Albern Allen

22 May 1802 - 3 Jun 1867

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Albern Allen

22 May 1802 - 3 Jun 1867
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Albern joined the Mormon Battalion in Iowa and marched to California where he was mustered out of the Battalion. He then travelled back to Utah. He expected to be reunited with his family. He was disappointed, as his family did not arrive until 1848.
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Life Information

Albern Allen

Born:
Died:

Ogden City Cemetery

11th Avenue
Ogden, Weber, Utah
United States
Transcriber

janettelaurie

May 28, 2013
Photographer

Baldwinga

May 11, 2013

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Getting to Utah

Contributor: janettelaurie Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Albern joined the Mormon Battalion in Iowa and marched to California where he was mustered out of the Battalion. He then travelled back to Utah. He expected to be reunited with his family. He was disappointed, as his family did not arrive until 1848.

Life Sketch of Albern Allen

Contributor: janettelaurie Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Baptism: 31 Mar 1835 by John Murdock. Ordained Seventy Jul 1838 at Far West, Missouri. Residence in Nauvoo: Five miles east of the temple. Endowed: Nauvoo Temple 1 Jan 1846. Presidency of 33rd Quorum of Seventy. Ordained High Priest: 6 Oct 1855 by E. D. Wooley, J. C. Wright Enrolled in High Priest Quorum, SLC: 7 Oct 1855 Sources: Susan Black, Early LDS Members Rec 1:455, Nauvoo Land and Record Files 39; Index 70s Bk B Sel, pg 17, 101. High Priest Qrm Rec, organized 23 Apr 1848, SLC, Utah, LDS Arc. For ten years Albern and his first wife resided in New York. In Cattaraugus, Cattaraugus County, New York. Albern joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1835 (Jensen, LDS Bio, 3:581). Following his baptism, he and his family migrated from New York to Missouri to be with the Saints. They settled in Caldwell County, Missouri, in 1836. In July 1838 Albern was ordained a seventy by Joseph Young (Early Church File). In 1839 he and his family fled from religious persecution to Adams County, Illinois. There, on 7 January 1840, Albern wrote a petition before William Laughlin, justice of the peace, seeking $1320 in redress for his suffering in Missouri (Johnson, Missouri Petitions). He and his family resided in Nauvoo, Hancock, County, Illinois, from 1840 through 1846. There he paid taxes and bought property (Nauvoo City Tax Lists: Nauvoo Property Transactions). He was a member of the Nauvoo 3rd Ward and served as a lieutenant in the Nauvoo Legion (Platte, Nauvoo; Jensen, LDS Bio, 3:581). Albern left Nauvoo to serve a short mission to the southern states (Jensen, LDS Bio, 3:521; Jensen, Chronology, 28). Upon his return to Nauvoo, he participated in temple ordinance work, including baptismal ordinances for his father, Daniel Allen; his uncle, Orlo Allen; and his cousin, Sally Comstock (Nauvoo Baptismal Record). He was sealed to his wife Marcia Allen on 24 January 1846 in the Nauvoo Temple (Nauvoo Temple Register). Albern was called to be the senior president of the Thirty-third Quorum of the Seventy in 1846 (Jenson, Church Chronology). His joy, prosperity, growing civil and Church prominence, ended when religious persecution forced he and his family to flee from Nauvoo to Iowa Territory. In Council Bluffs Albern and his oldest son, Rufus Chester, enlisted in the Mormon Battalion. At the time of their enlistment, Marcia, with her aged parents, brothers and sisters, and the rest of the children, were ill in a wagon (Carter, Treasures, 2:428). As father and son marched with the Battalion they were often asked to serve picket guard duty. On 17 December 1846, near Tucson, they were instructed to fire an alarm and run into camp if more than a dozen Mexicans passed in or out of town. About midnight Albern and Rufus fired their signal guns (Tyler, Concise 228-29). Excitedly, Lieutenant George Oman shouted, "Beat the drum, beat that drum--if you can't beat that drum, beat that fife!" Within ten minutes the men formed a battle line on either side of the road (Pace Diary, 17 Dec 1846; Dunn Journal 17 Dec 1846). Fortunately, the signal proved a false alarm, and no battle ensued. Albern marched with the Battalion from Tucson to Ciudad de los Angeles where he was discharged on 16 July 1847. After being discharged he and his son migrated to the Salt Lake Valley via Fort Hall in 1847. In 1848 they met their family about one hundred miles east of Fort Laramie, on the Platte River. There they learned that two of Albern's younger children, (Rachel, age 10, and Sarah Ann, age 3) had died in Winter Quarters, Nebraska Territory (Carter, Treasures, 2:430). The family migrated from Wyoming to Utah. They located in Ogden, Weber County, in 1849. By 1850 Albern was considered Ogden's most notable farmer, even though his real wealth was only $50 (Utah Federal Census, 1850). He produced 450 bushels of wheat, 40 bushels of Indian corn, 50 bushels of corn, 100 bushels of potatoes, 25 bushels of buckwheat, 100 pounds of butter, and 250 pounds of cheese on a twenty-acre farm valued at fifty dollars (Ogden Standard Examiner, 25 Aug 1974). Albern served as president of the Thirty-third Quorum of the Seventy. He represented Weber County in the Utah Legislature for two terms. He was also a member of the Weber Stake High Council (Esshom, Pioneers, 713). During these busy years, he participated in the law of plural marriage with Mary Ann Hoops Yearsley, Mary Jane Morris, and Jane Elizabeth Hill. On 19 April 1857 Albern was given his patriarchal blessing by James Lake (Patriarchal Blessing Index, 701:19). Later that spring he accepted a mission call to Canada. He crossed the plains pushing his possessions in a handcart. In Genoa, Nancy County, Nebraska, he was asked by Apostles John Taylor and Erastus Snow to remain in Genoa and preside over a small branch of the Church (Carter, Treasures, 2:430). He presided in Genoa until 1858 when he returned to Ogden having never served his mission in Canada. Albern was selected as a counselor to Bishop Edward Bunker of the Ogden Third Ward. He became known as a liberal, broad-minded man who was willing to render both financial and spiritual aid (Carter, Treasures, 2:430).

Albern Allen

Contributor: janettelaurie Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Albern Allen, a member of the Mormon Battalion, was born May 22, 1802, in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, the son of Daniel and Clarissa Allen. Becoming a convert to “Mormonism,” he was baptized in Cattaraugus County, New York, in 1835. The next year, he moved to Missouri with his family and located in Caldwell County, where he passed through the persecutions and hardships which befell the Saints at that time. Thus he was with his brethren at Far West when they were betrayed into the hands of their enemies and laid down their arms. When the Saints were expelled from Missouri, in 1839, he located temporarily in Adams County, Illinois, and became a resident of Nauvoo, Hancock County, in 1840. In Nauvoo, he was ordained an Elder and afterwards a Seventy and filled a short mission to the South. As a military man, he served as a lieutenant in one of the companies of the Nauvoo Legion. In 1846, he became an exile, together with his co-religionists, after sharing in the sufferings of the Saints at Nauvoo. He went with the body of the Church to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he enlisted in the Mormon Battalion, leaving his family sick in a wagon on the prairie. He marched with the Battalion to California, and, having been mustered out of service, he made his way to Great Salt Lake Valley in the fall of 1847, expecting to meet his family there. In this, however, he was disappointed, as his family did not arrive in the Valley until the fall of 1848. During his absence from his family, serving in the Battalion, he lost two of his younger children to death. Locating in Ogden, he was chosen as senior president of the 33rd quorum of Seventy, and later he served two terms in the Utah legislature as a member from Weber County. In the spring of 1857, being called on a mission to Canada, he crossed the plains, together with a company of other missionaries with handcarts. On arriving on the Missouri, he was detained there to preside over a small branch of the church. After his return to Ogden, in 1858, he acted as a counselor to Bishop Edward Bunker of the Ogden Third Ward. As a faithful and exemplary Latter-day Saint, he died at Ogden June 2, 1867, leaving quite a large family of children, he having married several wives. Brother Allen was known universally as a liberal and broad-minded man, always willing to render both financial and spiritual aid whenever it was needed. ALBERN ALLEN & MARCIA ALLEN Albern Allen, born 22 May 1802, Cornwall, Litchfield, CT, married Marcia Allen, 1826, Hartwick, Otsego, NY, died 2 Jun 1867, Ogden, Weber, UT In a rapidly changing world, Albern Allen was born four months after Napoleon was elected President of Italian (Cisalpine) Republic, and just one day before Washington DC was incorporated. We know little of Albern’s childhood, other than the fact that he was born in Cornwall, Leitchfield, Connecticut on 22 May, 1802 to Daniel Allen (2 Mar 1777 - 22 Dec 1835) and Clarissa Dewey (28 Feb 1773 – 30 Dec 1804). But by the time he was four years of age, we know Daniel Allen had moved to Hartwick, Otsego, New York, as evidenced by his younger brother, Daniel Dewey being born there. Yes, that would mean that Daniel had either remarried by then, or Clarissa didn’t die until about 1806, but this hasn’t been resolved yet. One thing we do know is that Albern met, fell in love, and married Marcia Allen (6 Nov 1804 - 25 Feb 1866) sometime in 1826 in that same county. Marcia and Albern were not related, even though they shared the same last names. Records going back eight generations show their lines going different directions. At some point, Albern and Marcia moved to Cattaraugus, Cattaraugus, New York, and joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1835. Following his baptism, he and his family migrated from New York to Missouri to be with the Saints. They settled in Caldwell County, Missouri, in 1836. In July 1838 Albern was ordained a seventy by Joseph Young (Early Church File). Just a few months later, the terrible persecutions of the Missouri saints reached their peak, beginning with the slaughter at Haun’s Mill. History tells that Haun’s Mill could have been only the appetizer to the slaughter that almost happened in Farr West as told in the following account: “The mob grew bolder and bolder, and committed depredations upon the settlements in Caldwell and Davies Counties, so that our people had to flee into Far West from all quarters to save themselves. Many could not get into houses, and had to take shelter in wagons, tents, and under bedclothes, and while in this situation we had a severe snow storm, which rendered their sufferings intense. On the morning of November 1st, Hinkle [a leader of the militia that was to exterminate the saints] took another step to carry out his nefarious designs. The bugle sounded for the brethren to assemble, armed and equipped. Every man went out well armed and was paraded and delivered over to the enemy. The brethren were surrounded and required to surrender their arms, and were then guarded all day while the rapacious soldiery went from house to house, plundering, pillaging, and destroying, and even driving many helpless women and children from their homes, and committing deeds even worse than these in some instances. A court-martial was held by the officers and priests, and without being heard in their own defense, the brethren were sentenced to be shot on Friday morning on the public square in Far West, in the presence of their wives and families. At this unprecedented action General Doniphan objected, saying he would have nothing to do with such cold-blooded actions, and he would draw off his brigade from the army. This probably saved the lives of the prisoners, as the sentence was changed and the prisoners were taken to Independence, Jackson County.” Though they were not slaughtered, they were forced to leave their homes and belongings and move on in the middle of winter. So, in the winter of 1838-39 he and his family fled from religious persecution to Adams County, Illinois. In doing so, they were forced to sign over their Missouri property of 80 acres to the mob. Several sources show that Albern filed a petition on 7 January, 1840 before justice William Laughlin of Adams County, IL, seeking $1320 in redress for his suffering in Missouri (Johnson, Missouri Petitions). The petition included $150 to leave the state, $600 for land, $100 in stock, $50 in beef and pork, $20 for farming utensils, $400 moving because of extermination order. He and his family resided in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, from 1840 through 1846. There he paid taxes and bought property (Nauvoo City Tax Lists; Nauvoo Property Transactions). He was a member of the Nauvoo 3rd Ward and served as a lieutenant in the Nauvoo Legion. The picture shown here is at the address listed for Albern Allen in Nauvoo. It is uncertain how much of it is of original materials. Albern left Nauvoo to serve a short mission to the southern states. Upon his return to Nauvoo, he participated in temple ordinance work, including baptismal ordinances for his father, Daniel Allen; his uncle, Orlo Allen; and his cousin, Sally Comstock. He received the endowment on 1 January, 1846 and was sealed to his wife Marcia Allen on 24 January 1846 in the Nauvoo Temple. Albern was called to be the senior president of the Thirty-third Quorum of the Seventy in 1846 (Jenson, Church Chronology). Life in Nauvoo was beautiful. The Allen family prospered along with the growing and thriving city of Nauvoo. But those six years of prosperity and happiness ended abruptly also when the mobs drove them from that city. We don’t have any record of Albern’s work while in Nauvoo, but we do know he was skilled at making ox bows. Thomas Bullock kept a journal and made the following statement concerning Albern: “Attending the oxen in the wood all day also in the evening assisting Albern Allen to make the ox bows. Harder work than I’ve been used to. Beautiful day.” This sounds like our Albern was used to hard work. The picture of the ox yoke shows the bent wooden bows fitted in the yoke to keep the oxen harnessed to the wagon. The Nauvoo exodus began on February 1846 in a cold snowstorm. The destitute saints had run out of supplies, resources, and had little hope of any source of income by this time. But the national scene was focused on Mexico and that would prove a boon to the starving and freezing saints. The next month saw some skirmishes with Mexico and the United States declared war on Mexico on May 13. That opened a door of opportunity for the saints to join in the war and provide for their families during these difficult times. After arriving in Council Bluffs, Albern and his oldest son, Rufus Chester, enlisted in the Mormon Battalion in Company “A”. At the time of their enlistment, Marcia, with her aged parents, brothers and sisters, and the rest of the children, were ill in a wagon. It is difficult to imagine how hard it must have been for these two men to leave their families in such desperate circumstances. Again, quoting from the pioneer records of Nauvoo: “As father and son marched with the Battalion they were often asked to serve picket guard duty. On 17 December, 1846, near Tucson, they were instructed to fire an alarm and run into camp if more than a dozen Mexicans passed in or out of town. About midnight Albern and Rufus fired their signal guns (Tyler, Concise, 228-29). Excitedly, Lieutenant George Oman shouted, "Beat that drum, beat that drum--if you can't beat that drum, beat that fife." Within ten minutes the men formed a battle line on either side of the road (Pace Diary, 17 Dec., 1846; Dunn Journal, 17 Dec., 1846). Fortunately, the signal proved a false alarm, and no battle ensued. Albern marched with the Battalion from Tucson to Ciudad de los Angeles where he was discharged on 16 July,1847. After being discharged, he and his son migrated to the Salt Lake Valley via Fort Hall in 1847. In 1848 they met their family about one hundred miles east of Fort Laramie, on the Platte River. There they learned that two of Albern's younger children (Rachel, age 10, and Sarah Ann, age 3) had died in Winter Quarters, Nebraska Territory. The family migrated from Wyoming to Utah. They located in Ogden, Weber County, in 1849. By 1850 Albern was considered Ogden's most notable farmer, even though his real wealth was only $50 (Utah Federal Census, 1850). He produced 450 bushels of wheat, 40 bushels of Indian corn, 50 bushels of corn, 100 bushels of potatoes, 25 bushels of buckwheat, 100 pounds of butter, and 250 pounds of cheese on a twenty-acre farm valued at fifty dollars. Albern served as a president of the Thirty-third Quorum of the Seventy. He represented Weber County in the Utah Legislature for two terms. He was also a member of the Weber Stake High Council (13). During these busy years, he participated in the law of plural marriage with Mary Ann Hoops Yearsley, Mary Jane Morris, and Jane Elizabeth Hill. The following is quoted from an article from the Nauvoo Visitor Center: “On 19 April, 1857 Albern was given his patriarchal blessing by James Lake (patriarchal Blessing Index, 701: 19). Later that spring he accepted a mission call to Canada. He crossed the plains pushing his possessions in a handcart. In Genoa, Nance County, Nebraska, he was asked by Apostles John Taylor and Erastus Snow to remain in Genoa and preside over a small branch of the Church (Carter, Treasures, 2:430). He presided in Genoa until 1858 when he returned to Ogden having never served his mission in Canada. Albern was selected as a counselor to Bishop Edward Bunker of the Ogden Third Ward. He became known as a liberal, broad-minded man who was willing to render both financial and spiritual aid. On 16 November, 1982, at four in the afternoon, descendants of Albern Allen met at his gravesite to place a Mormon Battalion marker. ” Marcia Allen’s parents were also converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in July of 1836 and came west as pioneers. Their story will be listed under the name of Gideon Allen. I find the following relationship interesting. Albern & Marcia’s oldest son was Rufus Chester Allen, my 2ggf. In 1852, Albern married Mary Ann Hoops of my Yearsley line as a second wife; her husband had died at Rocky Ford, IA. Her oldest daughter was Lavenia Elizabeth Hoops Yearsley, who Rufus Chester married in 1853. That means that Rufus Chester married his step-sister, but that relationship was not a blood line. It also means that Albern married my 2ggm on the Yearsley side of the family; therefore, I have blood lineage through Albern and both his first and second wife. It is no wonder that some genealogy lines get mixed up. Albern Allen died on 3 June, 1862, in Ogden, Weber, Utah as the world continued to transform itself toward the modern age of machinery and world governments. It was just 17 days before the world found that J Gilpatrick had won the 1st Belmont aboard “Ruthless”, and just 13 days after British Parliament rejected John Stuart Mills law on women suffrage. By LaRon Taylor, 2006

Pioneer Overland Trail Story References

Contributor: janettelaurie Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Albern Allen Individual Information BIRTH DATE 22 May 1802 DEATH DATE 3 June 1867 GENDER Male His death date and the spelling of his given name are confirmed by the inscription on his gravestone. Companies Levi W. Hancock/Jefferson Hunt/James Pace/Andrew Lytle Company (1847) Approximate age at departure: 45 Sources "Died," Deseret News [Weekly], 19 June 1867, 200. Source Location Church History Library, Salt Lake City 1850 Utah Census Source Location Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Internet Web Site Find A Grave Source Location Internet Web Site New FamilySearch/Family Tree Source Location Internet Web Site Ricketts, Norma Baldwin, The Mormon Battalion: U.S. Army of the West, 1846-1848, [1996], 20-28, 238-40. Source Location Church History Library, Salt Lake City

Albern Allen July 4, 1847 Dedication of Fort Moore

Contributor: janettelaurie Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

http://californiamilitaryhistory.org/FtMoore2.html California State Military Department The California Military Museum Preserving California's Military Heritage The Mexican War and California The Two Forts of Fort Hill The Siege of Los Angeles and Fort Moore By Mark J. Denger California Center for Military History It is a fact not generally known that there were three fortifications and two forts planned, the first only partially constructed, on what has been called Fort Hill. The Siege of Los Angeles Fort Hill was a prominent hill overlooking the pueblo of Los Angeles. Its commanding view of the city made it a strategic location. One of the historical fictions that appears in most of the "write ups" of Fort Hill is the statement that Fort Moore was built by Capt. Archibald H. Gillespie, USMC. In all fairness, the first fortification on Fort Hill was indeed established when Capt. Gillespie moved to erect a temporary barricade of earth-filled sacks and mounted his cannon during the siege upon the Americans at Los Angeles. On August 11, Stockton had begun his march on Los Angeles. He took with him a battery of four guns. Col. Fremont, who had been sent to San Diego with his battalion of 160 men, had begun his march to join Stockton on August 8. He took with him 120 men, leaving about 40 to garrison San Diego. Fremont's troops joined Stockton just south of the city, and at 4:00 P.M. on August 13, the combined force, numbering nearly 500 men, entered the pueblo of Los Angeles without opposition. With the city of Los Angeles in their possession, Commodore Stockton appointed Capt. Gillespie military commandant of the southern department, with headquarters at Los Angeles, and assigned him a garrison of fifty men. He left Los Angeles on September 2d. Fremont, with the remainder of his battalion, took leave of the place a few days later. Nearly all historians who have written upon this subject lay the blame for the subsequent uprising of the Californians and their revolt against the rule of the military commandant, Gillespie, to his petty tyrannies. Bancroft states: "Gillespie had been left by Stockton as military commandant of the south, with a garrison of fifty men at Los Angeles. His instructions were to maintain military rule in accordance with the commodore's proclamation; but he was authorized to grant exemption from the more burdensome restrictions to quiet and well-disposed citizens at his discretion; and a lenient policy in this respect was recommended. From a purely political point of view, Gillespie's task was not a difficult one; that is, there was no disposition on the part of the Angelinos to revolt against the new regime. . . . Gillespie had no special qualifications for his new position; and his subordinates were still less fitted for their duties. They were disposed to look down upon Californians and Mexicans as an inferior race, as a cowardly foe that had submitted without resistance. . . ." Scarcely had Stockton and Fremont, with their men, left the city before trouble began. Within two weeks from the time Stockton sailed from San Pedro hostilities had begun and the city was in a state of siege. Bancroft concludes: "The result was an actual revolt; and there can be little doubt that Gillespie and his men were largely responsible for this result. Gillespie, writing in the Sacramento Statesman in 1858, thus describes the first attack: "On the 22d of September, at three o'clock in the morning, a party of sixty-five Californians and Sonorenos made an attack upon my small command quartered in the government house. We were not wholly surprised, and with twenty-one rifles we beat them back without loss to ourselves, killing and wounding three of their number." Gillespie left the government house and had taken position of Fort Hill, where he erected a temporary barricade of sacks filled with earth and mounted his cannons. Besieged by the Californians, Gillespie's situation was growing more desperate each day. Eventually, 600 indignant local citizens completely surrounded his forces. Finally, Gen. Flores issued his ultimatum to the Americans –surrender within twenty-four hours or take the consequence which might have resulted in the massacre of the entire garrison. Articles of capitulation were drawn up and signed by Gillespie and the leaders of the Californians. On September 30, the Americans marched out of the city with all the honors of war, the fortification abandoned. Most historians who have written upon this subject have incorrectly associated this first fortification by Capt. Gillespie as one of the two forts built on Fort Hill. The fortification on Fort Hill was just that –a fortified position. The first fort would not be established until Los Angeles was recaptured by Stockton and Fremont. The Unnamed (Emory) Fort The first of these two forts was actually designed by Lieut. William H. Emory, topographical engineer of General Kearney's staff, and its work was begun under his direction by order of Commodore Stockton. At the time, reports led Stockton to believe that Gen. Flores' army was encamped in the neighborhood of the city and was making plans to retake it, so Stockton decided to fortify the city. We learn from Lieut. William H. Emory, from his "Notes of a Military Reconnaissance," that on January 11, Stockton had ordered Emory "to select a site and place a fort capable of containing a hundred men. With this in view a rapid reconnaissance of the town was made and the plan of a fort sketched, so placed as to enable a small garrison to command the town and the principal avenues to it. The plan was approved." The fort referred to by Emory is that of the first. The second fort, Fort Moore, appears to have been established on the same location, but some three months after the first. A main purpose of the fort was to prevent rebellion so its principal embrasure commanded church and plaza, most probable rallying points. One hundred men were planned to garrison it. Emory's notes continue: "January 12. —I laid off the work and before night broke the first ground. . . . It was therefore desirable to establish a fort which, in case of trouble, should enable a small garrison to hold out till aid might come from San Diego, San Francisco or Monterey, places which are destined to become centers of American settlements." Bancroft confirms this by simply stating "Emory broke ground for his fortifications on the 12th. . . ." Emory goes on to state: "January 15. —The details to work on the fort were by companies. I (Emory) sent to Capt. Tilghman, who commanded on the hill, to detach one of the companies under his command to commence the work." Capt. Tilghman furnished a company of artillery (from the ship CONGRESS). As progress was being made on the fort, Col. John C. Fremont, with his battalion of 450 men, arrived in the city from Cahuenga. On January 18, Kearney, having quarreled with Stockton about who should be governor of the conquered territory, prepared to leave for San Diego, taking with him Lieut. Emory and the other members of his staff, and the dragoons. Stockton appointed Col. Fremont governor, and Col. Russell, of the battalion, secretary of state, and then took his departure to San Diego, where his ship, the CONGRESS, was lying. The sailors and marines departed on the 20th for San Pedro to rejoin their ships, and work on the fort was abandoned. Lieut. Emory concludes: "Subsequent to my leaving the Ciudad de Los Angeles, the entire plan of the fort was changed, and I am not the projector of the work finally adopted for defense of that town." This first fort, never completed by Lieut. Emory, was thereby disbanded and never named. Fort Moore A second plan for a fort, Fort Moore, much like the first, was located on what was earlier called Fort Hill. Planned by Lieut. J. W. Davidson, of the First U.S. Dragoons, it was built primarily by the men of the Mormon Battalion and named Fort Moore. Benjamin D. Moore, after whom the fort was named, was captain of Company A, First U.S. Dragoons. He was killed by a lance thrust in the disastrous charge at San Pasqual. On March 17, the famed Mormon Battalion under Col. Philip St. George Cooke had arrived in Los Angeles. Three months after work had ceased on Emory's fort, on April 23, the construction of the second fort was begun. The work on the fort was predicated upon rumors of an approaching of the enemy. On May 3, Col. Cooke writes: "A report was received through the most available sources of information that Gen. Bustamente had cross the gulf near the head in boats of the pearl fishers, and at last information was at a rancho on the western road 70 leagues below San Diego." Col. Stevenson's regiment of New York volunteers had arrived in California, and two companies of the volunteers had been sent to Los Angeles. The report that Col. Cooke had received large reinforcements and that the place was being fortified, was supposed to have frightened Bustamente into abandoning the recapture of Los Angeles. The scare, however, had but one effect –completion of the fort. The old fort was located along the easterly line of Fort Street (what is now Broadway). It began near the northerly line of Dr. Wills' lot and extended southerly to the fourth lot south of Fort Moore Place, a length of 400 feet. It was a breastwork with bastions and embrasures for cannon. The principal embrasure covered the church and plaza. It was a strong position for two hundred men. In the rear of the fort was a deep ravine which ran diagonally from an old cemetery to Spring Street just south of Temple. A road to the cemetery led up this ravine. The place was known as the Canada de Los Muertos (meaning "the canon of the dead"). The material for the fort was obtained from timber in the San Gabriel mountains, with the volunteer Mormon battalion doing most of the work. On May 13, Col. J. B. Stevenson succeeded Col. Cooke in command of the southern military district. As the fort approached completion, Col. Stevenson's attention turned to finding a suitable flagstaff as there was no tall timber in the vicinity of Los Angeles. The colonel wanted a flagstaff that would be an honor to his field works –nothing less than a pole 150 feet high. A local Californian, Juan Ramirez, claimed to have seen some trees in the San Bernardino Mountains that were "mucho alto" –very tall –just what was needed for a flagstaff. Ramirez, with a small army of Indian laborers, under an escort of ten soldiers from the Mormon battalion departed for the headwaters of Mill Creek in the San Bernardino Mountains. Within the month Juan Ramirez's cavalcade and its Mormon escort emerged with "two tree trunks, one about 90 feet and the other 75 or 80 feet long." The carpenters among the volunteers spliced the two pieces of timber together and soon fashioned a beautiful flagstaff a hundred and fifty feet in length. The flag pole was raised near what is now the southeast corner of North Broadway (known then as Fort Street) and Fort Moore Place (which runs parallel to Hill Street). By the first of July work had so far progressed on the fort that Col. Stevenson decided to dedicate and name it on the 4th. He issued an official order for the celebration of the anniversary of the birthday of American Independence at Los Angeles. "At sunrise a Federal salute will be fired from the field work on the hill, which commands this town, and for the first time from this point the American standard will be displayed. At 10 o'clock every soldier at this post will be under arms. The detachment of the 7th Regiment, New York Volunteers, and 1st Regiment, U.S. Dragoons (dismounted), will be marched to the field work on the hill, when, together with the Mormon battalion, the whole will be formed at 11 o'clock A. M. into a hollow square, when the Declaration of Independence will be read. At the close of this ceremony the field work will be dedicated and appropriately named; and at 12 o'clock a national salute will be fired. The field work at this post having been planned and the work constructed entirely by Lieut. Davidson of the First Dragoons, he is requested to hoist upon it for the first time, on the morning of the 4th, the American Standard. It is the custom of our country to confer on its fortifications the name of some distinguished individual who has rendered important services to his country either in councils of the nation or on the battlefield. The commandant has therefore determined, unless the department of war shall otherwise direct, to confer upon the field work erected at the port of Los Angeles the name of one who was regarded by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance as a perfect specimen of an American officer, and whose character for every virtue and accomplishment that adorns a gentleman was only equaled by the reputation he had acquired in the field for his gallantry as an officer and soldier, and his life was sacrificed in the conquest of this territory at the battle of San Pasqual. The commander directs that from and after the 4th instant it shall bear the name of Moore." On July 4, 1847 a great ceremony took place as planned. Capt. Stuart Taylor was selected to read the Declaration of Independence in English, and Stephen C. Foster read it in Spanish. The day's festivities ended with a fandango (dance) where both Mormon and Mexican, native and soldier, met in a mixing of cultures, as the conquerors from the US Army garrison, and the Californios who had just a few months before, fought bravely for their independence, met in peace and reconciliation. At its close, even the locals were known to shout "Viva Los Estados Unidos!" (Long live the United States.) Fort Moore was officially dedicated on July 4, 1847, and remained in service only until 1853, when it was decommissioned. In later years Fort Moore was leveled and became a public playground. Today, on the site where Fort Moore once stood, a memorial honors the troops who helped too win the Southwest. The memorial is located on Hill Street, between Temple and Ord Streets, and overlooks the Civic Center, and consists of an artificial waterfall and a series of decorative friezes. It was here that the flag of the United States was raised on July 4, 1847 by United States troops at the first Independence Day celebration held in Los Angeles. In closing, another of the historical fictions that appears in most of the "write ups" of old Fort Moore is the statement that it was built by Fremont. There is absolutely no foundation for such a statement. As has been shown, Gillespie's fortification established no fort; Emory's fort was begun before Fremont's battalion reached Los Angeles, and work ceased on it when Stockton's sailors and marines left the city; and Davidson's fort, Fort Moore, was begun while the battalion was at San Gabriel, a short time before it was mustered out. Fremont left for Monterey shortly after the Mormon battalion began work; and when it was completed, or rather when work stopped on it, he had left California.

Account of Albern Allen from Diary of Henry James Hudson

Contributor: janettelaurie Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Source: "Henry Hudson and the Genoa Settlement," ed. by Marguerette R. Burke, Nebraska History, Vol. 41, 1960. Jan 1, 1858 Friday the morning was cold and windy but beautiful and clear. The meeting house was pronounced ready for the com (mittee) of arrangements to arrange for the party. At one o'clock the saints began to assemble themselves together. At 1h past 2 o'clock p. m. Elder Allan our beloved president called the saints to order by singing come "Come all ye sons of God" when our meeting house was dedicated to the worship of God and as a place wherein the saints of Genoa can meet for their mutual improvement and a more close and intimate association with the Holy Ghost the Comforter. After which the com. of arrange­ments commenced the amusements of the day for which purpose we had come together. Some time having been spent in singing and recitation the com. announced a re­cess so that the tables could be spread. At 5 o'clock the saints about 95 in number sat down to a repast that aston­ished all that partook of the same. The tables were abundantly supplied with bread butter and meat and the piles of pies, tarts and custards that the sisters exercised their ingenuity to. produce together with potatoes and turnips nicely mashed with cream were. faithfully and mercilessly discussed if the empty plates and dishes are the testimo­nials of the evening, Bro. Allan gave the saints the prive­lege of a dance which was very generally indulged in by both old and young. After some 3 hours thus spent some more singing and recitations and a few very appropriate remarks from our president expressing himself well satis­fied with the saints the party and the committee and bless­ing them in · the name of Israels God. The dancing was again resumed till about 1 o'clock a.m. when the meeting of the saints was dismissed by prayer from Elder Hudson. Jan 2, 1858 A day of splendor the sun shining 'in its strength the air pleasant. The committee at 1 p.m. made arrang·ements for the children to enjoy themselves for our meeting house is not large enough to entertain both parents and children together. After amusing themselves in the dance and by singing and recitations they sat down 50 in number at 5 to toast an<:l milk, full and ample justice having been done to the same Bro. Allan spoke a few words of encouragement to· them both instructive and inspiring for they often responded in child like. simplicity which is so characteristic of children when interested ih conversa­tion. Thus ended the first social gathering of the Saints in Genoa without anything transpiring calculated to offend or mar the good feeling of the ·saints.

Life Timeline of Albern Allen

Albern Allen was born on 22 May 1802
Albern Allen was 10 years old when Charles Dickens, English novelist and critic (d. 1870) Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are still widely read today.
1812
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Albern Allen was 23 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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Albern Allen was 30 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Albern Allen was 38 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Albern Allen was 57 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Albern Allen died on 3 Jun 1867 at the age of 65
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Albern Allen (22 May 1802 - 3 Jun 1867), BillionGraves Record 4016417 Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States

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