John Fowlke

26 Jan 1803 - 9 Mar 1886

Register

John Fowlke

26 Jan 1803 - 9 Mar 1886
edit Edit Record
photo Add Images
group_add Add Family
description Add a memory

He was the son of John Fowlke and Hannah Mee; the eighth child in a family of twelve children. He was a wood turner by trade while residing in England. He married Harriet Raynor June 14, 1823 in Nottingham, England. The gospel of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was brought to the att
Register to get full access to the grave site record of John Fowlke
Terms and Conditions

We want you to know exactly how our service works and why we need your registration in order to allow full access to our records.

terms and conditions

Contact Permissions

We’d like to send you special offers and deals exclusive to BillionGraves users to help your family history research. All emails ​include an unsubscribe link. You ​may opt-out at any time.

close
close
Thanks for registering with BillionGraves.com!
In order to gain full access to this record, please verify your email by opening the welcome email that we just sent to you.
close
Sign up the easy way

Use your facebook account to register with BillionGraves. It will be one less password to remember. You can always add an email and password later.

Loading

Life Information

John Fowlke

Born:
Died:

Pleasant Grove City Cemetery

301-945 Utah 146
Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

Chynna67

July 3, 2011
Photographer

Papa Moose

July 2, 2011

Nearby Graves

Nearby GravesTM

Some family members have different last names, but they’re still buried relatively close to one another. View grave sites based on name, distance from the original site, and find those missing relatives.

Upgrade to BG+

Find more about John...

We found more records about John Fowlke.

Family

Relationships on the headstone

add

Relationships added by users

add

Grave Site of John

edit

John Fowlke is buried in the Pleasant Grove City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

John Fowlke

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

He was the son of John Fowlke and Hannah Mee; the eighth child in a family of twelve children. He was a wood turner by trade while residing in England. He married Harriet Raynor June 14, 1823 in Nottingham, England. The gospel of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was brought to the attention of John and Harriet by their daughter Louisa. Several members of the family joined the Church. Louisa joined the Church on Dec. 7, 1854. John and three other children were baptized on February 24,1855. The Fowlke family, similar to the other early Church converts, were anxious to emigrate to Zion in America. After joining the Church they worked toward this end, and finally their dreams were realized. They left England on April 23, 1861, on the ship UNDERWRITER. They sailed from Liverpool with 624 Saints under the presidency of Milo Andrus, Homer Duncan, and Charles W. Penrose. John and Harriet departed with the four youngest children, that is Louisa, Fredrick, Sarah Ann, and Clara. The older girls, Harriet and Emma, died in England as children. Two other older girls, Drucilla and Eliza came to America somewhat later. Three other children, Catherine Elizabeth, John and William remained in England. John and William were engineers. They refused to have anything to do with the family after they joined the Church. They were both strong and powerful men. One of them whipped the wrestling champ in a fight in a public house. The trip across the Atlantic Ocean took about four weeks. It was a long and hard journey for city folks. One person died and was buried at sea; and many passengers became sea sick. The Underwriter ship arrived at New York harbor on May 22, 1861. The group of Saints traveled from New York City to Central United States by railroad, boat, and wagon. They arrived at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, on June 2, 1861. Here they waited for oxen teams to take them across the plains to Utah Territory. Two more Saints died while waiting at Winter Quarters, or Florence as it was later called. The westward journey began on June 30, 1861, in the company of Captain Horace S. Eldredge (the same company as James Backhouse). Another emigrant died while crossing the plains, and was buried by the wayside. Most of the Saints had to walk, since the wagons were loaded with food supplies and other provisions. It was necessary to herd the oxen at night, because of the threat of Indian raids. The men took turns keeping watch, two men guarding at a time. The Indians would come about two or three o'clock in the morning; whooping it up to stampede the cattle. They would hope to drive off the cattle or shoot arrows into them so they would die, and they could get them later. The men on guard would fire shots to waken the men in camp to come to their assistance. Large herds of buffalo were encountered along the trail. At times it was necessary to cut the wagon train in two sections to allow the buffalo herds to pass through and not stampede the wagon train oxen. The Horace S. Eldredge Company arrived at Salt Lake City on Sept. 15, 1861. The Fowlke family stayed at the camping grounds overnight. The next morning they moved on to Pleasant Grove, Utah. Here sister Nancy Holman cooked supper for them, including chickens and biscuits. This was the first good meal they had had in five months. When the Fowlke family first came to Pleasant Grove they lived in a rock fort located at 500 South and 100 East. They lived in the fort for the protection it afforded from the Indians. When the men left the fort for wood in Battle Creek, they would go in a group because of the danger of being attacked. The Indians watched them during the day, and the men in the fort never dared go out of the fort during the night. At this time the Indians killed a white man near Lehi. They brought his scalp on a pole and had a War Dance around the pole at the mouth of Dry Canyon, just east of Lindon. John Fowlke and his family were among the first settlers in Lindon, just two miles south of Pleasant Grove. They worked hard to establish living quarters for the family. Their first home was a dugout, and later an adobe house was built. Much effort was needed to supply their immediate needs for food, clothing, and shelter. The small community built a place of worship, and a school for the children. Irrigation ditches had to be dug, mostly by hand and pick and shovel. Water was brought from Battle Creek, and later was obtained from Provo River. The crops grown were wheat, oats, potatoes, corn, sugar cane, alfalfa, and meadow hay being the main crop for the cattle. The grain crops were flooded instead of being marked off in rows as is done at present. Their clothing was mostly home spun. Moccasins were made of buck skin, when shoes were not obtainable. The pioneer way of life was challenging and difficult, but the pioneers accepted the hardships and privations as a way of life.

JOHN FOWLKE & HARRIET RAYNOR FOWLKE

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

John Fowike was born 26 December 1803, in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England. He was the son of John Fowike and Hannah Mee. He married Harriet Raynor in 1823 in Nottingham. Harriet Raynor was born in Nottingham on 10 September 1803, the daughter of Catherine Frost Raynor.* Eleven children were born to John and Harriet in Nottingham: Catherine, John, Harriet, Drucilla, Eliza, Emma, William, Louisa, Frederick, Sarah, and Clara. Harriet and Emma died before becoming adults. The Latter-Day Saint missionaries contacted the family. John and Harriet, and five of their children embraced the gospel. Louisa was the first to be baptized in 1854. She was only fourteen years old at the time. Her father John was baptized in 1855. It is not known when Harriet was baptized. Of the other children, Eliza and her husband, Elias Aston, were baptized in 1856; Frederick, Sarah, and Clara were also baptized. Like thousands of other British converts, the family was “waiting for the missionaries to find them, and when they heard the message, they believed, were baptized, told their friends, adored and cared for those who had brought the message, and prepared to leave the Babylon of the world for the kingdom of God being built in America. Besides being willing to accept the missionaries testimonies about the restoration of the original Church of Christ spoken of in the Bible, these British Saints also obeyed the counsel to gather to Zion. Before the end of the century, some fifty-five thousand had crossed the ocean and the continental U.S. to make their homes in the West. Not all were enthusiastic to come, but most, perhaps the most converted, scrimped and saved until they had enough to pay passage for a family.” (“Truth Prevailing”; Douglas F. Tobler; Ensign, July 1987) To aid the immigrants in their desire to join the Saints in Zion, the Church in 1849 created the Perpetual Emigration Fund. The fund helped the costs of the trip, but the family was expected to reimburse the fund after settling in Utah. John and Harriet, and the younger children immigrated to America on the ship Underwriter. The European Emigration Card Index shows: Foulkes, John (57) Turner Harriet (57) Wife Frederick (18) Joiner Sarah Ann (15) Spinster Clara (13) Louise (20) Arthur* (2) *Louise’s son The ship sailed from Liverpool on April 23, 1861. On board ship “the agent appointed a president and two counselors (usually missionaries returning to America) to preside over the company. After receiving the sustaining vote of the group, the presidency divided the company into wards or branches, usually along the lines of the travelers’s home districts. Each ward or branch was then provided with presiding officers and assigned a separate portion of the ship. ..Once underway, the emigrants were expected to rise at an early hour, clean their quarters, assemble for prayer, and then eat breakfast. Contemporary observers were impressed by the prevailing order, cleanliness, and decency aboard Mormon ships. Charles Dickens described the Mormon emigrants in a chapter of The Uncommon Traveler: “They had not been a couple of hours on board when they established their own police, made their own regulations, and set their own watches at all the hatchways. Before nine o’clock the ship was as orderly and quiet as a man-of-war.. .there was no disorder, hurry, or difficult. I afterwards learned that a Despatch was sent home by the captain, before he struck out into the wide Atlantic, highly extolling the behavior of these Emigrants and the perfect order and propriety of all their social arrangements.” Converts often arrived on the American frontier with only a short time to prepare for the trek to Utah. To economize, emigrants were expected to purchase cotton fabric for the wagon covers in England and stitch it during the voyage.” (The Mormon Experience; Leonard J. Arrington,) The Fowlkes’ ship took six weeks to cross the ocean. Another passenger on the Underwriter, Charles W. Penrose awoke one morning to find that a mother rat had given birth in his shoe during the night. (Life on Board a Mormon Emigrant Ship; David H Pratt and Paul F. Smart). Sometimes the ship made no progress because of the lack of wind to fill the sails. They rejoiced when they arrived in New York on May 22. From the Millennial Star: “The clipper ship Underwriter cleared on the 22nd instant, and sailed on the evening of the 23rd from this port for New York, having 624 Saints on board, under the presidency of Elder Milo Andrus, assisted by Elders Homer Duncan and C.W. Penrose as counselors. Presidents Lyman, Rich, and Cannon visited the ship on Sunday, the 21st, as she lay in the river, and held a meeting, giving the Saints their parting blessing and many choice instructions relative to their journey. The unanimity and good feeling which pervaded the deliverance having arrived, tended to make a fine and intelligent looking company double interesting; and we have no doubt that, under the wise direction of President Andrus their ocean trip will prove both agreeable and instructive. May God bless them in their jouneyings onwards to the home of the Saints in the valley of the mountains!” (Millennial Star, May 4, 1861) “The clipper ship Underwriter sailed from Liverpool, with 624 Saints, under the presidency of Milo Andrus, Homer Duncan and Charles William Penrose. The company arrived at New York May 22nd, and at Florence (Nebraska) June 2nd,~ (Millennial Star, Apr 23, 1861) The family then proceeded to the outfitting station at Council Bluffs, Iowa. At the outfitting station the immigrants were provided with “one wagon, two yoke of oxen, two cows, and a tent.” (The Mormon Experience; Arrington). The Journal History of the Church shows “John Foulke and family” joined Capt. Ira Eldredge’s ox train to travel over the plains to Salt Lake City. (Journal History, Sept. 15, 1861). The Fowlkes family was unaccustomed to the hardships and way of life that lay before them. They were city people and used to city life. They cared for and drove an ox team across the plains. The family walked alongside the wagon most of the 1500 miles. When at Florence, Nebraska, the Saints suffered much from the severe rain and thunder storms. They arrived at Salt Lake City on 15 September 1861. It was with relief and joy that the family found that “whether they arrived by wagon, handcart, or railroad, the immigrants were greeted warmly in Utah. The already established Saints were under instructions to take the new arrivals into their homes, care for them, and provide employment until they could begin to farm or practice their own occupations. The sense of gathering was confirmed by the food and festivities that welcomed immigrants in Emigration Square. Soon afterward they dispersed to the colonies scattered throughout the Great Basin. The dispersal began with a “placement meeting” attended by all local bishops. Each was asked how many families could be absorbed into his ward for the winter and what special skill were desirable.” (The Mormon Experience; Arrington). John Fowlke’s skills as a machinist and engineer were needed in Zion. Leonard Arrington in The Mormon Experience tells us, “Suffused with a desire to promote economic independence, the church became involved in nearly every important industrial development during the first two decades of settlement. Most American-born Mormons were lifelong farmers possessing few industrial skills. Foreign converts, on the other hand, tended to be craftsmen and mechanics, reflecting in the variety of their skills the higher stage of industrialization Europe had achieved. Quick to recognize the importance of this expertise to his dream of building an independent commonwealth, Brigham Young instructed church agents and missionaries in Great Britain to seek out skilled workers, especially iron manufacturers, metal workers, textile manufacturers, and potters. Such persons were to be encouraged to “emigrate immediately in preference to anyone else.” Each of -1- the major industrial enterprises attempted by the church during the first decade drew upon European converts for technical expertise. The family settled in Pleasant Grove in 1861. It was a peaceful farming community in the Utah Valley, founded in 1850, with groves of cottonwood trees, and sparkling streams of fresh water. John and Harriet Fowlke are shown living in Pleasant Grove on the 1880 Census, next to their son, Frederick and his family, and their daughter Clara, now married to James Cullimore. James and Clara’s daughter, Elizabeth, remembers that when just a small girl she loved to go to her grandmother’s house and wash off all the chairs with a rag. Daughter Eliza and her husband Elias Aston were near neighbors. John worked as a machinist and engineer, and a farmer. John and Harriet, like other British Saints, “most of whom gained no fame except that chiseled into the lives of a grateful and expanding posterity, became part of the bedrock of the growing kingdom.” (The Mormon Experience; Arrington). John was active in the priesthood, and was ordained a High Priest. His photograph in Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah shows a man of determination and courage. The description which accompanies the photo states: “FOWLKE, JOHN (son of John Fowike and Anna May, both of Nottingham, Eng.). Born Dec. 26, 1803. Came to Utah Sept. 17, 1861, Horace S. Eldredge company. Married Harriet Raynor about 1823 at Nottingham, Eng. (daughter of Mr. Raynor and Catherine Frost, of Nottingham., pioneers Sept. 17, 1861, Horace S. Eldredge Company). Their children: Catherine Elizabeth b. Sept. 24, 1824, m. Thomas Windle; John b. April 20, 1826, m. Susannah Bonner; Harriet b. Sept. 20, 1828, died; Drucilla b. Dec. 22, 1830, m. William Aston; Eliza b. April 20, 1832, m. Elias Aston; Emma b. Aug. 4, 1836. died; William b. Nov. 11, 1837; Lueza b. May 26, 1840, m. William Marrott; Frederick b. July 21, 1842, m. Elizabeth Cook; Sarah Ann b. Feb. 15, 1845, m. John Truscott; Clara b. Dec. 28, 1847, m. James Cullimore. Family home Lindon, Utah. High priest. Machinist and engineer; farmer. Died at Lindon.” (Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah; Frank Esshom). He died 9 March 1886, at his home in Lindon, and was buried in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery. Harriet lived two more years, and died in Mt. Pleasant on 13 September 1888. She was buried in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery with her husband. *

John Fowlke and Harriet Raynor

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

John Fowlke was born 26 December 1803, in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England. He was the son of John Fowlke and Hannah Mee. A history of John Fowlke states: "John Fowlke was the son of John Fowlke and Hannah Mee, the eighth child in a family of twelve children. He was a wood turner by trade while residing in England. He married Harriet Raynor June 14, 1823 in Nottingham, England." (Life History of John Fowlke, II) John married Harriet Raynor in 1823 in Nottingham. Harriet Raynor was born in Nottingham on 10 September 1803, the daughter of Catherine Frost Raynor. Eleven children were born to John and Harriet in Nottingham: Catherine, John, Harriet, Drucilla, Eliza, Emma, William, Louisa, Frederick, Sarah, and Clara. Harriet and Emma died before becoming adults. The Fowlke family are found at 34 Island Street in St. Mary's parish, Nottingham in the 1851 census. The census shows: John Fowlke, head, married, 50, Engeneer, born in Nottingham Harriett Fowlke, wife, married, 49, born in Nottingham Elizabeth Fowlke, daughter, 26, Lace mender, born in Nottingham Drucilla Fowlke, daughter, 20, Lace mender, born in Nottingham William Fowlke, son, 15, Coach builder, born in Nottingham Loisa Fowlke, daughter 11, Lace mender, born in Nottingham Fredrick Fowlke, son, 8, scholar, born in Nottingham Sarah Fowlke, daughter, 6, scholar, born in Nottingham Clara Fowlke, daughter, 3, scholar, born in Nottingham A history of John Fowlke describes how the family was converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints: The gospel of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints was brought to the attention of John and Harriet by their daughter Louisa. Several members of the family joined the church. Louisa joined the church on Dec 7, 1854. John and three other children were baptized on February 24, 1855." (Life History of John Fowlke, II; ********************) This caused some division in the family: "Three other children, Catherine Elizabeth, John, and William remained in England. John and William were engineers. They refused to have anything to do with the family after they joined the church. They were both strong and powerful men. One of them whipped the wrestling champ in a fight in a public house." (Life History of John Fowlke, II; ********************) The Latter-Day Saint missionaries contacted the family. John and Harriet, and five of their children embraced the gospel. Louisa was the first to be baptized in 1854. She was only fourteen years old at the time. Her father John was baptized in 1855. It is not known when Harriet was baptized. Of the other children, Eliza and her husband, Elias Aston, were baptized in 1856; Frederick, Sarah, and Clara were also baptized. Like thousands of other British converts, the family was "waiting for the missionaries to find them, and when they heard the message, they believed, were baptized, told their friends, adored and cared for those who had brought the message. and prepared to leave the Babylon of the world for the kingdom of God being built in America...Beside being willing to accept the missionaries' testimonies about the restoration of the original Church of Christ spoken of in the Bible, these British Saints also obeyed the counsel to gather to Zion. Before the end of the century, some fifty-five thousand had crossed the ocean and the continental U.S. to make their homes in the West. Not all were enthusiastic to come, but most, perhaps the most converted, scrimped and saved until they had enough to pay passage for a family." ("Truth Prevailing"; Douglas F. Tobler; Ensign, July 1987) To aid the immigrants in their desire to join the Saints in Zion, the Church in 1849 created the Perpetual Emigration Fund. The fund helped the costs of the trip, but the family was expected to reimburse the fund after settling in Utah. John and Harriet, and the younger children immigrated to America on the ship Underwriter. The European Emigration Card Index shows: Foulkes, John (57) Turner Harriet (57) Wife Frederick (18) Joiner Sarah Ann (15)Spinster Clara (13) Louise (20) Arthur* (2) *Louise's son The ship sailed from Liverpool on April 23, 1861. On board ship "the agent appointed a president and two counselors (usually missionaries returning to America) to preside over the company. After receiving the sustaining vote of the group, the presidency divided the company into wards or branches, usually along the lines of the travelers's home districts. Each ward or branch was then provided with presiding officers and assigned a separate portion of the ship...Once underway, the emigrants were expected to rise at an early hour, clean their quarters, assemble for prayer, and then eat breakfast. Contemporary observers were impressed by the prevailing order, cleanliness, and decency aboard Mormon ships. Charles Dickens described the Mormon emigrants in a chapter of The Uncommon Traveler: "They had not been a couple of hours on board when they established their own police, made their own regulations, and set their own watches at all the hatchways. Before nine o'clock the ship was as orderly and quiet as a man-of-war...there was no disorder, hurry, or difficulty...I afterwards learned that a Despatch was sent home by the captain, before he struck out into the wide Atlantic, highly extolling the behavior of these Emigrants and the perfect order and propriety of all their social arrangements." Converts often arrived on the American frontier with only a short time to prepare for the trek to Utah...To economize, emigrants were expected to purchase cotton fabric for the wagon covers in England and stitch it during the voyage." (The Mormon Experience; Leonard J. Arrington). The Fowlkes's ship took six weeks to cross the ocean. Another passenger on the Underwriter, Charles W. Penrose awoke one morning to find that a mother rat had given birth in his shoe during the night. (Life on Board a Mormon Emigrant Ship; David H. Pratt and Paul F. Smart). Sometimes the ship made no progress because of the lack of wind to fill the sails.. They rejoiced when they arrived in New York on May 22. From the Millennial Star: “The clipper ship Underwriter cleared on the 22nd instant, and sailed on the evening of the 23rd, from this port for New York, having 624 Saints on board, under the presidency of Elder Milo Andrus, assisted by Elders Homer Duncan and C.W. Penrose as counselors. Presidents Lyman, Rich, and Cannon visited the ship on Sunday, the 21st, as she lay in the river, and held a meeting, giving the Saints their parting blessing and many choice instructions relative to their journey. The unanimity and good feeling which pervaded the deliverance having arrived, tended to make a fine and intelligent looking company double interesting; and we have no doubt that, under the wise direction of President Andrus their ocean trip will prove both agreeable and instructive. May God bless them in their journeyings onwards to the home of the Saints in the valley of the mountains!” (Millennial Star, May 4, 1861) "The clipper ship Underwriter sailed from Liverpool, with 624 Saints, under the presidency of Milo Andrus, Homer Duncan and Charles William Penrose. The company arrived at New York May 22nd, and at Florence (Nebraska) June 2nd.” (Millennial Star, Apr 23, 1861) The family then proceeded to the outfitting station at Council Bluffs, Iowa. At the outfitting station the immigrants were provided with "one wagon, two yoke of oxen, two cows, and a tent." (The Mormon Experience; Arrington). The Journal History of the Church shows "John Foulke and family" joined Capt. Ira Eldredge's ox train to travel over the plains to Salt Lake City. (Journal History, Sept. 15, 1861). The Fowlkes family was unaccustomed to the hardships and way of life that lay before them. They were city people and used to city life. They cared for and drove an ox team across the plains. The family walked alongside the wagon most of the 1500 miles. When at Florence, Nebraska, the Saints suffered much from the severe rain and thunder storms. They arrived at Salt Lake City on 15 September 1861. It was with relief and joy that the family found that "whether they arrived by wagon, handcart, or railroad, the immigrants were greeted warmly in Utah...The already established Saints were under instructions to take the new arrivals into their homes, care for them, and provide employment until they could begin to farm or practice their own occupations. The sense of gathering was confirmed by the food and festivities that welcomed immigrants in Emigration Square. Soon afterward they dispersed to the colonies scattered throughout the Great Basin. The dispersal began with a "placement meeting" attended by all local bishops. Each was asked how many families could be absorbed into his ward for the winter and what special skill were desirable." (The Mormon Experience; Arrington). John Fowlke's skills as a machinist and engineer were needed in Zion. Leonard Arrington in The Mormon Experience tells us, "Suffused with a desire to promote economic independence, the church became involved in nearly every important industrial development during the first two decades of settlement...Most American-born Mormons were lifelong farmers possessing few industrial skills. Foreign converts, on the other hand, tended to be craftsmen and mechanics, reflecting in the variety of their skills the higher stage of industrialization Europe had achieved. Quick to recognize the importance of this expertise to his dream of building an independent commonwealth, Brigham Young instructed church agents and missionaries in Great Britain to seek out skilled workers, especially iron manufacturers, metal workers, textile manufacturers, and potters. Such persons were to be encourage to "emigrate immediately...in preference to anyone else." Each of the major industrial enterprises attempted by the church during the first decade drew upon European converts for technical expertise." The family settled in Pleasant Grove in 1861. It was a peaceful farming community in the Utah Valley, founded in 1850, with groves of cottonwood trees, and sparkling streams of fresh water. It appears that John married a plural wife, Elizabeth Carlin in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City on 8 July 1865. In the 1870 census of Pleasant Grove, John and Harriet are found living next to their son Frederick and his family, along with Elizabeth Fowlke, age 57: In the 1880 census of Pleasant Grove, John and Harriet Fowlke are shown living in Pleasant Grove next to their son, Frederick and his family, and their daughter Clara, now married to James Cullimore. Elizabeth is shown as a boarder and is using her maiden name. James and Clara’s daughter, Elizabeth, remembers that when just a small girl she loved to go to her grandmother’s house and wash off all the chairs with a rag. Daughter Eliza and her husband Elias Aston were near neighbors. John worked as a machinist and engineer, and a farmer. John and Harriet, like other British Saints, "most of whom gained no fame except that chiseled into the lives of a grateful and expanding posterity, became part of the bedrock of the growing kingdom." (The Mormon Experience; Arrington). John was active in the priesthood, and was ordained a High Priest. His photograph in Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah shows a man of determination and courage. The description which accompanies the photo states: "FOWLKE, JOHN (son of John Fowlke and Anna May, both of Nottingham, Eng.). Born Dec. 26, 1803. Came to Utah Sept. 17, 1861, Horace S. Eldredge company. Married Harriet Raynor about 1823 at Nottingham, Eng. (daughter of Mr. Raynor and Catherine Frost, of Nottingham, pioneers Sept. 17, 1861, Horace S. Eldredge company). Their children: Catherine Elizabeth b. Sept. 24, 1824, m. Thomas Windle; John b. April 20, 1826, m. Susannah Bonner; Harriet b. Sept. 20, 1828, died; Drucilla b. Dec. 22, 1830, m. William Aston; Eliza b. April 20, 1832, m. Elias Aston; Emma b. Aug. 4, 1836, died; William b. Nov. 11, 1837; Lueza b. May 26, 1840, m. William Marrott; Frederick b. July 21, 1842, m. Elizabeth Cook; Sarah Ann b. Feb. 15, 1845, m. John Truscott; Clara b. Dec. 28, 1847, m. James Cullimore. Family home Lindon, Utah. High priest. Machinist and engineer; farmer. Died at Lindon." (Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah; Frank Esshom). He died 9 March 1886, at his home in Lindon, and was buried in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery. Harriet lived two more years, and died in Mt. Pleasant on 13 September 1888. She was buried in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery with her husband. FAMILY GROUP RECORD OF JOHN FOWLKE AND HARRIET RAYNOR JOHN FOWLKE, son of John Fowlke and Hannah Mee, was b. 26 Dec. 1803, Nottingham, Nottingham, England He married 1) Harriet Raynor 14 July 1823 at Radford, Nottingham, England, and 2) Elizabeth Carlin 8 July 1865 in Salt Lake City, Utah. John died 9 Mar. 1886 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah. Harriet was born 10 Sept. 1803, Nottingham, Nottingham, England, and christened 25 Sept. 1803, in Nottingham, Nottingham, England. She was the daughter of Catherine Frost. Her father is listed in family records, however she was born after the death of Samuel Raynor, and was listed as illegitimate on the parish records. Harriet died 13 Sept. 1888, in Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah. John and Harriet had the following children: 1. Catherine Elizabeth, born 24 September 1824, in Nottingham; married. Thomas Windell; died in 1912. 2. John, born 20 April 1826, in Nottingham; married Susannah Bonner; died in April of 1901. 3. Harriet, born 20 September 1828 in Nottingham; died 25 March 1842. 4. Drucilla, born 22 December 1830 in Nottingham; married William Aston 22 June 1856; died 28 January 1877. 5. Eliza, born 20 April 1832 in Nottingham; married Elias Aston 5 January 1851 in Nottingham; died 31 January 1917 in Lindon, Utah. 6. Emma, born 4 August 1836 in Nottingham; died 10 August 1839. 7. William, born 11 November 1837 in Nottingham; married Rachel Chapman 25 March 1860. 8. Louisa, born 26 May 1840 in Nottingham; married William Marrott 9 February 1862, then Lorenzo Waldram 8 February 1901; died 29 January 1913. 9. Frederick, born 21 July 1842 in Nottingham; married Elizabeth Cook 17 November 1866; died 8 April 1905. 10. Sarah Ann, born 14 February 1844 in Nottingham; married John Truscott 22 February 1862; died 20 August 1919. 11. Clara, born 28 December 1847 in Nottingham; married James Cullimore 10 February 1864; died 13 November 1927. SOURCE: IGI, “Genealogy of William Marrott and Louisa Fowlke”, Kenneth Bullock, 929.273 M349b; 1841 English census, St. Mary, Nottingham; 1870 census, Pleasant Grove, Utah; 1880 census, Pleasant Grove, Utah; Life History of John Fowlke, II.

James Alfred Cullimore & Clara Fowlke

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Source: Utah Since Statehood: Historical and Biographical. Volume III. James Cullimore married Clara Fowlke. They were natives of England and came to the new world with their respective parents, who settled in Utah. James Cullimore and his people came to Utah in 1859 with the Robert F. Neslen company, while the mother's family came in 1861 with the Ira Eldredge company. The grandparents in the paternal line were William and Lettice Powell Cullimore, who were natives of England, the former born January 5, 1791, and the latter December 15, 1792. James Cullimore was born July 26, 1840, in Tokington, Gloucestershire, England, which was also the birthplace of his Father, and while in his native land he learned the mason's trade of his father. James Cullimore was one of the pioneer settlers of Pleasant Grove and was active in the pioneer development of the community as well as in the work of the church. He served as president of the high priests' quorum and assisted in building the St. George Temple in 1874. He was a director of the Pleasant Grove Cooperative Company for several years and was a representative of the Genealogical Society of Utah for two years. He was also high priest. He died in 1917. Seven of his children and his wife survived him. Three of his children died in infancy. Those children who surved him are: Elizabeth Lettice, the wife of George R. Ash, of Pleasant Grove; William James, of Pleasant Grove; Albert Lorenzo, of Pleasant Grove, who is bishop of the Lindon first ward; Calara Rosena, the wife of James H. Kirk, of Provo bench; Etta Caroline, the wife of William S. Greenwood, of American Fork; George Alfred and wife Allie McBride, and Harriet, who was born October 2, 1868, and gave her hand in marriage to Benjamin Cluff, Jr. ----------------- Source: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah Genealogies and Biographies James Cullimore married Clara Fowlke Feb. 10, 1864, Pleasant Grove, Utah (daughter of John Fowlke and Harriet Raynor of Nottingham, Eng., pioneers Sept. 15, 1861, Ira Eldredge company). She was born Dec. 28, 1847 Nottingham, Eng. Their children: Elizabeth Lettice b. Jan. 31, 1865, m. George R. Ash; William James b. Oct. 26, 1866, m. Elizabeth Keetch; Harriet b. Oct.2, 1868, m. Benjamin Cluff, Jr.; Maria Louisa b. Nov. 22, 1870, died; Albert Lorenzo b. Dec. 25, 1872, m. Luella Keetch Dec. 7, 1892; Clara Rosena b. April 18, 1875, m. James H. Kirk; Etta Caroline b. Dec. 20, 1877, m. William S. Greenwood; George Alfred b. April 15, 1880, m. Alice McBride; Vernie Angus b. July 25, 1883, died; Ernest b. May 1, 1882, died. Family home Lindon, Utah. James Cullimore and his family came to Utah Sept 16, 1859 with the Robert F. Neslen company. James was born July 26, 1840, in Tockington, Gloucestershire, England, which was also the birthplace of his father, and while in his native land he learned the mason's trade of his father. James Cullimore was one of the pioneer settlers of Pleasant Grove and was active in the pioneer development of the community as well as in the work of the church. President high priests' quorum; assisted in building St. George Temple 1874; active Sunday school worker. School trustee several terms. Director in Pleasant Grove Co-op. several years. Representative of the Genealogical Society of Utah two years. He died in 1917, -------------- James and Clara Cullimore The transcontinental railroad, completed in 1869, carried the immigrants to Utah. James and Clara came earlier and didn't use the railroad. They established a home in Pleasant Grove, Utah, where Eliza`s parents had settled, and worked at farming the land. In 1861 a few of the families from Pleasant Grove had moved out onto the land south of town, settling along a wagon route which had once been an Indian trail. At first these settlers lived in dugouts, but later they built homes out of logs hauled from the mountains. Some houses were built from adobe, a few of which are still standing. Although this area still belonged to Pleasant Grove, this string of homes became known as Stringtown. Some of the first settlers of Stringtown, later Lindon, were the Cullimore, Wooley, Brown, Nerdin, Howard and Gillman families, along with Frederick Fowlke. Other early settlers were the White, Davis, Lord, Bezzant, Holland, Harris, Ash, Parks, Fage, Dittmore, Wright, Mayhew, Rogers, and Wadley families, along with the Elias Aston family. * The first couple married in the new settlement were Clara Fowlke, and James Cullimore. * The first baby girl born in this town was James and Clara’s daughter, Elizabeth Lettuce Cullimore. She was born in a dugout with a dirt roof and floor. Frederick Fowlke and James Cullimore later started a coffin-making business. The first homes of the settlers were meagerly furnished. Most of the furniture was handmade from native wood. Their beds and chairs were made of willows tied with buckskin. They slept on ticks stuffed with straw, feathers, or cattail down. Their clothing was homemade. Most families owned a few sheep, and the wool was spun into cloth. The men’s trousers was made from buckskin. The children went barefoot until cold weather, and then they wore moccasins of buckskins. There was usually no great shortage of food. A variety of vegetables was raised in their gardens, and there were plenty of fish and wild game. (Lindon— Town, 1983) In the 1880 census of Pleasant Grove, John and Harriet Fowlke are shown living in Pleasant Grove next to their son, Frederick and his family, and their daughter Clara, now married to James Cullimore. Elizabeth is shown as a boarder and is using her maiden name. It is also said that James and Clara used to sell Honey. Young couples going on dates would stop by their house to buy the honey.

Life Timeline of John Fowlke

1803
John Fowlke was born on 26 Jan 1803
John Fowlke was 16 years old when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founds Singapore. Sir Thomas Stamford Bingley Raffles, FRS was a British statesman, Lieutenant-Governor of British Java (1811–1815) and Governor-General of Bencoolen (1817–1822), best known for his founding of Singapore and the British Malaya.
1819
See More
John Fowlke was 23 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
See More
John Fowlke was 29 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
See More
John Fowlke was 37 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
See More
John Fowlke was 57 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1859
See More
John Fowlke was 58 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
1861
See More
John Fowlke was 72 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
1874
See More
John Fowlke died on 9 Mar 1886 at the age of 83
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for John Fowlke (26 Jan 1803 - 9 Mar 1886), BillionGraves Record 34954 Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States

Loading