Andrew Andersen

20 Jan 1836 - 15 Nov 1915

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Andrew Andersen

20 Jan 1836 - 15 Nov 1915
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Biographical and Charter Sketch of Andrew Arne Anderson By Lavawn Richard Owen 1957. About 40 to 50 miles south-southeast of Oslo, Norway is a village and district called Onsoy. It has a population at present (1957) of 8,532. It is near a stone quarrying region noted for granite and paving stone. It
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Life Information

Andrew Andersen

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Died:

Hyrum City Cemetery

2-98 North 500 East
Hyrum, Cache, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Sarah M, daughter of Andrew and Alice Andersen Andrew Anderson emigrated from Norway 1854 Johannah, wife of Andrew Anderson
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melohnt

April 11, 2013
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OurFamilyBefore

April 10, 2013

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Andrew Arne Anderson by Lavawn Richard Owen (1957)

Contributor: melohnt Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Biographical and Charter Sketch of Andrew Arne Anderson By Lavawn Richard Owen 1957. About 40 to 50 miles south-southeast of Oslo, Norway is a village and district called Onsoy. It has a population at present (1957) of 8,532. It is near a stone quarrying region noted for granite and paving stone. It was in this district that Andrew Arne Anderson, son of Mons Arneson and Ingar Olsen, was born on January 22, 1836. He gives his place of birth as Aggard. This is believed to be the name of a farm on which he was born and lived, or a small community in the district of Onsoy. It was not long after his birth that the Latter-Day Saint missionaries came to this land of the North, preaching the Restored Gospel. And as Andrew Arne Anderson grew up, he learned of this newly established religion, and was convinced that it was true. He was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints on 9 October 1853. Men’s lives are shaped according to their convictions. No one can truthfully say that the life of Andrew was not influenced by the new faith that came to him from across the sea. Because of this new religion, he left his father and mother, his brothers, friends, and other relatives and set out to answer the call, “Come to Zion”. He had without doubt heard stories told by the American missionaries of the beautiful places of Independence and Nauvoo in the Midwest that had served as the headquarters of the Church previous to his coming to America. Now that he was here, the broad expansive prairie lands of the Midwest must have looked good to him. There was ample rainfall in the Midwest and the grass grew green and the crops produced abundantly. Might he have wished that the Saints were still there? Regardless of what his wishes were, the Saints were now gathering in the West. They were pioneers in the Rocky Mountains and he was to become one of them. There is not any known record which states when Andrew left Norway, what port he sailed from, nor which port he landed at here in America. We first find him here in America at Atchison, Kansas, ready to leave for Salt Lake Valley. His name is on the roster of the 2nd company that left the Midwest en route to Salt Lake Valley in 1855. He is listed on the roster of this company under the name of Anders Monson. This company was under the command of Captain Jacob F. Secrist and consisted of 368 souls, 51 wagons, 317 oxen, 100 cows, and 5 horses. The company included Danish immigrants and part of a British independent company. They left the camps near Atchison, Kansas on 13 June 1855. During the overland journey, considerable sickness prevailed among the passengers. Among the sick was Captain Secrist, who died 2 July 1855 on Ketchum Creek, between Kearney and Leavenworth. Noah T. Guyman was appointed captain in his stead and the company arrived in the Salt Lake Valley 7 September 1855. Andrew changed his name twice after arriving in Zion. He was apparently confused relative to the name he should use for doing temple work. He first used his father’s surname of Arnesen. Then, later he felt as if he should use the surname by which he was christened, Anders Monsen. His father’s first or given name was Mons and it is the custom in Norway for the child to use the father’s first name as his surname. When he went to be sealed to his parents there was another change. His mother, Inga Marie Olsen, had been married first to a man by the name of Anders Arvesen, who died. They had one child, a daughter, named Anne Maria Arvesen. Andrew Anderson was apparently told by the temple authorities that his mother must be sealed to her first husband and that the mother had the right of the children born to her second husband, Mons Arnesen. So Andrew was sealed to his mother, Inga Maria Olsen, and her first husband, Anders Arvesen, and therefore took the first name of the man to whom he was sealed as a son, as was the custom in Norway, and added SEN to make his surname “Andersen”. He changed his first name from “Anders” to “Andrew”. At a later date the middle name “Arne” was introduced. This happened to be the first part of the surname of his real father. The first pioneers had been in Zion nine years when Andrew arrived, and Zion was expanding. While some of the newcomers stayed in Salt Lake City, many of them went out to assist in building up the waste places. Andrew was amongst those who left the City. He went north and settled for a time at Plains City, Weber County, Utah. In December 1856, a young English immigrant woman, named Alice Brooks, came to Plains City to live. Andrew met Alice, fell in love with her, and asked her to marry him. The General Authorities of the Church were encouraging the Saints to get their endowments as soon as arrangements could be made, that they might enjoy the blessings of the fullness of the Gospel. In March of 1857 Andrew and Alice were called to come to Salt Lake City to get their endowments in the Endowment House. They thought that they had been called there to get married. So they were married. After their marriage they returned to Plains City, Weber County. They did not remain long, however. Later in the same year they went to Davis County to live. On 27 February 1858 their first child, a daughter, came to bless their home. They named her Sara Maria Anderson. In the spring of 1858, upon the approach of Johnston’s Army, they participated in the great “move” South. Before leaving, they piled straw around their home with the view of setting fire to it if the Army moved in and occupied Salt Lake City. After peace was declared, they returned to Davis County. On September 1, 1859 a son was born to Andrew and Alice. They named him James Andrew Anderson (my grandfather). In the spring of 1860, Andrew, his wife, Alice, and their children joined several other families with the intention of settling in Cache Valley. This pioneering company went up north of Collinston and entered Cache Valley north of Wellsville Mountain. Upon looking over the valley, they decided to locate in the southeast part of the valley where there was yet no settlement. These first settlers in 1860 located temporarily about one mile east and a few blocks north of the present town site of Hyrum. This first location was called Camp Hollow. A small stream of water coming from a spring located there was the main attraction. The Camp Hollow Spring comes up in what is now Anderson Pond. Levi and Borgen Anderson own the farm now, including the spring area. The pond is about two blocks north of the Hyrum, Paradise Canyon Junction on the west side of the road. It was here that Andrew, with the rest of the settlers, built his first home in the new settlement. It was only a dugout home, dug out of the hollow by the stream and faced on the front with logs and a door and covered on the top with logs and dirt, but they were thankful for it and tried to make it as comfortable as possible until they could get better established. After this meager home was hurriedly built, the immediate concern of the settlers was to raise some food. About 100 acres of ground was plowed and wheat planted. Then came the question of water. A route for a canal had been sketched and traveled over by some of the leaders. An engineer was engaged to survey the route, but his stakes were so far apart that the men could not follow them for any great distance. With the aid of a spirit level, eight shovels, and a few home-made plows, 20 men brought the water from Little Bear River from Paradise, a distance of nine miles in 21 days. By the time water reached the land that first year, there was little grain left to save. After giving more consideration to a place for a permanent settlement, they finally decided on the present town site of Hyrum. So their small dugout home was lived in only a few months when they moved to this new location, and there they built log cabins close together in the usual fort formation. The cabins extended east and west on both sides of the present Main Street. The heads of the families of these early settlers selected their first city building lots by number drawing conducted by the Bishop of the settlement. The only cost for the lot was one dollar to pay for the survey. The head of the family was allotted 20 acres of farm land, and it was his privilege to farm it the way he wished, and plant what he wished. The first lot owned by Andrew and where he built his first log house after he and his family left their dugout home in Camp Hollow was located at about the present address of 200 East Main Street. Sometime after acquiring this small lot on Main Street, he acquired another lot at the present home of Carrol Miller, 364 North 2nd West. Andrew became a farmer, and it was at this place that he built his home and farm buildings. He had land in several other places. One of the first of the larger tracts he acquired was 38 acres two miles south of the Hyrum, Paradise Junction. 30 acres of this tract could be irrigated. He acquired 40 acres at a place called Mount Sterling, which is located south of Little Bear River. This tract was not irrigated. He had some pasture land west of Hyrum. In the late 1870’s or early 1880’s he rented land from the Brigham Young College. At the time this was called the “Church Farm”. But now it is called College Ward. Andrew acquired a large herd of dairy cows and enough horses to carry on his farming operation. The family of Andrew and his wife, Alice, increased after they came to Hyrum. On 5 July 1861 a daughter, Phenette Alice, was born to them. Another daughter, Nancy Ann, was born 12 May 1863. Martha Marinda was born 18 October 1865. A son, Samuel, was born 8 July 1867. Joseph Willard was born 2 October 1871. Hyrum B. was born 25 August 1873. Lovina A. was born 17 July 1876. Their tenth and last child, Gilbert Nathan, was born 23 August 1878. Sadness came into the home of Andrew and Alice when their first child, Sara Maria passed away on 25 September 1878. Sara Maria was 20 years of age when she died. Her endowment work was attended to on 13 August 1884. Another sad moment came into their home when their fourth child, Nancy Ann, died 24 February 1893. Nancy Ann’s husband, Neils Joseph Nielsen was called by the Church to serve as a missionary just three weeks before their fourth child, Essie, was born. Fifteen months later Nancy died of a ruptured appendix. Nancy Ann lived with her parents while her husband was serving as a missionary. Her father, Andrew Arne Anderson, loved her dearly and when she died, he paid her funeral expenses. He even hired a hearse to carry Nancy Ann to the cemetery. This was a very unusual thing for the people living in Hyrum to di in 1893. This sacrifice on the part of Andrew was his final way of expressing his love for his daughter who had departed from this life. Nancy’s children continued to live with her parents, as did also her husband for a while after he returned from his mission. Their sixth child, Samuel, passed away 2 August 1910. His endowment work was attended to on 21 December 1911. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints at that time sanctioned and encouraged the practice of plural marriage. Four years after coming to Hyrum, on 5 March 1964, Andrew married a second wife, Ellen Hogenson. Two children were born to this couple. A daughter, whom they named Emerette, was born 28 May 1865. A son, Charles L., was born 18 May 1866. On 9 May 1870 Andrew married a third wife, Johanna Hogenson, a sister of his second wife, Ellen. Four children were born to them. Their first child, Mary, was born 9 April 1871. Wilford Ephraim was born 6 August 1872. Another son, Nephi, was born 17 March 1876 and their fourth child Andrew Jr., was born 1 June 1878. This large family was a great assistance with the work on the farm. Both sons and daughter helped, especially with the milking of the cows. Besides being a farmer, Andrew was a shoemaker and also a harness maker. Andrew was ambitious. He would arise at 4:00 in the morning to begin the day’s work on his farm. Then after his day’s work on the farm was finished, he would often go into his small shoemaker shop and make or repair shoes until late at night. The sun never caught him in bed. He seemed to feel that for six days of each week his complete duty was to work. Each minute, he felt, had to be properly accounted for. Andrew was a natural born pioneer. Although he came from a land where pioneering was a thing of the past, he accepted his lot as a pioneer in this new land as a perfectly natural way of life for him. When he went to Weber soon after his arrival in Zion he made his livelihood in this pioneer community. He acquired the means on which to get married, and to feed his wife and children. He was able to gather together the necessary food, supplies and equipment with which to begin a new pioneering adventure in Hyrum. When he got to Hyrum, he was able to build his dugout home. He dug a straight wall on the side of Camp Hollow to form the rear end of his house. At a right angle it this he dug another straight wall to form one side of his house and opposite to this he dug another wall to form the other side of his house. The front of the house was made of logs with a door in the center. The front end of each side he also filled with logs to fit into the logs on the front. He put logs on the top and covered them with dirt. He soon learned how to cut down trees in the canyon, and to hew the logs so they would fit properly on the walls of his log house. He learned how to plant crops. He learned how to dig ditches, and irrigate his thirsty land, and to harvest the crops when they were ripe. He knew how to make shoes. He made so many pairs he acquired the name of “Shoemaker Anderson”. He built himself a machine shop and a blacksmith shop with a bellows pumped by hand and made himself a buggy and sleigh and other things he needed, as well and repaired his farm machinery when it broke down. He could not only build a dugout house and a log house, but about 1875 he demonstrated his ability to build a better house made of stone and lumber and made it very substantial by driving plenty of nails into it. Into this house, located at 364 North 2nd West, he moved his wife, Alice and their growing family. Their daughter, Lovina, was the first child born in the new house. He built a frame house for his second wife, Ellen, at _____East Main Street, and another substantial stone and lumber house for his third wife, Johanna, at 45 North 2nd West. He built barns as a shelter for his cattle and horses, and granaries in which to store the grain he raised. He operated the first molasses mill in Hyrum which was operated by steam. He had a small room wherein he kept his tools which he used to make shoes and where he plied his trade as a shoemaker. Progressive thinking and good planning are important factors of success, and Andrew possessed both of these character traits. It was only a short time until he began gathering material things about him. “It was surprising”, his daughter, Lovina, recounts, “That he was able to get so many things in such a short time.” When a new and better machine came to town, he was among the first to acquire one. He strived to get the best cows and horses that he could. He imported horses from England, and also purebred Jersey cows. How proud he was of those high quality cows. Andrew was a religious man. Although it is not recorded that he held many positions of responsibility in the Church, he nevertheless went to church regularly. He was advanced to the office of a Seventy by John Stoddard. He was 47 years of age at that time. On 2 February 1910 he was ordained to the office of High Priest by William Maughan. He was 74 years of age then. He was a very strict observer of the Word of Wisdom, even going so far as to abstain from eating pork. The revelation on the Word of Wisdom did not forbid the use of pork; nevertheless it was forbidden to Ancient Israel; also the presiding brethren, especially Brigham Young, counseled against it. Andrew lived by that council. He was concerned about the salvation of his ancestors. He did a considerable amount of temple work, especially in his later years. In the winter time, day after day, he would hitch his horse to his cutter and drive over to the temple in Logan and spend the day doing temple work for his dead ancestors. He hired women to do the work for the females on his ancestral line and he also hired men to help do the work for the males on his line. So interested in temple work was he that he specified in his will that certain amount of his money was to be used for temple work after he died. He is not often remembered to this day as a benevolent man. Several things which he did, however, tells us that he was. Besides leaving a sum of money with which to do temple work after his death, which surely must be considered as an act of kindness toward his departed kinsfolk, he assisted several people financially to immigrate to Zion. He assisted missionaries in their efforts to go abroad and preach the gospel. He sent three of his own sons on missions. His eldest son, James, was called to serve in the Northern States Mission and departed May 1883. His son Hiram, (Hyrum) served in the Northern States Mission also. He departed 23 April 1902 and returned 1 June 1904. His son Wilford served in the Norwegian Mission. He was set apart on 30 November 1899 and released on 30 November 1901. Andrew specified in his will that when he died, $500.00 was to be placed in the missionary fund of the Hyrum Third Ward to be used for missionary work. He also specified that $1800.00 be turned over to the Bishop of the Hyrum Third Ward to be used for the support of the worthy poor of that ward. This money was kept by various Bishops of the ward unused for many years. On 30 October 1949, Ivan V. Miller, a great-grandson of Andrew, was sustained as Bishop of Hyrum Third Ward. He felt as if this money which his great-grandfather had left should be used as he willed. So it was used to finance a poultry enterprise, sponsored by the Hyrum Third Ward, as a project of the Latter-Day Saint Church Welfare Plan, which was put into operation in the late 1930’s. In the later years of his life a sad thing happened to Andrew. He left his wives and children and went to live by himself in a small house. When men came to this earth to live they do not come as perfect beings. They have their faults and imperfections. Andrew was of a quiet reserved nature. He had his strict code he wished his family to live by. Members of this family were not always willing to do so. Minor things came up which were not properly adjusted. Satan and his emissaries play upon the weakness of individuals. Shall we not believe that it was the influence of these evil forces at work which finally caused Andrew to leave his wives, his children, and his home and live by himself, lonely and unhappy, but still able to live righteously otherwise? It makes one sad at this time to think of this situation. He was a family man. He was the father of 16 children. As the days and nights went by, might he not have longed for the companionship of his wives and children? His daughter-in-law, Rachael, relates that he was pleased to have her children come over to his place to see him and visit with him. She explained that he kept a jar in his house with cookies in it. Her children would go over there and get his cookies and eat them. She told him that he ought not to let the children ear his cookies. “Oh, I want them to eat the cookies”, he replied, “That is what I keep them for”. If some of his grandchildren had come over to visit him, might he not have kept two or three or four jars of cookies in his house, just to have the opportunity to see them from day to day. Even in his old age he did have a tender place in his heart for children. Rachael relates further that one time when she went down to the spring to get a bucket of water, she left her baby, Chloe, at their home. While she was away, Grandfather happened to be walking by the house. He heard the baby crying so went inside the house. When Rachael returned with the water, he had the child in his arms and was walking the floor with her, singing and trying to console the baby. Andrew passed away on 25 November 1915 at the home of his son, Wilford. He was 79 years of age and was laid to rest in the Hyrum Cemetery. We respect Andrew and feel to honor him for the many admirable things he did in life; for being the first in his family with the courage to accept the gospel, for the sacrifice he made in leaving home and country and as a young man coming to this new land, for his untiring efforts in helping to redeem the waste places of Zion. We respect him for his intelligence and ability, for his unusual ambition, for his love of work and his willingness to toil all day and into the night to provide for his family, and his help to the poor and unfortunate. We honor him for his testimony of the gospel which endured to the end as exemplified in his diligence in attending to the ordinances of his departed kinsfolks. A reward awaits those who have done good in life. We sincerely trust that he is happy with his. Sources for this history came from: 1. Gazetteer—Public Library. 2. Temple Index Bureau 3. Church Immigration Book- 1849—1857, vol. 2. 4. Letter written to Bernice Anderson Chadwick by Mrs. Margaret C. Eckersley, 567 8th Street., Ogden, Utah 2nd August 1935. 5. Lovina A. Ralph 6. Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Sunday 25 March 1956. 7. Hyrum and Rachael Anderson. 8. Record Book of Lovina A Ralph. 9. Hyrum Ward Record, Genealogical Society, Salt Lake City. 10. Temple Index Bureau Card. 11. Family Record Book of Hyrum and Rachael Anderson. 12. Record Book of Norma Anderson Crow. 13. Ivan V. Miller. 14. Rachael Anderson.

Biography of Andrew Andersen (Monsen) 1836-1915 By Horace F. Ralph, written 14 September 1977

Contributor: melohnt Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Biography of Andrew Andersen (Monsen) 1836-1915 By Horace F. Ralph, written 14 September 1977 In the beautiful green country side on the Odegaarden farm in Onsoy Parish of Ostfold, Norway, Andrew Monsen was born 22 January 1836, to Mons Arnesen and Enger Marie Olsen. He was christened Anders Monsen, 21 February 1836, in Onsoy and the 2nd son of the family. He was known by the name of Anders until after his marriage to Alice Brooks, 9 March 1857, in the Endowment House, in Salt Lake City, Utah. So in this biography his name Anders will be used until his marriage, for a short time after he changed his name to Andrew Andersen. Anders had two brothers, Ole Arnt, born 7 August and christened 4 September 1831 and Jens, born 9 June and Christened 30 June 1839, in Onsoy. His mother, Inger Marie Olsen was married 1st to Anders Arvesen, on 23 September 1822, in Onsoy. A daughter was born to this couple 1 September and Christened 17 September 1826, named Anne Marie, at Dahle, Onsoy Parish. The father Anders Arveson passed away 6 November 1827, at the age of 45, leaving Inger Marie, a young widow only 29 years old. The following year this young widow mother Inger Marie was married to Mons Arnesen, 1 December 1830 in Onsoy. This young couple lived on the farms in the Onsoy area where Anders and his two brothers were born and raised. When Anders was only 9 years old the family had the sad experience of their mother passing away 21 February 1844, when she was almost 44 years old. This left a heavy responsibility on their father to care for the 4 growing children. For some 6 ½ years the children were without a mother. In the fall of 1850, Anders being about 14 ½ years old, his father married a fine young lady about 27 years old named Anne Helene Hansen, on __ September 1850, in Onsoy. To this couple were born 4 children in Onsoy, 2 sons and 2 daughters, so Anders was raised in a family of 8 children. The name of Anne Helene’s children are Hans Jorgen, born 6 February, Christened 29 September 1850; Anne Helene, born 7 July, Christened 30 October 1855; Boletta Maria, born 4 October 1856, Christened 1 February 1857; Karl Arndt, born in 1860. (The L.D.S. Genealogical Library records of Onsoy for 1860 are incomplete, so Karl’s birth is not listed.) The following story leads to the conversion of Anders Monsen to the Gospel in Norway: In the summer of 1851, Apostle Erastus Snow was contacting the L.D.S. missionaries who had started to proselyting work in the Scandinavian countries. The Lutheran Church was the State Religion for Norway, Sweden and Denmark at this time. It was difficult for missionaries of any other religion or denomination to introduce any new religious teachings. The L.D.S. missionaries were having a little success, finding a few Scandinavians willing to hear about the new religious teachings as some few were accepting the Gospel. Elder Erastus Snow, who had been visiting with missionaries in some towns in Denmark, was visiting with Hans Peter Jensen, in Morre Sundby, Denmark, 3 September 1851. At this time Elder Snow had the following conversation with a Norwegian sailor which he records in his diary: “A Norwegian by the name of Svend Larsen, the master of a small merchant vessel came to visit me. He said he had heard of me and my new religion and had came with a view to learn more about it. I improved the opportunity to explain to him the principles of the gospel and the order of the kingdom of God as it had been revealed from the Lord; he received my testimony with gladness. His vessel being ready to sail for Norway on his return next day. I called and appointed Elder Hans F. Petersen to go with Mr. Larsen to his home in Norway to open up the gospel door in that country. The two sailed together from Aalborg on the 4 September 1851, well supplied with the Book of Mormon and tracts.” …This little vessel encountered stormy weather, finally be Thursday, 11 September 1851, they arrived safely at the port of Osterrisor, Norway. Captain or “Skipper” Larsen, as he was called, afterwards offered brother Petersen the hospitality of his home as long as he remained in town. The next day Elder Petersen commenced to visit people in Osterrisor and leaving tracts. On 13 September 1851, Captain Larsen went to the local priest to see if the “Mormon” Elder could hold meetings in the School house the next Sunday. The priest was very surprised and upset, so Elder Petersen was summoned to appear before the mayor in Osterrisor, who closely questioned him. With Captain Larsen giving good security for him, Elder Petersen was permitted to stay a few days as he had left his passport in Aalborg, Denmark. By 23 September 1851, Captain Larsen was baptized by Elder Ole Christian Nielsen. Thus Captain Larsen became the first fruits of the true Gospel in Norway. (See pages 33 and 34, “History of the Scandinavian Mission, by Andrew Jensen, 1927.) Following his baptism, Captain Larsen was very active in helping the Elders make friends and doing missionary work. There was a lot of local opposition by civil and State Church officials as well as mobs of local residents opposing the Elders and their missionary work. The home of Captain Larsen was used to hold meetings in as well as a place for the missionaries to live. Captain Svend Larsen’s busy life started in Osterrisor, now called Risor, where he was born 26 January 1816, to her parents, Lars Svensen and Trine Maria Nielsen, being their only child. His father was a mariner, so was seldom home. His mother loved and cared for her only child and helped him to get what schooling was available in the seacoast town. When Svend was 11 years old he went to sea with his father who was in charge of a coastwise vessel. At the age of 13, with his father’s approval and counsel, Svend became a cabin boy on a larger ship brig Edward, and sailed to London, England in February 1828. From then on Svend spent his life as a sailor, continuing his travels on the high seas and became the master of a small merchant vessel of his own. Slowly the missionary work continued and expanded north along the coast to Fredrikstad and on the Drammen, Norway. In the Fredrikstad area there was soon enough converts to form a small branch named Brevig Branch. Often the missionaries were imprisoned several months for their proselytizing. They were frequently visited in person by local people, new converts, and friends. Among the local folks who visited the Elders in person was Carl Widerborg, a merchant in Fredrikstad. His first visit was in November, 1852 when he discussed the Gospel with the Elders. From that time on he began a thorough investigation of the Gospel. He read the books and pamphlets published by the Church, and discussed the gospel topics often with local Saints. He had been a school teacher and had devoted much time to study, so was well educated. He was well posted in law and politics in Christiana, which is now Oslo, the capital of Norway. January 1853, Carl Widerborg went to Christiania in behalf of the Elders in prison. On the 4th of March 1853, he was baptized and the following day as he visited with the Elders in the Fredrikstad prison he was ordained by them to the office of a priest. After this he was very active with the Elders in spreading the Gospel in Fredrikstad and the surrounding farm areas the following few years. He also became the president of the Brevig Branch in Fredrikstad. About 2 miles north west of Fredrikstad in the Onsoy Parish farm area Elders were busy doing missionary work. As a result of this missionary activity, Anders Monsen became interested in their teachings and was baptized 18 September 1853, by Carl Widerborg and confirmed by him the same day. On this same day Anders Monsen’s aunt Bolette Arnesdatter Johnsen, sister to Anders’ father Mons Arnesen was baptized by Canute Petersen. Also on 18 September 1853, Elder Carl Widerborg baptized Syver Johnsen, Bolette’s husband who was confirmed the same day by Elder C. Dorius. The two daughters of Bolette, Katen Kirstina, and Inger Andrea were baptized also. Gradually the Church membership increased in Fredrikstad area. Lake other Scandinavian converts the desire to immigrate to Zion found Anders Monsen along with his aunt Bolette and family making plans to join other converts to go to Zion. At this time the sea port of Liverpool, England were the L.D.S. British Mission office was, became the center of great activity for both converts and missionaries going to different European countries and returning home from their missions abroad. Anders Monsen, along with many other Norwegian immigrants left their homeland 17 November 1854, for Liverpool, England. Some of the converts had left a few weeks earlier for the U.S.A. there was at times a delay of a week or so before passage could be obtained to cross the Atlantic Ocean. Anders Monsen first boarded the ship James Vesmith, of 1162 tons, with Captain Wills. It seems there was not enough room for the large group of passengers so they were transferred to the “Charles Buck” of 1424 tons, with Captain Smally. This ship sailed from Liverpool, England, 17 January 1855, for New Orleans, U.S.A. arriving about 14 March 1855. Traveling in the same group with Anders Monsen was his aunt Bolette and Syver Johnsen with their 4 daughters, Karen Kristine, Inger Andrea, Anne Maria and Mina. At New Orleans the immigrants changed to the Mississippi River Steamer “Michigan”, and left 16 March 1855, for St. Louis, Missouri, arriving 17 March. Then they traveled with a group in Kansas City, Missouri, one of the outfitting posts for the Saints crossing the plains. Then they followed the Missouri River to Atchison, Kansas, where some of the group were organized into companies for crossing the plains. Now Anders, as a 19 ½ year old young man was trying to learn a new language and get used to the American Pioneer’s life. He joined the 2nd Company of pioneers with Jacob F. Secrist as Captain. In this group there were 368 souls, 59 wagons, some 231 oxen, 100 cows and 5 horses. They left their camp near Atchison, Kansas on 13 June 1855, with Anders driving a team of oxen. This Company included the Danish emigrants, and part of the British independent Company of returning missionaries. In this group besides Captain Noah T. Guyman, were Charles Smith, O. M. Duel, Eric G. M. Hogen and Peter O. Hansen. During the overland journey, considerable sickness prevailed among the travelers, as Captain Secrist became very ill and died 2 July 1855, on the Ketchum Creek between Fort Leavenworth, Kansas and Kearney, Nebraska. His body was placed in a tin coffin and buried on the Blue River. Noah T. Guyman was appointed Captain in his stead. At Fort Leavenworth, Bolette had the sad experience of loosing her husband and her daughter Anne Marie, who both passed away 14 May 1855, from Cholera. The train of pioneers and oxen teams arrived in Salt Lake City 7 September 1855, spending 85 days enroute. During the fall of 1855, Anders was busy getting used to pioneer life in Salt Lake Valley as the pioneers had only been in the valley a little over 8 years. It was no easy life for a young Norwegian convert of only 2 years to adjust his life to rugged pioneer life in this high mountain country. Anders worked his way north to South Weber which is near the mouth of Weber Canyon as it is today. In December 1856, Alice Brooks went to Weber, now Uinta, near the mouth of Weber Canyon, where she met Anders Monsen. Soon they became good friends and were married 9 March 1857, in the endowment House in Salt Lake City. The Endowment House Marriage Records for 9 March 1857 lists Alice Brooks being sealed to Anders Monsen. Some time later Anders changed his name to Andrew Andersen as it is found listed on his marriage records when his 2nd wife Ellen Hogensen was sealed to him, 5 March 1864 in the Salt Lake Endowment House and again when Ellen’s sister Johanna was sealed to him 9 May 1870 in the Endowment House. Andrew and Alice started their life in Sessions Settlement, a pioneer community about 8 miles north of Salt Lake City, where Bountiful is nw. here Andrew became interested in farming. The next spring on 27 February 1858 the young pioneer couple’s first child was born, named Sarah Maria. Then during the “Move South”, in 1858 they were involved with other pioneer families getting ready to leave the area because of the pending approach of Johnston’s Army. However due to the Mormon’s very dear friend Colonel Thomas L. Kane who was concerned about their welfare, arrived in Salt Lake City, on 25 February 1858. He convinced Brigham Young and the pioneers that the federal troops would not make war upon the people of Utah. Then conditions began to change for the better. As a result of Colonel Kane’s negotiations with President Brigham Young and with several U.S. senators and U.S. President Buchanan, a federal peace commission reached Salt Lake City on 7 June 1858. From the peaceful negotiations and finding of the commission, General Johnston’s Army passed through Salt Lake City on 26 June 1858 and a few days later established a permanent camp in Cedar Valley, west of the Utah Lake and named it Clamp Floyd. It took time to clear away the misunderstanding and place the Pioneers and the U.S. Government on friendly terms again. In the early fall of 1859, a son was born 1 September 1859, to Alice and Andrew, to whom they gave the name of James Andrew. In the rest of the biography Anders Monsen will be called Andrew Andersen, the name he seems to have used most often. However, in checking the Logan Temple records up to 1914 the year before Andrew’s death, lots of Temple work was done by him under the names of Anders or Andrew Monsen, Arnesen or Andersen, of Hyrum, Utah. He spent his time in his after years doing Temple work for his Norwegian ancestors at the Logan Temple, as some of the recordings start in June 1890 President Brigham Young was sending some early pioneer families as well as new arrivals to surrounding valleys and outpost to colonize the area. In 1856, Peter Maughan and 6 families settled Wellsville, Cache Valley. Three years later William B. Preston, the Thatcher family and others settled where Logan City is now. Cache Valley area in general was being used as a summer grazing area for some 2,000 head of cattle and horses belonging to the church, and 1,000 head of animals belonging to pioneer families. In the spring of 1860 Andrew Andersen, his wife Alice and their two young children emigrated to Cache Valley with other pioneer families going to Hyrum area, about 5 miles east of Wellsville. Pioneers were settling in Paradise, Hyde Park and Franklin as new country communities. The pioneers going to Hyrum first stopped at a place called Camp Hollow one mile north east of where Hyrum is now located. It was too early for spring plowing so all available men, wagons and oxen were used to get timber for log dugouts. Soon 13 dugouts were built for shelter for the families who did not have wagon boxes or tents to live in. In the last part of May, Apostle Ezra T. Benson and Peter Maughan visited the Camp Hollow families, but were not impressed with the location. With several brethren they checked the higher plateau lands south of the camp which they liked better. So the new settlers decided to locate their town on the higher location. Andrew Andersen was involved with others, building the first log house by the dugouts. By fall Camp Hollow was evacuated as enough log houses were built for the families. The houses faced each other in Fort fashion for the protection against the Indians. There were 21 families, totaling 77 persons listed as the first settlers of Hyrum in 1860. Andrew Andersen and wife Alice and their 2 children Sarah Maria and James Andrew are listed in the group. The following year a 3rd child named Phennetta Alice was born 5 July 1861, in Hyrum to Andrew and his wife Alice. Now with 3 children the young couple was busy with new family cares and trying to get use to their growing pioneer town of new log houses being built and trying to develop new farms in the open fields. On 12 May 1863, the 4th child of Andrew and Alice was born in Hyrum, named Nancy Ann. Besides farming Andrew found time to make shoes for his family and town people. He was very practical and a handy craftsman and builder. As new local roads needed building and canals built to water their fields, Andrew was involved with these community projects. Andrew built a small molasses mill by the “Big Ditch” on Main Street. As the small country towns in Cache Valley were expanding a few pioneer Mormon men became involved in “Plural Marriage” or “Polygamy”, as it was being introduced by the Church. The whole country became upset over the practice. It was one of the contributing causes of Johnston’s Army coming to Utah in 1858. Many of the men who entered into Polygamy were fined and imprisoned, even though less than 4% entered in to the plural marriage covenant. In the spring of 1864 Andrew Andersen became involved in polygamy by his marriage with Ellen Hogenson, 5 March 1864, in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah. She became the mother of Andrew’s 5th child, named Emmerette, born 26 November 1864 in Hyrum. Ellen and her sister Johanna were young converts from Eslov, Malmohus, Sweden. Andrew was busy building a home for his new wife and daughter. The following year Andrew and Alice had their 5th child born to them in Hyrum on 18 October 1865, named Martha Marinda. In the spring of the next year Ellen had her 2nd child born on the 18 March 1866, in Hyrum, named Charles Leonard. The following season Alice had her 6th child born 8 July 1867, in Hyrum, named Samuel. Then in the spring of 1870, Andrew married a 3rd wife, Johanna, on 9 May 1870, in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, the sister of his 2nd wife, Ellen. Andrew built a lirge white stone house for his wife Johanna, a little north west across the street from the Hyrum 3rd Ward Building. The next spring Johanna gave birth to her first child, Mary Elizabeth, in Hyrum, 9 April 1871. The baby girl only lived a few days and then died 15 April 1871, in Hyrum. The same year Alice had her 7th child Joseph Willard, born 2 October 1871, in Hyrum, the 10th child for Andrew. The next summer, Johanna had her 2nd child born 6 August 1872, in Hyrum, named Ephraim Wilford, his father’s 11th child. About a year later Alice had a son born 25 August 1873, named Hyrum, in honor of the fast growing pioneer town. With a dozen growing children, some teenagers, Andrew and his three wives were all busy with their young families. Then came 1876, an important year for 2 more children to be born as on 17 March 1876, Johanna had a boy born in Hyrum, named Nephi Alma; then on 17 July 1876, in Hyrum, Alice had a girl born to her named Lovina, her youngest daughter, who is my mother. About two years later Johanna had her 4th and last child born, 1 June 1878, in Hyrum, named Andrew Jr. after his father. Then Alice had her last and 10th child born 23 August 1878, in Hyrum, named Gilbert Nathan. Now Andrew had 16 healthy active children to provide for with the help of his 3 busy wives. While Johanna’s three boys were still young she decided to leave Hyrum, so she went to a small country town of Imbler, Union County, Oregon to raise her small family. When Johanna was almost 71, she passed away on 29 August 1911, in Imbler, Oregon, and was returned to Hyrum shere she was buried. Alice lived alone for several years in a small brick home across the street a little was South East of Hyrum 3rd Ward, where her children and grandchildren often came to visit her. She passed away 24 August 1915, and was buried in Hyrum, 26 August 1915. Andrew’s 2nd wife Ellen lived alone also in Hyrum where she spent her last few years out living the other 2 waves and her husband. Ellen died 23 April 1924 and was buried 26 April 1924 in Hyrum. Many of Andrew’s children inherited from their father his ability, ingenuity and understanding the use of their minds and hands to originate new practical ideas and became expert craftsmen, business operators and leaders in their own right. Soon some of Andrew’s teenage children were getting serious with their companions. The only daughter Emmerette, of his wife Ellen, was married 7 November 1882, to Christian Frederick Olsen. In time the 8 living children of Alice were married. The two children not married died shortly after attaining adulthood. Both of Ellen’s children were married. All three of Johanna’s boys were married. As Andrew lived alone in Hyrum during his later years he spent much of his time in doing Temple Work for his Norwegian ancestors at the Logan Temple. He had folks write letters for him addressed to his relatives in Onsoy Parish, Ostford, Norway, for their names, dates and places of birth or Parish family groups. He would have this genealogical data of his people entered in a record book, showing his relationship to these relatives. Then as he was able to do the temple work for his ancestors had the dates of temple ordinance work recorded in his record book. Often as I worked for his son Hyrum, during the summer of 1912 to 1915, I remember grandfather driving in his one horse buggy early in the morning to go to the Logan Temple and returning in the evenings. He always was alone living in a small house on the North West part of town on a road leading down to the pastures north of Hyrum. We grandchildren would visit him in his shop like home now and then and enjoy having him show us about his little shop and how to open the bench drawers and cabinets filled with hand tools etc. No locks were used as he had built-in locks and catches to keep the drawers and cabinets secure. He would show us how to use a bent wire or other homemade devise to open the cabinets of tool cases. My cousin Chloe Anderson Affleck, the 3rd child of my uncle Hyrum has offered a few interesting incidents about Grandfather Andrew she recalls as she was growing up, her father, Hyrum or Hivy Hirum as some called him, lived in the large rock pioneer home that grandfather built for his 1st wife Alice. Chlo was raised in the old rock home with her brothers and sisters. Chlo’s story follows: “When her father Hivy was small Grandfather Andrew would go up to the east hills to work taking little Hivy (Hyrum) and his brother Joe to help. They would camp overnight so they could catch the grain in the morning while it was wet with dew and would not shell out as when dry. One time Grandfather and Uncle Joe went out and lift Hivy asleep at the camp. When they looked back at the camp a large bear came up, walked all around camp, saw the sleeping child but walked away without disturbing him.” Pioneer children had strange experiences! “When we were small we used to like to go over to Grandpa’s. He lived in a one room shanty just across the road and down the road a short distance. There was a couch, a stove, a table, and cupboard of shelves. He would sit in a round backed chair in front of the stove. He gave us gingersnaps from a pasteboard carton shaped like a gallon can. We liked the gingersnaps, so of course we liked to go visit Grandpa.” “Grandpa could be identified because he never had two feet on the ground at one time. He would get up at 4:00A.M. And haul wood till dark, then he would lake shoes till midnight, then up again at four the next morning to haul more wood.” “Grandpa was a skilled craftsman; he made his own cutter, a sleigh pulled by one horse. He would drive in this cutter to Logan Temple every day in the winter to do endowments for his deceased ancestors. I remember him in his fur coat with a fur lap-robe in his cutter. I was so proud because Mama said Grandpa made the cutter himself. As growing children when we were in Hyrum we would go across the street of Hyrum 3rd Ward and east a couple of houses and visited with Grandmother Alice Brooks Andersen. Her little brick home was always so nice, neat and clean and very plain. There was plenty of ground for a garden about the house for her use and fruit trees. It seems Andrew’s active temple work ended in the fall of 1914, the end of his recorded temple work. Andrew now 78 ½ years old, his active life of the past was requiring him to ease up on some activities. Andrew out lived his wife Alice Brooks, by 2 ½ months. He passed away 15 November 1915, in Hyrum. Now the end had come of a very active life of one of Hyrum’s original pioneers, leaving posterity of 14 active children who all married well and were involved with their own families. A year and 5 months before Andrew Andersen passed away; he signed his last will and testament on 15 June 1914, in the presence of H.A. Pedersen and Eva Dunn, Logan Utah. He nominated and appointed as the administrators of his will and testament, A.M. Israelsen and Andrew A. Allen of Hyrum. A copy of Andrew Andersen’s will is on file #56,395, part 20, page 265, in Salt Lake City, Genealogical Library, as it was filed in District Court of the State of Utah, in and for the County of Cache, at Logan, Utah. The order fixing time for bearing petition for probate of the will and listing the 16 people as heirs, devises and legates of Andrew Andersen is found on the same film on page 259. It is interesting to note in his will Andrew Andersen’s last name is spelt as Anderson, in place of Andersen, the correct Norwegian spelling. As some of Andrew’s married sons started out on their own married life, some spelt their surname as Andersen as Joseph Willard did and some as Anderson an James Andrew did. Many people are not aware that in genealogy it is important to use the correct spelling of a name. in most cases Norwegian surname ends in sen and a surname ending in son, generally is a Swedish name. Danish surnames end with either spelling. (See pages 10 &11 of the L.D.S. Gen. Records Submission Manual. 1973) The black temple record book Andrew had compiled by the aid of several persons to help him keep tract of his temple work, came into the hands of a young lady, Della Johnson of Hyrum. She had received it from a male friend who visited her at her home. She lived in Hyrum till 1923, when she married C.C. Wendelboe, then moved to Logan. The male friend told her the black temple book about 9 ½” X 12” X ½” thick had been found on top of a board which was floating in water in a flooded basement. The black cloth cover of the book had become all wrinkled from the water but the genealogical data recorded on the inside pages was not marred in any way. All the recording was done in black ink by several different scribes, but no writing was altered or blurred at all from the water. Abut 1951, Mrs. C.C. Wendelboe gave the temple book to Brother Nolan P. Olsen, recorder of the Logan Temple, as there were many names of persons listed with no temple work done for them. Brother Olsen noted on page 1 of the book, the 1st family of 5 listed was Mons Arnesen, his wife Inger Marie Olsen and 3 sons, Ole Arnt, Anders, (Grandfather Andrew) and Jen Morenius, listing complete birth dates and where born, as town county and country etc.. on the opposite page was listed the death dates and dates of temple work had been done if any etc.. Since Mons was the first name listed, Brother Olsen following the Scandinavian custom tried for some 10 years to find someone in Cache Valley by the name of Monsen who was related to Mons Arnesen family so he could give the book to them to complete the temple work. He had not found the right person during this time. For some 3 years or so I had been doing research work on our Norwegian lines and doing temple work for the ancestors I could identify. To save duplication of temple work I thought I had better check with the Logan Temple to see what Norwegian lines my Grandfather Andrew may have done work on. The evening of 13 June 1961, I went to the Logan Temple and discussed the problem with Brother Olsen. As I told him about my grandfather Andrew doing temple work under 3 different Scandinavian names; he quickly left the room. Soon he returned with the black wrinkled temple record book. He opened it to the first page and there to my surprise I saw Grandfather’s name Anders Arnesen along with his two brothers and their parents. Then I told Brother Olsen my relationship to these listed families. He looked at me surprised. He told me how he received the book and handed it to me and said now it was my obligation to do the remaining temple work for the listed people. Needless to say I was very surprised to receive so much information and the assignment to see that the needed temple work would be done for the remaining names. In checking this temple record book I found about 100 names needing temple work done. Then with the help of my dear wife Marva and a few ward members we were busy going to the Logan Temple as time permitted with our car full of ward friends to get our temple work done. Being initiated in to doing temple work for so many of my Norwegian ancestors, I have continued doing research to extend our lines in Norway. Receiving the black temple book is just one of several spiritual experiences I have had as I have been involved in genealogy research and temple work. To end the story of my Grandfather Andersen’s temple work he started for his ancestors and extend the search work…..

Church Emigration in ship “Charles Buck"

Contributor: melohnt Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

2 Jan. 1975 copied from Church Historian's Office in New Church Office Building, at State St. and N. Temple, on the 2nd floor. Eighty-Second Company - “Charles Buck” Company, 403 Souls, 1855 On 17 Jan. 2855, the clipper ship “Charles Buck”, Captain Smalley, sailed from Liverpool, England, with 403 souls on board including the remainder (about 70) of the Scandinavian emigrants for the season, in charge of Elder Eric G. M. Hogan, and the remainder of the British Saints who had been re-shipped from the “Helios,” the whole under the presidency of Elder Richard Ballantyne, who had recently arrived in England from his mission to Hindostan. The emigrants who sailed on the “Charles Buck”, were somewhat depressed in spirits because of their long detention in Liverpool; and by living in unhealthy places as well as on scanty diet, their general health had become somewhat impaired. When they came on board sea-sickness also prostrated many, but through the blessings of the Lord attending the ordinances of the laying on of hands, and anointing with oil, together with such medicines as the spirit of wisdom dictated the brethren to administer, the sick were raised to health, and only 3 children died during the voyage. One of these was a boy, 7 years old, who got entangled in the ropes of the ship, about a week after sailing from Liverpool, and was thrown overboard and drowned. One birth also occurred on board. The voyage throughout was prosperous, the winds being light and the sea calm. In consequence of head winds after leaving the Irish Channel, the ship took a more easterly course than usual, and came in sight of the Cape de Verde Islands on the 10th Feb. A favorable wind then brought her to the island of Guadeloupe and Antigua on the 27th. The English part of the company who had been shipped on board the “Helios” at Liverpool by President Franklin D. Richards had been provided for on an unusually comfortable and liberal scale on that ship; but when finally re-shipped on the “Charles Buck,” the excellent provisions furnished by President Richards were withheld from them, and in their stead some raw oatmeal, coarse biscuit and a little rice and flour were furnished after being out 6 weeks were placed on short allowances of provisions. This was about 2 weeks before their arrival in New Orleans. For several days many of the Saints had nothing to eat but oatmeal cakes or porridge, and for 3 days only 2 quarts of water was served out to each passenger. Notwithstanding these unpleasant circumstances, the emigrants manifested an unusual measure of cheerfulness and patience. Whatever sickness and debility they suffered was chiefly occasioned through the want of something nutritious and desirable to eat. About the 14 March, 1855, the “Charles Buck” arrived at New Orleans from which city the emigrants continued the journey up the Mississippi River on the 16, on board the fine steamer “Michigan.” Through the exertions and proffered help of Elder McGaw, the Church emigration agent at New Orleans, together with the liberal contributions of those saints who had a few shillings to spare, the whole company were taken along. Had it not been for this, a number of the Saints would have stopped at New Orleans to earn means where with to pay their passage to St. Louis or Cincinnati, later on. The fare from New Orleans to St. Louis was $3.50 for each adult passenger; children under 14 and over 1 year, half price. The captain of the “Michigan” behaved very badly toward the Saints. As the boat left the wharf in New Orleans, John Koelson fell overboard and was drowned. Four children died on the way to St. Louis. A Danish brother by the name of Nordberg fell overboard the morning before arriving at St. Louis and perished. On the 27 March, the company arrived at St. Louis, from whence 191 Saints re-embarked on the 3 April, in charge of Elder Richard Ballantyne, who was instructed to land at Atchison, and take charge of all P.E. Fund passengers who would be shipped to that place. 40 of the Danish Saints under the presidency of Elder Hogan left St. Louis for the same destination on the 31 March, and joined Peter O. Hansen's company near Atchison. In consequence of the river being low, boats were scarce, and fares very high, and it was with considerable difficulty that the brethren of St. Louis succeeded in shipping the company to Atchison. The unprecedented rush of people to Kansas and Nebraska also materially increased the rates of fares and the difficulty of shipping to the upper country. (Millenial Star. Vol. 17, pp. 73, 202, 247?, 300, 315, 490; Deseret News of 13 June, 1855)

The Story of James A. Anderson

Contributor: melohnt Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

James A. Anderson was born September 1, 1859, a son of Andrew and Alice Brooks Anderson. His parents were some of the early Utah pioneers. His father came from Norway, his mother from England. His mother was one of that memorable Handcart company who crossed the plains in 1849. [Trans. Note: Alice Brooks (later Anderson) was part of the Martin Handcart Company.] James was born at West Weber, Utah, but moved to Hyrum while a baby. The family were some of Hyrum's earliest pioneers. James, being the first child, learned to work while oung. He helped his father, driving oxen or horses, on a farm which his father had on the Island in College Ward. When James was a boy they raised sugar cane and made molasses. He hardly knew what it was to have white sugar. Sometimes they would have a little brown sugar. When he was only 12 years of age he helped build the road up Blacksmith Fork Canyon, and received credit for doing a man's work. At one time when he was 12 or 13 years old, hes father raised a quantity of corn. Indians were hired to shuck large piles of corn during the day, and at night after his day's work James worked until late carrying the corn in baskets up to the granary. When he was 16 or 17 years of age he hauled rock to build the Logan Temple. He hauled two loads a day for a month. He also spent 15 days hauling logs. It was 15 miles each trip, and he hauled two loads a day. James enjoyed working in the canyon, and had many interesting experiences as well as several narrow escapes. One day he was leading his horse when a snow slide came down and caught the horse, jerking it away from him. He jumped and grabbed a bush to keep from being caught in the slide. Afterward, he found the horse nearly buried in the snow. Another time, he was in the canyon with his brother-in-law, Ira Williams. He was cutting a tree on a side hill when it fell sooner than he had expected. He tried to get out of the way of the falling tree, but he stumbled and fell on his hands going downhill. He took handsprings over 2 or 3 small cliffs, and then came to a big cliff about 50 feet high. He stopped on the top of the big cliff, out of the way of the tree that was crashing down the hill. His brother-in-law saw the tree go down, and started after him wondering how he could get him out of such a place, for he was sure James was killed. He saw James coming back through the brush with his face scratched a little, but otherwise uninjured. While James was a young man he helped build railroads through part of Idaho and into Wyoming and Montana. While working in Wyoming in late fall a big snowstorm came up, and it turned so cold that the men nearly froze. So much snow fell and the cold became so intense that they found some of their horses standing in the snow, frozen to death. They didn't think they could ever get through the snow and out of the ravine they were in. It looked like they would surely die. They were near the place called Sweetwater where James' mother, with the Handcart company, were camped to die some years before. James knew that without help from God they could never get out alive. So he asked for help. And that night he saw in his dream a trail, or a way, by which they could lead their horses out, leaving their wagons behind. In the morning he told the other men how they could get out, and they were willing to try, so they began their weary journey. That night they gathered some brush and put part of it under a quilt. Then by getting under the quilt to keep out the storm, James started a fire to warm themselves by and cook pancakes over. They were nearly frozen and starved. The next day they went on, reaching the railroad finally, and eventually they arrived home safe. Years later James was hauling grain out at Blue Creek with a colt on one side of the team. The horses ran away, and James pulled on the lines until he was pulled down onto the wagon tongue. They came to a narrow bridge on a curve with a deep hole at the sides and he thought he would be killed under the big load of grain. He couldn't jump as he was wearing a large fur overcoat. The colt became frightened and pushed the horses over onto the bridge. They ran on down the road quite a way before he managed to get them stopped. James filled a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Indiana in 1883. At one place where he went the people had tarred and feathered the missionaries who had been there previously, and had said they would kill the next ones who came. One night they tried to get him and his companion, but a friend at whose place they stayed that night guarded them. The next day they had to leave through the woods. One place they were rotten-egged, and James was hit on the nose. Another time one hit him and ran all down his face. Once a mob broke up their meeting and came after them with hickory switches. But after one of the elders spoke to them the leader began to shake and they left them alone for that night. James also filled a home mission which he enjoyed very much. After he returned home from his mission, James married Hansine Larson in the Logan Temple, June 18, 1886. He first took up farming in Hyrum, then moved to College Ward -- or the Church Farm, as it was then known -- where he raised his family. He was the father of 3 sons and 9 daughters. The one recreation that he enjoyed immensely was going on picnics with his family. He was a progressive farmer, and became one of the leading farmers of Cache Valley. He also raised cattle and sheep. James' wife, Hansine, died July 16, 1929. A year later, on August 7, 1930, he married Lelia S. Swenson, and helped her to rear her three sons. He was as good and kind to them as he would have been had they been his own. Because of the depression, he came near to losing all of the property and material possessions which he had accumulated, so he moved to his farm on the Island in Young Ward, and started over again. Although he was over 70 years of age, he worked hard and was successful. James always had great ambition and an excellent character. He loved his neighbors, and always tried to help anyone in need. It has been said that his biggest fault was in being to good to others. He was loved and respected by his fellow men throughout his entire life. He was widely known as owner of some of the best horses in the Valley. He was always interested in a fine horse, and was a good judge of them. He died May 16 1943, loved and mourned by all who knew him.

Andrew Andersen, from Nancy Ashcroft, sources cited, Horace Ralph was a main source

Contributor: melohnt Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

BIOGRAPHY OF ANDREW ANDERSEN (MONSEN) 1836-1915   Early Childhood History In the beautiful green countryside on the Odegaarden farm in Onsøy Parish of Østfold, Norway, Andrew Monsen was born 22 January 1836(1) to Mons Arnesen and Inger Marie Olsen. He was christened Anders Monsen 21 February 1836 in Ønsby, the second son of the family. He was known by the name of Anders until after his marriage to Alice Brooks, 9 March 1857(2) in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah. In this biography, his name Anders will be used until his marriage. A short time after his marriage he changed his name to Andrew Andersen. Inger Marie Olsen was first married to Anders Arvesen on 23 September 1822,(5) in Onsøy. A daughter, Anne Marie, was born to this couple on 1 September and christened 17 September 1826,(6) at Dahle, Onsøy Parish. Three years later her husband, Anders Arvesen, died 6 November 1829 at the age of 45,(7) leaving Inger Marie a young widow only 29 years old. The following year Inger Marie married Mons Arnesen 7 December 1830 in Onsøy. They had three sons: Ole Arnt, born 7 August and christened 4 September 1831;(3) Anders Monsen, born 22 January and christened 21 February 1836; and Jens, born 9 June and christened 30 June 1839(4) in Onsøy. Inger Marie and Mons lived on a farm in the Onsøy area where Anders and his two brothers were born and raised. When Anders was only eight years old, the family had the sad experience of their mother passing away on 21 February 1844(9) when she was almost 44 years old. This left a heavy responsibility on their father to care for the four growing children. For more than six years the children were raised without a mother. In the fall of 1850, when Anders was 14 years old, his father married a fine young lady about 27 years old named Anne Helene Hansen. They were married 27 September 1850 in Onsøy.(10) To this couple were born four children in Onsøy, two sons and two daughters, so Anders was raised in a family of eight children. Their four children: Hans Jorgen, born 6 February, christened 29 September 1850;(11) Anne Helene, born 7 July, christened 30 October 1853;(12) Bolette Marie, born 4 October 1856, christened 1 February 1857;(13) and Karl Arndt, born in 1860. (Note: LDS Genealogical Library records of Onsøy for 1860 are incomplete, so Karl’s birth is not listed.) Anders Monsen’s Conversion to the Gospel in Norway In the summer of 1851, Apostle Erastus Snow was contacting the LDS missionaries who had started to do proselyting work in the Scandinavian countries. The Lutheran Church was the state religion for Norway, Sweden, and Denmark at this time. It was very difficult for missionaries of other religions or denominations to introduce any new religious teachings. The missionaries were having little success finding few Scandinavians willing to hear about the new religious teachings, but some few were accepting the gospel. Elder Snow, who had been visiting with missionaries in some towns in Denmark, was visiting with Hans Peter Jensen in Nörre Sundby, Denmark on 3 September 1851.(14) At this time, Elder Snow had the following conversation with a Norwegian sailor, which he records in his diary: "A Norwegian by the name of Svend Larsen, the master of a small merchant vessel, came to visit me. He said he had heard of me and my religion and had come with a view to learn more about it. I improved the opportunity to explain to him the principles of the gospel and the order of the kingdom of God as it had been revealed from the Lord. He received my testimony with gladness. His vessel being ready to sail for Norway on his return the next day, I called and appointed Elder Hans F. Petersen to go with Mr. Larsen to his home in Norway to open up the gospel door in that country. The two sailed together from Aalborg on the fourth day of September 1851, well supplied with the Book of Mormon and tracts." The little vessel encountered stormy weather. Finally by Thursday, 11 September 1851, they arrived safely at the port of Østerrisör, Norway. Captain, or "Skipper Larsen" as he was called, afterwards offered Brother Petersen the hospitality of his home as long as he remained in town. The next day, Elder Petersen commenced to visit people in Østerrisör and left tracts. On 13 September 1851, Captain Larsen went to the local priest to see if the Mormon Elder could hold meetings in the school house the next Sunday. The priest was very surprised and upset, so Elder Petersen was summoned to appear before the Mayor in Østerrisör who closely questioned him. With Captain Larsen giving good security for him, Elder Petersen was permitted to stay a few days, as he had left his passport in Aalborg, Denmark. By 23 September 1851, Captain Larsen was baptized by Elder Ole Christian Nielsen.(15) Thus, Captain Svend Larsen became the first fruits of the gospel in Norway. (See pp. 33 and 34, History of the Scandinavian Mission by Andrew Jenson, 1927.) Following his baptism, Captain Larsen was very active in helping the Elders make friends and doing missionary work. There was much local opposition by civil and state church officials, as well as mobs of local residents opposing the Elders and their missionary work. Captain Larsen’s home was used to hold meetings as well as a place for the missionaries to live. Captain Svend Larsen’s busy life started in Østerrisör, now called Risör, where he was born 26 January 1816,(16) the only child of Lars Svendsen and Trine Marie Nielsen. His father was a mariner and was seldom home. His mother loved and cared for her only child and helped him obtain the schooling which was available in the seacoast town. When Svend was 11 years old, he went to sea with his father who was in charge of a coastwise vessel. At the age of 13, with his father’s approval and counsel, Svend became a cabin boy on a larger ship, Brig Edward, and sailed to London in February 1828. From then on, Svend spent his life as a sailor, continuing his travels on the high seas. He became the master of a small merchant vessel of his own.   Slowly the missionary work continued and expanded north along the coast to Fredrikstad and on to Drammen, Norway. In the Fredrikstad area there were soon enough missionaries to form a small branch, named Brevig Branch. Often the missionaries were imprisoned several months for their proselytizing and were frequently visited in prison by local people, new converts, and friends. Among the local folks who visited the Elders in person was Carl Widerborg, a merchant in Fredrikstad. His first visit was in November 1852, when he discussed the gospel with the Elders. From that time on he began a thorough investigation of the gospel. He read the books and pamphlets published by the LDS church and discussed the gospel topics often with the local members. He had been a school teacher and had devoted much time to study and was considered well educated. He was well versed in law and politics in Christiania (now Oslo), the capital of Norway. In January of 1853, Carl Widerborg went to Christiania in behalf of the Elders in prison. On 4 March 1853(17) he was baptized. The following day, as he visited with the Elders in the Fredrikstad prison, he was ordained by them to the office of a Priest. He became very active with the Elders in spreading the gospel in Fredrikstad and the surrounding farm areas during the following few years. He also became the president of the Brevig Branch. About two miles northwest of Fredrikstad in the Onsøy Parish farm area, Elders were busy doing missionary work. As a result of this missionary activity, Anders Monsen became interested in their teachings and was baptized and confirmed on 18 September 1853, by Carl Widerborg.(18) On the same day, Anders Monsen’s Aunt Bolette Arnesdatter Johnsen, sister of Anders’ father, Mons Arnesen, was baptized by Canute Petersen. Bolette’s husband, Syver Johnson, was baptized and confirmed that day by Elder C. Dorius, along with their two daughters, Karen Kirstine and Inger Andrea. Crossing the Plains Gradually the membership of the church increased in the Fredrikstad area. Like other Scandinavian converts, the desire to emigrate to Zion found Anders Monsen, along with his Aunt Bolette and her family, making plans to join other converts to go to Zion. At this time, the seaport of Liverpool, England, where the LDS British Mission office was located, became the center of great activity for both converts and missionaries going to different European countries and returning home from their missions abroad. Anders Monsen, along with many other Norwegian immigrants, left their homeland 17 November 1854 for Liverpool. Some converts had left a few weeks earlier for the United States. There was sometimes a delay of a week or more before passage could be obtained to cross the Atlantic Ocean. Anders Monsen first boarded the ship James Vesmith, of 1162 tons, with Captain Mills. It seems there was not enough room for the large group of passengers, so they were transferred to the Charles Buck, of 1424 tons, with Captain Smally. This ship sailed from Liverpool on 17 January 1855 and arrived in New Orleans about 14 March 1855.(19) Traveling with Anders Monsen was his Aunt Bolette and Uncle Syver Johnsen with their four daughters, Karen Kristine, Inger Andrea, Anne Marie, and Mina. At New Orleans, the immigrants changed to the Mississippi River steamer Michigan on 16 March 1855 and arrived one day later in St. Louis, Missouri. The group then traveled to Kansas City, Missouri, one of the outfitting posts for the Saints crossing the plains. They followed the Missouri River to Atchison, Kansas, where some of the group were organized into companies and prepared to cross the plains. Anders was a young man, 19 years old, who was trying to learn a new language and becoming accustomed to the American pioneer’s way of life. He joined the second company of pioneers with Jacob F. Secrist as Captain. In this group there were 368 souls, 58 wagons, some 231 oxen, 100 cows, and five horses. They left their camp near Atchison, Kansas on 13 June 1855 with Anders driving a team of oxen. The company included the Danish emigrants and part of the British Independent Company of returning missionaries. In this group, besides Captain Noah T. Guyman, were Charles Smith, O.M. Duel, Eric G.M. Hogen, and Peter O. Hansen. During the overland journey, considerable sickness prevailed among the travelers. Captain Secrist became very ill and died 2 July 1855 on Ketchum Creek, between Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, and Kearney, Nebraska. His body was placed in a tin coffin and buried on the Blue River. Noah T. Guyman was appointed Captain in his stead.(20) At Ft. Leavenworth, Bolette had the sad experience of losing both her husband and daughter, Anne Marie, who died 14 May 1855 from cholera.(21) The train of pioneers and oxen teams finally arrived in Salt Lake City 7 September 1855, spending some 85 days on their journey across the plains. During the fall of 1855, Anders was busy getting used to pioneer life in Salt Lake City. The pioneers had only been in the valley a little over eight years. It was no easy life for a young Norwegian convert of only two years to adjust to the rugged pioneer life in this high mountain country. He worked his way north to South Weber, which is near the mouth of Weber Canyon as it is known today. Alice Brooks and the Martin Handcart Company In the 13th General Epistle of the First Presidency, dated Salt Lake City 29 October 1855, the following instructions were given:(22) Let all the Saints who can gather up for Zion, and come while the way is open for them. Let the poor also come, ... let them come on foot, with handcarts or wheelbarrows; let them gird up their loins and walk through, and nothing shall hinder or stay them. In regard to the foreign emigration another year, let them pursue the northern route from Boston, New York, or Philadelphia, and land at Iowa City or the then terminus of the railroad. There let them be provided with handcarts on which to drag their provisions and clothing; then walk and draw them, thereby saving the immense expense every year for teams and outfits for crossing the plains. We are hopeful that such a train will out-travel any ox team that can be started. They should have a few good cows to furnish milk and a few beef cattle to drive and butcher as they may need. In this way, the expense, risk loss, and perplexity of teams will be obviated and the Saints will more effectually escape the scenes of distress, anguish, and death which have often laid so many of our brethren and sisters in the dust. We purpose sending men of faith and experience with some suitable instructions to some proper outfitting point to carry into effect the above suggestions. Let the Saints, therefore, who intend to emigrate the ensuing year, understand that they are expected to walk and draw their luggage across the plains and that they will be assisted by the Perpetual Emigration Fund in no other way. Thus the year 1856 was the beginning of pioneer handcart companies crossing the plains, following the instructions of the First Presidency issued in the fall of 1855. There were five different handcart companies that arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in 1856. The last handcart company of 1856, led by Edward Martin,(23) started out with 575 persons, 146 handcarts, seven wagons, six mules and horses, 50 cows and beef cattle. The company left Iowa City, Iowa, on 28 July 1856 and headed west. One of the persons in Captain Martin’s company was a young 21-year old English convert to the gospel named Alice Brooks. Alice was born in Bolton, Lancashire, England, on 16 January 1835 to Samuel Brooks and Sara Ashley.(24) She was baptized 26 June 1847 by Elder Squire Farnsworth and confirmed 2 July 1847 by Elder Robert Holt, according to the Bolton LDS Branch records. Alice’s parents were very much opposed to her joining the small Mormon group. After her baptism, the spirit of emigration came upon her and she felt determined to go to Zion. Her parents were very much opposed to her leaving home to join the Saints. At the last fast meeting she attended before leaving England, she bore her testimony and bid farewell to her friends. When she finished speaking, a man arose and spoke in tongues. He said she would come to Zion through much tribulation and would become a mother in Israel. This strengthened her faith and proved a great source of inspiration to her on her journey to Zion. After literally running away from home, she left England for America on 25 May 1856 on the ship Horizon, with 856 Saints aboard.(25) They were five weeks on the ocean, arriving at Boston Harbor 30 June 1856. The Saints traveled by rail to Iowa City, Iowa, arriving on 8 July 1856. Here she had to wait three weeks for a handcart to be made. She joined the fifth and last handcart company of the season to cross the plains. Samuel Richards was president of the company and Edward Martin was the captain. Brother Taylor advised them not to start with such a large company so late in the year; however, President Richards insisted on going as soon as the handcarts were ready. By 12 August 1856 the company left the Missouri River and made good headway until they passed Ft. Kearney. That night they lost 15 head of cattle which had been used to haul provisions. The provisions had to be removed from the wagons and added to the already overloaded handcarts. When they began, there were two persons assigned to each handcart, with 17 pounds of bedding and a few cooking utensils allowed to each couple; two ox teams carried provisions for the entire company. They traveled two to 30 miles a day. Some days they had to travel 20 miles to reach water. As these pioneers walked along, passing some homes and pulling and pushing their handcarts, people would come out and gaze at them as they sang, "As we go marching up the hill as merrily on the way we go, some must push and some must pull until we reach the valley, Oh!" As the company reached the Green River in Western Wyoming in the early fall, they were caught in a severe early snowstorm which took many lives. They had to wade across the river pulling their handcarts. The fall storm increased and the cold winds blew their tents asunder and scattered their campfires. Some nights nine or ten persons would perish from hunger and cold. Their provisions were nearly gone. Men became so weak and famished they could not dig graves for the dead, so they had to leave the bodies on the open prairie to be eaten by wolves. Finally they reached Devil’s Gate, now called Devil’s Slide, near Croyden, Utah. They camped in a ravine, never expecting to get out alive. They had only four ounces of flour a day for each person, with only enough of that to last four days. They had no salt and had to melt icicles from the brush to obtain water. Their exhausted oxen were killed, their rawhides roasted, and soup made of the bones. At this camp, many more Saints died and as many as 16 bodies were buried in one grave. Alice often thought of the blessing she was given before leaving her home in England and wondered if she would really become a mother in Israel. The Saints in the company fasted and prayed for their deliverance. President Richards asked if they were willing to perish there for the gospel’s sake, if the Lord saw fit, and every person answered, "Yes." Almost at this same moment, Joseph A. Young arrived in camp on a white horse. He was hailed by the company as if he were an angel. Weeping men and women surrounded him, pleading with him to save them from death. Elder Young returned to Salt Lake and reported to President Brigham Young the precarious plight of the two handcart companies that he had discovered -- the Willy and Martin Companies. President Young was presiding over a meeting, dismissed the meeting at once, and ordered wagons with food and warm clothing and bedding to be sent immediately to rescue these stranded Saints. At last the Martin Company arrived in Salt Lake City on 30 November 1856. About 135 members of that company died en route from Iowa City to the Great Salt Lake Valley. Life in the New Country In December of 1856, Alice Brooks went to Weber, now Uinta, near the mouth of Weber Canyon, where she met Anders Monsen. Soon they became friends and were married 9 March 1857 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City.(26) The Endowment House Marriage Records for 9 March 1857 lists Alice Brooks as being sealed to Anders Monsen. Some time later, Anders changed his name to Andrew Andersen, as it is found listed on his marriage records when his second wife, Ellen Hogensen, was sealed to him on 5 March 1864 in the Endowment House;(27) and again when Ellen’s sister, Johanna was sealed to him 9 May 1870 in the Endowment House.(28) Andrew and Alice started their married life in Sessions Settlement, a pioneer community about eight miles north of Salt Lake City. This community later became Bountiful. It was here that Andrew became interested in farming. The next spring the young pioneer couple’s first child was born on 27 February 1858.(29) They named her Sarah Maria. During the "Move South" effort in 1858, they were involved with other pioneer families preparing to leave the area because of the pending approach of Johnston’s Army. The Mormon’s very dear friend, Colonel Thomas L. Kane, arrived in Salt Lake City on 25 February 1858.(30) He convinced Brigham Young and the pioneers that the federal troops would not make war upon the people of Utah. Soon conditions began to change for the better. As a result of Colonel Kane’s negotiations with President Young, several U.S. Senators, and President Buchanan, a federal peace commission reached Salt Lake City on 7 June 1858. From the peaceful negotiations and findings of the commission, General Johnston’s army passed through Salt Lake City on 26 June 1858. A few days later the army established a permanent camp in Cedar Valley, west of Utah Lake, and named it Camp Floyd. It took time to clear away the misunderstandings between the U.S. government and the pioneer settlers before friendly feelings were again established. In early fall of 1859, a son was born on 1 September 1859, who was named James Andrew. In the remainder of this biography, Anders Monsen will be called Andrew Andersen, the name he seems to have used most often after this time. President Brigham Young was sending some early pioneer families, as well as later arrivals, to surrounding valleys and outposts in an effort to colonize the area. In 1856, Peter Maughan and six families settled in Wellsville, Cache Valley; then three years later, William B. Preston, the Thatcher family, and others settled where Logan City is now located. Cache Valley in general was being used as a summer grazing area for some 2,000 head of cattle and horses belonging to the church, as well as for 1,000 head of animals belonging to pioneer families.(31) In the spring of 1860, Andrew Andersen and his wife Alice, with their two young children, emigrated to Cache Valley with other pioneers. They settled in the Hyrum area, about five miles east of Wellsville. Pioneers were settling in Paradise, Hyde Park, and Franklin and forming new communities in Cache Valley. The pioneers who were going to Hyrum first stopped at a place called Camp Hollow, one mile north of where Hyrum is now located.(32) It was too early for spring plowing, so all available men, wagons, and oxen were used to get timber for building log dugouts. Soon 13 dugouts were built for shelter for the families who did not have wagon boxes or tents to use for homes. In the last part of May 1860, Apostle Ezra T. Benson and Peter Maughan visited the Camp Hollow families but were not impressed with the location. With several brethren they checked the higher plateau lands southwest of the camp, which they liked better. So the new settlers decided to locate their new town on the higher location. Andrew Andersen was involved with the others building the first log house by the dugouts. By that fall, Camp Hollow was evacuated, as enough log houses were built for the families. The houses faced each other in fort fashion as protection against the Indians. There were 21 families, totaling 77 persons, listed as the first settlers of Hyrum in 1860. Andrew Andersen and his wife and two children are included in that group. The following year, a third child named Phennetta Alice was born 5 July 1861 in Hyrum. Now with three children, the young couple was busy with new family cares, becoming acquainted with their growing pioneer town of new log houses being built, and developing new farms in the open fields. On 12 May 1863, the fourth child of Andrew and Alice was born in Hyrum, named Nancy Ann. Besides farming, Andrew found time to make shoes for his family and the town’s residents. He was very practical and a gifted craftsman and builder. As new local roads needed building and canals developed to water their fields, Andrew was involved with these community projects. Andrew built a small molasses mill by the "Big Ditch" on Main Street. He was an accomplished stone mason and many of the stone homes he helped build are still standing in Hyrum. Many of Andrew’s children inherited from their father his ability, ingenuity, and understanding the use of their minds and hands to originate new practical ideas. Many became expert craftsmen, builders, and business leaders in their own right. As the small country towns in Cache Valley were expanding, a few pioneer Mormon men became involved in plural marriage, or polygamy, as it was being introduced by the Church leaders. The whole country became upset over this practice and was one of the contributing causes of Johnston’s Army coming to Utah in 1858. Many of the few men who entered into polygamy were fined and imprisoned, even though less than four percent of the members entered into the plural marriage covenant. Andrew became interested in the idea of entering into this plural marriage covenant. Some of the local ward brethren became aware that Andrew entertained the idea of marrying another wife. It is a family story that a stake officer, in discussing the subject of polygamy with Andrew, advised him not to become involved in this practice. If he did, the leader said, Andrew would live to see the day he would not have a wife because they would all leave him. In the spring of 1864, Andrew Andersen became involved in polygamy by his marriage with Ellen Hogenson on 5 March 1864 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. She became the mother of Andrew’s fifth child, Emmerett, born 26 November 1864 in Hyrum. Ellen and her sister, Johanna, were young converts from Eslov, Malmohus, Sweden. Andrew was busy now with building a home for his new wife and daughter. The following year, Andrew and Alice had their fifth child in Hyrum, born 18 October 1865, named Martha Marinda and later nicknamed "Rindy." In the spring of the next year, Ellen had her second child born 18 May 1866 named Charles Leonard. The following season, Alice had her sixth child born 8 July 1867, whom they named Samuel. In the spring of 1870, to the surprise of some, Andrew married a third wife, Johanna, the sister of his wife Ellen, on 9 May 1870 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Andrew built a large white stone house for Johanna a little northwest across the street from the Hyrum 3rd Ward building. The next spring, Johanna gave birth to her first child, Mary Elizabeth, 9 April 1871. Unfortunately this little daughter died a few days later on 15 April 1871. This same year Alice had her seventh child, Joseph Willard, born 2 October 1871. This was the tenth child for Andrew. The next summer, Johanna had a second child, born 6 August 1872. He was named Ephraim Wilford. A year later, Alice had a son born 25 August 1873 named Hyrum, in honor of the fast-growing pioneer town. With a dozen growing children, some of them now teenagers, Andrew and his wives were busy with their young families. The year 1876 was an important year for two more children to be born. On 17 March Johanna had a son named Nephi Alma, and Alice had a girl born to her named Lovina, her youngest daughter. In 1878, Johanna had her fourth and last child born 1 June 1878, named Andrew Jr. after his father. Alice had her tenth, and last, child born 23 August 1878 in Hyrum, who was named Gilbert Nathan. Now Andrew had 16 healthy active children to provide for with the help of his three busy wives. While Johanna’s three boys were still young, she decided to leave Hyrum and move to the small country town of Imbler, Union County, Oregon, to raise her family. When she was almost 71 years old, she passed away on 29 August 1911 in Imbler and was returned to Hyrum to be buried. Alice lived alone for several years in a small brick home across the street a little way southeast of the Hyrum 3rd Ward. Her children and grandchildren often came to visit her. She passed away 24 August 1915 and was buried in Hyrum 26 August 1915. Andrew’s second wife, Ellen, lived alone also in Hyrum. She outlived the other two wives and her husband. She died 23 April 1924 and was buried 26 April 1924 in Hyrum. Soon Andrew’s children grew up and began to be married. His daughter Emmerett, the only daughter of his wife Ellen, was married 7 November 1882 to Christian Frederick Olsen. The eight living children of Alice were married. The two not married died shortly after attaining adulthood. Both of Ellen’s children married and all three of Johanna’s boys were married. Andrew lived alone in Hyrum during the latter years of his life. He spent much time doing temple work for his Norwegian ancestors at the Logan Temple. According to the Logan Temple records up to 1914, the year before Andrew’s death, much temple work was done by him under the name of Anders or Andrew Monsen, Arnesen, or Andersen, of Hyrum. Some of the recordings begin in June 1890. He had people write letters for him addressed to his relatives living in Onsøy Parish, Østfold, Norway, asking for names, dates and places of birth. He had this genealogical data entered in a record book showing his relationship to these relatives. As he was able to do the temple work for these ancestors, he had the dates of the ordinance recorded in his record book. Horace Ralph, a grandson, recalls working for Andrew’s son Hyrum during the summers of 1912 to 1915. He recalls his grandfather driving in his one-horse buggy early in the mornings going to the Logan Temple and returning to Hyrum in the evenings. He was always alone, living in a small house in the northwest part of town on the road leading down into the pastures north of Hyrum. The grandchildren would enjoy visiting him in his small shop and having him show them around. He showed them how to open the bench drawers and cabinets filled with hand tools, etc. No locks were used, as he had built-in locks and catches to keep the drawers and cabinets secure. He demonstrated how to use a bent wire or other homemade device to open the cabinets or tool cases. Chlo Anderson Affleck, the third child of Hyrum, offers a few interesting incidents about her Grandfather Andrew that she recalls as she was growing up in Hyrum. Her father, Hyrum (or "Hivey" as he was known by some, lived in the large rock pioneer home that Andrew had built for his first wife, Alice. Chlo was raised in that home with her brothers and sisters. Chlo’s story follows: "When my father, Hivey, was small, Grandfather Andrew would go up to the east hills to work, taking little Hivey and his older brother Joe to help. They would camp overnight so they could catch the grain in the morning while it was wet with dew and not shell out as when dry. One time Grandfather and Uncle Joe went out to work and left Hivey asleep at the camp. When they looked back at the camp, a large bear came up, walked all around camp, saw the sleeping child, but walked away without disturbing him. "When we were small we used to like to go over to Grandpa’s. He lived in a one-room shanty just across the road and down the road north a short distance. There was a couch, a stove, a table, and cupboard of shelves. He would sit in a round-backed chair in front of the stove. He gave us gingersnaps from a pasteboard carton shaped like a gallon can. We liked the gingersnaps, so of course we liked to go visit Grandpa. He could be identified because he never had two feet on the ground at one time. He would get up at 4:00 a.m. and haul wood until dark, make shoes until midnight, then get up again at 4:00 the next morning to haul more wood. "Grandpa was a skilled craftsman. He made his own cutter, a sleigh pulled by one horse. He would drive in this cutter to the Logan Temple every day during the winter to do endowments for his deceased ancestors. I remember him in his fur coat with a fur lap robe in his cutter. I was so proud because Mama said Grandpa made the cutter himself. "As growing children living in Hyrum, we would go across the street of the Hyrum 3rd Ward and east of couple of houses and visit with Grandmother Alice. Her little brick home was always so neat, nice and clean and very plain. There was plenty of ground for a garden and fruit trees about the home for her use." It seems Andrew’s active temple work ended in the fall of 1914, the end of his recorded temple work. Andrew was now more than 78 years old and his active life of the past required him to ease up on some activities. Andrew outlived his wife, Alice Brooks, by a little more than two months. He passed away 15 November 1915, in Hyrum. The end had come of a very active life of one of Hyrum’s original pioneers. He left a posterity of 14 active children who all married well and were involved with their own families. Postscript by Horace F. Ralph, Grandson A year and five months before he passed away, Andrew signed his last will and testament on 15 June 1914 in the presence of H.A. Pedersen and Eva Dunn in Logan, Utah. He nominated and appointed as the administrators of his will A.M. Israelsen and Andrew A. Allen of Hyrum. It is interesting to note in his will that Andrew Andersen’s last name is spelled Anderson, not Andersen, the correct Norwegian spelling. As some of Andrew’s married sons started out on their own, some spelled their surname as Andersen, as Joseph Willard did, while some spelled it Anderson, as James Andrew did. Many people are not aware that for genealogy it is important to use the correct spelling of a name. In most cases, a Norwegian surname ends in sen, while a surname ending in son is generally a Swedish name. Danish surnames end with either spelling. The black temple record book Andrew had compiled by the aid of several persons to help him keep track of his temple work came into the hands of a young lady, Della Johnson, of Hyrum. She received it from a male friend who visited at her home. She lived in Hyrum until 1923 when she married C. C. Wendelboe, then moved to Logan. The male friend told her the black temple book, about 9"x12"x1/2", was found on top of a board which was floating in water in a flooded basement. The black cloth cover of the book had become all wrinkled from the water but the genealogical data recorded on the inside pages was not marred in any way. All the recording was done by a black ink pen by several different scribes, but no writing was altered or blurred by the water. About 1951, Mrs. C. C. Wendelboe gave the Temple Book to Brother Nolan P. Olsen, Recorder of the Logan Temple, as there were many names of persons listed with no temple work done for them. Brother Olsen noted on page 1 of the book the first family of five listed was Mons Arnesen, his wife Inger Marie Olsen, and three sons, Ole Arnt, Anders (Grandfather Andrew), and Jens Morenius, listing complete birth dates and where born, as town, county, and country, etc. On the opposite page was listed the death dates and dates the temple work had been done, if any. etc. Since Mons was the first given name listed, Brother Olsen, following the Scandinavian patronymics custom, tried for more than ten years to find someone in Cache Valley by the name of Monsen who was related to the Mons Arnesen family so he could give the book to them to complete the temple work. He had not found the right person during this time. For some three years or so I had been doing research work on our Norwegian lines and doing temple work for the ancestors I could identify. To save duplication of temple work, I thought I had better check with the Logan Temple to see what Norwegian lines my Grandfather Andrew may have done work on. The evening of 13 June 1961 I went to the Logan Temple and discussed the problem with Brother Olsen. As I told him about my Grandfather Andrew doing temple work under three different Scandinavian names, he quickly left the room. Soon he returned with the black wrinkled Temple Record Book. He opened it to the first page and there to my surprise I saw Grandfather’s name, Anders Arnesen, along with his two brothers and their parents. Then I told Brother Olsen my relationship to these listed families. He looked at me surprised. He told me how he received the book and handed it to me and said now it was my obligation to do the remaining temple work for the listed people. Needless to say, I was very surprised to receive so much information and the assignment to see that the needed temple work would be done for the remaining names. In checking this Temple Record Book, I found about 100 names needing temple work to be done. With the help of my dear wife, Marva, and a few ward members, we were busy going to the Logan Temple as time permitted with our car full of ward friends to get this temple work done. Being initiated into doing temple work for so many of my Norwegian ancestors, I have continued doing research to extend our lines in Norway. Receiving the black Temple Record Book is just one of several spiritual experiences I have had as I have been involved in genealogy research and temple work. To end this story of my Grandfather Andrew Andersen, I just hope I can live a life worthy of continuing on with Grandfather Andersen’s temple work he started for his ancestors and extend the research work. Index of Sources (Film numbers and references cited located at LDS Family History Center, Salt Lake City) 1.Ons øy Parish Births, #18165, Pt. 2, p. 328 2.Endowment House Sealings for 1857, #25165, Pt. 15, p. 132 3.Ons øy Parish Births, #18165, Pt. 2, p. 296 4.Ibid, p. 348 5.Ibid, p. 407 6.Ibid, p. 185 7.Ibid, p. 230, #23 8.Ibid. p. 462 9.Ons øy Parish, #33663, Part 3, p. 314 10.Ibid., p. 270 11.Ibid., p. 54 12.Ibid., p. 65 13.Ibid., p. 83 14.History of the Scandinavian Mission, Andrew Jensen, 1927, pp. 31-34 15.Ibid., p. 34 16.Ibid., pp. 33-34 17.Ibid., p. 74 18.Fredrickstad Branch, #123,000, Entry #88 19.Ship Charles Buck, #6184, Pt. 1, p. 211 20.LDS Church History Department, Emigration Book Vol. 2, 1849-57 21.Life of Bolette Monsen Johnson Levi Brown, Nephi J. Brown, 1963 22.13th General Epistle for Handcart Company, Deseret News Weekly, Oct. 31, 1855 23.Edward Martin’s Handcart Company, Deseret News, 30 Nov. 1856 24.Bolton, Lancashire, England Births, #13656, Pt. 9, p. 5 25."Ship Horizon" #6184, Pt. 2, p. 151 26.Endowment House Sealings, #25165, Pt. 15, pp. 132-133 27.Ibid., p. 301 28.Ibid., Pt. 16, p. 176 29.Births of all 16 children, Family Record of H.F. Ralph and Genealogy Archives 30.Utah, Story of Her People, Milton R. Hunter, 1946, pp. 307-308 31.The Story of a Mormon Pioneer, Alvin Allen, 1946, pp. 178-180 32.Ibid., pp. 33-37     This biography was researched and compiled by Horace F. Ralph, Grandson (Oldest son of Lovina Anderson Ralph) 21 September 1977   c:\My Documents\Nancy Genealogy\ArneAnderson bio.wpd ANDREW ARNE ANDERSEN Original Pioneer of Hyrum, Utah Andrew Arne Andersen, son of Mons Arnesen and Inger Olsen Andersen, was born January 22, 1836, at Aale, Oume, Norway. He was baptized into the LDS Church in September 1853. Andrew Andersen came to Utah in the Noah T. Guyman Company. Upon arriving in Utah he first went to South Weber and later to Plain City in Weber County. On March 9, 1857, he and Alice Brooks were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. They participated in the ‘great move south" in 1858 when Johnston’s Army threatened to enter Salt Lake City in the Utah War. In the spring of 1860 Andrew and his wife came to Cache Valley with the first pioneer settlers and assisted in establishing the town of Hyrum. At first they built a dugout and log shelter at Camp Hollow, northeast of Hyrum. Later, Father built the first log cabin on the northeast corner of what is now Main and Second East Streets. In 1864, Andrew married a second wife, Ellen Hogan, in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Two children were born to this couple: Emma, who later became the wife of Christian F. Olsen, a long-time school teacher in Hyrum; and Charles L. Andersen. Andrew married a third wife, Johanna Hogan, a sister of his second wife, Ellen. He built a large white stone house for Johanna which was located on Second West Street across the street and a little northwest from the Hyrum Stake-Third Ward church building. Three children were born to Andrew and Johanna: Wilford, Nephi, and Andrew. Shortly after Andrew was born Johanna moved with her children to Idaho, reportedly to Weiser or that vicinity. The children of Andrew A. Andersen and Alice Brooks Andersen were: James, Phenette (Mrs. Ira T. Williams), Marinda (Mrs. Louis T. Miller), Samuel, Joseph, Hyrum B, Lovina (Mrs. Fred Ralph), and Gilbert. Andrew A. Andersen was an ambitious, energetic, hard-working man. He was an excellent general craftsman, mechanic, and builder. He is reported to have been a practical shoemaker. He built horse carriages, sleds, and various farm implements. He built the first molasses mill in Hyrum. His large family of children possessed similar characteristics to those of their father with respect to ambition, industry, and economic success. This family to the third and fourth generation has been outstanding in its contributions to the economic growth and progress of Hyrum, Cache Valley, Utah, and surrounding states, and also to the development of high quality and highly respected citizenship. Andrew Arne Andersen passed away on November 15, 1915, at Hyrum, Utah of pneumonia. This life sketch was given orally by his youngest daughter, Lovina, when she was 79 years old, December 11, 1955. This history does not mention all of the children born to Andrew and Alice Brooks. They had 10 children.     LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF ANDREW A. ANDERSEN I, Andrew Arne Andersen, of Hyrum, Cache County, Utah, of the age of 78 years, and being of sound mind and memory (blessed by Almighty God for the same) and not acting under duress, fraud, or undue influence of and person whatever, do make, publish, and declare this, my last will and testament, in the manner following: 1.I desire that at death my body be decently buried with proper regard for my station and condition in life and the circumstances of my estate. 2.I desire that my body shall be buried in a vault made of brick or cement arched over at the top. 3.I direct that my executors hereinafter mentioned, as soon as they have sufficient funds on hand, pay my funeral expenses and the expenses of my last sickness. 4.I give and bequeath to my children, 12 in number, whose names and addresses are as follows, $5.00 each: James A. Anderson, College Ward, Utah; Joseph W. Anderson, Hyrum, Utah; Hyrum Andersen, Hyrum, Utah; Gilbert Andersen, Hyrum, Utah; Phennetta Andersen Williams, Hyrum, Utah; Martha Maude Andersen Miller, Hyrum, Utah; Lovina Andersen Ralph, Salt Lake City, Utah; Charles C. Anderson, Hyrum, Utah; Emeretta Anderson Davis, Rupert, Idaho; Wilford E. Anderson, Rupert Idaho; Nephi Anderson, Weiser, Idaho; and Andrew Anderson, Weiser, Idaho. I direct that said amount be paid by my executors as soon as they have sufficient funds on hand. 5.I direct that my executors hereinafter mentioned shall have the right to sell all my real and personal property, not theretofore disposed of, and that the means from such sales shall be used as follows: $500.00 to the ward missionary fund of Hyrum Third Ward, Hyrum Stake, Cache County, Utah. Said amount to be known as the Andrew Andersen fund and to be used for the worthy missionaries who shall be called from said ward from time to time who are not able to pay their own expenses. Said fund to be handled by the Bishopric of Third Ward of Hyrum, Hyrum Stake, Utah. I give and bequeath to the Logan Temple the sum of $500.00 to be used for the redemption of worthy poor. I direct the balance, if there be any, shall be turned over to the Bishopric of the Third Ward of Hyrum to be used for the worthy poor of said ward, said amount to be distributed and used under the direction of the ward Bishopric. I do hereby nominate and appoint A.M. Israelsen and Andrew Allen of Hyrum, Cache County, Utah, the administrators of this my last will and testament, and I hereby revoke all former wills by me made. In witness thereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal. This 15th day of June 1914. /s/ Andrew Andersen Witnesses: /s/ H.A. Peterson and /s/ Ira dbrieuw(?)   [Note: Andrew Andersen was 79 years old and had about $4,000.00 at his death]

Life Timeline of Andrew Andersen

1836
Andrew Andersen was born on 20 Jan 1836
Andrew Andersen was 4 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Andrew Andersen was 24 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Andrew Andersen was 27 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1862
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Andrew Andersen was 42 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1877
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Andrew Andersen was 45 years old when The world's first international telephone call is made between St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, and Calais, Maine, United States. A telephone call is a connection over a telephone network between the called party and the calling party.
1881
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Andrew Andersen was 56 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1891
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Andrew Andersen was 68 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
1903
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Andrew Andersen died on 15 Nov 1915 at the age of 79
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Andrew Andersen (20 Jan 1836 - 15 Nov 1915), BillionGraves Record 3545440 Hyrum, Cache, Utah, United States

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