, Jackson County, where extermination measures had already been practiced and sanctioned by the State Governor, and Clay and Caldwell Counties where feelings were running high. As a brief interlude of joy and sorrow prior to the tragedy to follow was the birth of Araminta, a daughter, 21 August 1838. She passed away 1 Oct 1838. On 30 October 1838, the Hauns Mill massacre occurred. According to the account of Amanda Smith, "Bro. David Evans made a treaty with the mob that they would not molest us. He came just before the massacre and called the company together and we knelt in prayer." From Joseph Young's narrative of the massacre: It was about 4:00 o'clock, while sitting in my cabin, with my babe in my arms, and my wife standing by my side, the door being open, I cast my eyes on the opposite bank of Shoal Creek and saw a large company of armed men, on horses, directing their course towards the mill with all possible speed. As they advanced through the scattering trees that stood on the edge of the prairie they seemed to form themselves into a three square position, forming a vanguard in front. At this moment David Evans, who had command of the few brethren who had organized for self defense, seeing the superiority of their numbers (there being 240 of them, according to their own account), swung his hat and ran out to meet them crying for peace. This not being heeded they continued to advance...no peace was granted. During the ensuing scene of bloodshed, eighteen or nineteen lives were snuffed out. David, his wife and family hid in the wooded area next to the river where they were saved. Following the massacre, a few of the bereaved families gathered at the home of David Evans some two miles from the scene of the tragedy. It was to his home at this time that Alma Smith was carried. It was also at this time that the extermination order from the Governor of the State of Missouri was issued. And David's family togehter with many others, left for Illinois, David finding a home near Payson, Adams County. It was here that their seventh child, Emma, was born 12 Jan 1840. Early in 1841, David Evans was called on a mission to Iowa by the Council of the Twelve. A receipt dated 18 January 1841 at Nauvoo for $6.25 to apply against a hymn book, a book of covenants and two of the new translation makes one wonder if he were not endeavoring to broaden his missionary talents. These missionary activities, however, appear to have been cut short with the death of his wife, Mary, on 20 June 1841, leaving a family of five (two had predeceased). Eliza Jane 14 years 2 months Israel 12 years 9 months Henry 10 years 8 months Mary Ann 8 years 10 months Emma 1 year 5 months Mary Beck Evans, by the remembrances of her children and pioneer associates, was a woman of courage, resourcefulness and power. She was true to her friends, and always trustworthy. On the 23 November 1841, David married Barbara Ann Ewell, the daughter of Pleasant and Barbara Fauber Ewell. She, being 20 years 6 months, became the head of two households of children--her father's and her new husband's. On the 20 August 1842, a committee of the High Council recommended the division of Nauvoo into ten wards, with an Eleventh Ward to the south and east of the town site. David was asked to accept the bishop's assignment. With this responsibility before him he gave up his place in Adam's County and purchased, on the 8th of September 1842, some ten acres in Township 6, Range 8 North of Hancock Co., being about three miles south and east of Nauvoo. On 4 December 1842 he was ordained Bishop of the Eleventh Ward. At this time they were also to have joy in the birth of Barbara Ann's first child--a daughter--Martha 20 Oct 1842. A second daughter to Barbara Ann, Amanda, was born 21 April 1844. With all this, David was called by the High Council to serve a mission to Virginia, 15 May 1844. It is doubtful that he fulfilled any part of this mission as the Expositor Press affair flared into heat, and the mobs began to cry out for the life of the Prophet and to incite any who would join them against any member of the Church. On the 16th June 1844 a public meeting was held at Nauvoo where a resolution was formed to send delegates into the various precincts throughout the county to lay a true statement of the facts before the public. The Rocky Run precinct was assigned to Anson Call, E. Horner, Nicholas Boscow and David Evans. After their efforts in Rocky Run had proved anything but satisfactory--on the 19 June 1844, Call, Evans, and Horner submitted an Affidavit regarding treatment of the Nauvoo Committee by Levi Williams et.a. to the effect that General Smith be taken on an Old Writ by the same person who had previously taken him, and that he be tried at the same place where the writ was originally issued. (This was apparently into Missouri as Joseph Smith, through his representation had expressed a willingness to appear in any court except in Missouri.) Talk of tar and feathers and dipping in the Mississippi were also a part of the report. On 21 June 1844 the City Council met. The various affidavits already submitted were read, including the one of Call, Evans and Horner, and others were taken from attending delegates after which all were sent to Governor Thomas Ford at Carthage, Ill. As early as the 15 June 1844 Anson Call and David Evans had been asked by the Prophet to determine the temper of the mob. After the Prophet was informed of their findings he requested that they make affidavit of their findings, and then to take it to Judge Thomas who was holding court in Knoxville about 80 miles away. After great effort, Call and Evans managed an audience with the judge who, after insistence for a letter from the judge to Joseph Smith, wrote the following--as near as Anson Call could remember: "General Smith, Sir, In perusing your letter I find that you were mistaken in the instructions that I gave you while at Nauvoo, and I know of no course for you to pursue to answer the requirements of the law, but to suffer yourself to be taken by the officer holding the writ and go before the Justice of the Peace who issued the same and have an investigation of the matter. It is the officer's duty to protect you; this the law requires, and I cannot as an officer of the law give you any different instructions. Yours Respectfully, _______" "We (Call and Evans) told the judge that General Smith could not go in safety to Carthage for the trial with the officer who held the writ, for there were five hundred men there who were sworn to take his life -- The judge replied: 'This is nothing but his and your imagination and that will be better understood when tried.'" On the afternoon of the 20 June, Anson Call and David Evans returned and went directly to the Mansion House. They were refused audience with the Prophet, or of any information of where he was to be found. (Actually he was on the Iowa side of the river.) Emma, thereafter, talked with them, requested the letter from Judge Thomas and promised to give it to the Prophet as soon as she could. After some thoughtfulness they gave her the letter. She read it in their presence and in the presence of Messrs Cutler and Cahoon. Call and Evans told her what Judge Thomas had said and wished her to tell it to Joseph. Mrs. Smith again assured them that the Prophet would be informed of the conversation with Judge Thomas. Anson Call continues his recollections of their mission for the Prophet, with the statement: "I have since understood from Dr. Willard Richards that Messrs. Cahood and Cutler went over the river the same afternoon, after they had heard the letter read, and persuaded Joseph to give himself up to his enemies. I never had the privilege of speaking to the Prophet again." Anson records the closing event of their assignment: "Sunday morning, the 28th, I saw O.P. Rockwell come into the city at full speed, with the sweat dripping from his horse, shouting with his stentorian voice pitched in the highest notes of intensified sorrow and wrath, 'Joseph is killed, they have killed him, they have killed him.' Yes, Joseph Smith the Prophet and his brother the Patriarch, Hyrum, had been shot in Carthage jail about 5:00 p.m. on the 27th June 1844." Barbara Ann Ewell Evans writes in her life sketch the following: "I saw Joseph and Hyrum Smith after their martyrdom. It was a solemn day among the Saints. We felt like a flock of sheep without a shepherd, but the Lord had another shepherd to lead His Saints. It was Brigham Young. I was present the day he was set apart to lead the church. No Saint could dispute it, for it did seem when he spoke as though it was Joseph's own voice that was addressing us. I never shall forget that day nor how the Spirit of the Lord was poured out upon the people; it came so mild, yet so penetrating that every heart beat with joy to know we had a man of God to lead the Saints. Oh, what a consolation it was to know we were not forgotten." At the October General Conference following the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph and his brother Hyrum, the many church officers then assembled received a sustaining vote from the membership. Bishop David Evans was sustained in his calling in the Eleventh Ward. In 1845 Bishop David was issued a Certificate to the Membership Abroad. We wonder if this was by way of a mission assignment in an attempt to raise funds for the completion of the temple. If so it is not known that he fulfilled such a mission. On the 27 January 1846 Amanda, David's tenth child and Barbara Ann's third child was born. Continued and increasing persecution from the unfriendly mobs caused the saints, who could get no legal redress from their enemies, to sell out as best they could and leave the state. So it was with Bishop David who 20 April 1846 sold his property just south and east of the City for $100 and joined the Westward migration. Barbara Ann tells it as follows: "I remained in Illinois until the exodus from that state, which was in 1846. Some of the Saints had neither teams nor wagons. The brethren united together and made wagons for those that had none: by that means all had wagons, but not teams, and we were obliged to get away, as the mob was howling around, and Nauvoo was threatened. So my husband, being Bishop of the Eleventh Ward, concluded to take the teams they had and move as many as they could. We made a start with what teams we had, crossed the Mississippi River, went a day's journey, and set the families down on the prairie. The next day they took the teams and brought the rest." With great hardship, because of insufficient teams for all their wagons, they moved across Iowa and on the 21 July 1846 were among those who watched the mustering in of the men of the Mormon Battalion at Council Bluffs, Iowa. Israel Evans, son of David, was signed up in Company "B" for what became a march unsurpassed by foot soldiers. Through the States of Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Old Mexico, Arizona and Southern California, a distance of more than 2000 miles, only to be mustered out 29 January 1847 in San Diego, California, more than a thousand miles from their planned-for homes in the Utah Territory. With Israel "gone for a soldier," the Evans Company, made up of 11th Ward members and David Evans' converts, began the preparation for their trek across to the Rocky Mountains. Barbara Ann tells it this way: "Soon after the men got employment breaking prairie and other work. We took oxen and milk cows, so in the fall all had teams and provisions for the winter. I did considerable spinning in the tent, also quilted several quilts. One great blessing, we were generally well. We did not have many luxuries, still we felt thankful for what we had. We then started for Council Bluffs, but it was late in the fall, winter had set in, and we stopped on the headwaters of the Nodaway. The men cut hay and put up log huts. My husband made a sideloom, and I did considerable weaving that winter. The cattle could not live on the frost-bitten hay so they commenced to die; our provisions began to get short; and we were obliged to leave in the month of February, 1847. We started for Missouri, lost our way, our teams that were left gave out, and we had to kill and eat them to save our lives. "My husband and two other men, Joseph Smith (Lehi) and Shaw, went down to Missouri to get fresh teams and provisions, while they left their families camped on a small stream which was called Starvation Creek. We suffered from hunger and cold, but we did not complain, for we were united; we truly lived the order; we all shared alike. My husband came with fresh teams and provisions. I tell you it was a day of rejoicing. We had not heard from them since they left. They had had hard work to get teams. The people were so prejudiced against the Mormons, they were almost to return without anything. My husband told the people he would return and die with the rest of the people. One gentleman spoke and said, 'can't you do something for these men; they seem to be honest?' The men began to volunteer, and he soon had all the provisions and teams he wanted. "We then made another start for Missouri. The snow had fallen to a great depth, and we could not keep on the divide. After wallowing in the snow for our or five days, camping on the prairie without fire, we arrived in Nodaway County, Missouri, March 1, 1847. My son, Joseph, was born April 7, in a house without doors, windows, chimneys or floors. My food was corn bread ground on a hand mill; we had bran for coffee. We stayed there three years, had plenty of work, made a good outfit and started for Utah, May 15, 1850. My baby was ten days old when we started. After the company got together, Bishop Evans was appointed captain. They were organized, and on June 15 we made a start for Utah." To catch up on the statistics--Biblically it would be said, "And so and so begat..." During their stay on Nodaway Ridge, Missouri, the oldest child of David's, Eliza Jane, married Ira Hinckley, August 1848. On 7 April 1847, Joseph, Barbara Ann's fourth child was born on the Nodaway Ridge, Missouri. On 27 April 1849, Sarah, the fifth child was born to Barbara Ann. 1 June 1849, Israel, son of David, married Matilda Thomas in Great Salt Lake City, Utah Territory. In October 1849 Mary Ann, David's fourth child, married John Henry Glines. 6 May, Susannah, Barbara Ann's sixth child was born. On the 15th of May they left their log shelter on the Nodaway Ridge and traveled to Kanesville where on 15 June, together with two other companies of Saints, they started for Utah. Bishop David Evans was in charge of a company of 54 wagons. Almost immediately after they left Kanesville, the cholera broke out. On 27 June 1850, Eliza Jane Evans Hinckley, first child of David Evans, passed away leaving a baby daughter. There were five deaths in the company. Barbara Ann gives the following in her life sketch: "The cholera soon broke out in camp. People were stricken down on every side. There were five deaths in our company, my husband's oldest daughter, Mrs. Ira Hinckley, was one among them. That was a trying time. I had six small children, but non of them had the horrible disease. Had it not been for that we should have had a pleasant journey. After we arrived at Laramie, we all enjoyed good health. "In the year 1850, September 15th, we arrived at Salt Lake Valley, and lived there until February 15, 1851. We then moved to what was then called Dry Creek. We have made our home in Lehi ever since." The tender compassion of David Evans is reflected in an incident remembered by the family of Abigail who tells of falling from the wagon shortly after they left Kanesville. Her back was badly hurt and the pitch and roll of the wagon caused her pain. Bishop David wrapped her in his coat and, walking beside the oxen, carried her in his arms a good part of the way. By Walton Evans Foulger, a great grandson of Bishop David Evans His Leadership in Utah (1851 - 1883) (Explanatory Note: Information covering this period in the life of David Evans is not readily available in histories, newspapers or periodicals. The most comprehensive is the "History of Lehi," published in 1913 by the Lehi Pioneer Committee. Thus, the following material draws heavily on his research and writings. This has two distinct advantages. It relies on years of research, and discussions with people not now living, by a student of history of the period. It also provides an unbiased, objective commentary on David Evans, his personal qualities that motivated others to unusual achievements, and significant events in which he had a primary responsibility as an organizer and leader. Except where indicated otherwise, material attributed by footnote to Gardner is in each instance verbatim, but the sequence has been modified to conform to the subject-matter format presented here.) Evansville. On February 15, 1851, there arrived on Dry Creek a man who was destined to play the leading part in the growth of the community for many years. This man was David Evans. He had previously been ordained a bishop in Nauvoo by Joseph Smith, and had now been sent by Brigham Young to preside over the Saints of Dry Creek. Bishop Evans was a typical pioneer. Possessing the same rugged qualities which distinguished his chief, President Young, he was eminently fitted to direct the work of founding a community. Devoted to his Church, honest, upright, but determined and aggressive, and withal characterized by that rare gift of leadership which, above everything else, was imperative for a pioneer commander, he knew how to direct the colonists to obtain the best results. In his dealings with his fellows he was plain and outspoken, but always just and fair. Altogether, Bishop Evans was precisely the kind of man needed to meet the situation. With his family, Evans made his home on Dry Creek with some of the people who had moved up from Sulphur Springs. His land was a tract west of the creek and just north of the present City Park. This place was called Evansville in honor of the bishop, and being on higher ground, with good water available by digging wells, it soon became the favorite locality for the home-seeker.1 Shortly after the arrival of Bishop Evans Apostle George A. Smith visited the little colony and organized the Dry Creek Ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. David Evans was appointed bishop, with Charles Hopkins and David Savage as counselors and Hejial McConnell as ward clerk. This was the first organization of any kind to be effected, and with it a coherency and direction was given to the growth of the settlement impossible heretofore. An illustrative of the conditions existing at this time, it is related that no paper could be found in the settlement on which to keep records except a blank book owned by John Fotheringham. Fotheringham had been a master tailor in Europe, and this book had been used for entering orders for clothes. It was partly full of notations, but as occasion demanded, leaves were torn from it and supplied to the bishop.2 Supply--The American Fork DitchWater . As the water in Dry Creek could not be relied upon to mature the crops, it was imperative that late irrigation water be procured. As the only supply available was the stream in American Fork Canyon, the prodigious undertaking of digging a ditch seven miles long from the mouth of the canyon to Lehi was begun under the initiative and direction of Bishop Evans. Early in May (1851) Charles Hopkins and Henry McConnell were sent to the mouth of the canyon to cut and haul logs for the purpose of constructing a dam which should divert part of the water into the proposed ditch. The main company arrived the next day and work was immediately begun. The ditch was made about two feet wide in the bottom, and one rod was considered a good day's work for a man. Tools were scarce and of poor quality, while the sun-baked soil was full of cobblestones and otherwise hard to dig. Under such hardships, the men, poorly fed and scantily clothed, would undoubtedly have abandoned the enterprise, but for the influence of the bishop. His good humor and witticisms never failed, and with rare tact and diplomacy, he kept the men from brooding over their troubles, and inspired them with new hope and courage. By the latter part of August, the water reached the farms and helped to save part of the corn and potato crop.3 Six months later, David Evans succeeded in getting the Territorial Legislature to pass the following act granting to the settlement on Dry Creek one-third of the waters of the American Fork Creek: "An act in relation to the waters of American Creek in Utah County. "Section 1. Be it enacted by the Governor and Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah: That the inhabitants of the settlement of Dry Creek in Utah County are hereby authorized and allowed to take out, at some convenient point, the waters of American Creek, and use the same for their benefit: Provided that no more than one-third part of said waters shall be so taken for the use of said settlement on Dry Creek. "Approved February 18, 1852." Early Business Enterprises The First Blacksmith Shop. One of the greatest difficulties which beset the pioneers of Dry Creek was the lack of mechanical help, the nearest blacksmith being at Alpine, and that not until 1851. However, in the autumn of that year, on the invitation of Bishop Evans, Joseph J. Smith, a skilled mechanic, came to Dry Creek and set up a blacksmith shop. It was first situated in Evansville, but after the city was laid out, it was moved and located on the present northeast corner of the intersection of Main and Fourth West Streets.4 Sugar Beets. John Taylor, in the spring of 1852, had imported from France and brought across the plains by ox team, a quantity of sugar beet seed, and Bishop Evans with others had been able to secure a small part of this. The beets they planted matured successfully, but were used for making molasses rather than sugar. In this was presaged an industry which was destined to become the most important factor of Lehi's commercial development--the sugar industry.5 A Post Office. Early in 1853, Lehi was placed in communication with the outside world by the establishment of a post office with David Evans as postmaster. He fitted up a small room in his house for an office, the sole equipment being a green painted box divided into alphabetically arranged pigeon holes. Before the trans-continental railroad reached Utah, the mail was handled by means of overland stage or the "Pony Express." It often happened that months would elapse, especially during the winter season, between the arrivals of the mails. But the people were well satisfied even with this imperfect service.6 The First Threshing Machine and Fanning Mill. The summer of 1854 also witnessed the importation of the first agricultural machinery into Lehi--a threshing machine. Compared to modern standards it was but a sorry affair, since it did not separate the chaff from the wheat. This operation was performed by hand. A tread mill, run by horses, furnished the motive power. A few years later, Bishop Evans secured a fanning mill and this proved of inestimable assistance. Both the threshing machine and the fanning mill were owned and operated by Bishop David Evans, Thomas Karren, and Daniel Collett.7 The First Tannery. Early in 1862, David Evans and Canute Peterson built a small tannery near the north-east corner of Third North and Second West. Jonas Holdsworth, a tanner who had learned his trade in England, was the first workman in the little establishment. He had brought some of his tools with him across the atlantic and had others made here. By aid of tan bark from the surrounding mountains, Holdsworth succeeded in making a quality upper, sole, and harness leather that was exceedingly useful to the people of the city.8 The First Telegraph Office. The autumn of 1870 Lehi began communication with the outside world through one of the modern inventions--the telegraph--which was installed in the residence of Bishop Evans. The Lehi Union Exchange. An early commercial enterprise was the Lehi Union Exchange, founded in 1868, as a result of agitation on the part of Israel Evans, who, while on a mission to England, had studied the Rochdale co-operative system, and now believed the same plan of cooperation could be utilized beneficially in his own city. In a meeting called by Bishop Evans, and attended by Israel Evans, William Wanlass, John Zimmerman, William Clark, Thomas R. Jones, Andrew A. Peterson, Joseph A. Thomas, and James Q. Powell, the project was launched and definite plans made for its maintenance. David Evans was elected president of the company; William Wanlass, secretary; John Zimmerman, treasurer; Israel Evans, William Clark, and Thomas R. Jones, directors; and it was capitalized for $350 in shares of $25 each. Several of the incorporators volunteered to haul the first goods free of charge. Thus was organized the first co-operative store in Utah. On July 23 the new company opened its establishment for business. The enterprise met with immediate success.9 Political Activities Lehi's First Legislator. David Evans was elected from Utah County to serve in the Territory's first Legislative Assembly which convened September 22, 1851. The following article, of special interest to his decendants, appeared in the Deseret News January 10, 1852: "Capt. David Evans, Representative from Utah County, has made his appearance in the Representatives Hall, clad in his own family manufactured habiliments, worthy of the imitation of a mabob. We understand his wife cut and made his garments as well as spun and wove the cloth. Mrs. Evans is worthy to stand by the side of the lady in the buckskin sack, whose name will be forthcoming by and by. Legislators, what say you for home productions?"10 Lehi Incorporated. A body of such thorough Americans as composed the little settlement on Dry Creek could not long remain without some form of civil administration. An innate love of law and order--the priceless heritage of their Pilgrim forefathers--soon compelled them to take steps to form some kind of municipal government. Accordingly, early in 1852, David Evans, on behalf of the people of Dry Creek, presented a petition to the Territorial Legislature, requesting that body to incorporate the little community. This petition was granted, and the city incorporated under the name of Lehi, this Book of Mormon appellation being suggested because the people had moved so frequently. Lehi was the sixth city in the Territory of Utah to be incorporated, the Act being approved February 5, 1852.11 Lehi's Second Mayor. In the second municipal election, March 6, 1854, David Evans, with no opposition, was elected Mayor of Lehi. He was re-elected in 1856. Due to the Echo Canyon War no election was held in 1858, and David Evans continued to serve until an election could be held on February 14, 1859. On that date he was again re-elected Mayor and served until February 11, 1861. Early Cultural Activity The first School House. In the fall of 1851, just one year after the arrival of the first settlers, the people of Evansville erected a school house. It was a little log structure, eighteen by twenty-four feet. The building was fitted up for school purposes in the best manner possible under the circumstances. A large fireplace in one end served to keep the interior warm. For desks, the children used rough slab benches without backs. Other furniture in the room consisted of a long table at which the pupils practiced writing. Nor was the school house limited to use as a temple of learning. Being the first public building, it served alike as school house, meeting house, city hall, ballroom theatre, and the gathering place for assemblies of all kinds. At its completion a rousing picnic was held in it, and who can doubt that the little place saw just as enjoyable a time as any of our pretentious modern structures. 12 The First Meeting House. Since, in the late fall and winter of 1855, the people had a great deal of spare time, it was proposed by Bishop Evans that work be commenced on a meeting house. The suggestion met with instant favor, and preparations were accordingly made for the construction of such a building. A committee was appointed to take charge of the matter--Daniel S. Thomas, chairman, and James Harwood, assessor and collector, are the only ones of this committee now known--and a tax of $1.50 for every $100 valuation levied, $1 to be paid in labor and fifty cents to be paid in grain. Men were sent into West Canyon to obtain logs, and others busied themselves with hauling rocks and making adobes, and soon the masons were busy putting in the foundations and erecting the walls. The logs were hauled to Alpine and sawed into boards, except a few of the best which were reserved for shingles. The house was not completed the first season, but was used in an unfinished condition. The church is sixty feet long by forty feet wide, and sixteen feet high to the square, with a gable at each end. The main auditorium is forty-eight by thirty-six feet, and with the gallery which extends across one end has a capacity of about five hundred. In the attic are two rooms used as school rooms, and for quorum meetings, City Council meetings, and prayer meetings.13 Trouble With the Indians A Fort and Fort Wall are Built. Notwithstanding the extremely wise and humane policy of the pioneers of Utah in dealing with the Indians, it was inevitable that trouble should eventually arise. The situation was new for both; the white men, from their previous life in the East and Middle West, were comparatively lacking in knowledge of the character and habits of the red men; while the savages were none too trustful of the intentions of the pale faces, and certain turbulent spirits among them openly showed their hostility. It needed but an overt act, even though unintentional, to kindle the flame. The opportunity finally presented itself through the killing of an Indian in Springville in 1853. One Chief Walkarah immediately incited the neighboring Indians into hostilities, and from these the warlike spirit spread generally among the Indians in the southern part of the Territory. Attacks were made on the settlers and numerous depredations were committed before the uprising was quelled. This trouble was called the Walker War, an incorrect English rendition of the name of the Indian leader. To protect the settlers, their militia was called to arms, and on July 25, Colonel George A. Smith was placed in command of that part operating south of Salt Lake City. At once he directed the inhabitants of the settlements, as the first means of defense, to gather in forts and barricades. The question of the location of the proposed fort in Lehi immediately arose. At this time the people were scattered from the present State Road to the lake, although the majority lived in Evansville. Different localities were agitated as being the most desirable, but the choice finally dwindled to two sites--one the present New Survey, (the north-west part of modern Lehi), the other, the site upon which the city was eventually built. The latter was selected because no one had already constructed homes there, thus avoiding rivalry and unpleasantness, and also because the surface well water was considered more desirable. The plan of construction for the fort was not a complex one. It consisted merely of placing the log houses of the settlers end to end, thus forming a hollow square seventy rods long. Inside the enclosure were to be built the corrals, stockyards and stables. As the crops were harvested this fall, they were brought to this place, and later the houses were moved into line. This was not accomplished without reluctance, especially on the part of those who had most recently erected their homes. But the need of defense was so urgent and the labor of moving a log house so comparatively small that eventually everyone was found in the fort. This centralization with its resulting close associations did much to develop and cement the union of community life, furnishing, through the stress of adverse circumstances, an excellent opportunity for the expression of that high regard of civic life which so markedly characterized the people of Utah. The log school house was torn down and rebuilt near the northeast corner of the fort. As an additional safeguard against the Indians, a parapet was erected a short distance north of the fort near the State Road. Bishop David Evans and Abel Evans directed the work. The parapet consisted of a trench eight feet wide and five feet deep, enclosing a piece of ground eleven rods square. The excavated earth formed a formidable breastwork. In especially dangerous times, a guard maintained a lookout on the parapet and warned the people in the fort of any approaches of the enemy.14 The settlers in Lehi exercised great care to protect themselves and their property. The men were armed whether within the fort or working in the fields. No one went alone any great distance. Armed herders were in charge of the cattle during the day, and drove them inside the stockade at nightfall. The Fort Wall. In May, 1854, Brigham Young concluded a treaty of peace with Chief Walker, and upon his return to Salt Lake City was caught in a blinding snowstorm on the west side of Utah Lake. Reaching Lehi on the fourth of June, he decided, because of the inclemency of the weather, and also because he desired to warn the people of possible future danger, to stop in a little settlement and hold a meeting. The advice he gave at this gathering was to proceed immediately with the ******** of a strong fort wall, an undertaking in Lehi which had been contemplated but as yet not begun. Governor Young, because of his recent experience with the red men, was deeply impressed with the necessity for caution, and so expressed himself. Heber C. Kimball, who accompanied the Governor, called attention to the fact that the recent snow fall might be used to some present advantage in dampening the earth to be used in the construction of the wall. Work was accordingly begun the next day. Bishop David Evans, who was also Mayor at this time, directed the surveying of the city, previous to the building of the wall. The result of this work, which was performed with a pocket compass and a carpenter's square, was a plat containing sixteen square blocks twenty rods long, intersected with streets six rods in width. Just inside the wall, there was left an eight rod street on all sides except the south, where it narrowed to five rods. Thus the dimensions of the fort were 114 rods in length and 111 rods in width, the wall enclosing the whole. The wall itself was no small thing. Standing twelve feet in height, it sloped from a bottom six feet in thickness to a top of three feet. For the use of the defenders, portholes, eight feet from the ground and a rod apart, might be used. The bastions which projected out from the walls midway between the corners served as an additional protection. Entrance to the fort could be made through gates on each side, which were well guarded through their closeness to the bastions. The construction of the wall proved to be an arduous and difficult task. First the earth had to be mixed to the proper consistency, this work often being performed with wooden spades made by Charles Barnes, the city's first cooper. Then it was necessary to tramp the mud unto the wall, in itself an undertaking of no mean dimensions. Each layer must dry thoroughly before the next could be applied, and this delayed the work considerably. In view of the small number of people and their meager resources, it must be granted that they completed a colossal enterprise. Not the least interesting of the houses in the fort was the so-called Indian House. This was a four-roomed adobe structure built against the north wall. Its purpose seems to have been two-fold--a reward for a clan of Indians under a Chief Yan Tan who had aided Bishop Evans in capturing the Indian murderers of two white boys named Weeks from Cedar Fort, and also a means of attempting to civilize these dusky friends. The first purpose failed in part, and the second entirely. Only in the day time would the red men occupy the house built by the pale faces--at night, no other shelter than their "wickiups" would suffice; and after an Indian child died in the house, they would never enter it again. Thereafter the house was used temporarily by new arrivals of settlers.15 Frontier Explorations In the first few years immediately following his migration to the Rocky Mountains, David Evans headed, or participated in, a number of exploration parties into the interior of the territory. In 1853 Brigham Young sent David to the Southwest in search of fertile country which Young felt would support a half million people. David failed to find any such country. Feeling that he had not penetrated the area far enough, Young in March, 1858, sent other parties in search of such a location. These parties also failed to find an area that would support so large a population. But they confirmed the accuracy of David's earlier report. In April, 1857, Bishop Evans, William Fotheringham and John Brown, upon the invitation of Brigham Young, joined a party which he and Heber C. Kimball were organizing to explore the country in the north. The company was made up of picked men from the various towns, together with a few women, Bishop Evans' wife, Ann, being one of the number. Leaving Salt Lake City April 24, 1857, they traveled north into the trackless plains and mountain ranges of Idaho, until they arrived at Fort Limhi, a Mormon settlement on Salmon River. The company reached Utah again May 26. Upon his return from Idaho, Bishop Evans was called to explore the White Mountains and Beaver Valley. With him went Richard Bee, William W. Taylor, John Norton, William Skeens, Dr. Williams, Thomas Randall, and James Harwood. The latter gives an account of the trip. "With some of the men riding horseback and other taking their ox teams, and equipped with provisions to last several months, we started some time in June, going south to the present site of Beaver, thence west. Through groves of trees, many of which were cut down by the beavers for their dams, we followed down the river to a large spring, issuing from a black rock, which we named Black Rock Spring. Here we camped and plowed a ditch, taking the water from the spring for irrigation purposes, because we intended to locate a settlement. "A tribe of Indians camped with us, made themselves quite at home, and enjoyed our rations exceedingly. After a few days, the Bishop took a small party of men and explored the White Mountain country. After being at the spring about a month, we received orders from Church headquarters to abandon the idea of making a settlement and to return home. The Indians were quite disappointed at our departure."16 A Military Leader In February 1852, the Territory of Utah was divided into military districts for the security of the people, and for effective operations of the "Nauvoo Legion," the title by which the Utah territorial militia was then known. David Evans had been commissioned a Major in the Legion by Brigham Young, on March 11, 1854. Accordingly, as intensive preparations were being made in the spring of 1857 to resist the possible intrusion of Federal troops into the Territory, Lieutenant-General Daniel H. Wells issued a general order relating to the organization of the militia. Among other actions, the order designated David Evans as the commanding officer of the "Lehi Military District." The order established the boundaries of the District at "the northern portion of Utah County, extending south to the northern limits of the city of Provo. David Evans served in this capacity--first as Major, later as Colonel--when the activities of the militia were at their height due to the Echo Canyon Campaign, the administration of martial law, and the so-called "move" south. All three of these actions were ordered by Brigham Young to protect the settlers should the Johnston Army enter the Territory and conduct a campaign of violence and destruction under the guise of "putting down" a reported rebellion. The Governor's initial reaction to this outside interference was to resist at all costs, evacuate the people into the mountains, and devastate the valleys by destroying crops, vegetation, homes and other facilities. This plan, however, was later modified to include only evacuation and movement south of all the people north of Utah County. The action became known, generally, as the "Move." At the outset of the campaign of resistance, the Lehi Military District furnished one company of Calvary and one company of infantry for military service in Echo Canyon to block the entrance of the troops into the Salt Lake Valley. The calvalry unit from the Lehi District first engaged only in the construction of barricades in the mountain passes. Later they engaged in tactics of harassment to Johnston's troops. According to reports, they burned his supply trains, drove off his horses and mules, stampeded his cattle, and set fire to the dry grass around his campsites, "but they shed not a drop of blood." The "Move" The winter of 1857-1858 passed very much as the preceding winters, but underneath the outward feeling of serenity there existed a vague wonder as to the future movements of the army quartered just outside the Territory. During all the months of inactivity, negotiations were carried on between Brigham Young on one hand and General Johnston and the newly appointed Governor, Alfred *******, on the other. The upshot of these communications were hardly satisfactory to either party. At first fearful of allowing the soldiers to enter Salt Lake Valley, the Mormon leaders finally consented to permit them to come in without resistance, upon condition that their commanders pledge the security of the life and property of the people. This both Governor ******* and General Johnston did. The outcome was unsatisfactory to Brigham Young and his colleagues, because in their minds no necessity existed for the presence of an armed force in Utah, while for the army the occupation meant a mere empty triumph of their policy. So strong was the distrust of the Utah leaders for the army that they resolved not to leave them any opportunity for depredation. Accordingly, Brigham Young directed all the people north of Utah County to leave their homes and proceed southward. At the same time, he perfected measures whereby sufficient men were left in Salt Lake to set fire to all the houses and chop down all the trees upon the first sign of disorder by the invaders. Thus began the famous "Move" in which Lehi was destined to play so prominent a part. The spring of 1858 found 30,000 people migrating southward. Day after day the citizens of Lehi saw them pass through their borders, continuous stream along the State Road, from daylight till dark. A striking picture was this exodus, one long to be remembered--covered wagons laden with all manner of household goods; hand carts; men and women mounted on horses or mules; far more of them walking, often barefoot; cattle, sheep and pigs, singly and in herds; all manner of freak conveyances; no end of confusion, and not a little suffering and sorrow.17 The migration was so extensive, and the exodus of Salt Lake City so complete, that the area was left "almost deserted; only a few men being left to guard the city and set fire to it if the troops attempted to occupy the town, molest any person or seize upon a piece of property. In the gardens were heaped bundles of straw and other combustible materials, and every preparation had been made for 'the burning.' Mrs. *******, the wife of Governor Alfred *******, was so affected at the sight and by the tomb-like stillness everywhere prevailing, that she burst into tears, expressing her deep sympathy for the migrating saints. She entreated her husband not to allow the army to stay in the city and begged him to do something to 'bring the Mormons back.'"18 The people of Lehi responded nobly in assisting their unfortunate visitors. Men who could, furnished teams and wagons to help in the transporting of their neighbors from the north. Every home in the little city was thrown open, and each room filled to its capacity; even the Meeting House was placed at the disposal of the refugees. When all available room had been occupied, the men built cabins against the fort wall, and even made dugouts on the vacant lots in the city. But the hardest problem was to provide food for this excessive number. After the people had migrated south, negotiations continued between Brigham Young and the Federal officials who had been sent out. At first they bore no fruit, but finally two additional commissioners arrived from the East, met Brigham Young at Salt Lake City, and after holding a meeting in Provo, came to Lehi on June 17. These men were Governor L.W. Powell, of Kentucky, and Major Ben McCullough of Texas. They called an open-air mass meeting near Bishop Evans' residence, and addressed the gathering in the hope of conciliating them. They promised that the people should not be molested by the army, in fact that it should be quartered a reasonable distance from their homes; they affirmed that full amnesty had been granted by the President of the United States for whatever fancied wrongs the people of the Territory had committed; and finally they promised that all difficulties should be amicably settled. Their pleas were not in vain. Their auditors took them at their word and accepted the proposals of peace. The meeting was followed by great enthusiasm and no less intense gratitude that the affair should have so fortunate a termination. The next two months--July and August--saw all the people back in their homes and the danger of any further conflict averted.19 The sacrifices of the Lehi settlers to aid and relieve the hardships of others, and the prominent part the community played in the entire Territorial effort to protect lives and property, and ensure the liberty and freedoms for which they trudged westward, is a testimony to the genius of David Evans as an organizer and a leader. During this entire epochal period he was, simultaneously, the military commander, the mayor and the bishop of the area. Aid to Church Immigration The year 1860 saw the arrival of the last hand cart companies to Utah. Henceforth immigrants came in trains of "prairie schooners" drawn by oxen. To assist this trans-continental travel, Brigham Young began the practice of sending expeditions out from Utah, fully equipped, to transport numbers of the waiting immigrants from Florence, Nebraska, which was the starting point of Church migration, over the plains to the Rockies. It grew to be a common practice for men to be called from the different towns in Utah to accompany these trains; indeed, it was generally regarded as missionary work. During a period of eight or nine years, until 1868, Lehi furnished her share of men and equipment for the carrying out of this plan. Each summer a little company from the settlement, which itself had only been established ten years, set out for the Missouri to assist others in their journey went. Those who remained at home helped the expedition by furnishing provisions and adding to the equipment of the outfit.18 The following letter from the Presiding Bishop's Office to Bishop Evans reflects the spirit of the times, and is self-explanatory. Bishop David Evans, Lehi, Utah Dear Brother Evans: In view of the increasing anxiety of our leaders to assist the poor from the Old and New Worlds, coupled with the warmest desire to get them here, we are prompted to make an extra effort this year to bring them hither; and to carry out such design, we will be obliged to fit out and equip at least five hundred teams to bring them from Florence. In proportioning these teams among the Territorial wards, your ward will be expected to furnish eight ox or mule teams (four or six mules or four yoke of oxen to each team) an equal number of good and trusty teamsters, and one mounted guard, armed and equipped for a four or five months' journey, with clothing, provisions, ammunition, ferriage means, ox or mule shoes, spades, aces, picks, ropes, augers, saws, etc., for down and back trips, without the expectation of receiving any assistance from any other source. As sacks and sacking are scarce, you will have to make boxes to put the flour in, for the poor on the road. Each team will be expected to have sufficient boxes to carry at least one thousand pounds of flour for this purpose. The flour and grain must be brought to this city, and a full and detailed report made to us of the amount of flour for the poor, number of teams, etc., so that a settlement can be made with you after their return in the fall. The teams are expected to leave this city about the 25th of April next, and will have to be such as will bear inspection before starting. The captain assigned to take charge of your teams is Peter Nebeker, of Mill Creek, this county, who will as soon as possible put himself in communication with you. Your Brethren in the Gospel, Edward Hunter, L.W. Hardy, J.C. Little. Personal Life Very little is recorded regarding David Evans' family life in Utah. It is known that he loved the Gospel, and that he did not hesitate to make any sacrifice for it. Some of his children were heard to say that his religion, his commitments to it, and the covenants he had made with his God were paramount with him. They dominated his every action; with members of his family as well as with his fellowmen. He had been variously described by others as a man of great determination; strong in character, yet humble, kind and charitable; frank and outspoken, yet tactful and diplomatic; full of witticisms which he used wisely; "a pioneer in every respect." Some indication of his home life, as viewed by a stranger, is found in correspondence of Captain Jesse A. Gove, a member of Johnston's Army, who visited the Evans family in June, 1858, and remained overnight. "Descending a gradual slope we soon arrived at Lehi, thirty-two miles south of Salt Lake City. As it was already night we laid over in that little town till the ensuing morning. "Lehi is a little town of about 1,200 inhabitants built of sun-dried bricks, and, like all the other towns in the valley, having its streets laid at right angles to each other. The buildings are small, sparsely located, having large gardens between them. The town is surrounded by a mud wall eight or ten feet high and four or five feet thick, so access to and exit from it can only be obtained through a gate on one principal street at each side of the wall. The wall was built to protect the inhabitants from Indian depredations. "Bishop Evans was our host; he is the highest church dignitary in the place and keeps a sort of hotel. The Bishop is a corpulent and quite sociable old man. A multitude of children were running about the house; they were very well behaved, made no noise, kept out of the way and bore a very retiring disposition; they took care of each other, the elder ones acting as matrons to their younger relatives, whose exact consanguinity it would doubtless have been very difficult for the little creatures or even elder ones to trace. We did not ask the corpulent bishop the number of his spirituals, nor did he instruct us upon that point, so we were left in unhappy ignorance. Several women were moving round the house. It was very easy to distinguish the one old lady who claimed priority as mater familias. There were three quite young women who worked about the house more quiet than tongue-tied servant girls. Whether they were daughters of our pursy host, or whether they were some of his "better halves," we were unable to decipher even after comparing notes.--The children looked well, fat and hardy." It is clear that David enjoyed socials and loved dancing. In the letter to his brother-in-law and sister, William and Nancy Dolsen, in Ontario, Canada, July 13, 1871, he said: "I should be much pleased if you were here to see one Mormon Frolich on a Grand Scale, when Israel was here he seen one on a small scale. Israel did not Participate in the Dance but Jane and me had a good one together." According to some of his children, David always felt kindly toward the Indians. He viewed with sympathy their grievances and pleas for justice and assistance. He ate at the same table with them and permitted them to sleep in the tithing office building during stormy weather. They soon came to accept him as an unfailing friend on whom they could depend for counsel and material assistance. This endeared him to them; and some of the Indians called him "Bishop." According to one account, the Indians after David's retirement still insisted he was Bishop and refused to accept his successor, calling him a "boy bishop." It is said that the Indians visited rather frequently the homes of David's wives. On such occasions they were always invited in as guests and offered refreshments. This continued for many years after David's death. Retirement and Death By this time Bishop Evans had become an aged man, and with the addition of poor health to interfere with his duties, he concluded to resign as Bishop. On September 21, 1879, after twenty-eight years of service such as few men have had the opportunity and ability to give, he was honorably released from his position.20 On June 19, 1883, David suffered a serious stroke that left him speechless and partially paralyzed. Death occurred June 23rd. Funeral services were held in the Lehi Tabernacle, June 24th. A special train was dispatched from Salt Lake City, for the benefit of his friends and acquaintances, among whom were President Woodruff, Bishop Hunter and others; also many came from Provo and adjacent settlements. The services were conducted by President Smoot and addresses were made by Bishop Hunter, President Woodruff, Bishops Hardy, Burten and others. After the services the remains were carried to the cemetery followed by a numerous procession, numbering 115 vehicles containing the relatives and friends of the deceased, this being the largest funeral cortege ever formed in Lehi. Bishop David Evans & His Family The Bishop David Evans Family Association Lehi, Utah 1972 Published by J. Grant Stevenson

DAVID EVANS - Biography and timeline by E. Bruce Preece

Contributor: SGirton Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

David Evans Occupation: Mayor of Lehi, Utah County Territorial Legislator, Colonel of Militia, Postmaster • Born: 18 Oct 1804, Cecil County, Maryland • Baptized: 6 Apr 1833 • Ordained a Priest: 11 Apr 1833 • Attended School of the Prophets • Ordained an Elder: 21 Jul 1833 • Marched with Zion's Camp: 1834, Ohio to Missouri • Ordained to First Quorum of the Seventy: 27 Feb 1835 by Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon and Oliver Cowdery • Present at Hauns Mill Massacre: 30 Oct 1838 • Mission to Iowa, 1841 • Married to Barbara Ann Ewell: 23 Nov 1841, Illinois • Set Apart as Bishop: 1842, Nauvoo, Illinois, Eleventh Ward, by the Prophet Joseph Smith • Mission to Virginia, 1844 • Appointed Captain of Pioneer companies by Brigham Young, 1845 • Endowed: 30 Jan 1846 • Arrived in Salt Lake Valley: 15 Sep 1850 • Called to settle in Dry Creek (Lehi), February 1851, by Brigham Young • Set Apart as Bishop: 1851, Dry Creek Ward by George A. Smith • Elected to be a member of the first Territorial Legislature: Utah County • Commissioned to Major in the Nauvoo Legion: 11 March 1852, Lehi District • Sealed to Barbara Ann Ewell: 21 Jun 1852 • Appointed Postmaster, 1853 • Elected Mayor of Lehi: March 6, 1854, Lehi, Utah • Elected Major of Battalion of Infantry of Lehi: March 11, 1855 • Served as Mayor until 1861 • Died: 23 Jun 1883, Lehi, Utah, Utah • Buried: 24 Jun 1883, Lehi, Utah, Utah Height: 6 ft. Weight: 180 lbs. Eye Color: Black Hair Color: Black Cause of Death: “General Disability” History written by: E. Bruce Preece "Happy is he who remembers his progenitors with pride, who relates with pleasure, to the listener, the story of the greatness of their deeds, and silently rejoicing sees himself link to the end of this goodly chain." --Goethe It is with these thoughts in mind that I remember my great-great grandfather, David Evans, and relate to the reader of this paper some of the important deeds and experiences of a man whose name is closely identified with the early history of the church. As an associate of the prophet Joseph Smith, military officer, spiritual leader, missionary, town-planner, territorial legislator, and patriarch to his family, he deserves to be recognized as a pioneer leader by at least those people who see themselves "linked to the end of this goodly chain." When a son was born to Israel and Abigail Evans, in Cecil County, Maryland, October 27, 1804, they chose for him the Biblical name of David. Soon after the birth of their son, the Evans family sought new opportunity in Pennsylvania, considered at that time as part of the new nation's frontier. During his early life in this primitive region, David developed the spiritual and physical ruggedness which prepared him for the trials and challenges that were to follow on other frontiers. Conversion and Missionary Labors. In 1826 David Evans married Mary Beck and the couple purchased a large farm in Richland County, Ohio. Not far away in another section of the state, the leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints were intensifying proselyting efforts, in order to swell the ranks of the new church organization. Responding favorably to the message of the gospel, delivered them by the L.D.S. missionaries, David and Mary were baptized into the church on its third anniversary. Willingness to give their all for the church, the Evans sold their farm so that David would have sufficient funds to perform missionary labors. This was the beginning of service to the church as a missionary. David later filled a mission to Iowa in 1841, being called by the Council of the Twelve for that purpose. In 1844 he went as a missionary to Virginia. As a result of a revelation, the Prophet Joseph Smith organized the School of the Prophets at Kirtland, Ohio in 1832. The main objective of the school was to prepare the membership of the church to carry the gospel to the world. David's effectiveness as a missionary was no doubt influenced by his attendance at these class sessions. When the body of the church later left for Missouri, the leaders of the church placed David in charge of a company of Saints; most of these Saints were people that he had converted and baptized. The Call to Leadership. In Kirtland, Joseph Smith heard that hundreds of Saints were experiencing great trials as a result of expulsion from their homes in Jackson County, Missouri, in 1833-34. The prophet organized a group of some 200 volunteers to march to the aid of these distressed saints. This organization came to be know as Zion's Camp. David Evans volunteered to make the 1,000 mile march with the other members of this armed body. Even though Zion's Camp failed in its mission, the experiences gained from the march provided the participants with knowledge which proved valuable in the exodus from Nauvoo to the Rocky Mountains.. From among those willing to make the march, the Lord chose His First Quorum of Twelve Apostles and First Council of Seventy. Joseph Smith and his two counselors Sidney Rigdon and Oliver Cowdery set apart David Evans as a member of this First Council of Seventy on February 27, 1835. Ten years later, in 1845, when it became apparent that the church would need to move to the west, Brigham Young appointed David as a captain of one of the pioneer companies of Saints. The training which David Evans received on the Zion's Camp march equipped him well for this particular assignment. Persecutions in Missouri. Along with other faithful Ohio Saints, David heeded the admonition of the church leaders to move his family to Missouri during the middle 1830's. Like most of the Saints in this area, the Evans' suffered persecution at the hands of lawless mobs. Probably the best known example of brutality and murder in Missouri occurred at Haun's Mill on Tuesday, October 30, 1838. The following is taken from Joseph Young's narrative of the massacre. It was about 4:00 o'clock, while sitting in my cabin, with by babe in my arms, and my wife standing by my side, the door being open, I cast my eyes on the opposite bank of Shoal Creek and saw a large company of armed men, on horses, directing their course towards the mill with all possible speed. As they advanced through the scattering trees that stood on the edge of the prairie they seemed to form themselves into a three square position, forming a vanguard in front. At this moment David Evans, seeing the superiority of their numbers, (there being 240 of them, according to their own account), swung his hat, and cried for peace. This not being heeded they continued to advance... During the ensuing scene of bloodshed, eighteen or nineteen lives were snuffed out. Hiding in the brush, David's wife and family escaped without harm. On another occasion, David Evans was preaching in the home of a man named Charles Jameson who he had converted in Ohio several years previous. At the close of the meeting ten men intruded with the intent of tarring and feathering David. At this point Charles stepped between his good friend and the mob saying, "the first man that lays a hand on David Evans will have to walk over the body of Charles Jameson." The mob retreated fearfully. Throughout the winter of 1838-39 such lawlessness continued among the scattered settlements of Mormons in northern Missouri. Unable to endure terrible treatment further, the Saints again abandoned their homes and property to the mobs and located themselves in the western part of Illinois. Experiences in Illinois. Leaving behind their home in Missouri, the Evans family settled in Adams County, Illinois, where David actively engaged in missionary work among the local settlers. However, when death took his wife Mary, David moved to Nauvoo. On the twenty-third of November, 1841, David married my great-great grandmother, Barbara Ann Ewell, in Nauvoo. She was a girl whom he had converted and baptized in Ray County, Missouri, four years previously. For the next forty-two years, Barbara Evans endured the trials and hardships required of the wife of a pioneer leader. She deserves to be revered as a chosen and faithful daughter of Israel, especially by those who descend from the fifteen children she bore. At the age of seventy-five, she offered this fervent testimony, "I feel thankful through all the meandering and shifting scenes of mortal life that I have been preserved thus far in the faith of the gospel, and can testify that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God." Several new opportunities and experiences came to David Evans during his five years residence in Nauvoo. When Joseph Smith organized the city into ecclesiastical units, David became the bishop of the South side Eleventh Ward. He received his ordination under the hands of the Prophet on August 20, 1842. At one time Bishop Evans had to deal with a member of his ward who worked with witches devining rods and burning boards used for healing the sick. At another time he entertained Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball who visited the ward to solemnize a marriage. Those who are acquainted with the Nauvoo period of Church History know that many outward as well as under-lying problems led to the martyrdom of the Prophet and the expulsion of the Saints from Nauvoo. However, the Nauvoo Expositor affair brought the trouble to a head. Shortly after this disturbance, Joseph Smith organized delegates and sent them into the surrounding towns and villages to explain the situation in Nauvoo was under control and that mob action was uncalled for. Along with several other brethren, Bishop Evans filled one of these peace-making assignments. As history records, all efforts to avert trouble failed and the Prophet Joseph Smith fell martyr to the cause of the gospel. The death of their leader came as a blow to the Saints, but at the same time most of the church members felt that God had not forsaken them. Bishop Evans' wife expressed her feeling this way. I saw Joseph and Hyrum Smith after their martyrdom. It was a solemn day among the Saints. We felt like a flock of sheep without a shepherd, but the Lord had another shepherd to lead his Saints. It was Brigham Young. I was present the day he was set apart to lead the church. No Saint could dispute it, for it did seem when he spoke as though it was Joseph's own voice that was addressing us. I never shall forget that day nor how the Spirit of the Lord was poured out upon the people; it came so mild, yet so penetrating that every heart beat with joy to know we had a man of God to lead the Saints. Oh, what a consolation it was to know we were not forgotten. Along with other officers of the church, David Evans received a sustaining vote from the membership of the church as Bishop of the Eleventh Ward at the October General Conference of the church following the martyrdom of Joseph Smith. Expulsion from Nauvoo. As it became apparent that their beloved city of Nauvoo would have to be forsaken, the Saints made preparations for the trek west. Barbara Evans gave this account. I remained in Illinois until the exodus from that state, which was in 1846. Some of the Saints had neither teams nor wagon. The brethren united together and made wagons for those that had none; by that means all had wagons, but not teams, and we were obliged to get away, as the mob was howling around, and Nauvoo was threatened. So my husband, being bishop of the Eleventh Ward, concluded to take the teams they had and move as many as they could. We made a start with what teams we had, crossed the Mississippi River, went a day's journey, and set the families down on the prairie. The next day they took the teams and brought the rest. When the Saints reached Council Bluffs, Iowa, the United States government asked them for soldiers to fight in the war in Mexico. Anxious to be a member of the Mormon Battalion, the Evans' eighteen year old son, Israel, got into line with the intention of joining up. The recruiting officer turned him down as being too small. Unwilling to accept this reason as valid, young Israel made his way to the other end of the line and stood on a tree stump behind a friend. This time the recruiting officer signed him up as a member of Company B. Many years later he was asked why he was so eager to enlist. He answered, "my enlistment saved some man with a family and if I had stayed my father might have been compelled to go. That would have been a tragedy." Staying in Missouri from 1847-50 to prepare for the journey west, David Evans, at the head of fifty-four wagons, including his own, set out for Salt Lake valley on June 15, 1850 from Kanesville, Iowa. Three months to the day, the company set foot in the city of Salt Lake. The stay in Salt Lake valley proved to be a short duration for the David Evans family. In February, 1851, Brigham Young called David to take charge of the little colony that had settled at Dry Creek in Utah Valley. Packing up their belongings in mid-winter, the family headed for the area located thirty-two miles to the south. I, Lehi, Having Been Born of Goodly Pioneers. It would be interesting to know the thoughts of David Evans as the wagon entered the small encampment that cold February day. Would this settlement be a temporary one like those in Ohio? Would persecutions come to them as they did in Missouri? Or would they be allowed to build a beautiful city only to abandon it as they did in Nauvoo? Is it possible that David envisioned a permanent and prosperous city, ever growing from the sturdy foundations that he helped to build? Shortly after the arrival of the Evans family, Apostle George A. Smith visited the little colony and organized Dry Creek Ward of the church. David Evans was appointed Bishop. In this capacity he faithfully performed his duties for twenty-eight years. For awhile a ward organization sufficed in taking care of civil and ecclesiastical demands. Later on the citizens felt that a town should be properly organized and named. Accordingly, early in 1852, David Evans, elected member of the first territorial legislature for Utah County, presented a petition to the legislature requesting that Dry Creek be incorporated. With the granting of this petition came also the christening of Lehi, the sixth city in Utah to be incorporated. Knowing well that a city must grow out of more than mere legislative action, the Lehi citizens considered their most important needs. The town desperately required more water. Dry creek was just what its name implied. In February of 1852, Bishop Evans steered a bill through the territorial legislature granting to the people of Lehi one third of the waters of American Fork Creek. Under the direction of David Evans, the mammoth task of digging a canal the seven miles from American Fork Creek to Lehi began. With poor tools, the job of digging in the cobblestone formation was difficult. Poorly fed and clothed, the workers would have abandoned the project except for the "good humor and tact of their leader." Water began pouring into Lehi before the summer's end, insuring future growth and development of the city. Not so long out of Nauvoo that they couldn't remember the beautiful physical arrangement and order of that city, the Lehi settlers wanted as much for their own community. Lack of proper instruments did not prevent them from having their wish granted. Bishop Evans with the aid of a pocket compass, carpenter's square, and tape line, laid out the city in blocks and lots. Passing through Lehi in May of 1854 on a return trip from making a peace treaty with the Ute war chief Walker, Brigham Young advised the people of Lehi to build a fort. Following this counsel, Bishop Evans supervised the construction of a fort and stationed guards at all gates for protection against marauding Indians. This guard lasted for two years. It must have been effective since the very night that it stopped, an Indian broke into the fort and stole two of the best horses. Early in 1853, Lehi made communication with the outside world when the citizens established a post office in the community. They appointed David Evans as Postmaster with an office conveniently located in one part of his home. The town residents rejoiced when, in 1870, Lehi broadened its communication facilities with the initiation of the telegraph. Until it was discontinued two years later, due to financial troubles, Bishop Evans' residence house the telegraph. His daughter Barbara operated the telegraph. She employed the special training that she had learned in Lehi and Farmington. On March 6, 1854, the second municipal election in Lehi was held with David Evans winning the Mayor's Post unopposed. He served two successive later terms in this position. In addition, David Evans later belonged to the city council and was made judge of elections. Industry and Business Enterprises. Although business and industry played lesser roles in the establishment of communities in the early history of Utah, David Evans became involved with a number of different enterprises. Soon after arriving in Lehi, David took advice from Brigham Young and engaged in home manufacturing ventures, as evidenced by the following article which appeared in the Deseret News on January 10, 1852. Capt. David Evans, Representative from Utah county, has made his appearance in the Representatives' Hall, clad in his own family manufactured habiliments, worthy the imitation of a nabob. We understand his wife cut and made his garments as well as spun and wove the cloth. Mrs. Evans is worthy to stand by the side of the lady in the buckskin sack, whose name will be forthcoming by and by. Legislators, what say you for home productions? With two partners, David began operating a threshing machine and fanning mill in the summer of 1854. Although the machines were crude in operation, the settlers appreciated any mechanical help they could get to help harvest their crops. Several years later David and Canute Peterson built a small tannery in Lehi. The townspeople found many uses for the leather produced by the workman, Jonas Holdsworth, who had learned the trade in England. The tannery operated until 1870. The first cooperative store in Utah came about as a result of an idea brought to Lehi from England from Bishop Evans' son, Israel. Fresh home from a mission Israel felt that an experiment he had studied while on a mission could be practiced profitably by the people of Lehi. The project, called Lehi Union Exchange was launched in 1868, with David elected as the first president. The enterprise met with immediate success and after six months of business paid a dividend of $28 per share. The Lehi business later became linked with Zion's Cooperative Mercantile Institution (ZCMI) in Salt Lake City. The latter business was organized in 1869. The success of several cooperatives throughout Utah spurred Brigham Young to the organization of his long-dreamed United Order. Under the Order, the whole community would be working and sharing alike. At a mass meeting held in April, 1874, Provo voted to live within the United Order, with A. O. Smoot elected as president. David Evans served as one of the directors. The Order failed in all of the more populated centers but succeeded temporarily in the rural towns of central and southern Utah. Military Activities. Very early in the history of Utah, a territorial militia, known as the Nauvoo Legion was organized with military districts in each settlement. Lehi District comprised all of Utah County North to Provo. Brigham Young commissioned David Evans a Major with the Legion on March 11, 1852. In the summer of 1857, President James Buchanan ordered United States troops under the command of Sidney Johnson to Utah to put down an alleged rebellion. To brace the various settlements against this outside intrusion, General Daniel H. Wells, commander of the militia ordered each district to make ready. Major Evans assumed command of the Lehi District. At first the Mormons decided to resist the army at all costs. This plan however, gave way to one of evacuation of the people north of Provo to southern areas. Lehi played a major role in assisting thousands of refugees along the way. Fortunately open warfare between the Saints and the army did not result due to negotiations between opposing factions. During the summer of 1858, the dislocated Saints returned to their homes. The army stationed just eighteen miles from Lehi at Camp Floyd seemed at first to pose a threat to settlers. However, the military installation proved to be an economic blessing in disguise to Lehi since it furnished Lehi with many badly-needed articles in exchange for farm produce. This trade continued until the abandonment of the camp in 1861 at the time of the outbreak of the Civil War. Lehi obtained a large share of the materials and equipment from the camp which went for sale at this time. In company with George A. Smith, David Evans visited the camp in 1861 for the purpose of purchasing supplies. Explorations. Various duties and responsibilities kept David Evans tied pretty close to his beloved Lehi most of the time. However, occasionally, at the request of Brigham Young, David headed exploration parties throughout the territory of Utah. One such venture took place in 1853 when Brigham Young sent David to the Southwest in search of a fertile country which Brigham felt would support 500,000 people. David failed to find the region described. Brigham Young felt that David had not penetrated far enough into the interior, and in March, 1858, he sent other parties to make more extensive explorations. The parties found no such place for habitation for a multitude of people as President Young had hoped for, but confirmed the correctness of Bishop Evans' previous report. On May 22, 1855, under the authority of the First Presidency of the Church, David Evans led an exploration party to White Mountain (Nevada) to find a suitable settling place for the Saints and to open up a mission to the Indians. James Harwood, a member of the party recorded the following: A tribe of Indians camped with us, made themselves quite at home, and enjoyed our rations exceedingly. After a few days, the Bishop took a small party of men and explored the White Mountain country. After being at the spring about a month, we received orders from Church headquarters to abandon the idea of making a settlement and to return home. The Indians were quite disappointed at our departure. Following orders, the party returned to Lehi on July 17, 1855. In April of 1857, President Brigham Young and a caravan of 142 people, including David Evans and Ann, one of his plural wives, explored the country to the north. The company reached the Mormon settlement and Indian mission at Fort Lemhi, Idaho, on the Salmon River on May 8. The group returned to Utah again on May 26. Due to Indian hostilities this Indian mission was closed in the Spring of 1858. Family Life. Entering the patriarchal order of marriage, David Evans married seven wives and fathered forty-one children. Even though many responsibilities made demands on the time and energies of Bishop Evans, still he found time for his family. As a member of the legislature, he wrote this letter to his wife Barbara. Great Salt Lake City December 30, 1856 Dear Companion: I take this opportunity of writing to you to let you know that I am well, and enjoying myself every day as either Brother Brigham or Brother Heber and the twelve are with us almost every day--preach to us the principles of the Reformation and the unsearchable riches of Jesus, and the mysteries of the Kingdom. We feast here every day, and the fire of God is burning in our hearts, and we have good times here in the midst of blessings. I think of my family, and pray for you daily that the Reformation may sink deep into each of your hearts, and the Lord bless you all with understanding hearts that you may understand some of the things that are coming upon the earth, and also upon the Saints if they repent not. When I come home I shall endeavor to proceed further in setting my family in order that the fire of the Lord may be kindled in every heart in my house and round about it, and that our habitation may be a habitation of health and peace, and wickedness and evil spirits have no place with us, and not only with us but in our City, that our City even the city of Lehi may be cleansed with the spirit of judgment and burning, and every soul therein that will not worship the Lord, our God, shall die. Dear wives and children, remember this, the admonition of your husband and father and act accordingly, and the Lord will bless you. Read this to Brother Able and Brother Thomas, and all my family, and all who may wish to hear from me, for the day to trifle with this people is gone by, and they must repent or be damned. Come down in about two weeks from New Year's Day, and stay until I return. I remain as ever your husband in the bonds of the new and everlasting covenant. (Signed) David Evans Though the message of this letter is somewhat stern, it manifests the spirit of a man's concern for the spiritual welfare of his family during the Reformation period in Utah. The following account from a member of Johnson's army, Lt. Jesse A. Gove who visited the Evans family in June of 1858, gives us a glimpse into the Bishop's home life. Bishop Evans was our host; he is the highest church dignitary in the place and keeps a sort of hotel. The bishop is a corpulent and quite sociable old man. A multitude of children were running about the house; they were very well behaved, made no noise, kept out of the way and bore a very retiring disposition; they took care of each other, the elder ones acting as matrons to their younger relatives. It seems that Bishop Evans' well-ordered home made an impression on the lieutenant. Mrs. C. E. Peterson tells the story of how one of David Evans' sons learned a valuable lesson from his father. Mrs. Peterson, the granddaughter of David Evans, says that her grandfather had assigned some work for his sons Edwin and Azer to do. Edwin worked longer than Azer and expected more pay for his work. When it came time to settle up, Grandfather Evans gave the two boys equal amounts of money. Edwin expressed anger at his brother. Grandfather Evans then without speaking a word took Edwin's money and gave it to his brother Azer. Edwin received a valuable lesson that lasted throughout his life. He says, "Never act in anger or in haste." Remembering this incident, Edwin grew up to be one of Utah's finest artists and art teachers. Death and Funeral. Following a long and eventful life, David Evans passed away on June 23, 1883 as he neared his eightieth birthday. From near and far came people to pay their respects to the pioneer colonizer. Family and friends alike mourned their loss. President Woodruff and other church officials accompanied a special mourning train from Salt Lake City to attend and speak at the funeral. The funeral procession consisted of 115 vehicles, the largest line ever formed in Lehi. "Only in a thoughtless temper would an intelligent man declare that it mattered nothing to him who were his ancestors, nor what his relationship might be to those coming after him." -- Henry Kendall LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 3, p.627 Evans, David, Bishop of Lehi, Utah county, Utah, from 1852 to 1879, was born Oct. 27, 1804, in Cecil county, Maryland, the son of Israel and Abigail Evans. His early training in life was on the frontiers in Pennsylvania. His rugged character qualified him for the events which were to follow. In 1826 he married Mary Beck and moved to Richland county, Ohio. Here he bought and opened up a new farm, where he lived until he was baptized into the ChurCh of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 6, 1833. On the 11th of the same month he was ordained a Priest and immediately commenced traveling and preaching, selling his farm to enable him to perform his missionary labors. Being ordained an Elder July 21, 1833, he went with Zion's Camp from Ohio to Missouri in 1834, and received ordination to the first quorum of Seventy under the hands of the Prophet Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon, April 29, 1835. He attended the "School of the Prophets" in Kirtland, and then left Ohio for Missouri in charge of a company of saints, most of whom he had baptized himself. Here he bought land and again made a home. He was with the Saints through all their persecutions in Missouri, among which was the terrible massacre at Haun's Mill. In December, 1828, he and family were compelled to flee from the State of Missouri, leaving all their property behind. He then went to Adams county, Illinois, and commenced preaching and baptizing many. He lost his wife, after which he moved to Nauvoo and married Barbara Ann Ewell in November, 1841. In 1842 when Nauvoo was organized into Wards he was ordained Bishop of the Eleventh Ward. [p.628] He remained in Nauvoo until the Saints were driven out, when he was appointed captain of a company to cross the plains, and arrived in the Valley Sept. 15, 1850. He moved to Lehi the following February, over which place he was appointed to preside as Bishop, the duties of which he faithfully performed for twenty-eight years. He tendered his resignation on account of old age and failing health, Aug. 24, 1879. Bro. Evans located the city of Lehi and laid it off into blocks and lots with a pocket compass, tape line, and square. He was elected to the first legislature of Utah and acted for many years as a member of that body. He was colonel of militia, served as major of the Lehi Military District several terms and was mayor of Lehi city three terms. He married Climena Gibson in 1854, Rebecca Coleman in 1856, and Christina Holm in 1861, was the father of forty-one children and a good provider for all his family. His death occurred June 23, 1883, and the following day a special train was dispatched from Salt Lake City, which brought President Wilford Woodruff, Bishop Edward Hunter and several other leading men to attend the funeral. The cortege to the cemetery was the largest ever formed in Lehi, 115 vehicles being in line. Bishop Evans was remarkable for his great industry, frugality and charity to the poor, his public spiritness and broad self-acquired education. Timeline on David Evans from the DavidEvans.org website Maryland (1804 to Abt 1810) 4 Oct 1802 Israel Evans and Abigail Alexander, David Evans' parents, marry in Cecil County, Maryland. 3 Aug 1803 Eliza Evans, David's older sister, is born in Cecil County, Maryland. 27 Oct 1804 David Evans is born in Cecil County, Maryland. Pennsylvania (Abt 1810 to 1826) Abt 1810 Israel Evans' family moves near Spruce Creek, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. Israel builds a one-room log structure that he operates as a tavern. 29 May 1811 Jesse Evans, David's younger brother, is born near Spruce Creek, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. 26 May 1814 Nancy Evans, David's younger sister, is born near Spruce Creek, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. 1823 Israel Evans, David's youngest brother, is born, possibly in Centre Hall, Centre County, Pennsylvania. 25 Jul 1826 David Evans marries Mary Beck, daughter of Henry and Margaret Beck who reside about 10 miles southeast of Spruce Creek in Huntingdon. Ohio (1826 to 1836) 1826 David and Mary Evans move 160 miles west to Hanoverton Township, Columbiana County, Ohio. 16 Apr 1827 Eliza Jane Evans, David's first child, is born in Hanoverton Township, Columbiana County, Ohio. 2 Oct 1828 Israel Evans, David's second child, is born in Hanoverton Township, Columbiana County, Ohio. Bet 1828-1830 David Evans' family moves 100 miles further west to Worthington Township, Richland County, Ohio where David purchased and farmed a tract of public land. 25 Oct 1830 Henry Evans, David's third child, is born in Worthington Township, Richland County, Ohio. 2 Sep 1832 Mary Ann Evans, David's fourth child, is born in Worthington Township, Richland County, Ohio. 6 Apr 1833 Thomas Tripp teaches David and Mary Evans about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and they are baptized. 11 Apr 1833 Thomas Tripp ordains David a Priest in the LDS Church. May 1833 David is asked to serve a mission to the local area. He may have sold his farm to help finance some of his missionary labors. During this time, the family may have resided in Perry, Richland County, Ohio. 21 Jul 1833 Thomas Tripp ordains David an Elder in the LDS Church. Sep 1833 David completes his mission for the season. He later wrote of baptizing 74 people in 1833 and 30 in one day. Feb-May 1834 David makes a journey back to Columbiana County, Ohio and continues his mission, preaching in Hanoverton and "on the Sandy Plains." May 1834 David returns to Perry, Columbiana County, Ohio and joins Zion's Camp. He travels with the camp to Independence, Jackson County, Missouri with the intent of restoring the church members there to their properties from which they had been forced to abandon. Aug 1834 David returns to Perry, Columbiana County, Ohio after Zion's Camp had been disbanded. Nov 1834-Jan 1835 David attends the School of the Prophets in Kirtland, Geauga County, Ohio where Joseph Smith presents the Lectures on Faith, Sidney Rigdon teaches grammar and Frederick G. Williams and William E. McLellan teach various other secular and religious items. 21 Jan 1835 Margaret Evans, David's fifth child, is born in Richland County, Ohio, possibly near Perry. 28 Feb 1835 Joseph Smith ordains David a Seventy in the First Quorum of the Seventy in the LDS Church. Feb-Apr 1835 David preaches as a missionary in Richland County, Ohio. He mentions Perry, stating there are 36 members there and that he is having success. May-Sep 1835 David preaches as a missionary in Columbiana County, Ohio. He mentions Georgetown, Hanover and Manerva as some of the locations where he has preached. Sep 1835 A call is made by Joseph Smith for a number of men to relocate their families to Missouri the following spring. Nov 1835-Jan 1836 David attends the School of the Prophets in Kirtland where he is taught by Joseph Smith and others. Missouri (1836 to 1839) Apr 1836 David Evans' family and a number of other families around the Perry, Richland County Ohio area move over 500 miles west to Caldwell County, Missouri with David called as their captain. Some of the families, including David's settle near Haun's Mill on Shoal Creek in the eastern part of the county. David built a home about a mile and a half north of the mill. 27 Aug 1836 Margaret Evans, David's 19-month-old daughter dies near Haun's Mill, Caldwell County, Missouri. Summer 1837 David preaches as a missionary in Ray County, Missouri and surrounding areas. 10 Jun 1837 David baptizes Barbara Ann Ewell in Richmond, Ray County, Missouri. He had previously in 1837 baptized her mother and later baptized her father and some siblings. Summer 1838 As the presiding elder at Haun's Mill, David baptizes, ordains and blesses a number of people in the area around Haun's Mill. 21 Aug 1838 Araminta Evans, David's sixth child, is born near Haun's Mill, Caldwell County, Missouri. 1 Oct 1838 Araminta Evans, David's one-month-old baby daughter dies near Haun's Mill, Caldwell County, Missouri. 30 Oct 1838 A mob of 240 men approach Haun's Mill from the north, ignore the pleas of David Evans for "Quarters" and proceed to kill 18 men and boys some of whom had taken refuge in an unfinished blacksmith shop. Nov 1838 Alma Smith, who had been severely wounded in the raid on the mill, recuperated at the home of David Evans, after he had been brought there by his mother, Amanda Smith. Illinois (1839 to 1846) Feb 1839 David Evans' family along with many others around Haun's Mill move 125 miles east to Quincy, Adams County, Illinois. David's family possibly settles southeast of Quincy in Payson, Adams County, Illinois. 12 Jan 1840 Emma Evans, David's seventh child, is born in Adams County, Illinois (most likely in Payson). At this time, the family lived in a log house and used the wagon boxes to sleep in. 12 Jan 1840 David Evans writes from Payson, Adams County, Illinois that he has baptized 31 people in Payson in his missionary proselyting. Nov 1840 David preaches near Union County, Illinois in the southern tip of Illinois and baptizes the Abraham Hunsaker family. 20 Jun 1841 Mary Evans, David's wife dies in Payson, Adams County, Illinois from "exposure." 7 Oct 1841 David is called on a mission to Augusta, Des Moines County, Iowa by the Council of the Twelve. Augusta is 15 miles north across the Mississippi River from Nauvoo. 23 Nov 1841 David Evans marries Barbara Ann Ewell, daughter of Pleasant and Babara Ewell, in Hancock County, Illinois. Barbara Ann is referred to in the marriage license and in some other references as Ann. Ann and her parents were earlier converts baptized by David Evans in Missouri. Ann's mother and two sisters had died in the prior year and Ann was caring for her father and remaining siblings at home 20 Aug 1842 David is called by the Nauvoo High Council as Bishop of the Nauvoo Eleventh Ward, which included the area southeast of the city. Sep 1842 David Evans' family moves 3 miles southeast of Nauvoo where David had purchased a 10-acre farm. 20 Oct 1842 Martha Evans, David's eigth child and first with Ann, is born near Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. 4 Dec 1842 Nauvoo High Council ordains David Evans as Bishop of the Nauvoo Eleventh Ward. Dec 1842-1844 As Bishop, David presides over a Bishops court of Benjamin Hoyt and baptizes a number of people in the area. 15 Apr 1844 David, along with Pleasant Ewell and others are called on a mission by the Council of the Twelve to preach in Virginia and present before the people "General Smith's Views of the Powers and Policy of the General Government" and to seek electors who would vote for Joseph Smith as President of the United States. 21 Apr 1844 Amanda Evans, David's ninth child and second with Ann, is born in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. 16 Jun 1844 David was appointed at a public meeting in Nauvoo to go to the Rocky Run precinct with Anson Call, William E. Horner and Nicholas Boscow to lay a true statement of the facts, about the Nauvoo Expositor, etc., before the public. Others were appointed to do the same in other precincts around Hancock County, Illinois. 18 Jun 1844 David Evans, Anson Call and William E. Horner visited with a group of twenty of thirty men in Rocky Run precinct. They communicated to the people that Joseph Smith was willing to be tried anywhere but in Missouri and that Judge Thomas had advised Joseph to enter into bonds to be tried before the circuit court to allay the excited feelings of the people. The gathering rejected the idea and responded that they would gather enough men to take Joseph and try him as they wished. 19 Jun 1844 David Evans, Anson Call and William E. Horner swore and affidavit before Aaron Johnson describing there activities in Rocky Run precinct. They affidavits from each precinct were given to the Governor of Illinois, Thomas Ford, in a plea for help. Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith were murdered 8 days later by a mob after giving themselves up and being jailed in Carthage, Hancock County, Illinois. 7 Oct 1844 David Evans is sustained as Bishop of the Nauvoo Eleventh Ward at the General Conference of the LDS Church. Brigham Young and other church leaders were also sustained at this conference. 8 Oct 1844 David Evans is called from the High Priests Quorum by Brigham Young with 84 other high priests to serve a special mission to go abroad in all the congressional districts of the United States to preside over the branches of the LDS Church. The men were told this was not to be a short-term mission, but that they were to take their families, settle, and build up stakes like the Nauvoo stake. Jan 1845 Brigham Young and others discuss the propriety of settling another country. 22 Mar 1845 David Evans presides at a conference in Franklin, Oakland County, Michigan consisting of members from Oakland, Macomb, Livingston, Ingham, Washtenaw, Wayne and Monroe Counties, all in southeast Michigan. 11 Oct 1845 David Evans is appointed one of 25 captains of a hundred for companies preparing for the exodus west which had been discussed at the just concluded general conference. Nov-Dec 1845 Each Company of one hundred had established one or more wagon shops and all were engaged in getting ready for the departure westward. 27 Jan 1846 Amanda Evans, David's tenth child and third with Ann, is born in Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois. 30 Jan 1846 David receives his LDS temple endowment in the Nauvoo Temple. 29 Mar 1846 David sends horses, wagons, plows and wheat seed from Nauvoo to Brigham Young's advance company camped on the Chariton River in Appanoose County, Iowa. This advance company left Nauvoo in Feb 1846. Iowa (1846 to 1847) 20 Apr 1846 David Evans' company of pioneers leaves Nauvoo, due to increasing pressure from unruly citizens, even though the company did not have enough oxen for all of the wagons. The oxen were used to move part of the company to a camp 15 miles west near Farmington, Van Buren County, Iowa and then were taken back to Nauvoo to move the remainder of the company to the new camp. May 1846 Many of the men in the company get work with the settlers in the area breaking priarie for farms and splitting rails for fencing. The men take oxen and milk cows for payment. Jul 1846 Some in the company proceed on to Garden Grove, Decatur County, Iowa with some of the available oxen. It may have been here that some of the men in the David Evans' company learned of the request for volunteers to join the Mormon Battalion. Those that volunteered then travelled to Winter Quarters. 13 Jul 1846 Isreal Evans, David's second child, is enlisted in Company B of the Mormon Battalion, along with a few other men from David Evans' company. 19 Aug 1846 Barnet Manzer visits Brigham Young at Winter Quarters on behalf of the David Evans Company, most of which was camped near Farmington, Van Buren County, Iowa. Brigham counsels the company to try to reach Mount Pisgah, open farms and prepare for later travel. Late Fall 1846 David Evans' company begins travelling towards Council Bluffs, but because of the cold they stop and decid to spend the winter on the headwaters of the Nodaway River in Adair County, Iowa 50 miles west of Mount Pisgah. Here they built log huts and put up hay for the animals. Feb 1847 David Evans' company is forced to abandon the Nodaway river camp because provisions had run low. They decide to head south to the northern settlements of Missouri following a path between the Nodaway and One-Hundred-Two Rivers. Abt 24 Feb 1847 David Evans' company camps at "Starvation Creek" after suffering from cold and hunger and becoming lost in the snow. To survive, they eat many of the oxen that have become exhausted. Missouri (1847 to 1850) 1 Mar 1847 David Evans' company arrives in the area of Maryville, Nodaway County, Missouri after sending an advance party with the best remaining oxen to obtain provisions and oxen from settlers in Missouri. David Evans' family takes up residence in an abandoned log house without windows or doors. 7 Apr 1847 Joseph Evans, David's eleventh child and fourth with Ann, is born in Nodaway County, Missouri (probably in Maryville.) 16 Jul 1847 Israel Evans, David's second child, is discharged from the Mormon Battalion in San Diego, California. Aug 1848 Eliza Jane Evans, David's first child, marries Ira Nathaniel Hinckley in Missouri (possibly in Platte County.) 28 Sep 1848 Israel Evans, David's second child, arrives in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah after having worked at Sutters Fort near Sacramento, California the past summer. 27 Apr 1849 Sarah Evans, David's twelth child and fifth with Ann, is born in Nodaway County, Missouri (probably in Maryville.) 1 Jun 1849 Israel Evans, David's first child, marries Matilda Thomas in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. 16 Jun 1849 Eliza Jane Hinckley, David's first grandchild, is born to Ira and Eliza Jane (Evans) Hinckley in Estelle Mills, Platte County, Missouri. Oct 1849 Mary Ann Evans, David's fourth child, marries John Henry Glines in Missouri. 6 May 1850 Susannah Evans, David's thirteenth child and sixth with Ann, is born in Nodaway County, Missouri (probably in Maryville.) 15 May 1850 David Evans' family and a number of others from the David Evans Company leave Nodaway County, Missouri and the surounding areas for Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, 90 miles northwest, to organize themselves to travel to Utah. Jun 1850 David Evans is appointed captain of a company of 50 wagons in Council Bluffs by Orson Hyde as the Tenth Wagon Company of 1850. Nebraska & Wyoming (1850) 15 Jun 1850 David Evans Company leaves Council Bluffs for Salt Lake City, 900 miles west. 27 Jun 1850 Eliza Jane (Evans) Hinckley, David's first child, dies from cholera near near the Platte River in Dodge or Colfax County, Nebraska. Utah (1850 to 1883) 15 Sep 1850 David Evans Company arrives through Parley's Canyon into Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Nov 1850 Israel Evans, David's second child, settles at Sulphur Springs, Utah County, Utah. 15 Feb 1851 David Evans is called to preside over the saints at Dry Creek and so with some other families from the David Evans Company settles on Dry Creek, 2 miles north of Sulphur Springs, in what is called the Dry Creek settlement or Evansville. He takes up land west of of the creek and north of the present rodeo grounds. Apr 1851 David Evans is appointed and ordained Bishop of the newly organized Dry Creek Ward by George A. Smith. May 1851 David Evans and a crew of men begin digging a ditch from the American Fork River at the mouth of American Fork canyon seven-miles to Evansville to provide water for their farms. Aug 1851 The ditch is completed along a route through Cedar Hollow and used to water the parched crops. Fall 1851 Evansville citizens build build a log building west of Dry Creek north of where the present railrod tracks cross the creek. The building is used as a community center and school. Sep 1851 David Evans is elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the first Legislative Assembly of the newly created Territory of Utah. Oct 1851 David Evans and Shadrach Holdaway set up the first wool machinery in Utah. David first took charge of running it and then Shadrack took over the operations. The machinery was set up in Provo, Utah County, Utah. 28 Jan 1852 David Evans, Jr., David's fourteenth child and seventh with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 5 Feb 1852 David Evans introduces to the Legislative Assembly an act to incorporate all the area west to the Jordan River and south to Utah Lake from a point three miles north of the southeast corner of Evansville as the City of Lehi. 18 Feb 1852 David Evans introduces to the Legislative Assembly an act to grant one-third of the waters of American Fork creek for use by the Dry Creek settlement. Spring 1852 David Evans completes his term as representative in the Legislative Assembly. 18 Oct 1852 David Evans is sealed to Sarah Thornton Coleman, widow of Prime Coleman and daughter of William and Elizabeth Thornton, for time only at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Sarah was also sealed at this time to Prime Coleman, her first husband, for eternity with David acting as proxy. 29 Jan 1853 David Evans is elected as an Alderman of the City of Lehi at an election held in the log schoolhouse. Silas P. Barnes is elected Mayor. Spring 1853 David Evans is appointed Postmaster of the City of Lehi using a small room in his home as the post office. 8 Jul 1853 Hyrum Evans, David's fifteenth child and eighth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Jul-Aug 1853 David Evans moves his log home together with other Lehi residents into a fort centered at the present intersection of First South and Second West in response to direction from George A. Smith to gather in forts as a means of protection from the Indian raids. Earlier in the year, an Indian had been killed and Chief Walkara had incited the local Indians to violence. The log schoolhouse was moved to the northeast corner of the fort. David Evans and Abel Evans also direct the building of a parapet north of the fort. Oct 1853 David Evans attends a general conference in Salt Lake City where Brigham Young warns the saints to "fort up" against the Indians. 6 Mar 1854 David Evans is elected as Mayor of the City of Lehi. 11 Mar 1854 David Evans is elected as Major of Battalion of Infantry of the Lehi Post of Utah Military District. 16 Mar 1854 David Evans is sealed to Clymenia Shaw, daughter of Benjamin and Phebe Shaw, for time and eternity at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. 4 Jun 1854 David Evans visits with Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball, who were returning to Salt Lake after having signed a peace treaty with Chief Walkara and stopped in Lehi due to a heavy snow. They advise the citizens to erect a fort wall for protection. 5 Jun 1854 David Evans surveys a sixteen-block plat using a pocket compass and carpenter's square. Lehi citizens begin building a wall around the perimeter of the plat. The wall surrounds the cabins that had been moved to form a fort in the fall of 1853. Summer 1854 David Evans in partnership with Thomas Karren and Daniel Collett purchases and operates a threshing machine. Aug 1854 Large numbers of grasshoppers infest the fields around the Lehi City and everywhere else in the settlements destroying crops. Most of the harvest was complete so not everything was lost. 23 Nov 1854 David Evans is sealed to Edna Hinchliff Woods, widow of Edwin Woods and daughter of Elijah and Hannah Hinchliff, for time (and possibly eternity) at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. 15 Mar 1855 Barbara Ann Evans, David's sixteenth child and ninth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 22 May 1855 David Evans leads a group of men on an exploration for a series of large fertile valleys that could sustain a large population. Brigham young was under the impression that this area existed in the southwestern of the territory. The group explores the valleys west of present day Fillmore and north and west of present day Delta. The exploration is known as the White Mountain Mission. 3 Jul 1855 David Evans and his White Mountain Mission group arrive back in Salt Lake City having found only low mountain ranges and desert valleys and not the fertile valleys hoped for by Brigham Young. Sep 1855 David Evans reports that the tithing wheat collected was very small, due to the grasshopper infestations of the prior seasons. Fall 1855 David Evans proposes the building of a Ward meetinghouse. A committee is appointed and construction begins soon after. 3 Nov 1855 Samuel Evans, David's seventeenth child and first with Edna, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Samuel dies the same day. 1 Dec 1855 Phebe Jane Evans, David's eighteenth child and first with Clymenia, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 18 Dec 1855 Phebe Jane, David's eighteenth child, dies in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Spring 1856 David Evans is re-elected is Mayor of Lehi City. 4 May 1856 Rozilla Evans, David's nineteenth child and tenth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Fall 1856 David Evans is elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 18 Nov 1856 David Evans is sealed to Rebecca Coleman, daughter of Prime and Sarah Coleman, for time and eternity at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. David had been sealed to Sarah Coleman in 1852. 22 Nov 1856 Emma, David's seventh child, marries Prime Coleman, Jr., son of Prime Coleman and Sarah Thornton Coleman. 26 Dec 1856 Henry, David's third child, marries Anna C. M. Bruun. 30 Dec 1856 David Evans, in a letter from Salt Lake City, admonishes his family to live in health and peace, stating that he will endeavor to set his family in order when he returns from serving in the Legislative Assembly. Some of David's children may have been critical of Edna and this may have created some contention. 4 Jan 1857 Hannah Evans, David's twentieth child and second with Edna, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 14 Jan 1857 The Legislative Assembly approves an act for the organization of the Militia of the Territory of Utah. A board of officers was then appointed to more fully organize and strengthen the militia. 15 Feb 1857 Hannah, David's twentieth child, dies in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 11 Apr 1857 David Evans is appointed by Daniel H. Wells to supervise the organization of the Lehi Military District which was one of thirteen newly created military districts in the Utah Territory. The district covered all of Utah County north of Provo City. 24 Apr 1857 David and Ann Evans leave on an expidition to the Salmon River to the north with a group led by Brigham Young. 8 May 1857 David and Ann Evans arrive at Fort Limhi with the group of 142 people led by Brigham Young. 26 May 1857 David and Ann Evans return to Lehi from the expidition to the Salmon River. 1 Aug 1857 A letter is sent to David Evans, and to the commanders of each military district, by Daniel H. Wells informing them of an army from the Eastern States enroute to invade Utah. The commanders are instructed to keep their commands ready to march on short notice and to prepare for a winter campaign. 13 Aug 1857 David Evans is instructed to keep one or two platoons of ten men each out in the mountains on the approaches to the settlements as a corp of observation. He is also instructed to keep an eye out for locations in the mountains where grain can be cached and where women and children can be safe if they are forced to flee. 14 Aug 1857 David begins to fit-out and prepare a company of 50 men to carry out the instructions of Daniel H. Wells. 17 Aug 1857 James Evans, David's twenty-first child and second with Clymenia, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 18 Aug 1857 The troops ordered from David Evans command are dismissed from joining Colonel Cummings in Echo canyon with instructions to keep their fit-out and be prepared to march on short notice. Sep 1857 David Evans is promoted to Colonel in the militia of Utah. 16 Sep 1857 David is informed in a letter from Brigham Young and Daniel H. Wells of the governor's proclamation declaring martial law and that David Evans command would probably not be called this fall. David was also informed of the intent to desolate the territory, coneal their families, stock and possessions in the mountains, while the men waylay the approaching army. David is instructed to secure places in the mountains where the approaching army could not find the people, or at least where they could not easily attack, and to continue to cache grains and other supplies. Winter 1858 Representatives from the Utah Expiditionary force negotiate a plan for Brigham Young to step down as Governor and Alfred Cummings to take his place and for the army to camp for a short time west of Lehi in Cedar Valley. Apr-May 1858 Thousands of people abandon Salt Lake Valley and pass through Lehi with many staying in the homes of residents including David Evans. 18 May 1858 George Evans, David's twenty-second child and first with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Jun 1858 Peace commisioner Isaac Powell from the Utah Expiditionary force speaks in an open-air mass meeting in front of David Evans home reading a letter from Colonel Albert S. Johnston stating the army would be faithful to their duty of peace while in Utah. 29 Jun 1858 The army travelled through Salt Lake Valley and sets up camp at the mouth of West Canyon. 11 Jul 1858 Ephraim Evans, David's twenty-third child and eleventh with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 10 Sep 1858 The army moves its camp ten miles south near Fairfield and establishes Camp Floyd. Fall 1858 Some of the officers of Johnston's Army who are camped west of Lehi at Camp Floyd in Cedar Valley, when passing through Lehi, generally without permission, turn their horses into the enclosures and gardens of the citizens and ignored the requests of David Evans for compensation. David Evans finally presents the accounts to General Johnston and he reimburses the citizens for the tresprasses and states that it is not his policy to infringe on the citizens. Nov 1858 A number of cattle belonging to the army wandered south in blizzard. Colonel Patrick Conner herded the cattle north around the east shore of Utah Lake and passed though Lehi late in the evening. David Evans, after prompting from a spouse, helped Colonel Conner corral the cattle at David's home and invited him into his home to provide a meal and bed for the night. Bef 1859 David Evans and Edna divorce before this time due to the unbearable friction she felt between her and some of David's children. Edna moves to Riverdale, Utah and in May 1859 married William Stimpson. 14 Feb 1859 David Evans is admitted as a member of the Deseret Agricultural and Manufacturing Society by Edward Hunter, president of the society. 14 Feb 1859 David Evans is re-elected to a two-year term as mayor of Lehi City. Mar 1859 David Evans receives a subpoena to testify in the court of Judge Cradlebaugh. David, feeling that the truth will not be acceptable to the court and that he will be coerced through a bench warrant to lie, leaves the court and goes into hiding in the mountains, occasionally returning to the valley for short periods when safe. 29 Apr 1859 Amanda, David's nineth child, marries William Edwards. David misses the wedding because his is hiding in the mountains from Judge Cradlebaugh's court. 20 Oct 1859 Martha, David's eighth child, marries William Winn. 2 Feb 1860 Edwin Evans, David's twenty-fourth child and third with Clymenia, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 10 May 1860 Prime Coleman Evans, David's twenty-fifth child and second with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 11 Feb 1861 David Evans finishes his last term as Mayor of Lehi City having served four terms from 1854-1861 after serving as Alderman from 1853-1854. 24 Feb 1861 Eleazar Evans, David's twenty-sixth child and twelth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Apr 1861 David Evans voices opposition to enlarging the city due to a lack of water. His concerns are remedied and the City Council adds additional blocks to the original surveyed blocks. 4 May 1861 David Evans is sealed to Margaret Christine Holm, daughter and Jens and Margaret Christine Holm, for time and eternity at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Jul 1861 Johnston's Army closes down Camp Floyd, selling material for a bargain to area settlers before heading east to participate in the Civil War. 1 Nov 1861 Abigail, David's tenth child, marries Ole Ellingson. Spring 1862 David Evans and Canute Peterson build a small tannery on Dry Creek at the northwest corner of Third North and First West and had Jonas Holdsworth operate it. 11 Jun 1862 Harriet Coleman Evans, David's twenty-seventh child and third with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 29 Jul 1862 Hyrum, David's fifteenth child, dies at Pelican Point on the west side of Utah Lake. He drowned while helping to wash sheep. 22 Sep 1862 Mosiah Evans, David's twenty-eighth child and thirteenth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 5 May 1863 Ephraim, David's twenty-third child, dies in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 29 Nov 1863 John Holm Evans, David's twenty-ninth child and first with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 17 May 1864 Mary Evans, David's thirtieth child and fourteenth with Ann, is born in Lehi Utah County, Utah. 22 Sep 1864 Sarah Coleman Evans, David's thirty-first child and fourth with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 3 Oct 1864 John, David's twenty-ninth child, dies in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 29 Aug 1865 Margaret Christine Holm Evans, David's thirty-second child and second with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 5 Sep 1865 David Evans resigns his position as commander of the Lehi Military District. His military service in Utah covered 1852-1865. He retired as a Colonel. Fall 1865 David Evans is elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. Fall 1866 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 26 Apr 1867 Jacob Evans, David's thirty-third child and fifteenth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 30 May 1867 Sarah, David's twelth child, marries David Hodge. Fall 1867 The Deseret Telegraph installs a telegraph line into David Evans home. Fall 1867 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 18 Dec 1867 Jane Holm Evans, David's thirty-fourth child and third with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 10 Jul 1868 Rebecca Susannah Coleman Evans, David's thirty-fifth child and fifth with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 23 Jul 1868 The Lehi Union Exchange begins operations with David Evans as President. 27 Oct 1868 The Lehi Ward Relief Society is organized with Sarah Thornton Coleman Evans, David's third wife, as president. David Evans presided at the organization with Eliza R. Snow and Sarah Kimball in attendance. Fall 1869 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 11 Dec 1869 Ema Jane Coleman Evans, David's thirty-sixth child and sixth with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 27 Dec 1869 Susannah, David's thirteenth child, marries Isaac Alldredge. 1870 The tannery built by David Evans and Canute Peterson is closed. 4 Feb 1870 Hannah Holm Evans, David's thirty-seventh child and fourth with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Fall 1870 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 17 Jul 1871 David writes a letter to his sister Nancy stating his enjoyment of of the just completed Fourth of July celebration held in Provo. He also talked of the visit his brother Israel had made during that time. Fall 1871 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 1872 The Utah Southern railroad line from Salt Lake is completed into Lehi with a station being built on State Street. 1872 The telegraph office in David Evans home is discontinued due to a lack of business. 24 Jul 1872 Martha Ann Coleman Evans, David's thirty-eighth child and seventh with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 31 Mar 1873 Rozilla, David's ? child, marries William Emil Racker. 21 Apr 1873 Joseph, David's eleventh child, marries Sarah Jane Casto. Fall 1873 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. Spring 1874 David Evans retires from the Legislative Assembly after serving during the years 1851-1852, 1856-1858, 1865-1874. 28 Apr 1874 David Evans is appointed president of the Lehi United Order by Wilford Woodruff, Abrham O. Smoot and Angus M.Cannon. 25 Apr 1874 Rachel Holm Evans, David's thirty-ninth child and fifth with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 11 Jun 1874 David writes to his sister Eliza stating his gratefulness for his current abundance and mentions that he feels "age is beginning to crawl on him." 23 May 1875 Ellen Coleman Evans, David's fourtieth child and eighth with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 9 Aug 1875 Barbara, David's fifteenth child, marries John Pettit Bush. 21 Dec 1876 Clara Holm Evans, David's fourty-first and last child and sixth with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 21 Sep 1879 David Evans resigns as Bishop of the Lehi Ward due to his age and failing health. 1880 Lehi Union Exchange is sold to the People's Co-op. 15 Jan 1880 Edwin, David's ? child, marries Catherine Lewis. 1 Dec 1881 David, Jr., David's fourteenth child, marries Leah May Naegle. 20 Apr 1882 James, David's ? child, marries Sarah E. Wanlass. 14 Dec 1882 Mosiah, David's ? child, marries Catherine Esther Carter. 19 Jun 1883 David suffers a paralyzing stoke and is confined to bed. 23 Jun 1883 David Evans dies at his home at age 79. 24 Jun 1883 A special train is dispatched from Salt Lake City for the funeral of David Evans. Wilford Woodruff, Edward Hunter and several other leading men attend and speak at the funeral. David Evans is then buried in the Lehi Cemetery.

DAVID EVANS - Captain of Wagon Trail Company

Contributor: SGirton Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

David Evans Company 1850 Source : Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel Company Information David Evans Company DEPARTURE 15 June 1850 ARRIVAL 13-17 September 1850 NUMBER IN COMPANY 107 CAPTAIN David Evans David Evans 54 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa (present day Council Bluffs). View a list of individuals known to have traveled in this company. Sources "Arrival of the Mail from the Valley," Frontier Guardian, 10 July 1850, 2. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Barrows, Ethan, Autobiographical sketch, in 5th Quorum, Biographies, 1845-1881, vol. 1, 16, in Seventies Quorum, Records, 1844-1913, 1929-1973. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah Evans, Barbara Ann Eawell, Autobiographical sketch [ca. 1896], reel 13, item 13, 2 p. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah Fawcett, William, Autobiographical sketch, in Biographical sketches, 1891- , reel 36, box 37, fd. 1, item 8. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah Hatch, Abram, [Reminiscence], in Edward W. Tullidge, Tullidge's Histories of Utah, vol. 2, "Biographies (Supplemental Vol.) of the Founders and Representative Men of Northern, Eastern and Western Utah, and Southern Idaho" [1889], 192-93. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah University of Utah, J. Willard Marriott Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Hatch, Lorenzo Hill, Lorenzo Hill Hatch Journal [1958], 12-13. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah Jacobs, Elisabeth Coleman, [Reminiscences], in "Utah Pioneer Biographies," 44 vols., 44:67. Trail Excerpt Source Location Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Millett, Joseph, Sr., Reminiscence, in Joseph Millett, [Jr.], J. Millet on C[ape] B[reton] Island 1927, 89-92. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah Nixon, Hannah Isabell Fawcett, [Auto]biography, in Library of Congress, Collection of Mormon diaries [1935-1938], reel 9, item 1, 1. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Utah State University, Merrill Library, Logan, Utah Stowell, William Rufus Rogers, [Biography], in James Amasa Little, Biography of William Rufus Rogers Stowell 1893, 32-34. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah Whipple, Nelson Wheeler, "Journal of a Pioneer," Instructor, Mar. 1947, 121-24. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Whipple, Nelson Wheeler, Autobiography and journal 1859-1887, 79-92. Trail Excerpt Source Location Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah SOURCE: ******************************************************************

Bishop David Evans

Contributor: SGirton Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

The following obituary published in the Deseret News in 1883 was titled "Sketch of the Life and Ministry of Bishop David Evans" and does well at summarizing the life of David Evans: father, religious leader, pioneer and statesman. "David Evans the son of Israel and Abigail Evans, was born in Cecil County, Maryland, October 27th, 1804. When a small boy his parents moved to Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1826, when he was married to Mary Beck and moved to Richland County, Ohio. Here he bought and opened up a new farm, where he lived until he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, April 6th, 1833. On the 11th of the same month he was ordained a Priest and immediately commenced traveling and preaching, selling his farm to enable him to prosecute his missionary labors. He was ordained to the office of an Elder on the 21st of July the same year." "In 1834 he went in Zion's camp from Ohio to Missouri, with Joseph Smith the Prophet, for the redemption of Zion, and received his ordination to the First Quorum of Seventy, under the hands of Jospeh Smith and Sidney Rigdon, April 29th, 1835. He attended the School of the Prophets in Kirtland, in the winter of 1835 and 1836, and on May 20th, 1836, left Ohio for Missouri, in charge of a company of saints, most of whom he baptised himself. He settled on Shoal Creak, Caldwell County, buying some land and again making him a home; was with the saints through all their persecutions in Missouri among which was the barbarous massacre at Haun's Mill. In December he was compelled to leave the State without his family, who shortly after followed, leaving all their property behind. Arriving at Payson, Adams County, Ill., in the spring of 1839, he commenced preaching and baptised many persons, some of whom are now prominent members in the Church. He lost his wife June 20th, 1841, after which he moved to Nauvoo and married Barbara Ann Ewell, November 23rd, 1841, she being a member of a family he had baptised in Missouri. In 1842, when Nauvoo was organized into wards, he was ordained a Bishop, August 21st, to preside over the Eleventh Ward. He remained here until the Saints were driven from Nauvoo, when he was appointed Captain of company, many of the members remaining with the company until its arrival in the Valleys, September 15th, 1850." "Moved to Lehi February 15th, 1851, over which place he was appointed to preside as Bishop, the duties of which he faithfully performed for 28 years, tendering his resignation, on account of old age and failing health, August 24th, 1879. He located the City of Lehi and laid it off into blocks and lots with a pocket compass, tape line and square. Was elected to the first legislature in Utah and acted for many years in connection with that body. He was Colonel of Militia, served as Major of Lehi Military District several terms, and held other responsible positions. His death occurred June 23rd, 1883, at 12:30 p.m. For several days he was not well, and on Tuesday, June 19, at 1 p.m., he received a heavy paralytic stroke which completely paralyzed his whole right side rendering him helpless and speechless, in which condition he remained until death." "The funeral services were held in the Lehi Tabernacle at 3 p.m., Sunday June 24th, 1883. A special train was dispatched from Salt Lake City, for the benefit of his friends and acquaintances, among whom were President Woodruff, Bishop Hunter and others; also many came from Provo and adjacent settlements. The services were conducted by President Smoot and addresses were made by Bishop Hunter, President Woodruff, Bishops Hardy, Burten and others. After the services the remains were carried to the cemetary followed by a numerous procession, numbering 115 vehicles containing the relatives and friends of the deceased, this being the largest funeral cortage ever formed in Lehi."Maryland (1804 to Abt 1810) 4 Oct 1802 Israel Evans and Abigail Alexander, David Evans' parents, marry in Cecil County, Maryland. 3 Aug 1803 Eliza Evans, David's older sister, is born in Cecil County, Maryland. 27 Oct 1804 David Evans is born in Cecil County, Maryland. Pennsylvania (Abt 1810 to 1826) Abt 1810 Israel Evans' family moves near Spruce Creek, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. Israel builds a one-room log structure that he operates as a tavern. 29 May 1811 Jesse Evans, David's younger brother, is born near Spruce Creek, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. 26 May 1814 Nancy Evans, David's younger sister, is born near Spruce Creek, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. 1823 Israel Evans, David's youngest brother, is born, possibly in Centre Hall, Centre County, Pennsylvania. 25 Jul 1826 David Evans marries his first wife Mary Beck, daughter of Henry and Margaret Beck who reside in Warriors Mark Township a few miles northwest of Spruce Creek in Huntingdon County. Ohio (1826 to 1836) 1826 David and Mary Evans move 160 miles west to Hanoverton Township, Columbiana County, Ohio. 16 Apr 1827 Eliza Jane Evans, David's first child (first with Mary Beck), is born in Hanoverton Township, Columbiana County, Ohio. 2 Oct 1828 Israel Evans, David's second child, is born in Hanoverton Township, Columbiana County, Ohio. Bet 1828-1830 David Evans' family moves 100 miles further west to Worthington Township, Richland County, Ohio where David purchased and farmed a tract of public land. 25 Oct 1830 Henry Evans, David's third child, is born in Worthington Township, Richland County, Ohio. 2 Sep 1832 Mary Ann Evans, David's fourth child, is born in Worthington Township, Richland County, Ohio. 6 Apr 1833 Thomas Tripp teaches David and Mary Evans about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and they are baptized. 11 Apr 1833 Thomas Tripp ordains David a Priest in the LDS Church. May 1833 David is asked to serve a mission to the local area. He may have sold his farm to help finance some of his missionary labors. During this time, the family may have resided in Perry, Richland County, Ohio. 21 Jul 1833 Thomas Tripp ordains David an Elder in the LDS Church. Sep 1833 David completes his mission for the season. He later wrote of baptizing 74 people in 1833 and 30 in one day. Feb-May 1834 David makes a journey back to Columbiana County, Ohio and continues his mission, preaching in Hanoverton and "on the Sandy Plains." May 1834 David returns to Perry, Columbiana County, Ohio and joins Zion's Camp. He travels with the camp to Independence, Jackson County, Missouri with the intent of restoring the church members there to their properties from which they had been forced to abandon. Aug 1834 David returns to Perry, Columbiana County, Ohio after Zion's Camp had been disbanded. Nov 1834-Jan 1835 David attends the School of the Prophets in Kirtland, Geauga County, Ohio where Joseph Smith presents the Lectures on Faith, Sidney Rigdon teaches grammar and Frederick G. Williams and William E. McLellan teach various other secular and religious items. 21 Jan 1835 Margaret Evans, David's fifth child, is born in Richland County, Ohio, possibly near Perry. 28 Feb 1835 Joseph Smith ordains David a Seventy in the First Quorum of the Seventy in the LDS Church. Feb-Apr 1835 David preaches as a missionary in Richland County, Ohio. He mentions Perry, stating there are 36 members there and that he is having success. May-Sep 1835 David preaches as a missionary in Columbiana County, Ohio. He mentions Georgetown, Hanover and Manerva as some of the locations where he has preached. Sep 1835 A call is made by Joseph Smith for a number of men to relocate their families to Missouri the following spring. Nov 1835-Jan 1836 David attends the School of the Prophets in Kirtland where he is taught by Joseph Smith and others. Missouri (1836 to 1839) Apr 1836 David Evans' family and a number of other families around the Perry, Richland County Ohio area move over 500 miles west to Caldwell County, Missouri with David called as their captain. Some of the families, including David's settle near Haun's Mill on Shoal Creek in the eastern part of the county. David built a home about a mile and a half north of the mill. 27 Aug 1836 Margaret Evans, David's 19-month-old daughter dies near Haun's Mill, Caldwell County, Missouri. Summer 1837 David preaches as a missionary in Ray County, Missouri and surrounding areas. 10 Jun 1837 David baptizes Barbara Ann Ewell in Richmond, Ray County, Missouri. He had previously in 1837 baptized her mother and later baptized her father and some siblings. Summer 1838 As the presiding elder at Haun's Mill, David baptizes, ordains and blesses a number of people in the area around Haun's Mill. 21 Aug 1838 Araminta Evans, David's sixth child, is born near Haun's Mill, Caldwell County, Missouri. 1 Oct 1838 Araminta Evans, David's one-month-old baby daughter dies near Haun's Mill, Caldwell County, Missouri. 30 Oct 1838 A mob of 240 men approach Haun's Mill from the north, ignore the pleas of David Evans for "Quarters" and proceed to kill 18 men and boys some of whom had taken refuge in an unfinished blacksmith shop. Nov 1838 Alma Smith, who had been severely wounded in the raid on the mill, recuperated at the home of David Evans, after he had been brought there by his mother, Amanda Smith. Illinois (1839 to 1846) Feb 1839 David Evans' family along with many others around Haun's Mill move 125 miles east to Quincy, Adams County, Illinois. David's family possibly settles southeast of Quincy in Payson, Adams County, Illinois. 12 Jan 1840 Emma Evans, David's seventh child, is born in Adams County, Illinois (most likely in Payson). At this time, the family lived in a log house and used the wagon boxes to sleep in. 12 Jan 1840 David Evans writes from Payson, Adams County, Illinois that he has baptized 31 people in Payson in his missionary proselyting. Nov 1840 David preaches near Union County, Illinois in the southern tip of Illinois and baptizes the Abraham Hunsaker family. 20 Jun 1841 Mary Evans, David's wife dies near Pigeon Creek (south of Payson), Adams County, Illinois from "exposure." 7 Oct 1841 David is called on a mission to Augusta, Des Moines County, Iowa by the Council of the Twelve. Augusta is 15 miles north across the Mississippi River from Nauvoo. 23 Nov 1841 David Evans marries Barbara Ann Ewell, daughter of Pleasant and Babara Ewell, in Hancock County, Illinois. Barbara Ann is referred to in the marriage license and in some other references as Ann. Ann and her parents were earlier converts baptized by David Evans in Missouri. Ann's mother and two sisters had died in the prior year and Ann was caring for her father and remaining siblings at home 20 Aug 1842 David is called by the Nauvoo High Council as Bishop of the Nauvoo Eleventh Ward, which included the area southeast of the city. Sep 1842 David Evans' family moves 3 miles southeast of Nauvoo where David had purchased a 10-acre farm. 20 Oct 1842 Martha Evans, David's eigth child and first with Ann, is born near Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. 4 Dec 1842 Nauvoo High Council ordains David Evans as Bishop of the Nauvoo Eleventh Ward. Dec 1842-1844 As Bishop, David presides over a Bishops court of Benjamin Hoyt and baptizes a number of people in the area. 15 Apr 1844 David, along with Pleasant Ewell and others are called on a mission by the Council of the Twelve to preach in Virginia and present before the people "General Smith's Views of the Powers and Policy of the General Government" and to seek electors who would vote for Joseph Smith as President of the United States. 21 Apr 1844 Amanda Evans, David's ninth child and second with Ann, is born in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. 16 Jun 1844 David was appointed at a public meeting in Nauvoo to go to the Rocky Run precinct with Anson Call, William E. Horner and Nicholas Boscow to lay a true statement of the facts, about the Nauvoo Expositor, etc., before the public. Others were appointed to do the same in other precincts around Hancock County, Illinois. 18 Jun 1844 David Evans, Anson Call and William E. Horner visited with a group of twenty or thirty men in Rocky Run precinct. They communicated to the people that Joseph Smith was willing to be tried anywhere but in Missouri and that Judge Thomas had advised Joseph to enter into bonds to be tried before the circuit court to allay the excited feelings of the people. The gathering rejected the idea and responded that they would gather enough men to take Joseph and try him as they wished. 19 Jun 1844 David Evans, Anson Call and William E. Horner swore an affidavit before Aaron Johnson describing their activities in Rocky Run precinct. The affidavits from each precinct were given to the Governor of Illinois, Thomas Ford, in a plea for help. Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith were murdered 8 days later by a mob after giving themselves up and being jailed in Carthage, Hancock County, Illinois. 7 Oct 1844 David Evans is sustained as Bishop of the Nauvoo Eleventh Ward at the General Conference of the LDS Church. Brigham Young and other church leaders were also sustained at this conference. Barbara Ann later wrote of the mantel of the prophet Joseph Smith falling upon Brigham Young during this conference. 8 Oct 1844 David Evans is called from the High Priests Quorum by Brigham Young with 84 other high priests to serve a special mission to go abroad in all the congressional districts of the United States to preside over the branches of the LDS Church. The men were told this was not to be a short-term mission, but that they were to take their families, settle, and build up stakes like the Nauvoo stake. Jan 1845 Brigham Young and others discuss the propriety of settling another country. 22 Mar 1845 David Evans presides at a conference in Franklin, Oakland County, Michigan consisting of members from Oakland, Macomb, Livingston, Ingham, Washtenaw, Wayne and Monroe Counties, all in southeast Michigan. 11 Oct 1845 David Evans is appointed one of 25 captains of a hundred for companies preparing for the exodus west which had been discussed at the just concluded general conference. Nov-Dec 1845 Each Company of one hundred had established one or more wagon shops and all were engaged in getting ready for the departure westward. 27 Jan 1846 Abigail Evans, David's tenth child and third with Ann, is born in Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois. 30 Jan 1846 David receives his LDS temple endowment in the Nauvoo Temple. 29 Mar 1846 David sends horses, wagons, plows and wheat seed from Nauvoo to Brigham Young's advance company camped on the Chariton River in Appanoose County, Iowa. This advance company left Nauvoo in Feb 1846. Iowa (1846 to 1847) 20 Apr 1846 David Evans' company of pioneers leaves Nauvoo, due to increasing pressure from unruly citizens, even though the company did not have enough oxen for all of the wagons. The oxen were used to move part of the company to a camp 15 miles west near Farmington, Van Buren County, Iowa and then were taken back to Nauvoo to move the remainder of the company to the new camp. May 1846 Many of the men in the company get work with the settlers in the area breaking priarie for farms and splitting rails for fencing. The men take oxen and milk cows for payment. Jul 1846 Some in the company proceed on to Garden Grove, Decatur County, Iowa with some of the available oxen. It may have been here that some of the men in the David Evans' company learned of the request for volunteers to join the Mormon Battalion. Those who volunteered then travelled to Winter Quarters and then Council Bluffs. 13 Jul 1846 Isreal Evans, David's second child, is enlisted at Council Bluffs in Company B of the Mormon Battalion, along with a few other men from David Evans' company. 19 Aug 1846 Barnet Manzer visits Brigham Young at Winter Quarters on behalf of the David Evans Company, most of which was camped near Farmington, Van Buren County, Iowa. Brigham counsels the company to try to reach Mount Pisgah, open farms and prepare for later travel. Late Fall 1846 David Evans' company begins travelling towards Council Bluffs, but because of the cold they stopped and decided to spend the winter on the headwaters of the Nodaway River in Adair County, Iowa 50 miles west of Mount Pisgah. Here they built log huts and put up hay for the animals. Feb 1847 David Evans' company is forced to abandon the Nodaway river camp because provisions had run low. They decide to head south to the northern settlements of Missouri following a path between the Nodaway and One-Hundred-Two Rivers. Abt 24 Feb 1847 David Evans' company camps at "Starvation Creek" after suffering from cold and hunger and becoming lost in the snow. To survive, they eat many of the oxen that have become exhausted. Missouri (1847 to 1850) 1 Mar 1847 David Evans' company arrives in the area of Maryville, Nodaway County, Missouri after sending an advance party with the best remaining oxen to obtain provisions and oxen from settlers in Missouri. David Evans' family takes up residence in an abandoned log house without windows or doors. 7 Apr 1847 Joseph Evans, David's eleventh child and fourth with Ann, is born in Nodaway County, Missouri (probably in Maryville.) 16 Jul 1847 Israel Evans, David's second child, is discharged from the Mormon Battalion in San Diego, California. Aug 1848 Eliza Jane Evans, David's first child, marries Ira Nathaniel Hinckley in Missouri (possibly in Platte County.) 28 Sep 1848 Israel Evans, David's second child, arrives in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah after having worked at Sutters Fort near Sacramento, California the past summer. 27 Apr 1849 Sarah Evans, David's twelth child and fifth with Ann, is born in Nodaway County, Missouri (probably in Maryville.) 1 Jun 1849 Israel Evans, David's first child, marries Matilda Thomas in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. 16 Jun 1849 Eliza Jane Hinckley, David's first grandchild, is born to Ira and Eliza Jane (Evans) Hinckley in Estelle Mills, Platte County, Missouri. Oct 1849 Mary Ann Evans, David's fourth child, marries John Henry Glines in Missouri. 6 May 1850 Susannah Evans, David's thirteenth child and sixth with Ann, is born in Nodaway County, Missouri (probably in Maryville.) 15 May 1850 David Evans' family and a number of others from the David Evans Company leave Nodaway County, Missouri and the surounding areas for Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, 90 miles northwest, to organize themselves to travel to Utah. Jun 1850 David Evans is appointed captain of a company of 50 wagons in Council Bluffs (later known as Kanesville) by Orson Hyde as the Tenth Wagon Company of 1850. Nebraska & Wyoming (1850) 15 Jun 1850 David Evans Company leaves Council Bluffs for Salt Lake City, 900 miles west. 27 Jun 1850 Eliza Jane (Evans) Hinckley, David's first child, dies from cholera near near the Platte River in Dodge or Colfax County, Nebraska. Utah (1850 to 1883) 15 Sep 1850 David Evans Company arrives through Parley's Canyon into Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Nov 1850 Israel Evans, David's second child, settles at Sulphur Springs, Utah County, Utah. 15 Feb 1851 David Evans is called to preside over the saints at Dry Creek and so with some other families from the David Evans Company settles on Dry Creek, 2 miles north of Sulphur Springs, in what is called the Dry Creek settlement or Evansville. He takes up land west of of the creek and north of the present rodeo grounds. Apr 1851 David Evans is appointed and ordained Bishop of the newly organized Dry Creek Ward by George A. Smith. May 1851 David Evans and a crew of men begin digging a ditch from the American Fork River at the mouth of American Fork canyon seven-miles to Evansville to provide water for their farms. Aug 1851 The ditch is completed along a route through Cedar Hollow and used to water the parched crops. Fall 1851 Evansville citizens build a log building west of Dry Creek north of where the present railroad tracks cross the creek north of the Lehi Rodeo Arena. The building is used as a community center and school. Sep 1851 David Evans is elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the first Legislative Assembly of the newly created Territory of Utah. Oct 1851 David Evans and Shadrach Holdaway set up the first wool machinery in Utah. David first took charge of running it and then Shadrack took over the operations. The machinery was set up in Provo, Utah County, Utah. 28 Jan 1852 David Evans, Jr., David's fourteenth child and seventh with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 5 Feb 1852 David Evans introduces to the Legislative Assembly an act to incorporate all the area west to the Jordan River and south to Utah Lake from a point three miles north of the southeast corner of Evansville as the City of Lehi. (Sixth incorporated city in the territory.) 18 Feb 1852 David Evans introduces to the Legislative Assembly an act to grant one-third of the waters of American Fork Creek for use by the Dry Creek settlement. (The allocation is still in force in 2001.) Spring 1852 David Evans completes his term as representative in the Legislative Assembly. 18 Oct 1852 David Evans is married to Sarah Thornton Coleman, widow of Prime Coleman and daughter of William and Elizabeth Thornton, for time only at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Sarah was also sealed at this time to Prime Coleman, her first husband, for eternity with David acting as proxy. 29 Jan 1853 David Evans is elected as an Alderman of the City of Lehi at an election held in the log schoolhouse. Silas P. Barnes is elected Mayor. Spring 1853 David Evans is appointed Postmaster of the City of Lehi using a small room in his home as the post office. 8 Jul 1853 Hyrum Evans, David's fifteenth child and eighth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Jul-Aug 1853 David Evans moves his log home together with other Lehi residents into a fort centered at the present intersection of First South and Second West in response to direction from George A. Smith to gather in forts as a means of protection from the Indian raids. Earlier in the year, an Indian had been killed and Chief Walkara had incited the local Indians to violence. The log schoolhouse was moved to the northeast corner of the fort. David Evans and Abel Evans also direct the building of a parapet north of the fort. Oct 1853 David Evans attends a general conference in Salt Lake City where Brigham Young warns the saints to "fort up" against the Indians. 6 Mar 1854 David Evans is elected as the second Mayor of the City of Lehi. 11 Mar 1854 David Evans is elected as Major of Battalion of Infantry of the Lehi Post of Utah Military District. The Utah Military District covered Utah County north of Provo. 16 Mar 1854 David Evans is sealed to Clymenia Shaw, daughter of Benjamin and Phebe Shaw, for time and eternity at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. 4 Jun 1854 David Evans visits with Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball, who were returning to Salt Lake after having signed a peace treaty with Chief Walkara and stopped in Lehi due to a heavy snow. They advise the citizens to erect a fort wall for protection. 5 Jun 1854 David Evans surveys a sixteen-block plat using a pocket compass, line tape and carpenter's square. Lehi citizens begin building a wall around the perimeter of the plat. The wall surrounds the cabins that had been moved to form a fort in the fall of 1853. Summer 1854 David Evans in partnership with Thomas Karren and Daniel Collett purchases and operates a threshing machine. Aug 1854 Large numbers of grasshoppers infest the fields around the Lehi City and everywhere else in the settlements destroying crops. Most of the harvest was complete so not everything was lost. 23 Nov 1854 David Evans is sealed to Edna Hinchcliff Woods, widow of Edwin Woods and daughter of Elijah and Hannah Hinchcliff at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. (The descendents of Edna and her third husband William Stimpson spell the name Hinchcliff, although the Bishop David Evans Family Association has historically spelled the name Hinchliff.) 15 Mar 1855 Barbara Ann Evans, David's sixteenth child and ninth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 22 May 1855 David Evans leads a group of men on an exploration for a series of large fertile valleys that could sustain a large population. Brigham young was under the impression that this area existed in the southwestern area of the territory. The group explores the valleys west of present day Fillmore and north and west of present day Delta. The exploration is known as the White Mountain Mission. 3 Jul 1855 David Evans and his White Mountain Mission group arrive back in Salt Lake City having found only low mountain ranges and desert valleys and not the fertile valleys hoped for by Brigham Young. Sep 1855 David Evans reports that the tithing wheat collected was very small, due to the grasshopper infestations of the prior seasons. Fall 1855 David Evans proposes the building of a Ward meetinghouse. A committee is appointed and construction begins soon after. 3 Nov 1855 Samuel Evans, David's seventeenth child and first with Edna, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Samuel dies the same day. 1 Dec 1855 Phebe Jane Evans, David's eighteenth child and first with Clymenia, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 18 Dec 1855 Phebe Jane, David's eighteenth child, dies in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Spring 1856 David Evans is re-elected as Mayor of Lehi City. 4 May 1856 Rozilla Evans, David's nineteenth child and tenth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Fall 1856 David Evans is elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 18 Nov 1856 David Evans is married to Rebecca Coleman, daughter of Prime and Sarah Coleman. This marriage was later sealed in 1861. David had been married earlier to mother Sarah Coleman in 1852. 22 Nov 1856 Emma, David's seventh child, marries Prime Coleman, Jr., son of Prime Coleman and Sarah Thornton Coleman. 26 Dec 1856 Henry, David's third child, marries Anna C. M. Bruun. 30 Dec 1856 David Evans, in a letter from Salt Lake City, admonishes his family to live in health and peace, stating that he will endeavor to set his family in order when he returns from serving in the Legislative Assembly. Some of David's children may have been critical of Edna and may have created some contention that David addressed in the letter. 4 Jan 1857 Hannah Evans, David's twentieth child and second with Edna, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 14 Jan 1857 The Legislative Assembly approves an act for the organization of the Militia of the Territory of Utah. A board of officers was then appointed to more fully organize and strengthen the militia. 15 Feb 1857 Hannah, David's twentieth child, dies in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 11 Apr 1857 David Evans is appointed by Daniel H. Wells to supervise the organization of the Lehi Military District which was one of thirteen newly created military districts in the Utah Territory. The district covered all of Utah County north of Provo City. 24 Apr 1857 David and Ann Evans leave on an expidition to the Salmon River to the north with a group led by Brigham Young. 8 May 1857 David and Ann Evans arrive at Fort Limhi (present day central Idaho) with the group of 142 people led by Brigham Young. 26 May 1857 David and Ann Evans return to Lehi from the expidition to the Salmon River. 24 Jul 1857 David Evans family and 7 other families from Lehi join Brigham Young and others for a Pioneer Day celebration at a lake at the head of Big Cottonwood Canyon. 1 Aug 1857 A letter is sent to David Evans, and to the commanders of each military district, by Daniel H. Wells informing them of an army from the Eastern States enroute to invade Utah. The commanders are instructed to keep their commands ready to march on short notice and to prepare for a winter campaign. 13 Aug 1857 David Evans is instructed to keep one or two platoons of ten men each out in the mountains on the approaches to the settlements as a corp of observation. He is also instructed to keep an eye out for locations in the mountains where grain can be "cached" and where women and children can be safe if they are forced to flee. 14 Aug 1857 David begins to "fit-out" and prepare a company of 50 men to carry out the instructions of Daniel H. Wells. 17 Aug 1857 James Evans, David's twenty-first child and second with Clymenia, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 18 Aug 1857 The troops ordered from David Evans command are dismissed from joining Colonel Cummings in Echo canyon with instructions to keep their "fit-out" and be prepared to march on short notice. Sep 1857 David Evans is promoted to Colonel in the militia of Utah. 16 Sep 1857 David is informed in a letter from Brigham Young and Daniel H. Wells of the governor's proclamation declaring martial law and that David Evans command would probably not be called this fall. David was also informed of the intent to desolate the territory, conceal their families and stock possessions in the mountains, while the men waylay the approaching army. David is instructed to secure places in the mountains where the approaching army could not find the people, or at least where they could not easily attack, and to continue to cache grains and other supplies. Winter 1858 Representatives from the Utah Expiditionary force negotiate a plan for Brigham Young to step down as Governor and Alfred Cummings to take his place and for the army to camp for a short time west of Lehi in Cedar Valley. Apr-May 1858 Thousands of people abandon Salt Lake Valley and pass through Lehi with many staying in the homes of residents including David Evans. 18 May 1858 George Evans, David's twenty-second child and first with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Jun 1858 Peace commisioner Isaac Powell from the Utah Expiditionary force speaks in an open-air mass meeting in front of David Evans home reading a letter from Colonel Albert S. Johnston stating the army would be faithful to their duty of peace while in Utah. 29 Jun 1858 The army travelled through Salt Lake Valley and sets up camp at the mouth of West Canyon. 11 Jul 1858 Ephraim Evans, David's twenty-third child and eleventh with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 10 Sep 1858 The army moves its camp ten miles south near Fairfield and establishes Camp Floyd. Fall 1858 Some of the officers of Johnston's Army who are camped west of Lehi at Camp Floyd in Cedar Valley, when passing through Lehi, generally without permission, turn their horses into the enclosures and gardens of the citizens and ignored the requests of David Evans for compensation. David Evans finally presents the accounts to General Johnston and he reimburses the citizens for the tresprasses and states that it is not his policy to infringe on the citizens. Nov 1858 A number of cattle belonging to the army wandered south in blizzard. Colonel Patrick Conner herded the cattle north around the east shore of Utah Lake and passed though Lehi late in the evening. David Evans, after prompting from a spouse, helped Colonel Conner corral the cattle at David's home and invited him into his home to provide a meal and bed for the night. Bef 1859 David Evans and Edna divorce before this time due to the unbearable friction she felt between her and some of David's children. Edna moves to Riverdale, Utah and in May 1859 (or 1858) married William Stimpson. 14 Feb 1859 David Evans is admitted as a member of the Deseret Agricultural and Manufacturing Society by Edward Hunter, president of the society. 14 Feb 1859 David Evans is re-elected to a two-year term as mayor of Lehi City. Mar 1859 David Evans receives a subpoena to testify in the court of Judge Cradlebaugh. David, feeling that the truth will not be acceptable to the court and that he will be coerced through a bench warrant to lie, leaves the court and goes into hiding in the mountains, occasionally returning to the valley for short periods when safe. 29 Apr 1859 Amanda, David's nineth child, marries William Edwards. David misses the wedding because his is hiding in the mountains from Judge Cradlebaugh's court. 20 Oct 1859 Martha, David's eighth child, marries William Winn. 2 Feb 1860 Edwin Evans, David's twenty-fourth child and third with Clymenia, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 10 May 1860 Prime Coleman Evans, David's twenty-fifth child and second with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 11 Feb 1861 David Evans finishes his last term as Mayor of Lehi City having served four terms from 1854-1861 after serving as Alderman from 1853-1854. 24 Feb 1861 Eleazar Evans, David's twenty-sixth child and twelth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Apr 1861 David Evans voices opposition to enlarging the city due to a lack of water. His concerns are remedied and the City Council adds additional blocks to the original surveyed blocks. 4 May 1861 David Evans is sealed to Margaret Christine Holm, daughter and Jens and Margaret Christine Holm, for time and eternity at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Jul 1861 Johnston's Army closes down Camp Floyd, selling material for a bargain to area settlers before heading east to participate in the Civil War. 1 Nov 1861 Abigail, David's tenth child, marries Ole Ellingson. Spring 1862 David Evans and Canute Peterson build a small tannery on Dry Creek at the northwest corner of Third North and First West and had Jonas Holdsworth operate it. 11 Jun 1862 Harriet Coleman Evans, David's twenty-seventh child and third with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 29 Jul 1862 Hyrum, David's fifteenth child, dies at Pelican Point on the west side of Utah Lake. He drowned while helping to wash sheep. 22 Sep 1862 Mosiah Evans, David's twenty-eighth child and thirteenth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 5 May 1863 Ephraim, David's twenty-third child, dies in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 29 Nov 1863 John Holm Evans, David's twenty-ninth child and first with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 17 May 1864 Mary Evans, David's thirtieth child and fourteenth with Ann, is born in Lehi Utah County, Utah. 22 Sep 1864 Sarah Coleman Evans, David's thirty-first child and fourth with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 3 Oct 1864 John, David's twenty-ninth child, dies in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 29 Aug 1865 Margaret Christine Holm Evans, David's thirty-second child and second with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 5 Sep 1865 David Evans resigns his position as commander of the Lehi Military District. His military service in Utah covered 1852-1865. He retired as a Colonel. Fall 1865 David Evans is elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. Fall 1866 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 26 Apr 1867 Jacob Evans, David's thirty-third child and fifteenth with Ann, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 30 May 1867 Sarah, David's twelth child, marries David Hodge. Fall 1867 The Deseret Telegraph installs a telegraph line into David Evans home. Fall 1867 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 18 Dec 1867 Jane Holm Evans, David's thirty-fourth child and third with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 10 Jul 1868 Rebecca Susannah Coleman Evans, David's thirty-fifth child and fifth with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 23 Jul 1868 The Lehi Union Exchange begins operations with David Evans as President. 27 Oct 1868 The Lehi Ward Relief Society is organized with Sarah Thornton Coleman Evans, David's third wife, as president. David Evans presided at the organization with Eliza R. Snow and Sarah Kimball in attendance. Fall 1869 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 11 Dec 1869 Emma Jane Coleman Evans, David's thirty-sixth child and sixth with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 27 Dec 1869 Susannah, David's thirteenth child, marries Isaac Alldredge. 1870 The tannery built by David Evans and Canute Peterson is closed. 4 Feb 1870 Hannah Holm Evans, David's thirty-seventh child and fourth with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. Fall 1870 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 17 Jul 1871 David writes a letter to his sister Nancy stating his enjoyment of the just completed Fourth of July celebration held in Provo. He also talked of the visit his brother Israel had made during that time. Fall 1871 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. 1872 The Utah Southern railroad line from Salt Lake is completed into Lehi with a station being built on State Street. 1872 The telegraph office in David Evans home is discontinued due to a lack of business. 24 Jul 1872 Martha Ann Coleman Evans, David's thirty-eighth child and seventh with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 31 Mar 1873 Rozilla, David's nineteenth child, marries William Emil Racker. 21 Apr 1873 Joseph, David's eleventh child, marries Sarah Jane Casto. Fall 1873 David Evans is re-elected as a member of the House of Representatives in the Legislative Assembly of Utah. Spring 1874 David Evans retires from the Legislative Assembly after serving during the years 1851-1852, 1856-1858, 1865-1874. 25 Apr 1874 Rachel Holm Evans, David's thirty-ninth child and fifth with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 28 Apr 1874 David Evans is appointed president of the Lehi United Order at a mass meeting in Lehi by Wilford Woodruff, Abrham O. Smoot and Angus M.Cannon. 11 Jun 1874 David writes to his sister Eliza stating his gratefulness for his current abundance and mentions that he feels "age is beginning to crawl on him." 23 May 1875 Ellen Coleman Evans, David's fourtieth child and eighth with Rebecca, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 9 Aug 1875 Barbara, David's fifteenth child, marries John Pettit Bush. 21 Dec 1876 Clara Holm Evans, David's fourty-first and last child and sixth with Christine, is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah. 21 Sep 1879 David Evans resigns as Bishop of the Lehi Ward due to his age and failing health. 1880 Lehi Union Exchange is sold to the People's Co-op. 15 Jan 1880 Edwin, David's twenty-fourth child, marries Catherine Lewis. 1 Dec 1881 David, Jr., David's fourteenth child, marries Leah May Naegle. 20 Apr 1882 James, David's twenty-first child, marries Sarah E. Wanlass. 14 Dec 1882 Mosiah, David's twenty-eighth child, marries Catherine Esther Carter. 19 Jun 1883 David suffers a paralyzing stoke and is confined to bed. 23 Jun 1883 David Evans dies at his home at age 79. 24 Jun 1883 A special train is dispatched from Salt Lake City for the funeral of David Evans. Wilford Woodruff, Edward Hunter and several other leading men attend and speak at the funeral. David Evans is then buried in the Lehi Cemetary. Extracts From Anson Call's History 'DAVID EVANS' Written by James W. Evans #421 Sunday, June 14, 1844, when the Saints were gathered at their usual gathering place of meeting in a grove east of the Temple, Judge Thomas the circuit judge of the district drove up to the stand and requested an opportunity to speak with Joseph Smith. The latter went to him and spent about 15 minute in conversation, during which the judge explained to him the difficulties with which he was surrounded and advised him what to do. Joseph returned to the stand and commenced talking. The day was wet and rainy. He asked them whether they would remain and hear the discourse he had to deliver to them, or to the shelter of their homes. As with one voice they exclaimed, "we will tarry." This was the last discourse the people heard from their Prophet on the Sabbath day. Acting on the suggestion of Judge Thomas he appointed delegates to visit the precincts of the county to try to effect settlement with the mob, and among these, Anson Call and David Evans were appointed to visit the precinct where Col. Williams, an influential leader of the mob resided. After meeting they started on their mission and that night lodged with Father Call five miles from Warsaw. They called at the colonel's house the following morning, only to be informed that he had gone to Adams County to raise the militia against the Mormons. They were informed by Elder Knox, a Campbellite preacher, that a committee was appointed in each precinct for the transaction of business. Mr. Call and his companion expressed a wish to see that committee. Elder Knox replied that Col. Williams was one of them and he was another, but in the absence of Col. Williams, he would send for the other man, Mr. Henderson. He did so and while waiting for him, a mob of 50 men came around and into the house. Among these was a lawyer Stevenson, from Warsaw. Coming into the room he addressed Messrs. Call and Evans, "Gentlemen, you are delegates from Nauvoo, I suppose." Receiving an affirmative answer he said they were expecting delegates at Warsaw. Then addressing Elder Knox and those who had gathered around, he said to them, "The people of Warsaw intend to put their delegates into the Mississippi and make fish bait of them. You can dispose of yours as you think proper. “Being informed of the instructions Judge Thomas had given to Joseph Smith, he stated the Judge Thomas was at Warsaw the Saturday night previous to his visit to Nauvoo and that he perfectly understood the Judge's mind upon this matter and if he had given Joseph Smith such directions they would introduce him to the Mississippi river. The mob became threatening but the committee told them they must not disturb the Mormon delegates while they were doing business with them. For further protection, the committee put a guard around the house. After an hour's conversation they refused to entertain the proposition of the delegates until the arrival of Col. Williams. The committee guaranteed the safety of the delegates until they were mounted but no longer. They gained their saddles and put spurs to their horses, as the mobs were preparing to pursue. They were soon at a safe distance from their enemies. Messieurs Call and Evans arrived in Nauvoo Mansion late in the evening of the 15h of June. At eight o'clock the following morning, they met at the Nauvoo Mansion to report to Joseph. Reynolds Cahoon, the door keeper, refused them entrance stating that Joseph was busy and did not wish to see anybody. However, Mr. Call ascertained what room he occupied, opened the door and went in. Joseph took him by the hand and said, "When did you return and where is Bro. Evans." When he was admitted, the two gave their report. Joseph wished them to make affidavit to their report, which they did before Ebenezer Robinson, a Justice of the Peace. He then wished them to take the affidavit and a letter to Judge Thomas, whose court was then in session at Knoxville, eighty miles distant. Joseph ordered the two best horses that could be obtained for the service. They left Nauvoo about sun-down the same day, Tuesday the 16th of June 1844. The Prophet told them to go quickly and get an interview with the Judge if they had to follow him by his coat-tail. It was raining; the roads were muddy and the streams high. On Wednesday they came to a stream which was high and rapid which appeared dangerous. The importance of their mission decided them to try it. They plunged in and with much difficulty reached the opposite side. They arrived at Knoxville on Thursday at ten o'clock a.m. of the 18th. The court being in session they gave their letter to the sheriff who handed it to the judge. He read and put it into his pocket. The sheriff was informed of the importance of their business and was requested to intercede with the judge for an interview, but was informed that they would have to wait until intermission. Their presence caused some commotion and they were illy(sp) treated by citizens who had gathered around the court house. The sheriff took them under his protection and remained in conversation with them until intermission. After dinner, at the hotel, they locked-arms with the judge, one on each side, as he left the table and told him they wanted an answer to General Smith's letter. He replied that it was nearly time court was called and he deemed an answer unnecessary, that they could tell the General that he was mistaken as to his instructions to him in Nauvoo. A written answer being insisted upon, he consented to write a short note. He read it to Majors Call and Evans and the former states that as he remember it, it read as follows: General Smith, Sir, in pursuing your letter, I find that you were mistaken in the instructions that I gave you while at Nauvoo, and I know of no course for you to pursue to answer the requirements of the law, but to suffer yourself to be taken by the officer holding the writ and go before the Justice of the Peace who issued the same and have an investigation of the matter. It is the officer's duty to protect you; this the law requires, and I cannot as an officer of the law give you any different instructions. Yours Respectfully, In the following, it is easy to discern that Judge Thomas had already given General Smith away, deeming the sacrifice of him of secondary importance: "We told the Judge that General Smith could not go in safety to Carthage for the trial with the officer who held the writ, for there were five hundred men there who were sworn to take his life. He proffered in his letter to meet you here or in any other part of your district you may select and have a trial." To this Judge Thomas replied that he did not wish to interfere in any legal business neither did he consider the matter under his jurisdiction. We then told him that the General would not go to Carthage for his mends well knew that the object of his enemies was to take his life. The Judge replied: "This is nothing but his and your imagination and that will be better understood when tried." We assured him that we represented the universal feelings of the citizens of Nauvoo and further that we positively knew that our imaginations were correct perceptions of the situation and that General Smith would not go to Carthage without it was his order or that of his Excellency, the Governor." The Judge then advanced the following, which perhaps appeared to him a clinching argument in favor of his position. ''Would it not be better for one or two men to be killed than for a whole community to be destroyed." We replied to this flimsy apology for not making an exertion to save the innocent. "No we would all prefer to die in defense of innocent citizens, than for one of our members to be massacred by a ruthless mob, and we will show you and all other men that we will protect one another in our rights." He suggested, "Gentlemen, you are very zealous." The conversation closed with our asserting, "No more so than we are determined." We received the letter and made all possible hast to Nauvoo. We arrived at the Mansion House on Saturday at 10:00 o'clock a.m., June 20, 1844. On entering the house we were met by Alpheus Cutler and Reynolds Cahoon with the query intensified in tone and manner: "Boys, you have got back have you? Have you a letter from Judge Thomas?" "Yes." "Let us have it". We told them we could not. That it was necessary to see Joseph. They said we could not see him. In reply to the query of why not, they said they were under no obligation to give us the reason and that it was our duty to give them the letter We told them the instructions Joseph gave us, to press for interview with Judge Thomas, that it had been obtained with much difficulty and we deemed very essential to Joseph's welfare to rehearse to him what the Judge had said. In these conversations Reynolds Cahoon was usually the spokesman. For a short time they withdrew from the room. This gave an opportunity for Bro. Evans and myself to council together and we decided not give them the letter. Presently they returned and with persuasion and argument sought to obtain the letter. Some sharp words passed. We told Mr. Cahoon that this was the second time they had tried to prevent us from seeing Joseph when we deemed it important to do so, and it was useless for them to say anything more so we left the room. Soon after the departure of Messrs. Cahoon and Cutler, Emma Smith's nephew came into the room and said that Mrs. Smith wanted to see us. We followed him to the room. She opened the conversation with the query, "You have a letter from Judge Thomas, haven't you?" We replied, "Yes, and we want to see Joseph." We rehearsed the reason for wishing an interview as we had done before to her door-keepers. In a passing explanation relative to Joseph's absence at the Mansion House at that time, Mr. Call says, "It is simple justice to David Evans and myself to here record some explanation of the situation as facts have developed." It seems impossible for us to get an interview with the Prophet Joseph. If we could not see him it was of next importance that we got the note from Judge Thomas, that we might comprehend the extent of the plot against him and thus be prevented from giving himself up. We were not aware that he was on the west side of the Mississippi River, comparatively safe with a number of his mends. In our interview with Emma Smith, she persuaded us saying, "You ought to have confidence enough in me, boys, to give me that letter and if you want to see Joseph, I will carry any word you wish. You cannot see him, but he shall have this letter and then you shall see him." We retired from the room and counseled together. Seeing no better way to do, we concluded to give her the letter. This was in the afternoon of June 20th, only a few hours after our return from Knoxville. She opened the letter and read it in our presence and that of Messrs. Cutler and Cahoon. We then told them what Judge Thomas said to u!\.and we wished them to tell it to Joseph. Mrs. Smith again assured us that he should be informed of the conversation with Judge Thomas. I have since understood from Dr. Willard Richards that Messrs. Cahoon and Cutler went over the river the same afternoon, after they heard the letter read, and persuaded Joseph to give himself up to his enemies. I never had the privilege of speaking to the Prophet again. On Wednesday, the 24th of June, Joseph rode up to the Legion which was formed near the Masonic Hall and said, with his great heart in every accent, "Boys, I have come to bid you good-bye. I am going to leave you for a while." He turned in the saddle raised his hand and added, "You are my boys and I bless you in the name of Israel's God. Be faithful and true and you shall have your reward, farewell." I little thought, knowing his many deliverance's from the hands of his enemies, that it was the last time I should see him alive. That night I went home to rest with my family, about one fourth of a mile east of the temple on Brigham Street. "On Thursday, the 25th, I as usual, paraded wi1h 1he Legion. Friday and Saturday 261h and 27th attended to 1he same routine of business. Saturday night I was one of1he temple guard. Sunday morning, 1he 28th, I saw O. P. Rockwell come into the city at full speed with the sweat dripping from his horse, shouting with his stentorian voice pitched in the highest notes of intensified sorrow and wrath. "Joseph is killed, they have killed him, they have killed him." An immense tidal wave of sorrow and mourning swept over that devoted city. How many cherished anticipation's were swept from thousands of sorrowing hearts as the pall of shadowy darkness ga1hered over the place. It needed some kindly admonition to check 1he sweeping torrent of afI1iction, by calling 1he 1houghts of 1he people back to 1he practical needs of 1he moment. A kindly providence inspired those who had 1he influence to call1hem toge1her. They were admonished to be quiet and considerate and not allow their intensity of feeling to lead them to commit any over acts unbecoming to Saints and good citizens and leave vengeance wi1h the Lord. On Monday, the 29th of June, I took my family with me to see the remains of 1he martyrs at the Mansion. I have no language to describe my feelings. Sleep and the desire for food left me. I cried mightily to the Lord that I might know what to do. The third night I had a dream or vision in which I saw and talked wi1h Joseph. I was in a congregation of Saints when he assured, 1hat al1hough dead he would still lead the kingdom, the keys of which had been given him and that he should hold them forever. This dream was a good comfort to me and it enabled me to comfort others. I still at times felt a desire to know whether the Prophet Joseph received the letter from Judge Thomas and it was about this time that I went to see Dr. Willed Richard's. I found him very un-well and on his bed. He appeared over-powered with grief. I asked him if Joseph had received the letter from Judge Thomas. He looked up with an amazed expression as though something had suddenly stirred up the depths of his soul and asked, "Are you the one that went with David Evans to Judge Thomas? Did you get a letter? Being answered in the affirmative, with almost startling vehemence he asked, "What did you do with it?" When answered he sprang from his bed, walked across the room and with intensified agony in voice and manner exclaimed, "My God, I wonder what will come to light next." To my query, "Did Joseph get the letter?” he replied, "No!” with great vehemence. He threw himself upon the bed, covered his head and with great effort to control himself said, "You and Bro. Evans come in a day or two and tell me about it." As will be seen that opportunity did not come for sometime. In a few days after these events, I went to Carthage. I saw the blood from the Prophet's veins upon the well curb. The jailer accompanied me through the jail. I saw the hole through the panel door made by the bullet and that killed Hyrum and the stain of his blood upon the floor which the jailer said was impossible to erase. I told him I wanted it to remain as an everlasting testimony against the murders. I saw a number of the murderers. About twenty of them were personally known to me and especially Captain Robert Smith of the Carthage greys, the man who issued the writs against Joseph and Hyrum. I suppose I was the first man that ever testified to him that Joseph Smith was a Prophet of God. He never could look me in the face afterwards. Bishop David Evans A View of His Character Presented June 22, 2001 by John A. Nielsen johnn@davidevans.org . [Portrait of David Evans] Gordon B. Hinckley, President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said, “It is good to look to the past to gain appreciation for the present and perspective for the future. It is good to look upon the virtues of those who have gone before, to gain strength for whatever lies ahead. It is good to reflect upon the work of those who labored so hard and gained so little in this world, but out of whose dreams and early plans, so well nurtured, has come a great harvest of which we are the beneficiaries. Their tremendous example can become a compelling motivation for us all, for each of us is a pioneer in his own life.” The life of David Evans gives us, as his descendants, an ocean of events upon which to reflect and appreciate his dreams, labors and virtues. [Immigrant Ship on Atlantic Ocean] The ancestry of David Evans is that of early Welsh and Scot-Irish colonists. Family tradition holds that his father Israel Evans was born on the Atlantic when Israel’s parents immigrated to the American colonies about 1770. It is not known were the family settled, but the lands along the Susquehanna and its tributaries in Pennsylvania were a common destination for many of the Welsh who sought the religious freedoms incorporated in the “great law” of Pennsylvania’s constitution. [1795 Cecil Co. Map] The family of David’s mother, Abigail Alexander, lived on a 128-acre homestead east of the Big Elk River in Cecil Co., Maryland shown on this map in the upper right. Abigail’s great-grandfather, Joseph Alexander had emigrated with his siblings from Ulster, Ireland in 1683 to this homestead, which was part of the larger tract known as New Munster. [New Munster Signpost] They came to worship in the colonies without the encumbrances of British edict or Irish confinement as the Alexander’s were part of the Scot-Irish Presbyterians who had earlier emigrated from southwestern Scotland at the request of the British King to Ulster, Ireland where they were persecuted by Irish Nationalists during the religious upheaval of the protestant reformation in the 1600’s. [Rock Presbyterian Church] Israel Evans and Abigail Alexander were married at New Munster, 4 October 1802, possibly at this Rock Presbyterian Church, which had earlier been built by the Alexander’s and still stands near Appleton, Maryland. [Water Powered Mill] Israel and Abigail lived on the Alexander homestead, where Josiah Alexander, Abigail’s father, operated a mill. David and his older sister Eliza were born on the homestead here and were no doubt imbued with the independent spirit of their heritage. [Susquehanna and Juanita Rivers] About 1810, David’s parents followed the Susquehanna and Juanita Rivers to Spruce Creek in Huntingdon Co., Pennsylvania, 180 miles northwest at the edge of the Appalachian Mountains as show on the map. This move provided fresh farming ground and new economic opportunity, as the Spruce Creek valley was a corridor for settlers headed to the lands of the Ohio River and its tributaries. Israel built a large log tavern here, a few miles up Spruce Creek, where David’s younger siblings, Jesse (1811), Nancy (1814) and Israel, Jr. (1823) were born. [Juanita River at Spruce Creek Bridge] David and his siblings are sure to have had a principled upbringing here; experiencing the tavern enterprise of their father and possibly the many iron furnaces and forges of the area. They also saw their father’s civic mindedness, as he served as Constable of Franklin Twp. in 1824; and likely gained a meager but valuable education of reading and writing during the winters. Association with their mother’s relatives who had earlier moved to Centre Hall, Centre Co. over the mountain in the northern part of the larger valley is certain to have endowed them with a sense of belonging and family. [Columbiana Co. Map] David courted Mary Beck, whose family were early settlers in Huntingdon Co., and married her 25 July 1826. Soon after, they followed the trail of many others they had seen before, travelling across the Appalachian Mountains to the Ohio River and into Columbiana Co., Ohio, settling in Hanover Twp. near the Big Sandy River shown by the yellow line here. [Israel Evans, Jr. Portrait] About the same time David’s parents moved to Chatham, Ontario, Canada, 50 miles east of Detroit, Michigan where Israel, Jr. achieved prominence. [Israel Evans Portrait] David took up farming at his new home and soon his first two children, Eliza Jane (1827) and Israel (1828) were born. [Alexander Campbell] It may have been here that David began to consider his religious beliefs, as he learned about and possibly joined the Campbellites whose goal, in the language of founder Alexander Campbell, was to co-operate together for “the restoration of pure primitive apostolic Christianity…” [Richland Co. Map] Another move for the young family came in 1830, when David purchased 80 acres of public land in Worthington Twp., Richland Co., Ohio, 100 miles west of their home in Hanover Twp. [Henry and Mary Ann Evans Portraits] Henry (1830) and Mary Ann (1832) were born here where David cleared the land gave the fresh ground its first plowing. [Ohio Farm Landscape] Here, they met Thomas Tripp, a missionary of the recently (1830) formed Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. [Joseph Smith Portrait] Thomas told David and Mary of Joseph Smith and a restoration of the primitive church and with additional teaching, David and Mary came to the belief that a restoration had indeed occurred, for he and Mary were baptized members of this new Church, 6 April 1833 by Thomas Tripp. David soon found that his new religion required great sacrifice from his family and commitment as he was ordained a Priest and soon after an Elder by Thomas Tripp and called to spread the news of the restoration to his neighbors. David sold his farm to finance his missionary activities, and while his family likely resided in Perry Twp., David, in his own words, “proclaim[ed] the gladsome news of the everlasting gospel,” later writing that he had baptized 74 people in 1833 and 30 in one day. For the next eight years, David spent a large part of his time preaching to the citizens of northeast Ohio, northwest Missouri and western Illinois with fair success, but not without faith, persistence and peril to his safety. [Missionary Preaching] While visiting Georgetown in Columbiana Co. in 1835 David wrote, “I was sent by a landlord to a Methodist Preacher…I desired of him to let me preach. He replied, he would not, at the same time making many objections—such as deceivers, false prophets, etc. However he challenged me for a debate; and finding that I could not get any other way to preach to the people of that place—I thought proper to accept the challenge—feeling confident that after the debate I would get an invitation. We met…and held the debate upon the principles of religion. After the debate was over, I was invited to preach, and made an appointment the same evening…compar[ing] the Methodist Episcopal discipline with the sacred scriptures. Since then I have been informed, that all the citizens of that place decided in my favor, with the exception of two individuals.” [Tarring and Feathering] On another occasion, after arriving in Illinois in 1839, David Evans was preaching in the home of Charles Jameson, whose family he had converted in Ohio in 1834. At the close of this meeting, ten men intruded with the intent of tarring and feathering David. At this point, Charles stepped between his good friend and the mob saying, “The first man that lays a hand on David Evans will have to walk over the body of Charles Jameson.” The mob then retreated fearfully. [Mormon Panorama Five/Zion’s Camp] In the midst of these evangelistic efforts, David, in 1834, marched 1000 miles to Jackson Co., Missouri with a group known as Zion’s Camp led by Joseph Smith. This groups purpose was to restore fellow Church members to their properties, which they had been forced to abandon, but the group suffered sickness, bad weather, and lack of proper food and shelter, ultimately returning to Ohio without achieving their desired goal. [Seventy’s Wall Chart] When the Church was further organized in 1835, Joseph Smith turned to those in Zion’s Camp who had been faithful during the long march, calling some to the Quorum of Twelve and others including David Evans to the Quorum of Seventy as listed in this handbill produced years later. This new calling brought with it responsibility as a presiding Elder in the communities David lived. [Newell K. Whitney Store] During the winter of 1835, when his daughter Margaret was born, David sought further education, attending the School of the Prophets in Kirtland, Ohio, which, had the prior year been held in the upper room of the Newell K. Whitney Store. He heard the Lectures on Faith from Joseph Smith and learned penmanship, grammar, arithmetic and other subjects from Sidney Rigdon, Frederick G. Williams and William E. McLellan. [Haun’s Mill Stones] After two winters of schooling in 1836, David resolved to follow the request of Joseph Smith for a number of families to relocate to newly formed Caldwell Co. in Missouri. When spring arrived, David, as Presiding Elder, led a group of families, many of them his converts, from the Perry Twp. area 800 miles west to a location on Shoal Creek were Jacob Haun had established a mill the previous fall. The two grinding stones from this mill are located today in the Breckenridge City Park and Independence LDS Visitors Center. [Haun’s Mill Scenery] David and Mary lived in a home about a mile and a half north of the mill, giving them this view of Shoal Creek at the edge of the trees. While living here they endured the death of their 19-month-old daughter Margaret, as well as the birth and death in 1838 of newborn daughter Araminta. Resentment and intolerance to the Mormon’s beliefs and way of life was building and David with others sought to make peace with the neighboring militia’s in the counties north and east of Haun’s Mill, but feelings overflowed among the Missourians creating the subsequent tragic events of 1838. [Mormon Panorama Eight/Haun’s Mill] Much later in life, as C. C. A. Christensen presented his scroll of canvas paintings in the Lehi Meetinghouse, David was asked to describe the events that followed as he viewed this painting. David with emotion as he relived the happenings of those events, took a long pointer and “gave the direction from which 249 members of the State Militia on the afternoon of 30 October 1838, charged the little village of 30 families on Shoal Creek at Haun’s Mill…He met the mob crying ‘Peace, peace,’ but there was no peace. He pointed to where a woman [was] wounded and [having] fainted fell by the side of a log that afterwards was peppered with bullets.” After detailing the murders of seventeen fellow citizens and how the mob “proceeded to carry away all that was loose and within reach,” his pointer marked on the painting the partially dug well where he later gathered with others to hastily bury the dead. [Mormon Panorama Eleven/Leaving Missouri] The imposed resolution of this conflict was for the Mormons to leave the state of Missouri, which David and the saints at Haun’s Mill ill-prepared as they were, were obliged to do early in 1839 arriving in [Quincy Bridge/Emma] Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois to a populace more sympathetic to their plight. David and his family possibly found refuge with the family of Ezekiel and Charlotte Downs, twelve miles south of Quincy near Payson, Illinois. Soon David and Mary were living in a makeshift log cabin and sleeping in the wagon box where Mary’s last child Emma was born in 1840, but the toll on [Old Payson Cemetery] Mary from the exposure of the past years exacted its price and Mary died in 1841 possibly near this cemetery in Payson, Illinois. These trials gave David substantial opportunity to abandon his convictions, and move on to more comfortable paths, but his character, conviction and faith caused him to persevere in the path he had already chosen, for he continued his missionary teaching in western Illinois with Jacob Foutz as a companion, baptizing the Downs family, Abraham Hunsaker and others. [Barbara Ann Ewell Portrait] He also found a mother for his young children, marrying twenty-year-old Barbara Ann Ewell, 23 November 1841, whose family he had baptized in 1837 while in Missouri. [David Evans Nauvoo Farm picture] A move south of Nauvoo this 10-acre farm purchased from Abraham Hunsaker, still being farmed today, came when David was appointed as Bishop of the Nauvoo Eleventh Ward in 1842. David helped to establish a community field where the poorer saints without means could cultivate gardens to provide food for their families. [Martha, Amanda and Abigail] His charity to those in need was evident from this and other activities, while living on the farm where Martha, Amanda and Abigail were born. [Building the Nauvoo Temple] David also encouraged and collected goods, as an agent of the Church, as the saints sacrificed to build the Nauvoo Temple pictured here about 1846. [Leaving Nauvoo] The relative peace of the years in Illinois did not last long, as intolerance of the Mormons built in Illinois, eventually leading to the murder of Church founder Joseph Smith and preparations to leave Nauvoo in 1846. David chose to follow the counsel of Brigham Young, who now led the Church, in providing wagons, tools, wheat and other supplies to the advance parties, which left David and his own group without sufficient means to leave Nauvoo. [On the Trail near Farmington] As Barbara Ann recounts, “The brethren united together and made wagons for those that had none [and] by that means all had wagons, but not teams, and we were obliged to get away, as the mob was howling around…so my husband…concluded to take the teams they had and move as many as they could. We made a start with what teams we had, crossed the Mississippi River, went a day’s journey” traveling on trail shown here, “and set the families down on the prairie. The next day they took the teams and brought the rest.” [Des Moines River at Farmington, Iowa] Most of the company of poorer saints remained on the prairie near Farmington, Iowa pictured here and worked for oxen and the needed supplies, while some proceeded on to the [Garden Grove] Garden Grove way station. Israel and others in the group likely volunteered at Garden Grove for the Mormon Battalion and traveled on to [Mormon Battalion mustering] Council Bluffs where they were mustered in. Barnet Manzer, while at Council Bluffs, asked for direction from Brigham Young on behalf of the group back at Farmington and was told they should try to reach Mt. Pisgah, open farms and prepare for later travel. [Nodaway River] The remainder of the group at Farmington, with this direction and David as their captain, reached the Nodaway River near the location pictured here, west of Mt. Pisgah late in the fall of 1846, where they set up winter camp, building log huts and putting up hay. As winter set in and supplies ran short, the group decided to head south to the northern Missouri settlements, but lost their way in the snow. [Winter Camp / Joseph J. Smith Portrait] David, with Joseph J. Smith and a man by the name of Shaw in desperation sought help, but found “The people were so prejudiced against the Mormons, they were almost to return without anything. [David] told the people he would return and die with the rest of the people. One gentleman spoke and said, ‘Can't you do something for these men; they seem to be honest?’ The men began to volunteer, and he soon had all the provisions and teams he wanted.” [Maryville Scenery/Courthouse] David then brought the group to Maryville, Missouri, which was the seat of the recently created Nodaway County. [Joseph, Sarah and Susannah] Joseph, Sarah and Susannah were born here. They repaid the benevolence of the people and prepared to complete the trek west to the Salt Lake Valley where the saints were gathering. [Hyde Park/Council Bluffs Scenery] As the group traveled to Hyde Park near Council Bluffs, also known as Kanesville in 1850 and thence for the Salt lake Valley, David’s eldest daughter [Crosland Sculpture] Eliza Jane died of cholera and another child, Emma, injured by a fall from the wagon was carried by David most of the way to ease the pain of the injury. [Parley’s Canyon] These trials seemed to push David on and they arrived as one of the first groups to use the new trail through Parley’s Canyon in September 1850. [Early Lehi Survey Map] Seasoned by the events of his earlier life, David was prepared to direct the establishing of a community on Dry Creek, north of Utah Lake in the center of this map, where he arrived in the spring of 1851 with some who had surveyed the area the previous fall and others who had come with him across the plains. He was soon made Bishop of the Dry Creek Ward and later of the Lehi Ward. [Diversion Weir] His leadership and foresight was soon apparent as water was secured from Dry Creek and a seven-mile ditch from American Fork Canyon (in the background of the picture) to Dry Creek (in the middle of picture) under the initiative of David Evans. [Dry Creek Ditch] “One rod, [about sixteen and on-half feet,] was considered a good days work for a man. Tools were scare and of poor quality, while the sun baked soil was full of cobblestones and otherwise hard to dig. Under such hardships, the men…would undoubtedly have abandoned the enterprise, but for the influence of the Bishop. His good humor and witticisms never failed, and with rare tact and diplomacy he kept the men from brooding over their troubles and inspired them with new hope and courage.” [Log School] Bishop Evans directed other enterprises in early Lehi, such as the building of the log schoolhouse (1851) and later [Lehi Meetinghouse] the adobe meetinghouse (1855) that were used for church meetings, school and community gatherings. [Harwood Fort Wall Painting] In 1854, he surveyed the original sixteen-block city plat and directed the construction of a fort wall surrounding the plat. [Legislative Council House] David also took on other early leadership roles as representative in the first Legislative Assembly of the Utah Territory (1851) (serving at the Council House now located south of the Capitol building in Salt Lake City), Mayor of Lehi and Colonel in the Territorial Militia. [Sarah Thornton Coleman Portrait] David Evans entered polygamy marrying Sarah Thornton Coleman, a widow with children in 1852; [Clymenia Shaw and Edna Hinchcliff Portraits] and in 1854 Clymenia Shaw and Edna Hinchcliff. [David, Jr., Hyrum, Barbara Ann and Rozilla Portraits] During this period, David, Jr., Hyrum, Barbara Ann and Rozilla were born to David and Barbara Ann. Some of the older children were now married and starting families of there own. [James and Edwin] James and Edwin were also born at this time when Johnston’s Army had entered Utah and many of the Saints had moved south into Utah Valley. Polygamy would bring David some heartache, but it also gave him a large family and posterity. [Fruit Tree Orchard] David must have had some amusement when he returned home one day and finding one of his children playing unacceptably in a fruit tree behind the home, called out, “Get out of that fruit tree!” and not one, but several of his children dropped like apples from the branches of the trees in the orchard. [Rebecca Coleman Portrait] David married Rebecca Coleman in 1856 before problems came to a head with Edna in 1857. Apparently some of David’s children did not get along well with Edna and with the loss of two babies and David’s busy activities, Edna divorced David and moved to Riverdale. About this time, David wrote to his family after hearing Brigham Young preach of the Reformation to strengthen the Saints. [David Evans Younger Portrait] Expressing his love and concern he said, “I think of my family, and pray for you daily that the Reformation may sink deep into each of your hearts, and the Lord bless you all with understanding hearts that you may understand some of the things that are coming upon the earth, and also upon the Saints if they repent not. When I come home I shall endeavor to proceed further in setting my family in order that the fire of the Lord may be kindled in every heart in my house and round about it…” David was involved in a number of business interests: wool processing machinery, a threshing machine, a tannery and the [Lehi Union Exchange Buildings] Lehi Union Exchange. Others did not always agree with his methods or tactics in these enterprises and some were vocal in expressing their feelings. [Younger David Evans] David once said, “I am a man of turbulent disposition and have continual Warfare with myself.” He was once counseled by Daniel H. Wells, “you are a little like myself in some respects, rather hasty, have an irascible temper, which it would be better to control… Be this as it may we should sustain ourselves free and unbiased…and seek to conciliate the good feelings of all good men and still pursue the even tenor of our way…” [Margaret Christine Holm Portrait] David married his last polygamous wife Margaret Christine Holm in 1861 and his family was completed. [Barbara Ann Last Children] Barbara Ann bore Eleazer, Mosiah, Mary and Jacob. [Rebecca Last Children] Rebecca bore Harriet, Sarah, Emma Jane, Martha and Ella. [Christine Children] Christine bore John, Margaret, Jane, Hannah, Rachel and Clara. All of his wives and children were engaged in home industry, much of it related to wool in washing, cording, spinning, coloring and weaving it in cloth and clothing. [Spinning Wheel] Some of his daughters later wrote of cherished memories of “the pleasant evenings they enjoyed together busy at handiwork while one of them read aloud to the others.” Education was also important and tradition recounts that “determined that his children should learn to read and write, [he] wrote the alphabet and simple words, by hand, which they copied. As their abilities increased with practice they were given other things to learn.” [David Evans Homes] David retired from the Militia in 1865, the Legislature in 1874, the Exchange in 1880 and as Bishop in 1879 and with each change; more time was spent with family. Lieutenant Jesse Gove once remarked, “The Bishop is a corpulent and quite sociable old man. A multitude of children were running about the house; they were very well behaved, made no noise, kept out of the way and bore a very retiring disposition; they took care of each other, the elder ones acting as matrons to their younger relatives…” Occasionally though, a daughter related that in disciplining, David would “take a little pinch of skin between his thumb and finger and twist it. If he was a little too rough, the little bruise on their arm reminded them to behave.” [Older David Evans Portrait] David Evans death came 23 October 1883, at age 79, after a stroke had left him partially paralyzed. Many attended his funeral and a large procession followed to his burial. Elder Wilford Woodruff made special mention of David Evans when he recorded in his 1883 journal “his testimony to the character of men who died devoted to the Church, true to their covenants and faithful to the last.” As descendants of David Evans, we are now the beneficiaries of his life’s labors, his dreams and his plans. We can appreciate his independence, perseverance, leadership, charity, faith and conviction. We can gain strength from his virtues and motivation as we pioneer our own lives, just as did our pioneer grandfather, David Evans.

History of Israel Evans (born 1770)

Contributor: SGirton Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

compiled by Bryan Chapman (using multiple sources) Israel Evans was born on a ship in the Atlantic Ocean, while his family was coming to America on 15 October 1770. His father was of Welsh descent and mother with German ancestry (according to family records). Israel married Abigail Alexander (born 1782) in Cecil County, Maryland on 4 October 1802. Initially the couple settled on a tract of land in Maryland in an area known as the New Munster strip, owned by Abigail's father (Josiah Alexander), were their first two children were born -- Eliza Evans (born in 1803) and David Evans (born in 1804). Abigail's older brother James had settled in Centre County, Pennsylvania after reviewing the "advantages and disadvantages of the rocky Maryland soil against the claims of available rich land in Central Pennsylvania" (From book, Bishop David Evans & His Family, published in 1972 by J. Grant Stevenson). Sometime after 1804, Israel, Abigail, Eliza and David moved 30 miles to settle in Centre County, Pennsylvania where Israel established a one-room, log tavern near Spruce Creek (recorded in a journal kept by his son, David Evans). Three additional children were born into this family - Jesse Evans (born 1811), Nancy Evans (born 1814), and Israel Jr. (born 1822, although Israel Jr.'s death certificate only lists that he was born in Pennsylvania - no city or county listed). Abigail's parents (Josiah Alexander, born 1752 and Elizabeth Orr Alexander, born 1752) also lived nearby in Centre County, Pennsylvania. Around 1830, after both of Abigail's parents had passed away and there was decline in the tavern business, Israel moved his family to McGregor's Stream (established in 1820), near Chatham-Kent, Ontario, Canada. The move was about 420 miles from Centre Pennsylvania to McGregor's Mill on the North side of Lake Erie (and fairly close to Detroit Michigan, where Israel was eventually died and was buried). Israel established the first carding and grist mill in the area and was very successful. The mills where powered by (source: Bishop David Evans & his family). NOTE: prior to the move to Canada, Israel's children David and Eliza each married and established homes in the United States (didn't go with the family to Canada). It is unknown whether Jesse moved with the family. Children Nancy Evans and Israel Evans Jr. definitely moved with the family as Nancy married William Dolson of Chatham, Ontario, Canada and was also buried there. Israel Jr. also married a native Canadian, Minvera Jane Moe and he is also listed as having died in Middlesex, Ontario, Canada. In 1837, Israel Evans established the Cross Keys Tavern in Chatham, Ontario, Canada. Eventually he turned the business over to his son-in-law William Dolson (Nancy Evan's husband). Dolson also ran the Farmer's Exchange Hotel on the same corner as the tavern. The Farmers Exchange not only served as an Inn in which to sleep, eat and drink, but was also the unofficial town meeting place. Sometime prior to 1846, Israel and his wife Abigail moved to Greenfield, Wayne, Michigan; where their daughter Eliza Evans Daniels (husband was Orville Daniels). Abigail passed away on the 13th of October 1846. Israel Evans passed away on 16 Jun 1851 in Greenfield, Wayne, Michigan. He was buried next to his wife Abigail in Elmwood Cemetery (Lot 18, Section A, Number 8). NOTE: His gravesite is found in the same family plot with his daughter Eliza Evans Daniels and son-in-law Orville Daniels. Glass etchings of both Israel Evans and Abigail Alexander Evans were semi-recently discovered in a trunk, in an attic (near Greenfield, Wayne, Michigan) with a note reading "my great grand father. He was born on the boat coming to America." The photos appear to have been passed down through Eliza Elizabeth Evans Daniels (born 1803), the oldest daughter of Israel and Abigail Evans. Although digital scans of the etchings are somewhat blurry, they do give us an idea of what they looked like. See story entitled "Authenticity of photos of Israel Evans and Abigail Alexander Evans" for more detail (attached as a story to Israel Evan's profile on FamilySearch).

HISTORY OF BISHOP DAVID EVANS - Written by Mrs E J Roberts – June 1939

Contributor: SGirton Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

The father of David Evans (Israel by name) was born on the Atlantic Ocean in the year 1770, when his parents, brothers and sisters were sailing from Wales to “the new land in the west”. Family tradition says that he was the 21st child of the family. His father was Welsh and his mother was of German descent. Israel (father of David Evans) if the oldest ancestor we have record of, but his father (we do not know his name), and some of his older brothers undoubtedly gave service in the Revolutionary War, from the fact that the family landed on the American continent about six years before the War for Independence and at that early period every man and boy, old enough to be of any help, was pressed into service. Israel, born on the sea in 1770, grew to manhood and married Miss Abigail Alexander of Pennsylvania and to them were born three sons and two daughters: Eliza, David, Nancy, Jesse and Israel. David, the subject of this sketch, was the oldest son. He was born 27 October 1804 in Cecil County, Maryland. When only a small child, his parents moved into Pennsylvania and his early training in life on the frontier prepared him for the events which were to follow. 25 July 1826 he married Miss Mary Beck and moved to Columbus County, Ohio where two children, Eliza Jane and Israel, were born to them. From here they moved still farther westward into Richland County, Ohio where they bought and opened up a new farm. Here, three more children came to their humble home: Henry, Mary Ann and Margaret, the last one dying when less than two years old. Here, David Evans and his wife Mary Beck Evans toiled incessantly to subdue soil and make a home for their little family. No modern conveniences of a settled country, as we make our homes today in, but log huts, river water and a camp fire to furnish both warmth and light, were their comforts. Early in 1833 they heard the Gospel message and were convinced in their hearts that it was true and both were baptized members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints on 6 April 1833. On the 11th of the same month, David Evans was ordained a Priest and was ordained an Elder on 21 July 1833. They sold the farm and David commenced travelling and preaching to carry the message of Salvation to others. He went with Zion’s Camp from Ohio to Missouri in 1834. That same year he was preaching and baptizing in Richland County, Ohio and was president of a branch of the Church organized in the Crooked River, Missouri. David Evans was ordained to the first Quorum of the Seventy under the hands pf the Prophet Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon an 29 April 1835, attended the School of the Prophets during the winter of 1835-36 in Kirtland, Ohio, and left Ohio in May 183x for Caldwell County, Missouri in charge of a company of Saints, most of [whom[ he had baptized himself. Here he bought land and again made a home and another daughters was born to them, Arminta, but made a very short stay, as she died when only a few weeks old. David and Mary Beck Evans and their family of small children were with the Saints through all their persecution in Missouri, among which was the terrible Massacre of Haun’s Mill. “Tuesday, 30 October 1838, about 240 of a mob rushed upon the few inhabitants at Haun’s Mill and began firing. David Evans ran toward them, swinging his hat, and cried out for peace.” History of the Church, Period 1, Volume III, page 183. David Evans held an interview with a Mr Comstock, said to be the head man of the mob making the attack at Haun’s Mill, and felt there would be no trouble and “all was well”. He then called the brethren into the mill to pray and the mob came upon them suddenly. In December, with the snow and hardships of winter to face, they were compelled to flee from the State of Missouri, leaving all their property behind. They then went to Adams County, Illinois where David continued to preach and baptize many. Here, another beautiful baby girl, Emma, was born in January 1840. [She] came to brighten the home and here, on 20 June 1841, the wife and mother died, leaving the husband with five children. He then moved to Nauvoo, Illinois where, 20 August 1842, when Nauvoo was organized into wards, David Evans was made Bishop of the 11th Ward, where he remained until the Saints were driven from Nauvoo. Mary beck Evans, first wife of David Evans, was born 18 October 1804 in Huntington County, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Henry Beck and Margaret Beighel. She married 25 July 1826, was the mother of seven children and died on 20 June 1841 in Adams County, Illinois, age 37. Quoting from Church History, Period I, Volume V, page 311, “Saturday 25 March 1843 the High Council, with President Hyrum Smith presiding, sat on an appeal of Benjamin Hoyt, from the decision of Bishop David Evans cease to call certain characters witches or wizards, cease to work with the divining rod, cease burning a board or boards to heal those whom he said were bewitched. On hearing the case, the council decided to conform the decision of Bishop Evans.” David Evans married Barbara Ann Ewell, daughter of Pleasant Ewell and Barbara Farbur, born 16 May 1821 in Albemarle County, Virginia. He had previously baptized the Ewell family in Missouri. 15 April 1844, among Elders appointed to preach the Gospel and electioneer from the Prophet Joseph Smith as candidate for President of the United States, David Evans was appointed to go to Virginia. False reports were being circulated for the purpose of bringing persecution upon the Saints and, 6 June, David Evans, with three others, were appointed as delegates to go to Rocky Run precinct and present a true statement of the facts before the public. Mobs were gathering in the various precincts to make an attack on Nauvoo. 19 June, David Evans, Anson Call and M E Hormer of Hancock, Illinois, were sworn before Aaron Johnson, an acting Justice of the Peace in and for said County, and made affidavit as to the cruel treatment received when they arrived at Rocky Run precinct as delegates from Nauvoo. Little good it did, as the mobs continued in their cruel treatment of the Saints until they martyred the Prophet and Patriarch. 25 January 1845, Bishop David Evans was appointed agent for the Church, to visit, comfort and encourage the Saints to finish the Temple. I have a paper, signed by Brigham Young as President of the Twelve, showing that bonds were given by Father as to his faithful performance of this duty. Winter of 1846 the family was again driven from their home, in company with other Saints, and Bishop David Evans was appointed Captain of a company to cross the plains. Only part of the company had teams and wagons, and he and some other men took as many of the families as possible across the Missouri River and a few days’ journey on the prairie and then returned for the rest. They settled in Nodaway County, Missouri, where they built log huts, remaining three and a half years, and got work to enable them to make wagons, buy teams and provisions and then started for Utah in June 1850. Cholera broke out in camp and several died, among whom was Eliza Jane, oldest daughter of David Evans and his first wife. She had Married Ira Hinckley two years previously. Three children were born to David’s second wife, Barbara Ann, in Hancock County, Illinois and three in Nodaway County, Missouri under very trying circumstances. Israel Evans, oldest son of David and Mary Beck Evans, enlisted in the Mormon Battalion, July 1846, at Council Bluffs. When the general move was made, David was appointed Captain of a company to cross the plains. After three months travel on the plains, the company arrived in Salt Lake Valley September 1850, and remained there until February 1851 when Brigham Young sent David Evans to preside over the little colony located on Dry Creek. David was appointed Bishop of the little town, which was named Evansville in his honor, but he did not like that, so it was changed to Lehi. He laid the town off in blocks and lots with only a pocket compass, tape line and square—not a small task with such small tools. He allowed each man to take up a certain amount of land, in order that there be land left for those to come later [and allowed] himself no more than the other men. These pioneers lived in cabins made of cottonwood logs, the wagon boxes furnishing the doors, with burlap tacked over the windows. Early in 1852, a petition for the incorporation of the city of Lehi was presented to the Territorial General Assembly by Bishop David Evans. Five other cities had been chartered by the general assembly. The granting of the petition made Lehi the sixth city in the territory to be incorporated. The others were Salt Lake City, Ogden, Provo, Manti and Parowan, which had been chartered in 1851. The charter for Lehi was approved 5 February 1852. David was Bishop of Lehi for 28 years and resigned on account of ill health. He was a friend to the Indians, had them eat at his table and allowed them to sleep in the tithing office in stormy weather. After he resigned his office as Bishop, the Indians still insisted he was Bishop and refused to accept the new one, calling him a “boy bishop”. He was elected to the first Legislature of Utah and acted for many years as member of that body. [He] was the first representative from Utah County to serve in the lower house of the legislature. He was Colonel of the Militia and served as Major of the Lehi Military District several terms, was second Mayor of the City (acting three terms) and was postmaster for years. The post was in his house. As the water in Dry Creek could not be relied upon to mature crops, it was imperative that late irrigation water was procured. As the only supply available was the stream in American Fork Canyon, the huge task of digging a ditch seven miles long, from the mouth of the canyon to Lehi was begun under the direction of Bishop Evans. In 1854 he married Clymenia Shaw, in 1856 he married Rebecca Coleman and in 1861 [he married] Margaret Holm. Bishop David Evans was a man of sterling qualities. His career was remarkable for his great industry, frugality and charity to the poor, his public spiritedness and broad self-acquired education. HE was the father of 41 children and, with the help of his wives, was a splendid provider for his large family. The wives prepared and made up 500 pounds of wool into cloth, blankets, etc. [and], each fall, wove carpets, dried fruit, etc. David Evans died 23 June 1883 from the effects of a heavy paralytic stroke. The day of the funeral services, a special train on the Union Pacific was dispatched from Salt Lake City [for] the benefit of his friends and acquaintances. President Wilford Woodruff, Bishop Hunter and many other leading men spoke at the services. His funeral procession, number 115 vehicles, was the largest that had ever been formed in Lehi City. Note: I have in my possession letters written by David H Wells, Lieutenant General commanding the Nauvoo Legion in 1857, instructing David Evans, “Colonel” and “Major”, what to do in preparing the people to defend themselves in case that Johnston’s Army came into the Valley. I have the receipt showing that David Evans paid $6.25 for books when published, dated 1841 in Nauvoo. BATTLE HYMN OF EVANS (Tune: Battle Hymn of the Republic” The ancient clan of Evans raised their standard to the sky; They held their names in honor and their aims were ever high; They always did their duty and were not afraid to die. The clan goes marching on. Chorus: Glory to the tribe of Evans Glory to the name of Evans “Pro patris” our grand old family Then clan goes marching on. The ancient sires of Evans family lived and died in Wales; Where English tongue is spoken now the Evans name prevails; How could the nations but advance when Evans never fails. The clan goes marching on. David, Thomas, Evan, John were fathers of our clan; Posterity of Oliver and Richard never ran; Henry was quite virile, Caleb was a sturdy man. The clan goes marching on. “Bob” Evans was the admiral who was with courage blest; In covered wagon, Caleb led his comrades to the west; The Evans all are loyal and they always do their best. The clan goes marching on. There’s something strong and mighty in the good old family name; The name of Evans shoot high upon the school of fame; For nearly all the Evans have pursued a lofty aim. The clan goes marching on. The House of Evans cherished tradition of the past; With the word’s great movements they have all their fortunes cast; And when they pledge their honor they are loyal to the last. The clan goes marching on. The Evans sons have courage any task or foe to face; The Evans girls are lovely with their beauty, charm and grace. The Evans heaven is a blessing to the human race [?]. The clan goes marching on. If you claim the blood of Evans join the chorus of the Clan; In our Records and Reunions – all according to your plan The name to highest honors, boost it every way you can. The clan goes marching on.

David Evans (27 October 1804 – 23 June 1883)

Contributor: SGirton Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Son of Israel Evans and Abigail Alexander Married Mary Beck, 25 Jul 1826 Married Barbara Ann Ewell, 23 Nov 1841, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Married Sarah Thornton, 18 Oct 1852 Married Clymenia Shaw, 16 Mar 1854, Provo, Utah, Utah Married Edna Hinchliff, 23 Nov 1854 Married Rebecca Coleman, 18 Nov 1861, Salt Lake City, Utah Married Margaret Christine Holm, 4 May 1861 "David Evans the son of Israel and Abigail Evans, was born in Cecil County, Maryland, October 27th, 1804. When a small boy his parents moved to Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1826, when he was married to Mary Beck and moved to Richland County, Ohio. Here he bought and opened up a new farm, where he lived until he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, April 6th, 1833. On the 11th of the same month he was ordained a Priest and immediately commenced traveling and preaching, selling his farm to enable him to prosecute his missionary labors. He was ordained to the office of an Elder on the 21st of July the same year." "In 1834 he went in Zion's camp from Ohio to Missouri, with Joseph Smith the Prophet, for the redemption of Zion, and received his ordination to the First Quorum of Seventy, under the hands of Jospeh Smith and Sidney Rigdon, April 29th, 1835. He attended the School of the Prophets in Kirtland, in the winter of 1835 and 1836, and on May 20th, 1836, left Ohio for Missouri, in charge of a company of saints, most of whom he baptised himself. He settled on Shoal Creak, Caldwell County, buying some land and again making him a home; was with the saints through all their persecutions in Missouri among which was the barbarous massacre at Haun's Mill. In December he was compelled to leave the State without his family, who shortly after followed, leaving all their property behind. Arriving at Payson, Adams County, Ill., in the spring of 1839, he commenced preaching and baptised many persons, some of whom are now prominent members in the Church. He lost his wife June 20th, 1841, after which he moved to Nauvoo and married Barbara Ann Ewell, November 23rd, 1841, she being a member of a family he had baptised in Missouri. In 1842, when Nauvoo was organized into wards, he was ordained a Bishop, August 21st, to preside over the Eleventh Ward. He remained here until the Saints were driven from Nauvoo, when he was appointed Captain of company, many of the members remaining with the company until its arrival in the Valleys, September 15th, 1850." "Moved to Lehi February 15th, 1851, over which place he was appointed to preside as Bishop, the duties of which he faithfully performed for 28 years, tendering his resignation, on account of old age and failing health, August 24th, 1879. He located the City of Lehi and laid it off into blocks and lots with a pocket compass, tape line and square. Was elected to the first legislature in Utah and acted for many years in connection with that body. He was Colonel of Militia, served as Major of Lehi Military District several terms, and held other responsible positions. His death occurred June 23rd, 1883, at 12:30 p.m. For several days he was not well, and on Tuesday, June 19, at 1 p.m., he received a heavy paralytic stroke which completely paralyzed his whole right side rendering him helpless and speechless, in which condition he remained until death." "The funeral services were held in the Lehi Tabernacle at 3 p.m., Sunday June 24th, 1883. A special train was dispatched from Salt Lake City, for the benefit of his friends and acquaintances, among whom were President Woodruff, Bishop Hunter and others; also many came from Provo and adjacent settlements. The services were conducted by President Smoot and addresses were made by Bishop Hunter, President Woodruff, Bishops Hardy, Burten and others. After the services the remains were carried to the cemetary followed by a numerous procession, numbering 115 vehicles containing the relatives and friends of the deceased, this being the largest funeral cortage ever formed in Lehi." (bio by: Utah State Historical Society)

Life Timeline of David Evans

David Evans was born on 27 Oct 1804
David Evans was 14 years old when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founds Singapore. Sir Thomas Stamford Bingley Raffles, FRS was a British statesman, Lieutenant-Governor of British Java (1811–1815) and Governor-General of Bencoolen (1817–1822), best known for his founding of Singapore and the British Malaya.
1819
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David Evans was 21 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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David Evans was 27 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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David Evans was 36 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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David Evans was 55 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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David Evans was 56 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1860
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David Evans was 73 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1877
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David Evans died on 23 Jun 1883 at the age of 78
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for David Evans (27 Oct 1804 - 23 Jun 1883), BillionGraves Record 417638 Lehi, Utah, Utah, United States

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