Alanson David Allen

2 May 1829 - 3 Mar 1887

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Alanson David Allen

2 May 1829 - 3 Mar 1887
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ALANSON DAVID ALLEN OBITUARY Birth: May 2, 1829 Tompkins New York County New York, USA Death: Mar. 3, 1887 Huntsville Weber County Utah, USA Son of Albern Allen and Maria Allen Married Chastina Hadlock, 10 Nov 1850, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Children - Emma Rozina Allen, Mary Vilette Allen,
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Life Information

Alanson David Allen

Born:
Died:

Ogden City Cemetery

11th Avenue
Ogden, Weber, Utah
United States
Transcriber

DdraigGoch

May 16, 2013
Photographer

Baldwinga

May 11, 2013

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Alanson David Allen Obituary

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

ALANSON DAVID ALLEN OBITUARY Birth: May 2, 1829 Tompkins New York County New York, USA Death: Mar. 3, 1887 Huntsville Weber County Utah, USA Son of Albern Allen and Maria Allen Married Chastina Hadlock, 10 Nov 1850, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Children - Emma Rozina Allen, Mary Vilette Allen, Larinda Allen, Marinda Allen, Hyrum Allen, Andrew Stephen Allen, Orin Daniel Allen, David Orlo Allen, Amanon Allen, Emeline Clarissa Allen, Joseph Samuel Allen, Esther Allen, Emily Christina Allen, Sarah Ann Allen, Albern Alanson Allen LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 2, p. 338 Allen, Alanson David, a Utah pioneer of 1847, was born May 2, 1829, in the State Vermont, the son of Albern and Marcia Allen. He joined the Church when a boy and migrated to the West, together with his mother, his father having gone to California with the Mormon Battalion. He met Alanson and his mother in G. S. L. Valley in the fall of 1847. Alanson D. was ordained an Elder and subsequently a Seventy; he held the latter office at the time of his death. In 1850 he married Christine Hadlock, who was born April 2, 1828. By her he became the father of fourteen children. In the seventies, at the time of the John D. Lee trials, Brother Allen filled a short mission to Independence, Missouri, to settle difficulties and disputes. He died in March, 1888.    Family links:   Parents:   Albern Allen (1802 - 1887)   Maria (Marcia) Allen Allen (1804 - 1866)    Spouse:   Chastina Hadlock Allen (1828 - 1913)*    Children:   Albern Alanson Allen (1852 - 1929)*   Orin Daniel Allen (1854 - 1937)*   Hyrum Allen (1862 - 1950)*   Joseph Samuel Allen (1863 - 1933)*   Mary Viette Allen (1870 - 1901)*   David Orlo Allen (1872 - 1941)*   Andrew Stephen Allen (1874 - 1935)*   *Calculated relationship  Burial: Ogden City Cemetery Ogden Weber County Utah, USA Plot: A-2-10-5W

Alanson David Allen

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Alanson David Allen was born 2 May 1829 at Deposit, Delaware County, New York. He was the son of Albern and Marcia Allen. He was next to the eldest in a family of nine children. Albern Allen joined the Church in New York, when Alanson Allen was 8 years of age, and they journeyed with the Saints to Missouri. All the family was ready and started to come to Utah. When at Winter Quarters, Albern Allen and his eldest son, Rufus Allen joined the Mormon Battalion, and traveled across country in Company A under the command of Jefferson Hunt. They went to California, were discharged from there and came back to Utah, where he later met his family. Alanson (David) Allen stayed on at Winter Quarters with his mother and brothers and sisters. He had the responsibility and care of the family. Along in the summer, he realized he would have to secure food from somewhere to supply the family for winter. He went back to the Eastern part of Missouri and purchased the crops on a farm, harvested them, and took them to Winter Quarters. They had food to carry them through the winter. He was just sixteen years of age. He knew the Prophet Joseph Smith, and talked with him several times. He was near the scene at the time of the martyrdom; in fact, he heard the shot that killed him. He was at Nauvoo when they had trouble with the mob; when they weren’t going to let any more of the Saints go out West. Brigham Young told them to obey the men in charge of their groups, and all would be all right. This they did and everything did turn out all right. They had many trying hardships on their journey across the plains, but arrived safely in Utah in October 1849, in George A. Smith’s company. Their father who had arrived from California before them met them in Ogden. They had a little place and lived right in the main part of what is now Ogden City’s business district. In September 1850, he was married to Chastina Hadlock. They lived in Ogden about one year, when they were called to go to Willard, and from there, to what is known as Three Mile Creek, where they lived about six years. Then they went back to Ogden for about three years. He was a farmer and always had several cows; they pastured the cows just across Weber River in the vicinity of Wilson Lane. They lived in a little log cabin close to where the Union Depot now stands. At this time President Brigham Young called them to go to Hyrum, Cache County and help with the settlement there. They remained there about four or five years. He had a nice, neat, well-kept farm, on which he kept cows, pigs, horses, and always had several head of sheep; from which they secured the wool to make their clothing. After living in Hyrum six years, they moved to Huntsville, Weber County, where they lived the remainder of their lives. In 1857, he and five other men, Franklin Cummings, Thomas Bingham, Bill Brown, Nathan Slater and Bailey Lake, were sent to Salmon River to help a company of immigrants, who were having trouble with the Indians. Bailey Lake was killed and they all suffered terrible from exposure. Alanson Allen was never well after that. He was made Captain of the Militia in 1861 and served in this capacity until 1866; during which time they had the Echo Canyon War in which he took an active part. At this time there were a great many Indians around and the settlers were having a good deal of trouble with them, all through the country. One evening, Aunt Sarah Ann went out to the ditch to get some water and an old Indian came up behind her. She turned, saw him and screamed; the dog grabbed the Indian. Alanson heard the scream and ran out before she was harmed. The Indian was determined to kill the dog, but Alanson talked to him, gave him some food to take with him; he left and never came around to molest them again. One winter in the month of February, an old Indian came to the home and wanted flour. Alanson told him that all he had left was two sacks, and that they needed it themselves. The old Indian said that the snow would soon be melted, and there was a lot of it, and they would be plowing in March. So Alanson shared his flour with him. In March, they were plowing, which was very unusual because they were used to having a late spring. Alanson was always very good to the Indians as well as other people. He felt that he would be blessed by sharing with people and I believe he was, for they always had what they needed. When people were passing through Huntsville, they would stop overnight with their families and horses. Alanson would feed and shelter them, and take care of their horses. In later years, when their own family grew up and some of them moved down to the southern part of Utah and would be going to or from Huntsville, they would sometimes stop and stay with a family. In the morning, when they would be ready to leave after having been sheltered and cared for during the night, they would attempt to pay for their hospitality. The people with whom they stayed would say, “Now what Allen is your father?” They would reply, Alanson, and the hosts would exclaim, “Oh, I couldn’t take anything from one of Alanson Allen’s children. I have stayed overnight with your folks, and received kind treatment, so good luck on your way.” Having a quick mind and memory, Alanson was a diligent student of The Book of Mormon. He was a Seventy and Alanson was called on a mission to Nebraska. He served for some time, but was unable to stay as long as he wanted because of ill health. He was a very fine speaker, had a quick mind and could remember very well. He always gave the 4th of July speech, (which was quite an event in those days). He was good at writing poems for special occasions, and had a very fine speaking voice. His employment included farming and working on the railroad. He was with the crew that brought the railroad into Ogden. They had to work hard and didn't have many luxuries. One son remembered their diet being mostly bran mush and bran bread. When he wasn’t busy farming, which was his line of work, he would go seek employment elsewhere. As a result, he worked on the railroad and was working with the crew that finished the grade into Ogden. He was there when they laid the rails and the last spike was driven. They had to work hard, and didn’t have many of the things they didn’t have to have. Alanson was an affectionate father. He and his wife raised a fine family of 14 children. All of them grew to maturity. They were happy, good, honest, trust-worthy citizens. Some of them filled missions for the Church and nearly all of them were active in Church and Civic affairs. Their boys and girls have been leading citizens in the communities in which they have lived all their lives. Their children, their birthdates and spouses were: 1. Emeline Clarissa - Aug. 26, 1851- Erastus Perry Bingham 2. Albern Alanson - Dec 1852 - Louisa Stowell 3. Orin Daniel - Mar. 18, 1854 - Anna C. Benfrup 4. Emily Chastina - Nov. 30, 1855 - Joan Newy 5. Marinda - Feb. 15, 1857 - John Ingles 6. Esther - Sept. 27, 1858 - John Tangreen 7. Ammon - April 23, 1860 - Isabella Hyslop 8. Hyrum - Feb. 20, 1862 - Nancy A. Wilson 9. Joseph Samuel - Sept. 15, 1863 - Louisa C. Danielson 10. Sarah Ann - Dec. 9, 1865 - William G. Moyes 11. Emma Rozina - Jan. 18, 1868 - John H. Jorgenson 12. Mary Vileta - Jan. 29, 1870 - died Aug. 5, 1901 13. David Orlo - April 21, 1872 - Emma Lousia Berlin 14. Andrew Stephen - Feb. 23, 1874 - Mary Elizabeth Hyslop The thirteen children, who married, all had families. Mary, the youngest daughter was the only one who didn’t marry. They had 128 grandchildren. He lived to be 58 years old, passing away on the 5th of March 1887.

Biography of Alanson David Allen & Chastina Hadlock Written by Emma Louise Berlin Allen

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Biography of Alanson David Allen and Chastina Hadlock Allen written by their daughter-in-law, Emma Louisa Berlin Allen (1877-1952) who is the wife of David Orlo Allen (1872-1941). Alanson David Allen was born May 2, 1829 at Deposit, Thompkins, Delaware County, New York and died March 5, 1887 and was buried in Ogden, Utah. Baptized April 10, 1838 and Endowed and Sealed to his wife June 13, 1856 when four children were sealed to them who had been born previously. He came to Utah October 27, 1849 in Apostle George A. Smith Company. He was a Seventy in the Priesthood. Captain of the Utah Militia from 1861-1866 and during the Echo Canyon War. He married Chastina Hadlock about 1850, their first child being Emeline Clarissa Allen. They were the parents of 14 children, 7 boys and 7 girls. Most of their children had large families. Emeline the oldest had 19 children, 14 boys and 5 girls. A remarkable family--among them two Bishops, Sunday School Superintendents, Ward Clerks and many other responsible positions. The girls were excellent mothers. The youngest daughter of Alanson and his wife, Mary Viletta, died August 3, 1901, unmarried. He was an affectionate father, a student of the Book of Mormon, almost knowing it by heart. At one time a stranger at the home saw a number of boys around his place and asked, ”How many boys do you have?” to which Alanson replied, “Seven”. One of the boys piped up and said, “Yes, and each boy has seven sisters.” The man took an oath and asked, “How many wives do you have?” Another time Lige (or Elijah) Allen a man of another family of Allen’s was working for Alanson. During the day he said, “Say Lance, haint (sic) we some relation way back?” They said Lance said “Drop that shovel and get for home.” And he went. Often times when weary travelers passed by even though they were utter stranger he would give the command, “Drive in, unhitch that team and give them some hay”--keeping them through the night without charge. Alanson’s parents joined the church and traveled across the plains with the emigrants. When just a boy he was left to care for his father’s family at Winter Quarters, [Indian Territory, Nebraska], when his father and older brother Rufus [Rufus Chester Allen (1827-19125)] joined the Mormon Battalion. He was dependable and often time overworked to do the job assigned him. As he was cutting wood for fuel one time, he was so tired he became unconscious. In this state of mind he saw the Great Salt Lake Valley and was acquainted with the road all the way when he came to Ogden. He was a leader among men and had a very commanding figure. In Utah celebrations he was often Marshall of the Day, riding a fine black horse, himself clothed in a fine suit and wearing a long black plume in his hat. Alanson's father was Albern Allen who was born May 22, 1802, at Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut. He later lived in New York where a number of children were born. Second wife was Jane Elizabeth Hill. The third wife was Mary Ann Hoops (Yearsly) and the fourth wife was Mary Jane Morris (McCarty). Children by the first wife are as follows: Rufus Chester, Alanson David, Clarissa Abby, Marshall Franklin, Rachel, Rebecca, Sara, Sara Ann and Mary. Children by Mary Ann Hoops (Yearsly) one: [Marcia Ann Allen who married] Charles E Layne. Children by Jane Elizabeth Hill are Maria and Marcia [I do not find these names in FamilySearch/Family Tree. WHG]. One child by Mary Jane Morris (McCarty) was Albern Allen, Jr. who married Elizabeth Evans. She was a sister to David O. McKay’s mother, who was also an Evans. Albern Allen, Alanson’s father came to Utah October 16, 1847 with the Mormon Battalion from California. He was a member of Company 4 of the Mormon Battalion. Previous to this he had been chosen to preside over the little town or settlement Genoa, about 100 miles west of Florence, Nebraska where there was a supply depot and assembling station for mountain emigrants who planned to emigrate to Utah. He labored as a missionary, was president and missionary of the 33rd Quorum of Seventies at Nauvoo, Illinois. In 1849 he settled at Ogden, Utah. He was a member of the High Council and in 1857 assisted in bringing emigrants to Utah. At one time Stephan Hadlock, knowing the fine qualities of Alanson, was praising him and telling of these qualities in the presence of his daughter, Chastina. “Who is that fine young man, if he is all you say he is”, jokingly said. “I’ll marry him.” Strange to say she did marry the young man and was a dutiful wife and the mother of his 14 children. Chastina Hadlock Allen Wife of Alanson, Chasatina Hadlock Allen was a daughter of Stephan Hadlock and Sally Alton. She was born April 2, 1828 in Jay Orleans County, Vermont and was the sixth of ten children. She was a very staunch and sturdy women and one to unusual strength, the mother of fourteen children. After the birth of her babies she was usually up on the third or fourth day cooking the meals and doing the usual household duties. When their son Samuel was born [Joseph Samuel Allen (1863-1933)] her husband had gone to the canyon for a load of wood. When he came home she was getting supper and told him to go to the bed and see what was there. He was very much surprised to find a new son. Her days were filled in taking care of her family and at night she did her sewing by hand and knit beautiful lace for the trimming for the clothing of the expectant babies. Her promises were kept to her children even it was a promise of punishment and she was very firm. At one time a young man attempted to kiss her. She took him by the seat of the pants across her lap and spatted (sic) him so hard he couldn't sit down for some time. She could lift a hundred pounds easier than her husband who was not so strong physically. Aunt Marinda [Marinda Allen Ingles (1857-1944)] said two girls were taken by a Methodist minister and separated from the family, never to see them again, raised in the East. They were located later by more distant relatives.

Alanson David Allen

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

ALANSON DAVID ALLEN Alanson David allen was born May 2, 1829 at Deposit, Tompkins, Delaware County, New York. He was the sone of Albern and Marcia Allen. He was next to the oldest in a family of nine children. Albern Allen joined the church in New York, when Alanson was eight years old. They joined with the saint in Missouri. All the family were ready and started to come to Utah, when at Winter Quarters Albern Allen and his oldest sone, Rufus Allen joined the Mormon Battalion and they traveled across country in company A under the command of Jefferson Hunt. They went to California, were discharged from there and came back to Utah. There Albern later met his family. Alanson Allen stayed on at Winter Quarters with his mother and brothers and sisters. He took the responsibility and care of the family. Along in the summer Alanson realized he would have to secure food from some source to supply the family for winter. So he went back to the eastern part of Missouri and purchased the crops on a farm, harvested them, and took them to Winter Quarters. They had sufficient food to carry them through the winter. He was just sixteen years of age. He knew the Prophet Joseph Smith, and talked with him many times. Alanson was near the scene at the time of Joseph Smith’s martyrdom, in fact he heard the shot that killed him. He was at Nauvoo when they had trouble with the mob. They were not going to let any more of the Saints move out West. Brigham Young told the Saints to obey the men who were in charge of their group and all would be alright. This they did and everything did turn out alright. They had many trying hardships on their journey across the plains. They arrived safely in Utah in October 1849 with George A Smith’s Company They were met in Ogden by their father who had arrived here from California before them. They had a little place and lived right in the mainmast of what is now Ogden city’s business district. In September 1850 Alanson was married to Chastina Hadlock. They lived in Ogden about one year before they were called to go to Willard, and from there to what was know then as Three Mile Creek. They lived there about six years. They went back to Ogden for another three years. Alanson was a farmer and always had several cows, They pastured the cows just across the Weber river in the vicinity of Wilson Lane. They lived in a little log cabin close to where the Union Depot now stands. At this time President Brigham Young called them to go to Hyrum Cache County and help with settlement there. This they did, and they remained there about four or five years. While in Hyrum they had a nice, neat, well kept farm, on which theykept cows, pigs, horses, and always several head of sheep, from which they secured wool to make their clothing. After living in Hyrum six years, they moved to Huntsville, Weber County, where they lived the rest of their lives. In 1857 Alanson and five other men; Franklin Cummings, Thomas Bingham, Bill Brown, Nathan Slater and Bailey Lake were sent to Salmon River to help a company of emigrants, who were having trouble with the Indians. Bailey Lake was killed and they all suffered terribly from exposure. Alanson was never well after that. He was made Captain of the Militia in 1861 and served in this capacity until 1866. During this time they had the Echo Canyon war in which he took an active part. At this time there were a great many Indians around, and the settlers were having a good deal of trouble with them all through the country. One evening Sarah Ann went out to get water, and old Indian came up in back of her, she turned, saw him and screamed. The dog grabbed the Indian. Grandfather Alanson hearing her scream ran out before the Indian could hurt her. The Indian was determined he was going to kill the dog, but Alanson talked to him, gave him some food to take with him and he left, never coming around to molest them again. One winter in the month of February an old Indian came to his home and wanted some flour. Alanson told him that all he had left was two sacks, and they needed them. The Indian said that the snow would soon melt, and there was a lot of it, and they would be plowing in March. So Alanson shared his flour with him. In March they were plowing as the Indian had said, which was very unusual. They usually had a late spring. Alanson Allen was very good to the Indians, as well as other people. He felt that he would be blessed by sharing with people, and I believe he was, because they always had what they really needed. When people were passing through Huntsville, they would stop over night with their families and horses. Alanson would feed and shelter them and take care of their horses. In later years when their family grew up and some of them moved down to the Southern part of the state, their Father’s generosity was rewarded. When they were traveling back and forth from southern Utah to Huntsville and staying with families along they way, when they tried to pay for the hospitality, the people with whom they had stayed would say “Oh I could not take anything from Alanson Allen’s children, I have stayed over night with your folks, received kind treatment, so you just be on your way and Good Luck”. Grandfather Allen was called on a mission to Nebraska. He served for some time, but was unable to stay as long as he wanted because of ill health. He was a very fine speaker, had a quick mind and could remember very well. He always gave the 4th of July speech ( which was quite an event in those days) He was good at writing poems for special occasions. When he was not busy farming, which was his work, he would seek other employment. As a result he worked on the Railroad and was working with the crew that finished the grade into Ogden. He was there when the lay the rails and the last spike was driven. At this time his family was rather low on supplies and one of the sons says he can remember their diet was mostly bran mash and bran bread. They had to work hard, and didn’t have many of the things that were unnecessary. Alanson and Chastina raised a fine family of fourteen children. All of them growing to maturity, happy, good honest, trustworthy citizens. Some of them filled missions for the Church, and nearly all of them were active in the Church and Civic affairs. Their boys and girls have been leading citizens in the communities in which they have lived all their lives. The thirteen children who married all have families. Mary the youngest daughter was the only one who didn’t marry. They had 128 grandchildren in 1946. Alanson passed away March 5th 1887. Written by Mather Allen Ridges September 26, 1946 Additional information on Alanson David Allen Written by Emma Louise B. Allen (daughter of David Orlo Allen) Alanson David Allen was born May 2, 1829 at Deposit, Thompkins, Delaware County, New York and died March 5, 1887 and was buried in Ogden, Utah. Baptized April 10, 1838. He was endowed and sealed to his wife June 13, 1856. Four children were sealed to them who had been born previously. He came to Utah October 27, 1849 in Apostle George A Smiths Company. He was a Seventy in the priesthood. Captain of the Ustah Militia from 1861 to 1866 and during the Echo Canyon War. He married Chastina Hadlock about 1850. Their first child was Emiline Clarissa Allen. They were the parents of 14 children, seven boys and seven girls. Most of their children had large families. Emiline, the oldest had nineteen children, fourteen boys and five girls. A remarkable family. Among them two Bishops, a Sunday School Superintendent, Ward Clerks, and many other responsible positions. The girls were excellent mothers. The youngest daughter of Alanson and his wife Chastina, Mary Viletta died August 3, 1901, unmarried. Allenson was an affectionate father, a student of the Book of Mormon, almost knowing it by heart. At one time a stranger at the home saw a number of boys around his place and asked “How many boys do you have?” To which Alanson replied, “Seven” One of the boys piped up and said “Yes, and each boy has seven sisters.” The man took an oath and asked “How many wives do you have?” Another time Lige ( Elijah) Allen, a man of another family of Allens was working for Alanson sometime during the day he said “Say Lance, hain’t we some relation way back?’ They said Lance said “Drop that shovel and get for home” And he went. Often when weary travelers passed by, even though they were utter strangers, he would give the command, “Drive in, unhitch that team and give them some hay”, keeping them through the night without charge. Alanson’s parent joined the church and traveled across the plains with the emigrants. When just a boy he was left to care for his fathers family at Winter Quarters, Iowa, when his father and older brother Rufus joined the Mormom Battalion. He was dependable and often overworked to do the job assigned him. As he was cutting wood for fuel , one time, he was so tired he became unconscious. In this state of mind he saw the Great Salt Lake Valley and was acquainted with the road all the way when he came to Ogden. He was a leader among men and had a very commanding figure. In Utah celebrations he was often Marshall of the day, riding a fine black horse, himself clothed in a fine suit and wearing a long black plume in his hat. Alanson’s father was Albern Allen, who was born May 22, 1892, at Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut. He later lived in New York, where a number of his children were born. He married four times. The first time was in 1826 in Hartwick, New York to Marcia Allen. They had nine children: Rufus Chester, Alanson David, Clarissa Ebby, Marshall Fredrick, Rachel, Rebecca, Sarah, Sarah Ann, and Mary. The second wife was Jane Elizabeth Hill. There were two children: Maria and Marcia. The third wife was Mary Ann Hoops(Yearsly) with whom he had one child, Charles E. Layne. and the fourth wife was Mary Jane Morris(Mccarty) who had one child, Albern Allen, who married Elizabeth Evans. She was a sister to David O McKay’s Mother, who was also an Evans. Albern Allen, Alanson’s father, came to Utah October 16, 1847, with the Mormon Battalion from California. He was a member of Company A. Previous to this he had been chosen to preside over the little town of Genoa, about 100 miles west of Florence, Nebraska where there was a supply depot and an assembling station for mountain emigrants who planned to emigrant to Utah. He labored as a missionary, was President and Missionary of the 33rd Quorum of Seventies at Nauvoo, Ill. In 1849 he settled at Ogden Utah. He was a member of the High Counsel and in 1857 assisted in bringing emigrants to Utah. The story is told that Stephen Hadlock, knowing the fine qualities of Alanson, was praising him and telling of these qualities in the presence of his daughter, Chastina. “Who is this fine young man and if he is all you say he is,” jokingly said.” I’ll marry him.” Strange to say she did marry the young man and was a dutiful wife and the mother of his fourteen children.

The Man on the Black Horse

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Following is a family story about my great, great, grandfather, Alanson David Allen. My oldest brother, Gale Wells Collard, remembers a story of the death of this good man. Gale and I are grandchildren of Ammon Ether Allen who was a grandchild of Alanson David Allen. Our great great grandfather was large in stature and a tall handsome man. He had imposing dark eyes, black hair and a full long beard. He could be seen riding his beautiful black stallion around the roads of Huntsville, Utah. He was usually carrying a shovel over his shoulder so he would be prepared to open or clear irrigation ditches in his fields. My grandfather, Ammon Ether Allen, would stand on the back porch of his Huntsville home and chat daily with his grandfather, Alanson as he passed by. One day Alanson didn't return from the fields and it grew late. This was unusual. As time passed the powerful black horse came galloping into the town with Alanson's dead body dragging along side. My great great grandfather had experienced a freak accident when his boot slipped through the stirrup of his saddle. He had lost control, falling from is prized horse. this bizarre event was shocking to all. This accident seemed unlikely considering Alanson's expertise handling horses, especially this, his favorite horse. Our ancestors lived with unique hazards and issues we will never face in our modern times. However, as mortals we all face defining critical moments and are subject to accident and injury. This horrific moment took the life of a loved family man and neighbor leaving an empty space in the lives of members of the Huntsville community. My desire in writing this story is to share insight into the lives of those that loved and labored and open the way for future generations. Written by Juanita Collard Werrett

Life Timeline of Alanson David Allen

1829
Alanson David Allen was born on 2 May 1829
Alanson David Allen was 3 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Alanson David Allen was 11 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Alanson David Allen was 31 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1859
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Alanson David Allen was 32 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
1861
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Alanson David Allen was 49 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1877
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Alanson David Allen died on 3 Mar 1887 at the age of 57
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Alanson David Allen (2 May 1829 - 3 Mar 1887), BillionGraves Record 3893233 Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States

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