Horace Fish

6 Jan 1799 - 6 Jul 1870

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Horace Fish

6 Jan 1799 - 6 Jul 1870
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Grave site information of Horace Fish (6 Jan 1799 - 6 Jul 1870) at Parowan City Cemetery in Parowan, Iron, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Horace Fish

Born:
Died:

Parowan City Cemetery

485-519 City View Dr
Parowan, Iron, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Sacred to the Memory of Horace Fish born Jan 6th 1799 died July 6th 1870 Stansted, L.C.

Headstone Description

Horace Fish was born January 6, 1799 in Hatley, Stanstead, Quebec, Canada to Joseph Fish and Sarah Spear. He married Hannah Leavitt on March 18, 1824 in Hatley, Stanstead, Quebec, Canada. He died in Beaver, Beaver, Utah on July 6, 1870.
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fcgill

November 24, 2012
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fcgill

November 23, 2012

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Horace Fish

Contributor: fcgill Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Born: January 6,1799 in Hatley, Quebec, Lower Canada. Died: July 6, 1870 in Beaver, Beaver, Utah. Buried in Parowan, Iron, Utah My grandmother, Hannah Leavitt, was born at [St.]Johnsbury, [Caledonia], Vt., 26 Dec 1805, and was, therefore just a little past 18 years of age when she was married. As grandfather was the youngest of the sons, his parents persuaded him and his wife to live with them, which they did for some little time. Later he built a home and also a saw-mill. He was quite industrious and soon became very comfortably fixed. He not only sawed lumber but made shoes, copperware, wagons, and etc. During the years 1835-36, some Elders, representing the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, labored in this part of the country and a number of people joined this church, among them being my grandfather who was baptized in 1836. Grandfather had never belonged to any church but seemed to get the spirit of the gathering, fitted up an outfit, and with neighbors and relatives started for Zion. They left Hatley 20 Jul 1837, and traveled through the state of New York where they found a number of the Fish family who were cousins. Part of the company traveled by water up the Great Lakes, but grandfather and family followed the roads along the southern border of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. My mother said they could distinctly hear the roar of the Niagara Falls when not far from the Niagara River. As they were passing through the state of Ohio, as I recall it, they were visited by a man whom they afterwards supposed to be one of the three Nephites who were to remain. They were camped near a grove of trees when a man who was hatless, came out of the grove and walked up to their campfire. My mother was only eight years old at that time and, of course, would unable to remember very much of the conversation but says she remembers him speaking of helping to run the line between the United States and Canada. Grandfather said, "that was a long time ago" and the man said "yes, it was, but I am a very old man and you have no idea how old I am." He then told them that the Saints would be driven out and drew on the ground a rough map and marked out the route the Saints would follow before their return to Jackson County, Mo. He then left and was out of sight immediately after his departure. When they arrived at Joliet, Ill., the Saints were being driven out of Missouri, so they decided to remain in that part of the country until their people should find a resting place. They settled at Twelve Mile Grove, just twelve miles south of Joliet. This proved to be quite a desirable place to live. The soil was fertile and they raised vegetables in abundance. Game was plentiful in the adjoining woods and their table was generally supplied with game and fish. Their first son, Joseph, was born here on the 27th day of June, 1840, and grandfather was baptized here in Sept, 1839. They had resided here now for three years and although they liked the place and had bought land and built some houses, they felt that they would rather be with the body of the church, and, accordingly, left here in September, 1840, and went to Nauvoo where they purchased a lot in the east part of town and built a house. The Saints in Nauvoo were generally quite poor at this time as they had been driven from pillar to post and deprived of all their earthly possessions more than once; they were without proper clothing and suffered very much from cold and hunger. Grandfather farmed some land here belonging to Edward Hunter, but later spent much of his working on the Nauvoo Temple where he and grandmother received their endowments. Their daughter, Anna Maria, was born here in May 1842; and my mother, Sarah, was married to John Calvin Lazell Smith in the fall of 1845 or spring of 1846. The persecutions against the Mormons at this time became very acute. They were forced to leave the beautiful city of Nauvoo, which had attained a population of some 20,000 inhabitants, the largest city at that time in the state of Illinois. Most of our people had already left the city, many of them having crossed the Mississippi River on the ice during the month of February of this year -- 1846. Grandfather had been making preparations for the journey west and had made a good wagon which they loaded with their few belongings and hired a team to take it down to the river, which they crossed on the 23rd day of May, 1846. They then hired a team to take them a little way from the river and remained there a short time. From this point they could hear the shouts of the mob in Nauvoo. They would often ring the bell on the Temple and would fire their cannon across the river at the Saints who were camped there. The family procured a poor team here and continued their journey until they reached the Des Moines River, about four miles from Farmington, Iowa, where they remained for one year. Grandfather was an expert woodsman and spent part of his time in cutting cord wood and also worked in a mill. The people in this neighborhood were very bitter towards the Latter Day Saints. Some were hung and others whipped until they were nearly dead and one man was shot and killed. The family thought they would make some maple sugar to add to their depleted larder and, accordingly, made troughs and other equipment for the syrup. This was all destroyed and grandfather, with his son-in-law, JCL Smith, sat up many nights with their guns, expecting to be attacked by the mob. May 8, 1847, they started west again and arrived at the place where they had decided to locate - Council Point - on the 23rd of May. This place is about four miles up the Missouri River from Council Bluffs, or, as it was then called, Kanesville. Here they remained for three years. As would be expected, they were short of clothing and eatables and at one time lived on nothing but green corn for three weeks. Later, they were able to procure some game and raise more garden stuff. They built a log house, fenced some land and put in crops. Grandfather spent his evenings making axe handles, which he sold for ten cents each. My mother's husband, John Calvin, as he was generally called, taught school during the winter of '47 and '48, and he and mother started for the Salt Lake Valley that spring with a scanty outfit. Apostle Franklin D. Richards, who was a close friend of the family, came and stayed a short time with them while on his way east. On the 12th of April a son was born to them and they named him Franklin Richards. Aunt Julia, the oldest of the children, was married to Edward Thompson in the spring of '49, and they started for the valley of the Great Salt Lake a few weeks after their marriage. Aunt Julia was a very intelligent girl and taught school for six years. John Calvin and mother had arrived in Salt Lake Valley. He had made some money trading with men who were on their way to the California gold mines and, very liberally, sent part of it to assist grandfather's family as they were preparing to leave for the west. They made a start May 29, 1850, and crossed the Missouri River on the first day of June, stopping a few miles from the ferry where a company was organized to make the trip across the Plains. There were fifty wagons in the company with Milo Andrus as captain, and Robert Wiley captain of the ten to which our family belonged. As a rule, their cattle were wild and unbroken. Grandfather had one yoke of oxen but they were very old, though large and strong. With these he had some wild steers and cows. They had considerable difficulty at first but soon got their cattle accustomed to the yoke, and things went along more smoothly. They arrived at Ft. Kearney on the 23rd of June and spent the fourth of July crossing the South fork of the Platte River. Here the river was not so deep but had a quick-sand bottom and by going upstream and making an angle to the opposite shore, it was one mile across. Ft. Laramie was reached on the 19th of July, where they found a small number of United States troops and traders. Among the latter were half-breed Indians and some vagabonds. Devil's Gate was reached on August on August 4th. Here the Sweetwater had cut a channel several hundred feet through a ridge, and the walls were almost perpendicular on either side. A number of Burned wagons were found here, having been left by the immigrants to the gold fields of California. In their mad rush they had been obliged to leave their wagons and rather than have them fall into the hands of the Mormons or others, They had burned them. They now found wild grass pretty plentiful and saw herds of buffalo nearly every day. Green River was reached on the 18th of August but notwithstanding this season of the year there was a cold rain with considerable snow on the mountains. It had been rather a strenuous trip up to this point and they were now left with just one-half of the draft animals with which they had started. No serious accidents had befallen them, though the little daughter Anna Maria one day fell under the wagon and one wheel ran directly over her head. Grandmother had cautioned the children to be very careful for if this heavy wagon should run over them it would kill them. Anna Maria jumped up and immediately asked if she were dead. She soon made a complete recovery. A few days before reaching Salt Lake City they were met by John Calvin and mother with their little son, Horace Calvin. They arrived in the city August 29, 1850, having been just three months on the road from the time they left Council Point on 29th of May. John Calvin and family had settled in Centerville and persuaded grandfather and family to settle there also and divided his land with grandfather. Uncle Ed. Thompson was helping erect a mill not far south of Centerville, so the family was pretty well together. Grandfather built a house there; did some fencing and put in crops the following spring. The garden stuff and grain crops all did very well. Their wheat averaged sixty bushels to the acre. They were very well pleased with their location, but found that timber was very inaccessible and it was quite difficult to get firewood. John Calvin was called at this time to help pioneer Iron County. He was already engaged to teach school that winter so procured George Leavitt to take his place at that time, as a pioneer to Parowan; but after his school was out in the spring of 1851, he and his family went to Parowan. The place had just been settled on the 13th of January of this year so they were not long after the arrival of the first pioneers. I have heard my mother say that John Calvin was sick and she drove the team with a baby (Sarah Jane) on her lap and her small son by her side, and drove into Parowan in the night. In the fall of 1852 grandfather sold his place and on the 25th of November, with Edward Thompson and family, started for the south. It was storming and the roads were almost impassable. They reached Provo on the fourth day of December, having been nine days getting that far; and as the weather was so bad they decided to stay there until spring. They rented a place from a man by the name of Stewart, and grandfather hauled fire wood and took care of their cattle while Uncle ED worked in a mill. The children - Uncle Joseph, Aunt Jane and Aunt Anna- attended school. They, with five other wagons, began their pilgrimage for Parowan April 15, 1852. It had been rather a hard winter and their cattle were in poor condition; and, in addition to this, the roads were very bad. At Round Valley [Scipio Valley] they experienced quite a heavy fall of snow and had considerable difficulty getting over the mountains toward Fillmore; but they overcame all their obstacles and arrived at Parowan on the 30th day of April, 1853, having been just 15 days in making the trip from Provo. In early days, Parowan was afflicted with many heavy windstorms, and one of those storms was in full blast on their arrival. I have heard my mother tell of those severe winds, which were quite frequent and did much damage in the early history of the Little Salt Lake Valley. During the winter of 1849-50, the General Assembly of Deseret commissioned Parley P. Pratt to raise a company of fifty men with the necessary teams and equipment and explore southern Utah. This company was raised and they traveled as far south as the confluence of the Santa Clara River and the Rio Virgin. Returning to Salt Lake City in the early spring of 1850, Brother Pratt recommended that a settlement be made on Center Creek in the Valley of the Little Salt Lake; and accordingly, Brigham Young called a company for this purpose, to be organized and led by Apostle Geo. A. Smith. This organization was effected at Peteetneet Creek (now Payson) in December 1850, consisting of 30 families with 100 wagons and 114 men and boys, who arrived at a place they named Parowan on the 13th day of January 1851. A fort had been built here by the settlers building their houses in the form of a square, all of them facing the inside and no windows or doors on the outside, and high pickets between the houses. They first laid out a field of 11,000 acres but soon found that this was too large and cut it down to 1,100 acres. Some were not satisfied with the location, became discouraged, and soon left; but the majority carries on and the town survived and became the first settlement south of Peteetneet Creek of Payson. During the summer of 1853 the Ute or Walker [war] was on with the Indians, and it was thought that the whites needed additional protection. They, therefore, enclosed a fort one mile square, with a wall made of mud and green limbs from the cedar and pine trees. This wall was four feet thick at the base, two and a half thick at the top and twelve feet high, with gates on three sides. All their cattle were driven into this enclosure during the night. A military organization was effected and a guard was put out day and night. Every day when the men left the fort to work in their fields or in the canyons they went in companies, with their guns ready for instant use, and all while kept a sharp lookout for Indians. These precautions were continued for about two years and proved to be a very wise procedure as not one white person was killed or wounded and not one head of their cattle was lost. In connection with the Indian trouble, it might be well to mention here a fight that occurred later - July 21, 1867. My brother Horace was riding the range on the Parowan Bottoms near the Little Salt Lake. He noticed that a large number of cattle and horses had been gathered, but not a human being to be seen. He immediately concluded that it was the work of the Indians and, hurrying back to Parowan, gave the alarm. A number of men responded but it was about dark and already a few men who were out standing guard in the valley had observed what was going on and some of them gave the alarm in Paragonah, while one, my Uncle Joseph Fish, lay down on his horse and moved along with the herd which the Indians were driving toward the mouth of the Little Creek Canyon. This canyon is very narrow at it's mouth and Uncle Joseph stopped the herd when they arrived at this point. The Indians, presumably, couldn't understand just what was causing the holdup and tried desperately to drive them on. At this time some of the men from Parowan and Paragonah attacked the Indians, who retreated up the side of the mountain at the mouth of the canyon and got behind trees. The whites took their position be hind a large boulder, perhaps twelve to fifteen feet long and seven or eight high, which was at the mouth of the canyon. Here they kept firing at each other much of the night. Many Parowan people got on top of houses and could plainly see the flashes of the guns during this engagement. There were no whites killed or wounded, but it was reported that the Indians acknowledged having lost seven of their number. Our men followed the raiders the next day and overtook one of them who sat down and with an old Colts revolver began firing at them. They didn't wish to injure him but were obliged to shoot in self-defense and he was killed. Some of our boys had narrow escaped. As they were going up the canyon the Indians began shooting at them from the canyon wall and one ball grazed Heber Benson's head and struck the horse just ahead of him. Another ball struck the pistol of Allen Miller, my brother-in-law, but did no damage other than a bruised side. The Indians, what I have been informed, were Navajos, got out of the country as fast as they could without getting one head of the or horses they had rounded up and without doing any physical damage to the whites. Horace Fish was well fitted for pioneering. As we have stated, he built the wagon in which they came to this part of the country. He had built and run a saw mill in Canada and was not lacking in experiences when he erected a saw mill in the Parowan Canyon. He not only sawed lumber but he erected houses. Shoes were very scarce and hard to get at that time. There was no leather so grandfather built a small tannery and made leather. He then made his own tools for shoe-making, lasts, and etc, and made shoes. I remember very well seeing a drawing knife, square and other tools that grandfather had made and they might have passed as tools that came from a hardware store. The writer has also seen stumps of logs that grandfather, has chopped and marks of the axe were not discernable. They looked as though they mite have been sawed. My father worked with grandfather, logging, for a time after he came to the country. He was young and strong and felt that he at least ought to cut as many logs as grandfather; but work as hard as he could, grandfather would cut three logs to his one. Extracted from Short History of My Grandfather, Horace Fish and Family by Joseph F McGregor 7 Aug 1941.

Historical Pioneer Biographies Horace Fish

Contributor: fcgill Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Historical Pioneer Biographies Horace Fish Born: 1799 Died: 1870 Brought his family across the plains in a covered wagon in 1850. Biography: (Extracted from Short History of My Grandfather, Horace Fish and Family by Joseph F McGregor 7 Aug 1941.) My grandmother, Hannah Leavitt, was born at [St.]Johnsbury, [Caledonia], Vt., 26 Dec 1805, and was, therefore just a little past 18 years of age when she was married. As grandfather was the youngest of the sons, his parents persuaded him and his wife to live with them, which they did for some little time. Later he built a home and also a saw-mill. He was quite industrious and soon became very comfortably fixed. He not only sawed lumber but made shoes, copperware, wagons, and etc. During the years 1835-36, some Elders, representing the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, labored in this part of the country and a number of people joined this church, among them being my grandfather who was baptized in 1836. Grandfather had never belonged to any church but seemed to get the spirit of the gathering, fitted up an outfit, and with neighbors and relatives started for Zion. They left Hatley 20 Jul 1837, and traveled through the state of New York where they found a number of the Fish family who were cousins. Part of the company traveled by water up the Great Lakes, but grandfather and family followed the roads along the southern border of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. My mother said they could distinctly hear the roar of the Niagara Falls when not far from the Niagara River. As they were passing through the state of Ohio, as I recall it, they were visited by a man whom they afterwards supposed to be one of the three Nephites who were to remain. They were camped near a grove of trees when a man who was hatless, came out of the grove and walked up to their campfire. My mother was only eight years old at that time and, of course, would unable to remember very much of the conversation but says she remembers him speaking of helping to run the line between the United States and Canada. Grandfather said, "that was a long time ago" and the man said "yes, it was, but I am a very old man and you have no idea how old I am." He then told them that the Saints would be driven out and drew on the ground a rough map and marked out the route the Saints would follow before their return to Jackson County, Mo. He then left and was out of sight immediately after his departure. When they arrived at Joliet, Ill., the Saints were being driven out of Missouri, so they decided to remain in that part of the country until their people should find a resting place. They settled at Twelve Mile Grove, just twelve miles south of Joliet. This proved to be quite a desirable place to live. The soil was fertile and they raised vegetables in abundance. Game was plentiful in the adjoining woods and their table was generally supplied with game and fish. Their first son, Joseph, was born here on the 27th day of June, 1840, and grandfather was baptized here in Sept, 1839. They had resided here now for three years and although they liked the place and had bought land and built some houses, they felt that they would rather be with the body of the church, and, accordingly, left here in September, 1840, and went to Nauvoo where they purchased a lot in the east part of town and built a house. The Saints in Nauvoo were generally quite poor at this time as they had been driven from pillar to post and deprived of all their earthly possessions more than once; they were without proper clothing and suffered very much from cold and hunger. Grandfather farmed some land here belonging to Edward Hunter, but later spent much of his working on the Nauvoo Temple where he and grandmother received their endowments. Their daughter, Anna Maria, was born here in May 1842; and my mother, Sarah, was married to John Calvin Lazell Smith in the fall of 1845 or spring of 1846. The persecutions against the Mormons at this time became very acute. They were forced to leave the beautiful city of Nauvoo, which had attained a population of some 20,000 inhabitants, the largest city at that time in the state of Illinois. Most of our people had already left the city, many of them having crossed the Mississippi River on the ice during the month of February of this year -- 1846. Grandfather had been making preparations for the journey west and had made a good wagon which they loaded with their few belongings and hired a team to take it down to the river, which they crossed on the 23rd day of May, 1846. They then hired a team to take them a little way from the river and remained there a short time. From this point they could hear the shouts of the mob in Nauvoo. They would often ring the bell on the Temple and would fire their cannon across the river at the Saints who were camped there. The family procured a poor team here and continued their journey until they reached the DesMonies River, about four miles from Farmington, Iowa, where they remained for one year. Grandfather was an expert woodsman and spent part of his time in cutting cord wood and also worked in a mill. The people in this neighborhood were very bitter towards the Latter Day Saints. Some were hung and others whipped until they were nearly dead and one man was shot and killed. The family thought they would make some maple sugar to add to their depleted larder and, accordingly, made troughs and other equipment for the syrup. This was all destroyed and grandfather, with his son-in-law, JCL Smith, sat up many nights with their guns, expecting to be attacked by the mob. May 8, 1847, they started west again and arrived at the place where they had decided to locate - Council Point - on the 23rd of May. This place is about four miles up the Missouri River from Council Bluffs, or, as it was then called, Kanesville. Here they remained for three years. As would be expected, they were short of clothing and eatables and at one time lived on nothing but green corn for three weeks. Later, they were able to procure some game and raise more garden stuff. They built a log house, fenced some land and put in crops. Grandfather spent his evenings making axe handles, which he sold for ten cents each. My mother's husband, John Calvin, as he was generally called, taught school during the winter of '47 and '48, and he and mother started for the Salt Lake Valley that spring with a scanty outfit. Aspostle Franklin D. Richards, who was a close friend of the family, came and stayed a short time with them while on his way east. On the 12th of April a son was born to them and they named him Franklin Richards. Aunt Julia, the oldest of the children, was married to Edward Thompson in the spring of '49, and they started for the valley of the Great Salt Lake a few weeks after their marriage. Aunt Julia was a very intelligent girl and taught school for six years. John Calvin and mother had arrived in Salt Lake Valley. He had made some money trading with men who were on their way to the California gold mines and, very liberally, sent part of it to assist grandfather's family as they were preparing to leave for the west. They made a start May 29, 1850, and crossed the Missouri River on the first day of June, stopping a few miles from the ferry where a company was organized to make the trip across the Plains. There were fifty wagons in the company with Milo Andrus as captain, and Robert Wiley captain of the ten to which our family belonged. As a rule, their cattle were wild and unbroken. Grandfather had one yoke of oxen but they were very old, though large and strong. With these he had some wild steers and cows. They had considerable difficulty at first but soon got their cattle accustomed to the yoke, and things went along more smoothly. They arrived at Ft. Kearney on the 23rd of June and spent the fourth of July crossing the South fork of the Platte River. Here the river was not so deep but had a quick-sand bottom and by going upstream and making an angle to the opposite shore, it was one mile across. Ft. Laramie was reached on the 19th of July, where they found a small number of United States troops and traders. Among the latter were half-breed Indians and some vagabonds. Devil's Gate was reached on August on August 4th. Here the Sweetwater had cut a channel several hundred feet through a ridge, and the walls were almost perpendicular on either side. A number of Burned wagons were found here, having been left by the immigrants to the gold fields of California. In their mad rush they had been obliged to leave their wagons and rather than have them fall into the hands of the Mormons or others, They had burned them. They now found wild grass pretty plentiful and saw herds of buffalo nearly every day. Green River was reached on the 18th of August but notwithstanding this season of the year there was a cold rain with considerable snow on the mountains. It had been rather a strenuous trip up to this point and they were now left with just one-half of the draft animals with which they had started. No serious accidents had befallen them, though the little daughter Anna Maria one day fell under the wagon and one wheel ran directly over her head. Grandmother had cautioned the children to be very careful for if this heavy wagon should run over them it would kill them. Anna maria jumped up and immediately asked if she were dead. She soon made a complete recovery. A few days before reaching Salt Lake City they were met by John Calvin and mother with their little son, Horace Calvin. They arrived in the city August 29, 1850, having been just three months on the road from the time they left Council Point on 29th of May. John Calvin and family had settled in Centerville and persuaded grandfather and family to settle there also and divided his land with grandfather. Uncle Ed. Thompson was helping erect a mill not far south of Centerville, so the family was pretty well together. Grandfather built a house there; did some fencing and put in crops the following spring. The garden stuff and grain crops all did very well. Their wheat averaged sixty bushels to the acre. They were very well pleased with their location, but found that timber was very inaccessible and it was quite difficult to get firewood. John Calvin was called at this time to help pioneer Iron County. He was already engaged to teach school that winter so procured George Leavitt to take his place at that time, as a pioneer to Parowan; but after his school was out in the spring of 1851, he and his family went to Parowan. The place had just been settled on the 13th of January of this year so they were not long after the arrival of the first pioneers. I have heard my mother say that John Calvin was sick and she drove the team with a baby (Sarah Jane) on her lap and her small son by her side, and drove into Parowan in the night. In the fall of 1852 grandfather sold his place and on the 25th of November, with Edward Thompson and family, started for the south. It was storming and the roads were almost impassable. They reached Provo on the fourth day of December, having been nine days getting that far; and as the weather was so bad they decided to stay there until spring. They rented a place from a man by the name of Stewart, and grandfather hauled fire wood and took care of their cattle while Uncle ED worked in a mill. The children - Uncle Joseph, Aunt Jane and Aunt Anna- attended school. They, with five other wagons, began their pilgrimage for Parowan April 15, 1852. It had been rather a hard winter and their cattle were in poor condition; and, in addition to this, the roads were very bad. At Round Valley [Scipio Valley] they experienced quite a heavy fall of snow and had considerable difficulty getting over the mountains toward Fillmore; but they overcame all their obstacles and arrived at Parowan on the 30th day of April, 1853, having been just 15 days in making the trip from Provo. In early days, Parowan was afflicted with many heavy windstorms, and one of those storms was in full blast on their arrival. I have heard my mother tell of those severe winds, which were quite frequent and did much damage in the early history of the Little Salt Lake Valley. During the winter of 1849-50, the General Assembly of Deseret commissioned Parley P. Pratt to raise a company of fifty men with the necessary teams and equipment and explore southern Utah. This company was raised and they traveled as far south as the confluence of the Santa Clara River and the Rio Virgin. Returning to Salt Lake City in the early spring of 1850, Brother Pratt recommended that a settlement be made on Center Creek in the Valley of the Little Salt Lake; and accordingly, Brigham Young called a company for this purpose, to be organized and led by Apostle Geo. A. Smith. This organization was effected at Peteetneet Creek (now Payson) in December 1850, consisting of 30 families with 100 wagons and 114 men and boys, who arrived at a place they named Parowan on the 13th day of January 1851. A fort had been built here by the settlers building their houses in the form of a square, all of them facing the inside and no windows or doors on the outside, and high pickets between the houses. They first laid out a field of 11,000 acres but soon found that this was too large and cut it down to 1,100 acres. Some were not satisfied with the location, became discouraged, and soon left; but the majority carries on and the town survived and became the first settlement south of Peteetneet Creek of Payson. During the summer of 1853 the Ute or Walker [war] was on with the Indians, and it was thought that the whites needed additional protection. They, therefore, enclosed a fort one mile square, with a wall made of mud and green limbs from the cedar and pine trees. This wall was four feet thick at the base, two and a half thick at the top and twelve feet high, with gates on three sides. All their cattle were driven into this enclosure during the night. A military organization was effected and a guard was put out day and night. Every day when the men left the fort to work in their fields or in the canyons they went in companies, with their guns ready for instant use, and all while kept a sharp lookout for Indians. These precautions were continued for about two years and proved to be a very wise procedure as not one white person was killed or wounded and not one head of their cattle was lost. In connection with the Indian trouble, it might be well to mention here a fight that occurred later - July 21, 1867. My brother Horace was riding the range on the Parowan Bottoms near the Little Salt Lake. He noticed that a large number of cattle and horses had been gathered, but not a human being to be seen. He immediately concluded that it was the work of the Indians and, hurrying back to Parowan, gave the alarm. A number of men responded but it was about dark and already a few men who were out standing guard in the valley had observed what was going on and some of them gave the alarm in Paragonah, while one, my Uncle Joseph Fish, lay down on his horse and moved along with the herd which the Indians were driving toward the mouth of the Little Creek Canyon. This canyon is very narrow at it's mouth and Uncle Joseph stopped the herd when they arrived at this point. The Indians, presumably, couldn't understand just what was causing the holdup and tried desperately to drive them on. At this time some of the men from Parowam and Paragonah attacked the Indians, who retreated up the side of the mountain at the mouth of the canyon and got behind trees. The whites took their position be hind a large boulder, perhaps twelve to fifteen feet long and seven or eight high, which was at the mouth of the canyon. Here they kept firing at each other much of the night. Many Parowan people got on top of houses and could plainly see the flashes of the guns during this engagement. There were no whites killed or wounded, but it was reported that the Indians acknowledged having lost seven of their number. Our men followed the raiders the next day and overtook one of them who sat down and with an old Colts revolver began firing at them. They didn't wish to injure him but were obliged to shoot in self defence and he was killed. Some of our boys had narrow escaped. As they were going up the canyon the Indians began shooting at them from the canyon wall and one ball grazed Heber Benson's head and struck the horse just ahead of him. Another ball struck the pistol of Allen Miller, my brother-in-law, but did no damage other than a bruised side. The Indians, what I have been informed, were Navajos, got out of the country as fast as they could without getting one head of the or horses they had rounded up and without doing any physical damage to the whites. Horace Fish was well fitted for pioneering. As we have stated, he built the wagon in which they came to this part of the country. He had built and run a saw mill in Canada and was not lacking in experiences when he erected a saw mill in the Parowan Canyon. He not only sawed lumber but he erected houses. Shoes were very scarce and hard to get at that time. There was no leather so grandfather built a small tannery and made leather. He then made his own tools for shoe-making, lasts, and etc, and made shoes. I remember very well seeing a drawing knife, square and other tools that grandfather had made and they might have passed as tools that came from a hardware store. The writer has also seen stumps of logs that grandfather, has chopped and marks of the axe were not discernable. They looked as though they mite have been sawed. My father worked with grandfather, logging, for a time after he came to the country. He was young and strong and felt that he at least ought to cut as many logs as grandfather; but work as hard as he could, grandfather would cut three logs to his one. Source: Miscellaneous personal histories This information has been gathered by various people interested in Utah history. These are unpublished biographies. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Mail education-based questions and comments to: heritage@uen.org Site not affiliated with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.uen.org - in partnership with Utah State Office of Education (USOE) and Utah System of Higher Education (USHE). Questions or comments to: resources@uen.org

Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: fcgill Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

HORACE FISH (1799-1870) HORACE FISH WAS BORN JANUARY 6, 1799 IN HATLEY, STANSTEAD CO., QUEBEC CANADA. HE MARRIED HANNAH LEAVITT MARCH 18, 1824 HANNAH WAS BORN DECEMBER 26, 1805 HORACE DIED JULY 6, 1870 IN BEAVER, UTAH. HE WAS BURRIED JULY 7, AT PAROWAN, IRON CO., UTAH HANNAH DIED NOVEMBER 5, 1876 AT PAROWAN, UTAH. CHILDREN: JULIA FISH—BORN JULY 18, 1825, HATLEY, STANSTEAD CO. QUEBEC CANADA. MARRIED EDWARD WASHINGTON THOMPSON. _____1849 JULIA—DIED OCTOBER 24, 1916 SARAH FISH—BORN OCTOBER 24, 1828, HATLEY STANSTEAD CO, QUEBEC CANADA. MARRIED (1) JOHN CALVIN LAZELLE SMITH, MAY 12, 1846 MARRIED (2) WILLIAM C. MCGREGOR, APRIL 29, 1857. SARAH DIED—MAY 31, 1905 BETSY JANE FISH—BORN AUGUST 9, 1836 HATLEY, STANSTEAD CO., QUEBEC, CANADA. MARRIED JOHN ANDERSON WEST. MAY 19, 1854 BETSY DIED-- AUGUST 13, 1919 JOSEPH FISH—BORN JUNE 27, 1840, TWILVE MILE GROVE, WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. MARRIED (1) MARY CAMPBELL STEELE MARCH 22, 1859 MARY WAS BORN DECEMBER 23, 1840 BELFAST IRELAND. MARY DIED DECEMBER 12, 1874 PAROWAN, UTAH MARRIED (2) ELIZA JANE LEWIS JULY 26, 1869 ELIZA WAS BORN JUNE 18, 1853 S.L.C., UTAH ELIZA DIED FEBRUARY 10, 1949 PAROWAN, UTAH MARRIED (3) ADELAIDE MARGARET SMITH MAY 1, 1876 ADELAIDE WAS BORN FEBRUARY 13, 1857 IN PAROWAN, UTAH ADELAIDE DIED OCTOBER 29, 1927 S.L.C., UTAH MARRIED(4) JULIA ANN REIDHEAD APRIL 19, 1883 JULIA ANN WAS BORN NOVEMBER 15, 1895 IN RICHFIELD, UTAH (DAUGHTER OF JOHN REIDHEAD AND JULIA ANN YORK) JULIA DIED AUGUST 21, 1951—ENTERPRISE, UTAH JOSEPH DIED DECEMBER 10, 1926 ENTERPRISE, UTAH ANNA MARIA FISH WAS BORN MAY 14, 1842, NAUVOO, HANCOCK CO., ILLINOIS. MARRIED SIDNEY RIGDON BURTON MARCH 22, 1859 ANNA MARIA DIED APRIL 26, 1905 FRANKLIN RICHARDS WAS BORN APRIL 12, 1848 IN COUNCIL POINT, IOWA MARRIED REBECCA WIMMER ABOUT OCT. 1866 FRANKLIN DIED APRIL____1926 (THIS STORY IS COMPILED FROM THE WRITINGS OF JOSEPH FISH—1840, AND DR. JOSEPH F. MCGREGER, A COUSIN TO SILAS L. FISH WHO COMPILED THIS MATERIAL. SILAS FISH IS A HALF BROTHER TO ROWLAND FISH---OUR GRANDFATHER) HORACE FISH WAS AN ACTIVE, ENERGETIC PIONEER OF STANSTEAD COUNTY, QUEBEC, NAUVOO, ILLINOIS AND PAROWAN, UTAH. HE WAS BORN IN HATLEY TOWNSHIP, STANSTEAD COUNTY, QUEBEC, WHEN THE INHABITANTS OF STANSTEAD COUNTY WERE VERY FEW IN NUMBER, AND THE ENTIRE REGION WAS A DENSE FOREST, ALMOST TRACKLESS, AND WITH A VERY FEW CLEARINGS OR OPENINGS. WHERE THE IMMIGRANTS, MAINLY FROM NEW ENGLAND, HAD WITH AX IN HAND, CUT OPENINGS TO MAKE ROOM FOR A CABIN AND CLEARED A FEW ACRES FOR FARMING AND GRAZING. THE EARLIEST OF THE CLEARINGS IN STANSTEAD COUNTY WAS MADE SIX YEARS BEFORE HORACE WAS BORN, AND HIS FATHER’S CLEARING, THE FIRST FOR MANY MILES AROUND, WAS COMMENCED LESS THAN FOUR YEARS BEFORE HORACE’S BIRTH, JANUARY 6, 1799. HIS NAME WAS SIMPLY HORACE. THERE IS NO MIDDLE NAME. HE WAS THE YOUNGEST OF FOUR CHILDREN BORN TO JOSEPH FISHAND SARAH (SALLY) SPEAR. HIS PARENTS EXAMPLE OF INDUSTRY AND LOVE HAD A POWERFUL INFLUENCE ON ALL OF HIS DECISIONS. HE BECAME A REAL PIONEER. HORACE HONORED HIS PARENTS. THIS MEANT THAT HONESTY MUST CHARACTERIZE EVERY DEAL, HE MUST BE INDUSTRIOUS, HE LEARNED TO MAKE ALMOST EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A PIONEER SOCITY. WHEN A SPECIAL TOOL WAS NEEDED TO MAKE AN ARTICLE, HE MADE THE TOOL HIMSELF IF ONE COULD NOT BE LOCATED. HE HAD THE KNACK OF GETTING THE MOST OUT OF HIS TOOLS. IN HIS HANDS THE AX COULD DO THE WORK OF TWO ORDINARY MEN, NOT BECAUSE OF THE STRENGTH OF HIS ARMS, BUT BECAUSE OF THE SKILL, THE CONTROL OF HIS MUSCLES, WHERE THE AX WOULD HIT, AND AT WHAT ANGLE, ETC. SOMETIME DURING HORACE’S EARLY YOUTH THE LARGE FAMILY OF JEREMIAH AND SARAH SHANNON LEAVITT MOVED TO THE HATLEY NEIGHBORHOOD FROM NEW HAMPSHIRE. THEY HAD TEN CHILREN, AND THE YOUNGEST, ATTRACTIVE HANNAH, WON HIS EYE AND HEART. WHEN HORACE WAS 25, AND HANNAH BUT 18, THEY WERE MARRIED, MARCH 18, 1824. HORACE’S PARENTS HAD A LARGE HOUSE, AND SINCE HE WAS THE LAST ONE OF THE CHILDREN TO MARRY, THE PARENTS PURSUADED THE COUPLE TO LIVE WITH THEM FOR SOME TIME. BUT HORACE HAD TO BE BUSY. HE CLEARED SOME LAND (CUT DOWN THE THICK TIMBER) FOR A FARM, BUILT A FRAME HOUSE, AND ALSO BUILT A SAWMILL WHICH HE RAN HIMSELF. HE WORKED HIS FARM OR HIS SAW-MILL BY DAY AND IN THE EVENINGS HE MADE COPPER WARE, SUCH AS TUBS, PAILS AND BARRELS; ALSO WOODEN SHOES, WAGONS AND CARTS---WHATEVER WOULD SELL. (NOTE: HIS GRANDFATHER, NATHAN FISH PF PEPPERELL, WAS REFERRED TO AS A COPPER. BY INDUSTRY, HE BEGAN TO PROSPER, AND MADE HIS FAMILY COMFORTABLE. WHEN THE ELDERS OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS (MORMONS) VISITED CANADA IN 1835 AND 1836 MANY OF HIS (HORACE’S NEIGHBORS WERE BAPTIZED. HANNAH WAS BAPTIZED IN THE YEAR 1836, HORACE HAD NEVER BELONGED TO ANY RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATION, AND DID NOT JOIN THE CHURCH AT THIS TIME. NEVERTHELESS, WITH A LARGE NUMBER OF HIS NEIGHBORS, MOSTLY RELATIVES OF MY MOTHER) HE FITTED UP AN OUTFIT AND STARTED TO GATHER WITH THE SAINTS. THE COMPANY LEFT HATLEY ON JULY 20, 1837 AND TRAVELLED THROUGH THE STATE OF NEW YORK. HERE HE FOUND FAMILIES BY THE NAME OF FISH WHO WERE COUSINS. PART OF THE COMPANY (WHO LEFT HATLEY) TRAVELLED BY WATER UP THE LAKES. MY PARENTS WENT BY LAND ALONG THE SHORE OF THE LAKES, PASSING THROUGH BUFFALO, ERIE AND OTHER TOWNS ALONG THE SHORE. THEY ARRIVED AT JOLIET, ILLINOIS ON SEPTEMBER 19, 1837. IT WAS NOTED THAT TWO OR MORE COMPANIES LEFT HATLEY. ONE COMPANY WENT UP THE GREAT LAKES BY WATER TO MICHIGAN, REMAING THERE FOR SOMETIME, AND SOME OF THEM LATER JOINED THE MORMONS IN THE WEST. HORACE AND FAMILY, WITH HIS BROTHERS-IN-LAW, JAMES ADAMS AND FRANKLIN CHAMBERLAIN, TOGETHER WITH SARAH SHANNON LEAVITT AND SOME OTHERS TOOK THE LAND ROUTE. IT WAS WHILE THE LATTER GROUP WERE PASSING THROUGH NEW YORK STATE THAT HORACE SAW A SIGN IN A TOWN ON THEIR ROUTE, WITH THE NAME FISH ON IT. HE DISCOVERED THAT THE PROPRIETOR WAS HIS COUSIN AND THEY CAMPED THERE THAT NIGHT (WAS THIS MAN A SON OF SAMUEL FISH? WE HAVE NOT YET FOUND THE ANSWER TO THIS QUESTION.) CONTINUING ON, THEY TRAVELED WESTERLY SOUTH OF LAKES ONTARIO AND ERIE. THE ROUTE TOOK THEM NEAR ENOUGH TO THE NIAGARA FALLS THAT THEY COULD HEAR THE ROAR OF THE FALLS AS THEY PASSED. THE FARTHER THEY TRAVELED THE FEWER WERE THE TOWNS AS THEY PASSED ON WESTWARD. AT ONE POINT HORACE ASKED A MAN WHERE HE COULD FIND A BLACKSMITH SHOP. THE REPLY WAS THAT THEY WERE IN THE SHOP, BUT IT WAS THREE MILES TO THE ANVIL. AFTER MANY HARDSHIPS, TOILS, AND VARYING EXPERIENCES, THE COMPANY REACHED JOLIET, ILL. TWO MONTHS AFTER LEAVING HATLEY. UPON LEARNING THAT THE MORMONS WERE HAVING SERIOUS TROUBLE IN MISSOURI, THEY DECIDED TO CAMP AT A GROVE TWELVE MILES SOUTH OF JOLIET AND AWAIT THE TURN OF EVENTS. THE GROVE, THEY CALLED IT TWELVE MILE GROVE, WAS A PLEASANT PLACE. THE SOIL WAS GOOD AND THERE WAS PLENTY OF LAND AVAILABLE. THEY BOUGHT LAND, BUILT SOME CABINS, AND PREPARED FOR THE WINTER. DURING THE THREE YEARS THEY LIVED THERE THEY RAISED PLENTY OF VEGETABLES, AND THE WOODS, PRAIRIES, AND STREAMS FURNISHED THEIR TABLES WITH GAME AND FISH. WHILE THEY WERE HERE, HORACE WAS BAPTIZED SEPTEMBER, 1839, AND HERE HIS FIRST SON, JOSEPH WAS BORN JUNE 27, 1840, HORACE AND FAMILY, WITH OTHERS, GAVE UP ANOTHER HOME THAT HAD SMILED ON THEM, AND MOVED INTO NAUVOO FOR RELIGIOUS REASONS. THEY WERE SURE THEY HAD FOUND THE TRUTH. AND THEY WANTED TO HELP BUILD ZION. IT WAS BETTER TO SEEK LASTING VALUES, THEY THOUGHT, THAN TO LIVE ON EASY STREET, WITH PLEASANT WORLDLY SURROUNDINGS AND MATERIAL GOODS AND LOSE ETERNAL LIFE. HORACE AND HANNAH NEVER REGRETTED CHOOSING A COURSE THAT BROUGHT DAYS OF DARK INSECURITY, TIMES WHEN THE BODY SUFFERED THE PANGS OF HUNGER AND THE CHILLS OF WINTRY BLASTS. THEY ENDURED, THEY PRAYED, THEY DID NOT TURN BACK, BUT MARCHED RESOLUTELY ON, NEVER DOUBTING THE PROMISES OF THEIR GOD. IN NAUVOO, HORACE BOUGHT A LOT ABOUT A MILE EAST OF THE TEMPLE LOT AND BUILT A HOUSE. ALL WENT TO WORK WITH A WILL, BUT IT WAS SOMETIME BEFORE THEIR TABLE WAS SPREAD WITH PLENTY AND THEIR CLOTHING WAS ADEQUATE. HORACE HAD TO TAKE TO HIS BED WITH AGUE WHICH KEPT HIM FROM WORK SO MUCH THAT THE COULD NOT KEEP THE WOLF VERY FAR FROM THEIR DOOR. HOWEVER, HE PERSISTED. HE ARRANGED TO CULTIVATE A PIECE OF BISHOP EDWARD HUNTER’S LAND ON SHARES. ON APRIL 6, 1841, THE CORNER STONE OF THE NAUVOO TEMPLE WAS LAID. HORACE SPENT MUCH OF HIS TIME WORKING ON THE TEMPLE WHILE THAT BUILDING WAS BEING ERECTED. THE BUILDING OF THE CITY OF NAUVOO, AS WELL AS THE TEMPLE WAS SO RAPID, “IT SEEMED TO RISE AS IF BY MAGIC.” (I, BONNIE BIESINGER, FOUND IT VERY INTERESTING AND INSPIRING WHEN TWO OF MY FIRST COUSINS (BRIAN AND WOODY CHALLIS) HAD THE HONOR OF BUILDING THE STAIRCASES FOR THE NEW NAUVOO TEMPLE—EXPECIALLY SINCE THEIR GREAT GREAT GRANDFATHER HAD HELPED TO BUILD THE ORIGINAL TEMPLE) IT WAS DURING THIS PERIOD THAT THEIR FIFTH CHILD, ANNA MARIA, WAS BORN IN NAUVOO, MAY 14, 1842. YOUNG JOSEPH, OUR JOSEPH, 1840, SPENT THE FIRST SIX YEARS OF HIS LIFE IN NAUVOO. ON HIS FOURTH BIRTHDAY, THE PROPHET JOSEPH SMITH AND HIS BROTHER HYRUM WERE MARTYRED IN CARTHAGE JAIL. HORACE’S HOME WAS ON THE ROAD LEADING FROM NAUVOO TO CARTHAGE AND THE FOUR YEAR OLD BOY REMEMBERED SEEING TROOPS AND PEOPLE PASSING ALONG THE ROAD. ON JANUARY 21 1846, HORACE, HANNAH AND THEIR ELDEST CHILD, JULIA, RECEIVED THEIR ENDOWMENTS IN THE NAUVOO TEMPLE. ON MAY 12, 1846, THEIR SECOND DAUGHTER, SARAH, MARRIED JOHN CALVIN LAZELLE SMITH (POSSIBLY IN THE NAUVOO TEMPLE?) FOR MONTHS THE SAINTS HAD BEEN PREPARING FOOD AND SUPPLIES IN GREAT HASTE FOR THE LONG JOURNEY WEST. NOTHING BUT EXPULSION WOULD SATISFY THE MOB. TENTS, WAGONS, WAGON COVERS, CLOTH, FOOD STUFFS, WHATEVER THEY COULD MAKE, RAISE OF BOY, WAS PUT AWAY FOR THE JOURNEY. THE FIRST COMPANY TO LEAVE NAUVOO IN THE EXOCUS CROSSED THE RIVER ON FLAT BOATS FEB. 4, 1846. NOT LONG AFTER, A SUDDEN DROP IN TEMPERATURE CAME; THE RIVER FROZE OVER, AND MANY CROSSED ON THE ICE. THE SEVERE COLD ADDED GREATLY TO THE SUFFERING OF THE EXILES. BEFORE LEAVING NAUVOO, HORACE AND FAMILY WERE PERMITTED TO TAKE A FAREWELL VIEW OF THE TEMPLE. JOSEPH, WHO WAS NEARLY SIX, WROTE LATER: “WE ALL WENT THROUGH IT, LOOKING AT EACH ROOM. FRANKLIN D. RICHARDS CONDUCTED US THROUGH, AND HE CARRIED MY SISTER ANNA MARIA IN HIS ARMS. THE THING THAT SEEMED TO IMPRESS YOUNG JOSEPH MOST WAS THE BAPTISMAL FONT SUPPORTED BY TWELVE OXEN, THREE FACING EACH OF THE CARDINAL POINTS OF THE COMPASS. HORACE HAD BUILT HIS OWN WAGON, BUT METAL WAS SO SCARCE THAT HE COULD AFFORD LITTLE EXCEPT FOR TIRES, SO HE HAD TO USE HEAVY TIMBER WHICH MADE THE WAGON EXTRA HEAVY. HE HAD NO TEAM, SO HE BORROWED ONE TO PULL THE WAGON TO THE RIVER AND ON TO THE BOAT. AFTER CROSSING THE RIVER, MAY 23 1846, HE HIRED A TEAM TO PULL HIS WAGON SOME DISTANCE FROM THE RIVER. THE JOSEPH FISH JOURNAL GIVES A VIVID PICTURE OF THIS PERIOD: “WHEN WE LANDED ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE WE HAD NO MEANS OF GOING ANY FURTHER. OUR CITY PROPERTY HAD NOT BEEN SOLD, AND THE SIX YEARS OF PERSECUTION THAT WE HAD ENDURED WITH THE REST OF THE SAINTS HAD NOT ADDED ANYTHING TO OUR HOUSEHOLD GOODS. HERE UPON THE BANKS OF THE RIVER WE FOUND OURSELVES WITHOUT TEAM, FRIENDS OR PROVISIONS. A TEAM WAS SOON HIRED, WHICH MOVED OUR WAGON A FEW MILES ON FROM THE RIVER. HERE WE HAD TO REMAIN UNTIL A TEAM COULD BE OBTAINED TO TAKE US FURTHER WEST. WHILE WE WERE ENCAMPED HERE, THE LAST EFFORT OF THE MOB WAS MADE TO DRIVE THE REMNANT OF THE SAINTS FROM NAUVOO. I COULD DISTINCTLY HEAR THE CANNON, AND WILL LONG REMEMBER THOSE DREADFUL DAYS WHEN MEN WERE SHOT DOWN UNDER THE FLAG THEY HAD HELPED TO RAISE---FOR NO CRIME, BUT THAT OF BELIEVING THE SCRIPTURES AND CLAIMING THE RIGHT TO WORSHIP GOD AS THEY PLEASED.” MANY NOW WERE CAMPED IN THE SAME NEIGHBORHOOD ON THE IOWA SIDE OF THE RIVER, WHO DID NOT HAVE TEAMS OR THE NECESSITIES FOR THE LONG JOURNEY AHEAD. THERE WAS MUCH POVERTY AND SUFFERING. HORACE, AMONG OTHERS, HAD SUFFERED PERIODICALLY FROM CHILLS AND FEVER, CAUSING LOSS OF MANY WORK DAYS; HOWEVER, HE WORKED WHENEVER HE WAS ABLE. FOR HE WAS HABITUALLY INDUSTRIOUS. MANY OF THE SAINTS LACKED FOOD. AT THIS TIME A FLOCK OF QUAIL FELL IN AND NEAR THE CAMP, SUPPLYING MUCH NEEDED FOOD. THIS WAS REGRDED AS A GIFT FROM HEAVEN. (THIS WAS CALLED “THE MIRACLE OF THE QUAIL” IT IS ALSO TOLD IN THE BOOK “THE WORK AND THE GLORY” HOW WONDERFUL IT WAS TO READ IT IN THAT BOOK AND KNOW THAT I HAD FAMILY THERE AT THAT TIME.) WHILE HE WAS CAMPED IN EASTERN IOWA, HORACE CUT CORD-WOOD AND WORKED AT A MILL UNTIL HE WAS ABLE TO BUY A YOKE OF OXEN. PERSECUTION WAS SEVERE, AND MANY SERIOUS THREATS WERE MADE AGAINST THE SAINTS. HORACE AND HIS SON-IN-LAW, JOHN CALVIN LAZELLE SMITH, SAT UP MAKING BULLETS AND KEEPING THEIR GUNS HANDY MANY NIGHTS, DETERMINED TO PROTECT THEIR FAMILIES, BUT THE THREATENED ATTACKS NEVER CAME. IT WAS, HOWEVER, NERVE RACKING. AFTER NEARLY A YEAR OF UNEASINESS IN SOUTH EASTERN IOWA, HORACE WAS ABLE TO PURCHASE A YOKE OF OXEN. HIS SON-IN-LAW, JOHN CALVIN, HAD A YOKE OF STEERS, SO THEY WITH THEIR FAMILIES LEFT MAY 8, 1847, AND ARRIVED AT COUNCIL POINT ON MAY 23, COUNCIL POINT WAS ABOUT 4 MILES FROM COUNCIL BLUFFS, OR KANESVILLE, AS IT WAS CALLED AT THAT TIME. HERE HORACE BUILT A CABIN AND FENCED SOME LAND AND RAISED CORN. IN THE EVENINGS HE WOULD SHAVE OUT AX HANDLES FROM HICKORY TIMBER, WHICH HE SOLD FOR TEN CENTS EACH. IN THE WINTER, DUE TO THE SEVERE COLD THEY BURNED LARGE QUANTITIES OF WOOD IN THE LARGE FIRE-PLACE TO KEEP WARM. AGAIN JOSEPH WRITES, “MY BROTHER-IN-LAW, JOHN CALVIN LAZELLE. SMITH, TAUGHT SCHOOL DURING THE WINTER OF 1847-48. I WAS POORLY CLAD BUT ATTENDED THE SCHOOL AND MADE VERY GOOD PROGRESS FOR A BOY OF MY YEARS. IN THE SPRING, HE AND MY SISTER, SARAH, STARTED FOR THE MOUNTAINS WITH A SCANTY OUTFIT. THE SIXTH CHILD OF HORACE AND HANNAH, FRANKLIN RICHARDS, WAS BORN APRIL 12, 1848 AT COUNCIL POINT, IOWA. HE WAS NAMED FOR A GOOD FRIEND OF THE FAMILY, FRANKLIN D. RICHARDS, WHO WAS MADE AN APOSTLE THE FOLLOWING YEAR. IN 1849, THEIR ELDEST CHILD, JULIA, MARRIED EDWARD W. THOMPSON AND THEY LEFT FOR UTAH. IN JUNE 1849, JOSEPH WAS BAPTIZED IN THE MISSOURI RIVER BY BROTHER CLARK. JOHN CALVIN HAD REACHED THE GREAT SALT LAKE VALLEY AND HAD MADE SOME MONEY TRADING WITH THE IMMIGRANTS GOING TO CALIFORNIA. HE SENT SOME OF THIS TO HOACE TO HELP MAKE THE JOURNEY. WITH THIS, AND WITH WHAT HE HAD ACCUMULATED DURING HIS THREE YEARS AT COUNCIL POINT, HORACE BOUGHT A YOKE OF OXEN AND 4 COWS, AND LEFT FOR UTAH MAY 29, 1850. AFTER CROSSING THE MISSOURI, THE COMPANY CAMPED TO ORGANIZE. THERE WERE FIFTY WAGONS, AND MILO ANDRUS WAS CHOSEN CAPTAIN OF THE COMPANY, WITH ROBERT WILEY CAPTAIN OF THE TEN TO WHICH HORACE BELONGED. HORACE WAS NOT ACCUSTOMED TO HANDLING CATTLE. THE SIX HEAD HE HAD JUST PURCHASED WERE WILD AND HAD TO BE TAMED AND TRAINED TO TAKE THE YOKE. HE FOUND A MAN WHO WAS ACCUSTOMED TO HANDLING CATTLE, AND INDUCED HIM TO DRIVE HIS OUTFIR FOR HIS BOARD. MANY OTHERS ALSO HAD TO HAVE HELP BEFORE THEY GOT THEIR ANIMALS TRAINED. MANY OF THE COWS HAD TO BE YOKED UP WITH THE OXEN AND SOME OF THEM BECAME THE BEST LEADERS. PROGRESS WAS SLOW FOR A FEW DAYS, UNTIL THE ANIMALS WERE TRAINED. WHEN THIS WAS ACCOMPLISHED, THE COMPANY MOVED FORWARD SMOOTHLY MUCH OF THE TIME. EACH TEN WAGONS TOOK TURNS LEADING THE TRAIN. AT NIGHT, THEY CAMPED IN A CIRCLE. A STRONG GUARD TOOK THE ANIMALS TO THE BEST GRAZING GROUD WHILE ANOTHER GUARD WATCHED THE CAMP. VIGILANCE WAS THE WATCHWORD, AS IT SHOULD BE NOW. HORACE HAD MANY LESSONS IN VIGILANCE, VIGILANCE AGAINST HATE, SELF PITY, LAXNESS IN LOVE AND SPIRITUALITY. THESE EXILES ENDURED HARDSHIPS, SORROWS, DISCOURAGEMENTS, BUT FAITH BROUGHT COURAGE TO MANY, AND TRIALS SWEETENED THE DISPOSITIONS OF THE REAL SAINTS. EVERYDAY PROBLEMS MADE POSSIBLE THE DEVELOPMENT OF UNDERSTANDING HEARTS, AND BEING WITH THE SAINTS WAS A CONSTANT INCENTIVE TO HUMBLE EACH SOUL BEFORE THE LORD, AND KEEP THE LINES OF COMMUNICATION OPEN. ON THIS DIFFICULT JOURNEY, BOTH HORACE AND HANNAH GREW IN UNDERSTANDING AND IN THEIR FAITH. THERE WAS A CLOSENESS TO THE LORD THAT CAN BE DEVELOPED WHILE BEING VIGILANT AND ALERT. THE SENSES ARE KEYED UP, LIFE DOESN’T BECOME COMMON-PLACE. LET US TAKE A QUICK GLANCE AT THIS CARAVAN, THIS GROUP OF EXILES, AS THEY TRAVEL WESTWARD, SEEKING A NEW HOME. THE MEN, WITH LONG WHIPS ARE WALKING BESIDE THE OXEN AND COWS HITCHED TO THE WAGONS; MANY OF THE WOMEN, WEARING BONNETS OR HATS, ARE ALSO WALKING THE PARCHED AND DUSTY TRAIL MUCH OF THE WAY. MANY BAREFOOT CHILDREN ARE STRINGING ALONG. BEHIND THE TRAIN OF WAGONS COME OTHERS BRINGING THE LOOSE STOCK. THE MORMONS ON THE TRAIL MUST HAVE PRESENTED A RATHER PATHETIC SPECTACLE. THE FIRST PIONEERS TRAVELED ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE PLATT RIVER, BUT THIS COMPANY CAME ON THE SOUTH, WHERE THERE WAS BETTER GRASS FOR THE ANIMALS. THEY REACHED FORT KEARNEY ON JUNE 23, 1850. ON JULY 4, THEY SPENT THE DAY CROSSING THE SOUTH FORK OF THE PLATT. THIS WAS NO CELEBRATION, BECAUSE THEY ENCOUNTERED QUICKSAND. THEY HAD TO DOUBLE TEAMS AND MARK OUT A CROSSING WITH POLES WHCH MADE THE ROUTE A MILE LONG CROSSING. THEY HAD TEAMSTERS ON BOTH SIDES OF THE OXEN TO KEEP THEM MOVING. THE GOLD-SEEKERS HAD LEFT MANY WAGONS ON THE WAY IN THEIR RUSH TO GET TO CALIFORNIA. THEY OFTEN BURNED WHAT THEY LEFT, BUT HORACE FOUND ONE IN GOOD CONDITION WHICH WAS MUCH LIGHTER THAN HIS OWN HOME MADE ONE. HE LOADED HIS GOODS ON THIS LIGHTER WAGON, LEAVING HIS OWN TO BE APPROPRIATED BY SOMEONE IN A LATER COMPANY. THIS WAS A GREAT BOON TO HIS TIRED OXEN WHICH HAD BEEN REDUCED TO TWO YOKE BY THE DEATH OF HALF THE ANIMALS WITH WHICH HE STARTED. THUS HIS PRAYERS FOR HIS OXEN WERE ANSWERED IN AN UNEXPECTED WAY. HORACE WALKED NEARLY EVERY STEP OF THE WAY. HE COUNTED THE GRAVES OF THOSE WHO HAD DIED ON THIS WEARY TRAIL, BUT BY THE TIME HE HAD REACHED ONE THOUSAND, HE HAD TO GIVE HIS ATTENTION TO HIS WORN OUT OXEN AND OTHER THINGS. MANY OF THE COMPANY BECAME BADLY SUNBURNED, AND ALL BECAME WEARY. HORACE’S THIRD CHILD, BETSY JANE, TURNED 14 JUST BEFORE REACHING THE VALLEY, AND WAS NOT THE OLDEST CHILD WITH THE FAMILY. SHE WALKED AND CARRIED 2 YEAR OLD FRANKLIN MUCH OF THE WAY, BECAUSE HE GOT SO TIRED RIDING IN THE WAGON DURING THE THREE MONTHS JOURNEY, SOME OF THE COMPANY RAN SHORT OF THEIR PROVISIONS. HANNAH WAS ONE WITH THE KINDNESS OF HEART TO SHARE HER SCANTY SUPPLY WITH THOSE IN GREATER NEED. A FEW DAYS BEFORE THEY REACHED THE VALLEY, JOHN CALVIN AND WIFE, SARAH, AND CHILD, HORACE CALVIN, WHO WAS BORN AFTER THEY REACHED THE VALLEY, MET THEM. WHAT A REJOICING WITH LOVED ONES. AND HOW GOOD THE FOOD THEY BROUGHT. HOW THEY WELCOMED THE CHANGE OF DIET. THEIR SON-IN-LAW TOOK PART OF THEIR LOAD AND THEY THUS COULD TRAVEL FASTER THAN THE REST OF THE COMPANY. THEY REACHED SALT LAKE CITY AUGUST 29, 1850, THREE MONTHS AFTER LEAVING COUNCIL POINT. JOHN CALVIN HAD SECURED 25 ACRES OF LAND FOR HIS FATHER AT CENTERVILLE, TWILVE MILES NORTH OF SALT LAKE CITY, SO THE FAMILY MOVED THERE. HORACE FENCED THE LAND, BUILT IMPROVEMENTS, AND RAISED GOOD CROPS FOR TWO YEARS. THEN JOHN CALVIN WAS CALLED TO GO HELP SETTLE IRON COUNTY, UTAH, BUT HE HAD CONTRACTED TO TEACH SCHOOL IN CENTERVILLE THAT YEAR, SO HE HIRED GEORGE LEAVITT TO GO IN HIS PLACE AND HE AND HIS FAMILY LEFT FOR PAROWAN WHEN SCHOOL WAS OUT IN THE SPRING OF 1851. AFTER GETTING A START THERE, JOHN CALVIN HELD OUT GREAT INDUCEMENTS FOR HORACE AND FAMILY TO MOVE THERE. WITH SUCH ENCOURAGEMENT, HORACE, WITH HIS OTHER SON-IN-LAW, EDWARD W. THOMPSON, DECIDED TO MOVE TO PAROWAN. THEY SOLD OUT AND LEFT CENTERVILLE, NOVEMBER 25, 1852. IT BEGAN TO SNOW THAT EVENING AND THE ROADS BECAME IMPASSABLE, SO THEY STOPPED AT PROVO, AND REMAINED THERE THAT WINTER. THOMPSON GOT A JOB (HE WAS A SKILLED WORKMAN.) HORACE TENDED THE STOCK, AND THE CHILDREN WENT TO SCHOOL. LEAVING PROVO APRIL 15, 1853, THEY REACHED PAROWAN APRIL 30, AFTER A DIFFICULT JOURNEY. HERE HORACE GOT A JOB AT A SAW-MILL, WHICH HE LIKED. IN 1853, A GENERAL INDIAN WAR BROKE OUT. THE PEOPLE OF PAROWAN BUILT A TWELVE FOOT WALL AROUND THE TOWN, MAKING A FORT ONE FOURTH MILE SQUARE. MEN GOING TO WORK IN THE FIELDS OR CANYONS WENT IN GROUPS WELL ARMED. THIS, OF COURSE, HINDERED THE BUILDING OF HOUSES. HORACE WAS WELL FITTED FOR PIONEERING. HE WAS HANDY WITH TOOLS AND COULD MAKE NEEDED TOOLS HIMSELF. HE HAD BUILT HOUSES, WAGONS, AND COOPERWARE. HE HAD BUILT AND RUN A SAW-MILL IN CANADA. HE NOW ERECTED A SAW-MILL IN PAROWAN CANYON WHERE HE SAWED LUMBER FOR THE HOUSES HE BUILT. THE FOLLOWNG IS A QUOTE FROM DR. JOSEPH F. MCGREGOR: HE IS THE SON OF_______________. SHOES WERE VERY SCARCE, AND HARD TO GET AT THAT TIME. THERE WAS NO LEATHER SO GRANDFATHER (HORACE) BUILT A SMALL TANNERY AND MADE LEATHER. THEN HE MADE HIS OWN TOOLS FOR SHOEMAKING, LASTS, ETC., AND MADE SHOES. I REMEMBER VERY WELL SEEING A DRAWING KNIFE, SQUARE, AND OTHER TOOLS THAT GRANDFATHER HAD MADE, AND THEY MIGHT HAVE PASSED AS TOOLS THAT CAME FROM A HARDWARE STORE. THE WRITER HAS ALSO SEEN STUMPS OF LOGS THAT GRANDFATHER HAD CHOPPED AND MARKS OF THE AX WERE NOT DISCERNIBLE. THEY LOOKED AS THOUGH THEY MIGHT HAVE BEEN SAWED. MY FATHER WORKED WITH GRANDFATHER LOGGING FOR A TIME. HE WAS YOUNG AND STRONG, AND FELT THAT HE AT LEAST OUGHT TO CUT AS MANY LOGS AS GRANDFATHER, GUT WORK AS HARD AS HE COULD, GRANDFATHER WOULD CUT THREE LOGS TO HIS ONE. JOHN CALVIN SMITH, ALTHOUGH BUT YOUNG, WAS CALLED TO BE THE FIRST PRESIDENT OF PAROWAN STAKE, AND WAS LOVED AND HIGHLY RESPECTED. HE AND APOSTLE GEORGE A SMITH BUILT A LARGE FLOUR MILL, FOUR STORIES HIGH, AND APPARENTLY HAD IT FULLY PAID FOR. IN THE FALL OF 1855, HE ATTENDED THE DISTRICT COURT AT FILLMORE WHERE HE BECAME ILL. WE ARE INFORMED THAT HE HAD SOME LUNG TROUBLE. HE WAS RATHER SLENDER AND WAS 6 FEET 4 INCHES IN HEIGHT. HE RETURNED HOME, BUT SOON BECAME WORSE, AND HE DIED DECEMBER 30, 1855 AT THE AGE OF 33. AND HIS FUNERAL WAS HELD JANUATY 1, 1856. THIS WAS A TERRIFIC BLOW TO HIS FAMILY, TO HORACE AND FAMILY AND TO THE ENTIRE STAKE. HE WAS A VERY ACTIVE MAN IN THE CHURCH, AND AN ENERGETIC COMMUNITY BUILDER. HORACE CONTINUED TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY, AND WAS A VERY VALUABLE MEMBER, SINCE HE COULD MAKE ALMOST ANYTHING NEEDED, EVEN THOUGH HE HAD FIRST TO MAKE THE TOOLS FOR THE JOB. WHAT A VALUABLE PIONEER. ONE LITTLE STORY SHOWS HIS DEVOTION TO HIS CHURCH. A LITTLE WHILE BEFORE REACHING UTAH, HE SAW IN A DREAM OR VISION THE MOUNTAINS OF UTAH, AND HE SAW ONE THAT WAS RICH IN MINERALS. AFTER REACHING UTAH HE SAW AND RECOGNIZED THE “DREAM” MOUNTAIN, BUT HE NEVER WENT NEAR IT, BECAUSE PRESIDENT BRIGHAM YOUNG HAD SAID THAT WE SHOULD FIRST DEVELOP AGRICULTURE AND MANUFACTURING THAT WE MAY SUSTAIN OURSELVES IN THE LAND. HE CONTINUED TO LIVE IN PAROWAN, BUT HE DIED IN BEAVER WHILE IN THE HOME OF HIS DAUGHTER, JULIA THOMPSON, ON JULY 6, 1870. THE FUNERAL AND BURIAL WERE IN PAROWAN. ALL SIX OF HIS CHILDREN, AND MOST OF HIS 28 GRANDCHILDREN ATTENDED THE FUNERAL. THE FOLLOWING WAS PUBLISHED IN THE DESERET NEWS: “DIED AT BEAVER, ON JULY 6, 1870, HORACE FISH, AGE 71 YEARS AND 6 MONTHS. THE DECEASED WAS TAKEN TO PAROWAN FOR INTERMENT. HORACE FISH WAS BORN ON JANUARY 6, 1799, IN HATLEY, STANSTEAD COUNTY, LOWER CANADA (QUEBEC) HE WAS THE YOUNGEST SON OF JOSEPH FISH WHO WAS ONE OF THE FIRST WHO MOVED FROM THE EASTERN STATES INTO THAT LOCALITY. HORACE MARRIED HANNAH LEAVITT BY WHOM HE HAD A FAMILY OF 6 CHILDREN. HE FIRST HEARD OF THE GOSPEL IN CANADA IN 1836. HE AND FAMILY LEFT THEIR HOME FOR THE PURPOSE OF GATHERING WITH THE SAINTS IN 1837, ALTHOUGH HE DID NOT BECOME A MEMBER OF THE CHURCH UNTIL 2 YEARS AFTER. HE SETTLED IN WILL COUNTTY, ILLINOIS, AND REMAINED THERE UNTIL 1840 WHEN HE REMOVED TO NAUVOO. HE THERE LABORED ON THE TEMPLE AND FOR THE BUILDING UP OF THAT PLACE UNTIL 1846, WHEN HE REMOVED WITH THE SAINTS TO THE WEST. HE HAD BEEN A RESIDENT OF PAROWAN FOR 17 YEARS AND HIGHLY ESTEEMED BY ALL WHO KNEW HIM. HE WAS EVER FAITHFUL TO THE TRUST REPOSED IN HIM AND LED AN HONEST AND INDUSTRIOUS LIFE. HE DIED IN FULL FAITH OF THE GOSPEL AND A HOPE OF A GLORIOUS RESURRECTION. HE WAS AT PEACE WITH ALL MANKIND AND DID NOT FEAR FOR THE FUTURE.” IN JULY 1872, JOSEPH FISH WROTE IN HIS JOURNAL: MY MOTHERS HEALTH HAD BEEN POOR EVER SINCE MY FATHER DIED. SHE HAD BEEN A STRONG AND HEALTHY WOMAN UNTIL THIS, WHEN SHE APPARENTLY BROKE DOWN. THE BLOOM ON HER CHEEKS NEVER LEFT HER BEFORE. SHE HAD A SLIGHT STROKE WHICH GRADUALLY GREW WORSE SO THAT IN TIME SHE BECAME ENTIRELY HELPLESS. AT FIRST HER THIRD DAUGHTER BETSY JANE, WHO HAD DIVORCED HER HUSBAND, JOHN A. WEST, LIVED WITH HER AND CARED FOR HER FOR MANY MONTHS. THEN HER DAUGHTERS, JULIA AND SARAH, AND JOSEPH’S WIVES, MARY AND ELIZA, CARED FOR HER IN TURNS. SHE WAS SO NERVOUS THAT SHE NEEDED CONSTANT CARE (OTHERS PROBABLY HELPED DURING THE SIX YEARS OF HER INVALIDISM.) QUOTE FROM JOSPH’S JOURNAL: “SHE PASSED AWAY NOVEMBER 5, 1876, SHE HAD ALWAYS BEEN NOTED FOR HER HOSPITALITY AND GENEROUS DISPOSITION. SHE WAS EVER STRONG IN THE FAITH OF THE FOSPEL AND WAS A TRUE LATTER DAY SAINT. SHE HAD BEEN A MOST KIND AND AFFECTIONATE MOTHER, REARING HER CHILDREN DURING THE PERIOD OF PERSECUTION AND TRIALS, SHE AND MY FATHER HAD TOILED UNTIL THEIR HANDS WERE GNARLED AND THE BLOOM HAD LEFT THEIR CHEEKS, BUT STILL THE HILLS ECHOED BACK THE SONG OF ZION THAT MY MOTHER SANG.” THE STORY OF THE SHINGLE TREE (AS TOLD BY SAMUEL F. SMITH TO SILAS L. FISH (ROWLAND FISH’S HALF BROTHER.) TIME: ABOUT 1855 PLACE: PAROWAN, UTAH CHARACTERS : BROTHER B. AND HORACE FISH BROTHER B. WAS A SHINGLE MAKER, BUT NOT AN AXMAN. HE MADE THE SHINGLES BY HAND IN HIS OWN YARD, HAVING THE APPARATUS SET UP THERE. HE WOULD GET A LOG CUT UP INTO PROPER LENGTHS AND THEN SHAVE OUT THE SHINGLES. STRIGHT GRAINED TIMBER WAS NEEDED; THEREFORE THE TREES WERE SELECTED CAREFULLY FOR BROTHER B’S WORK. THERE WAS A CERTAIN TREE NOT FAR UP THE CANYON FROM PAROWAN THAT BROTHER B. HAD HAD HIS EYE ONFOR SOME TIME. IT WAS AN IDEAL SHINGLE TREE, LARGE AND GRAIGHT GRAINED. IT WOULD MAKE MANY THOUSNAD SHINGLES. HE MUST GET THAT TREE BEFORE SOMEONE ELSE DID. IT WOULD MAKE ENOUGH CLEAR LUMBER TO BE CONCIDERED A GREAT PRIZE BY LUMBERMEN. ONE MORNING BROTHER B. SET OUT WITH HIS AX ON HIS SHOULDER AND A LUNCH IN HIS PAIL HE WOULD GET THAT TREE NOW. IT WOULD BE A GREAT PRIZE. BROTHER B. CHOPPED AND CHOPPED. IT WAS HARD WORK, BUT THE PRIZE WAS WORTH IT. HE RESTED AT INTERVALS, THEN CHOPPED AGAIN. HE ATE HIS LUNCH AND CHOPPED AGAIN. TOWARD EVENING HE WENT HOME TIRED AND WITH BLISTERED HANDS, BUT HAPPY THAT THE PRIZED TREE WOULD SOON BE HIS. THE NEXT MORNING HE WENT AGAIN. HE CHOPPED AND CHOPPED. OH, WHAT A BIG TREE. PERHAPS HE COULD FINISH IT IN TWO MORE DAY. BY AFTERNOON HE WAS STYMIED. HE HAD CUT A COMPLETE RING AROUND THE TREE AND HAD CUT IN AS DEEPLY AS HE COULD CHOP AND THE TREE WAS FAR FROM ALLING. HE USED ALL HIS STRENTH TRING TO CUT IN A LITTLE DEEPER, AND HOW THOSE BLISTERED HANDS DID HURT. WHY, HE WAS MAKING NO HEADWAY. THEN HE THOUGHT OF HORACE FISH---“THERE WAS A REAL AX MAN. HE COULD CUT THIS TREE DOWN IN TWO MORE DAYS---PERHAPS LESS. AS FOR ME, I HAVE NOT MADE ANY HEADWAY ALL AFTERNOON---I’LL SEE IF I CAN GET HIM TO FINISH THE JOB.” THAT EVERNING A TIRED MAN WENT OVER TO SEE HORACE FISH: “BROTHER FISH, CAN I GET YOU TO FINISH CUTTING DOWN A SHINGLE TREE? I STARTED CUTTING IT DOWN, BUT MY HANDS ARE TOO BADLY BLISTERED TO FINISH IT.” “WHY YES, BROTHER B. I THINK I HAVE TIME TOMORROW. I’LL GO OUT IN THE MORNING.” “IT’S THAT BIG TREE JUST ON THE RIGHT, BEYOND THE POINT” “YES, YES, I KNOW THE TREE. I HAVE THOUGHT FOR SOME TIME THAT YOU SHOULD HAVE IT FOR YOUR SHINGLE MAKING. YES, I KNOW WHERE IT IS. I’LL GET IT DOWN FOR YOU.” THE CONTRACT WAS MADE. HORACE FISH WAS TO CUT THE TREE DOWN, AND BROTHER B. WOULD CARRY IT FROM THERE. THE NEXT MORNING, HORACE STARTED OUT WITH HIS AX ON HIS SHOULDER. AS HE PASSED BROTHER B’S PLACE, BRO B. CALLED OUT---“BROTHER FISH, TAKE YOUR LUNCH. IT IS A BIG TREE, IT MAY TAKE YOU MORE THAN A DAY. I DID NOT GET IT MORE THAN HALF DONE IN TWO DAYS.” HORACE REPLIED THAT HE WOULD COME IN FOR LUNCH IF HE GOT HUNGRY AND WENT ON. WHEN HE REACHED THE TREE, HE WALKED AROUND AND AROUND IT MUTTERING, “WHAT A SHAME. WHAT A SHAME TO WASTE SO MUCH GOOD TIMBER.” THERE WAS NO PLACE TO CHOP. HE FUSSED AROUND AND FINALLY BUILT A SCAFFOLD OR PLATFORM SO HE COULD GET AT THE TREE ABOVE BROTHER B’S HACKS, AND BEGAN CHOPPING. ABOUT NOON HE CAME IN. BROTHER B. SAW HIM COMING AND SHOUTED, “I TOLD YOU THAT YOU WOULD NEED YOUR LUNCH.” “YES, YES, I KNOW.” “CAN YOU GET THE TREE DOWN TOMORROW?” “OH, THE TREE IS DOWN, BROTHER B.” HORACE FISH (WRITTEN BY JOSEPH FRANKLIN MCGREGOR (SON OF SARAH—WHO WAS THE DAUGHTER OF HORACE AND HANNAH) IT IS UNDERSTOOD THAT THE FAMILIES, GENERALLY, TOOK SIDES WITH THE COLORIES DURING THE REVOLUTIONARY STRUGGLE AND TWO BROTHER OF MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER, SARAH (SALLY) SPEAR, SERVED UNDER GENERAL MORGAN AT SARATOGA, STILLWATER AND OTHER BATTLE FIELDS. THIS SAME GREAT GRANDMOTHER AND HER HUSBAND, JOSEPH FISH WERE SAID TO HAVE BEEN THE FIRST SETTLERS OF STANSTEAD CO. IN LOWER CANADA. THERE WERE NO ROADS THA THEY CARRIED ALL THEIR BELONGING ON THEIR BACKS FOR MANY MILES THROUGH THE WOODS. I HAVE HEARD MY MOTHER SAY THAT HER GRANDMOTHER, SALLY, WAS VERY INDUSTRIOUS AND WOULD WEAVE AS MUCH AS TWENTY YARDS OF CLOTH IN ONE DAY. I HAVE ALSO HEARD MY MOTHER SAY THAT THESE GRANDPARENTS SETTLED AT HATLEY BEFORE THE LINE WAS RUN BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES, AND SUPPOSED AT THE TIME THAT THEY WERE IN VERMONT. THEY HAD FOUR SONS. LEMUEL, JOSEPH, CHAMPION, AND HORACE (MY GRANDFATHER, WHO MARRIED HANNAH LEAVITT AT HATLEY, MARCH 18, 1824, AND THEY RAISED SIX CHILDREN: JULIA, SARAH, BETSY JANE, JOSEPH, ANNA MARIA, AND FRANKLIN RICHARDS. MY GRANDMOTHER, HANNAH LEAVITT, WAS BORN AT JOHNSBURY, BT., DECEMBER 26, 1805, AND WAS, THEREFORE, JUST A LITTLE PAST 18 YEARS OF AGE WHEN SHE WAS MARRIED. AS GRANDFATHER WAS THE YOUNGEST OF THE SONS, HIS PARENTS PERSUADED HIM AND HIS WIFE TO LIVE WITH THEM, WHICH THEY DID FOR SOME LITTLE TIME. LATER HE BUILT A HOME AND ALSO A SAW MILL. HE WAS QUITE INDUSTRIOUS AND SOON BECAME VERY COMFORTABLY FIXED. HE NOT ONLY SAWED LUMBER, BUT MADE SHOES, COPPERWARD, WAGONS, AND ETC. DURING THE YEARS 1835-36, SOME ELDERS, REPRESENTING THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS, LABORED IN THIS PART OF THE COUNTRY AND A NUMBER OF PEOPLE JOINED THIS CHURCH, AMONG THEM BEING MY GRANDMOTHER WHO WAS BAPTIZED IN 1836. GRANDFATHER HAD NEVER BELONGED TO ANY CHURCH, BUT SEEMED TO GET THE SPIRIT OF GATHERING. HE FITTED UP AN OUTFIT, AND WITH NEIGHBORS AND RELATIVES STARTED FOR ZION. THEY LEFT HATLEY JULY 20, 1837, AND TRAVELED THROUGH THE STATE OF NEW YORK WHERE THEY FOUND A NUMBER OF THE FISH FAMILY WHO WERE COUSINS. PART OF THE COMPAN7 TRAVELED BY WATER UP THE GREAT LAKES, BUT GRANDFATHER AND FAMILY FOLLOWED THE ROADS ALONG THE SOUTHERN BORDER OF LAKE ONTARIO AND LAKE ERIE. MY MOTHER SAID THEY COULD DISTICTLY HEAR THE ROAR OF THE NIAGRA FALLS WHEN NOT SO FAR FROM THE NIAGRA RIVER. AS THEY PASSED THROUGH THE STATE OF OHIO, AS I RECALL IT, THEY WERE VISITED BY A MAN WHOM THEY AFTERWARDS SUPPOSED TO BE ONE OF THE THREE NEPHITES WHO WERE TO REMAIN. THEY WERE CAMPED NEAR A GROVE OF TREES WHEN A MAN WHO WAS HATLESS CAME OUT OF THE GROVE AND WALKED UP TO THEIR CAMPFIRE. MY MOTHER (SARAH) WAS ONLY EIGHT YEARS OLD AT THAT TIME., AND OF COURSE DIDN’T REMEMBER VERY MUCH OF THE CONVERSATION, BUT SAYS SHE REMEMBERS HIM SPEAKING OF RUNNING THE LINE BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA. GRANDFATHER SAID, “THAT WAS A LONG TIME AGO.” THE MAN SAID, “YES IT WAS, BUT I AM A VERY OLD MAN AND YOU HAVE NO IDEA HOW OLD I AM.” THEN HE TOLD THEM THAT THE SAINTS WOULD BE DRIVEN OUT AND DREW ON THE GROUD A ROUGH MAP AND MARKED OUT THE ROUTE THE SAINTS WOULD FOLLOW BEFORE THEIR RETURN TO JACKSON COUTY, MO. HE THEN LEFT AND WAS OUT OF SIGHT IMMEDIATELY AFTER HIS DEPARTURE. WHEN THEY ARRIVED AT JOLIET, ILL. THE SAINTS WERE BEING DRIVEN OUT OF MISSOURI, SO THEY DECIDED TO REMAIN IN THAT PART OF THE COUNTRY UNTIL THEIR PEOPLE SHOUD FIND A RESTING PLACE. THEY SETTLED AT TWELVE MILE GROVE, JUST TWELVE MILES SOUTH OF JOLIET. THIS PROVED TO BE QUITE A DESIRABLE PLACE TO LIVE. THE SOIL WAS FERTILE AND THEY RAISED VEGETABLES IN ABUNDANCE. GAME WAS PLENTIFUL IN THE ADJOINING WOODS AND THEIR TABLE WAS GENERALLY SUPPLIED WITH GAME AND FISH. THEIR FIRST SON, JOSEPH, WAS BORN HERE ON THE 27TH DAY OF JUNE, 1840, AND GRANDFATHER WAS BAPTIZED HERE IN SEPTEMBER, 1839. THEY HAD RESIDED HERE NOW FOR THREE YEARS AND ALTHOUGH THEY LIKED THE PLACE AND HAD BOUGHT LAND AND BUILT SOME HOUSES, THEY FELT THAT THEY WOULD RATHER BE WITH THE BODY OF THE CHURCH, AND, ACCORDINLY, LEFT HERE IN SEPTEMBER, 1840, AND WENT TO NAUVOO WHERE THEY PURCHASED A LOT IN THE EAST PART OF TOWN AND BUILT A HOUSE. THE SAINTS IN NAUVOO WERE GENERALLY QUITE POOR AT THIS TIME AS THEY HAD BEEN DRIVEN FROM PILLAR TO POST AND DEPRIVED OF ALL THEIR EARTHY POSSESSIONS MORE THAT ONCE. THEY WERE WITHOUT PROPER CLOTHING AND SUFFERED VERY MUCH FROM COLD AND HUNGER. GRANDFATHER FARMED SOME LAND HERE BELONGING TO EDWARD HUNTER, BUT LATER SPENT MUCH OF HIS TIME WORKING ON THE NAUVOO TEMPLE WHERE HE AND GRANDMOTHER RECEIVED THEIR ENDOWMENTS. THEIR DAUGHTER, ANNA MARIA, WAS BORN HERE IN MAY, 1842, AND MY MOTHER, SARAH, WAS MARRIED TO JOHN CALVIN LAZELL SMITH IN THE FALL OF 1845 OR SPRING OF 1846. THE PERSECUTIONS AGAINST THE MORMONS AT THIS TIME BECAME VERY ACUTE. THEY WERE FORCED TO LEAVE THE BEAUTIFUL CITY OF NAUVOO, WHICH HAD ATTAINED A POPULATION OF SOME 20,000 INHABITANTS, THE LARGEST CITY AT THAT TIME IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. MOST OF OUR PEOPLE HAD ALREADY LEFT THE CITY, MANY OF THEM HAVING CROSSED THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER ON THE ICE DURING THE MONTH OF FEBRUARY OF THIS YEAR, 1846. GRANDFATHER HAD BEEN MAKING PREPARATIONS FOR THE JOURNEY WEST AND HAD MADE A GOOD WAGON WHICH THEY LOADED WITH THEIR FEW BELONGINGS AND HIRED A TEAM TO TAKE IT DOWN TO THE RIVER, WHICH THEY CROSSED ON THE 23RD DAY OF MAY IN 1846. THEY THEN HIRED A TEAM TO TAKE THEM A LITTLE WAY FROM THE RIVER AND REMAINED THERE A SHORT TIME. FROM THIS POINT THEY COULD HEAR THE SHOUTS OF THE MOB IN NAUVOO. THEY WOULD OFTEN RING THE BELL ON THE TEMPLE AND WOULD FIRE THEIR CANNON ACROSS THE RIVER AT THE SAINTS WHO WERE CAMPED THERE. THE FAMILY POCURED A POOR TEAM HERE AND CONTINUED THEIR JOURNEY UNTIL THEY REACHED THE DESMOINES RIVER. ABOUT FOUR MILES FROM FARMINGTON, IOWA, WHERE THEY REMAINED FOR ONE YEAR. GRANDFATHER WAS AN EXPERT WOODSMAN AND SPENT PART OF HIS TIME IN CUTTING WOOD AND ALSO WORKED IN A MILL. THE PEOPLE IN THIS NEIGHBORHOOD WERE VERY BITTER TOWARDS THE LATTER DAY SAINTS. SOME WERE HUNG AND OTHER WHIPPED UNTIL THEY WERE NEARLY DEAD AND ONE MAN WAS SHOT AND KILLED. THE FAMILY THOUGHT THEY WOULD MAKE SOME MAPLE SUGAR TO ADD TO THEIR DEPLETED LARDER AND, ACCORDINLY, MADE TROUGHS AND OTHER EQUIPMENT FOR THE SYRUP. THIS WAS DESTROYED AND GRANDFATHER, WITH HIS SON-IN-LAW, J.C.L.SMITH, SAT UP MANY NIGHTS WITH THEIR GUNS, EXPECTING TO BE ATTACKED BY THE MOB. ON MAY 8, 1847, THEY STARTED WEST AGAIN AND ARRIVED AT THE PLACE WHERE THEY HAD DECIDED TO LOCATE---COUNCIL POINT---ON THE 23RD DAY OF MAY. THIS PLACE IS ABOUT FOUR MILES UP THE MISSOURI RIVER FROM COUNCIL BLUFFS OR, AS IT WAS THEN CALLED, KANESVILLE. HERE THEY REMAINED FOR THREE YEARS. AS WOULD BE EXPECTED, THEY WRE SHORT OF CLOTHING AND EATABLES. AND AT ONE TIME LIVED ON NOTHING BUT GREEN CORN FOR THREE WEEKS. LATER, THEY WERE ABLE TO PROCURE SOME GAME AND RAISE MORE GARDEN STUFF. THEY BUILT A LOG HOUSE, FENCED SOME LAND AND PUT IN CRIPS. GRANDFATHER SPENT HIS EVENINGS MAKINGAX HANDLES WHICH HE SOLD FOR 10 CENTS EACH. MY MOTHER’S HUSBAND JOHN CALVIN, AS HE WAS GENERALLY CALLED, TAUGHT SCHOOL DURING THE WINTER OF 1847-48, AND HE AND MOTHER STARTED FOR THE SALT LAKE VALLEY THAT SPRING WITH A SCANTY OUTFIT. APOSTLE FRANKLIND. RIGHARDS, WHO WAS A CLOSE FRIEND OF THE FAMILY, CAME AND STAYED A SHORT TIME WITH THEM WHILE ON HIS WAY EAST. ON THE 12TH OF APRIL A SON WAS BORN TO THEM AND THEY NAMED HIM FRANKLIN RICHARDS. AUNT JULIE, THE OLDEST OF THE CHILDREN, WAS MARRIED TO EDWARD THOMPSON IN THE SPRING OF 1849, AND THEY STARTED FOR THE VALLEY OF THE GREAT SALT LAKE A FEW WEEKS AFTER THEIR MARRIAGE. AUNT JULIA WAS A VERY INTELLIGENT GIRL AND HAD TAUGHT SCHOOL FOR 6 YEARS. JOHN CALVIN AND MOTHER HAD ARRIVED IN SALT LAKE VALLEY. HE HAD MADE SOME MONEY TRADING WITH MEN WHO WERE ON THEIR WAY TO THE CALIFORNIA GOLD MINES AND, VERY LIBERALLY, SENT PART OF IT TO ASSIST GRANDFATHER’S FAMILY AS THEY WERE PREPARING TO LEAVE FOR THE WEST. THEY MADE A START MAY 29, 1850, AND CROSSED THE MISSOURI RIVER ON THE FIRST DAY OF JUNE, STIPPING A FEW MILES FROM THE FERRY WHERE A COMPANY WAS ORGANIZED TO MAKE THE TRIP ACROSS THE PLAINS. THERE WERE FIFTY WAGONS IN THE COMPANY WITH MILO ANDRUS AS CAPTAIN AND ROBERT WILEY AS CAPTAIN OF THE TEN TO WHICH OUR FAMILY BELONGED. AS A RULE, THEIR CATTLE WERE WILD AND UNBROKEN. GRANDFATHER HAD ONE YOKE OF OXEN, BUT THEY WERE VERY OLD, THOUGH LARGE AND STRONG. WITH THESE HE HAD SOME WILD STEERS AND COWS. THEY HAD CONSIDERABLE DIFFICULTY AT FIRST, BUT SOON GOT THEIR CATTLE ACCUSTOMED TO THE YOKE, AND THINGS WENT ALONG MORE SMOOTHLY. THEY ARRIVED AT FT. KEARNEY ON THE 23RD DAY OF JUNE AND SPENT THE FOUTH OR JULY CROSSING THE SOUTH FORK OF THE PLATTE RIVER. HERE THE RIVER WAS NOT SO DEEP, BUT HAD A QUICKSAND BOTTOM AND BY GOING UPSTREAM AND MAKING AN ANGLE TO THE OPPOSITE SHORE, IT WAS ONE MILE ACROSS. FORT LARAMIE WAS REACHED ON THE 19TH OF JULY, WHERE THEY FOUND A SMALL NUMBER OF UNITED STATES TROOPS AND TRADERS. AMONG THE LATTER WERE HALF-BREED INDIANS AND SOME VAGABONDS. DEVIL’S GATE WAS REACHED ON AUGUST 4TH. HERE THE SWEET WATER HAD CUT A CHANNEL SEVERAL HUNDRED FEET THROUGH A RIDGE, AND THE WALLS WERE ALMOST PERPENDICULAR ON EITHER SIDE. A NUMBER OF BURNED WAGONS WERE FOUND HERE, HAVING BEEN LEFT BY THE IMMIGRANTS OF THE GOLD FIELDS OF CALIFORNIA. IN THEIR MAD RUSH THEY HAD BEEN OBLIGED TO LEAVE THEIR WAGONS AND RATHER THAN HAVE THEM FALL INTO THE HANDS OF MORMONS OR OTHERS, THEY HAD BURNED THEM. THEY NOW FOUND WILD GAME PRETTY PLENTIFUL AND SAW HERDS OF BUFFALO NEARLY EVERY DAY. GREEN RIVER WAS REACHED ON THE 18TH OF AUGUST, BUT NOTWITHSTANDING THIS SEASON OF THE YEAR, THERE WAS A COLD RAIN WITH CONSIDERABLE SNOW IN THE MOUNTAINS. IT HAD BEEN A RATHER STRENUOUS TRIP UP TO THIS POINT AND THEY WERE NOW LEFT WITH JUST ONE HALF OF THE DRAFT ANIMALS WITH WHICH THEY STARTED. NO SERIOUS ACCIDENTS HAD BEFALLEN THEM, THOUGH THE LITTLE DAUGHTER ANNA MARIA ONE DAY FELL UNDER THE WAGON AND ONE WHEEL RAN DIRECTLY OVER HER HEAD. GRANDMOTHER HAD CAUTIONED THE CHILDREN TO BE VERY CARFUL FOR IF THIS HEAVY WAGON SHOULD RUN OVER THEM IT WOULD KILL THEM. ANNA MARIA JUMPED UP AND IMMEDIATELY ASKED IF SHE WERE DEAD. SHE SOON MADE A COMPLETE RECOVERY. A FEW DAYS BEFORE REACHING SALT LAKE CITY, THEY WERE MET BY JOHN CALVIN, AND WIFE (THEIR DAUGHTER SARAH) AND THEIR LITTLE SON, HORACE CALVIN. THEY ARRIVED IN THE CITY AUGUST 29, 1850, HAVING BEEN JUST THREE MONTHS ON THE ROAD FROM THE TIME THEY LEFT COUNCIL POINT ON THE 29TH OF MAY. JOHN CALVIN AND FAMILY HAD SETTLED IN CENTERVILLE AND PERSUADED GRANDFATHER AND FAMILY TO SETTLE THERE ALSO AND DIVIDED HIS LAND WITH GRANDFATHER. UNCLE ED THOMPSON WAS HELPING ERECT A MILL NOT FAR SOUTH OF CENTERVILLE, SO THE FAMILY WAS PRETTY WELL TOGETHER. GRANDFATHER BUILT A HOUSE THERE, DID SOME FENCING AND PUT IN CROPS FOLLOWING SPRING. THE GARDEN STUFF AND GRAIN CROPS ALL DID VERY WELL. THEIR WHEAT AVERAGED SIXTY BUSHELS TO THE ACRE. THEY WERE VERY WELL PLEASED WITH THEIR LOCATIONS, BUT FOUND THAT TIMBER WAS VERY INACCESSIBLE AND IT WAS QUITE DIFFICULT TO GET FIRE WOOD. JOHN CALVIN WAS CALLED AT THIS TIME TO HELP PIONEER IRON COUNTY. HE WAS ALREADY ENGAGED TO TEACH SCHOOL THAT WINTER SO PROCURED GEORGE LEAVITT TO TAKE HIS PLACE AT THAT TIME, AS A PIONEER TO PAROWAN; BUT AFTER HIS SCHOOL WAS OUT IN THE SPRING OF 1851, HE AND FAMILY WENT TO PAROWAN. THE PLACE HAD JUST BEEN SETTLED ON THE 13TH OF JANUARY OF THIS YEAR, SO THEY WERE NOT LONG AFTER THE ARRIVAL OF THE FIRST PIONEERS. I HAVE HEARD MY MOTHER SAY THAT JOHN CALVIN WAS SICK AND SHE DROVE THE TEAM WITH A BABY (SARAH JANE) ON HER LAP AND HER SMALL SON BY HER SIDE, AND DROVE INTO PAROWAN IN THE NIGHT. IN THE FALL OF 1852, GRANDFATHER SOLD HIS PLACE AND ON THE 25TH OF NOVEMBER WITH EDWARD THOMPSON AND FAMILY, STARTED FOR THE SOUTH. IT WAS STORMING AND THE ROADS WERE ALMOST IMPASSABLE. THEY REACHED PROVO ON THE FOUTH DAY OF DECEMBER, HABING BEEN 9 DAYS GETTING THAT FAR. AND AS THE WEATHER WAS SO BAD THEY DECIDED TO STAY THERE UNTIL SPRING. THEY RENTED A PLACE FROM A MAN BY THE NAME OF STEWART, AND GRANDFATHER HAULED FIRE WOOD AND TOOK CARE OF THEIR CATTLE WHILE UNCLE ED WORKED IN A MILL. THE CHILDREN,. JOSEPH, JANE AND ANNA ATTENDED SCHOOL. THEY, WITH FIVE OTHER WAGONS, BEGAN THEIR PILGRIMAGE FOR PAROWAN APRIL 15, 1853. IT HAD BEEN RATHER A HARD WINTER AND THEIR CATTLE WEE IN POOR CONDITION, AND IN ADDITION TO THIS THE ROADS WERE VERY BAD. AT ROUND VALLEY THEY EXPERIENCED QUITE A HEAVEY FALL OF SNOW AND HAD CONSIDERABLE DIFFICULTY GETTING OVER THE MOUNTAIN TOWARDS FILLMORE. BUT THEY OVERCAME ALL THEIR OBSTACLES AND ARRIVED AT PAROWAN ON THE 30TH DAY OF APRIL 1853, HAVING BEEN JUST 15 DAYS IN MAKING THE TRIP FROM PROVO. IN EARLY DAYS, PAROWAN WAS AFFLICTED WITH MANY HEAVY WINDSTORMS, AND ONE OF THESE STORMS WAS IN FULL BLAST ON THEIR ARRIVAL. I HAVE HEARD MY MOTHER (SARAH) TALL OF THESE SEVERE WINDS, WHICH WERE QUITE FREQUENT AND DID MUCH DAMAGE IN THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE LITTLE SALT LAKE VALLEY. DURING THE WINTER OF 1849-50, THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF DESERET COMMISSIONED PARLEY P. PRATT TO RAISE A COMPANY OF FIFTY MEN WITH THE NECESSARY TEAMS AND EQUIPEMENT AND EXPLORE SOUTHERN UTAH. THIS COMPANY WAS RAISED AND THEY TRAVELED AS FAR SOUTH AS THE CONFLUENCE OF THE SANTA CLARA RIVER AND THE RIO VIRGIN. RETURNING TO SALT LAKE CITY IN THE EARLY SPRING OF 1850. BROTHER PRATT RECOMMENDED THAT A SETTLEMENT BE MADE ON CENTER CREEK IN THE VALLEY OF THE LITTLE SALT LAKE, AND ACCORDINGLY, BRIGHAM YOUNG CALLED A COMPANY FOR THIS PURPOSE, TO BE ORGANIZED AND LED BY APOSTLE GEORGE A. SMITH. THIS ORGANIZATION WAS EFFECRTED AT PETEETNEET CREEK (NOW PAYSON) IN DECEMBER, 1850. IT CONSISTED OF 30 FAMILIES WITH 100 WAGONS AND 114 MEN AND BOYS, WHO ARRIVED AT A CLACE THEY NAMED PAROWAN ON THE 13TH DAY OF JANUARY, 1851. A FORT HAD BEEN BUILT HERE BY THE SETTLERS BUILDING THEIR HOUSES IN THE FORM OF A SQUARE, ALL OF THEM FACING THE INSIDE AND NO WINDOWS OR DOORS ON THE OUTSIDE, AND HIGH PICKETS BETWEEN THE HOUSES. THEY FIRST LAID OUT A FIELD OF 11,000 ACRES BUT SOON FOUND THAT THIS WAS TOO LARGE AND CUT IT DOWN TO 1,000 ACRES. SOME WERE NOT SATISFIED WITH THE LOCATION, BECAME DISCOURAGED, AND SOON LEFT, BUT THE MAJORITY CARRIED ON AND THE TOWN SURVIVED AND BECAME THE FIRST SETTLEMENT SOUTH OF PETEETNEET CREEK OR PAYSON. DURING THE SUMMER OF 1853 THE UTE OR WALKER WAR WAS ON WITH THE INDIANS, AND IT WAS THOUGHT THAT THE WHITES NEEDED ADDITIONAL PROTECTION. THEY, THEREFORE, ENCLOSED A FORT ONE MILE SQUARE, WITH A WALL MADE OF MUD AND GREEN LIMBS FROM THE CEDAR AND PINE TREES. THIS WALL WAS GOUR FEET THICK AT THE BASE, AND TWO AND A HALF FEET THICK AT THE TOP, AND TWELVE FEET HIGH, WITH GATES ON THREE SIDES. ALL THEIR CATTLE WERE DIRVEN INTO THIS ENCLOSURE DURING THE NIGHT. EVERY DAY WHEN THE MEN LEFT THE FORT TO WORK IN THEIR FIELDS OR IN THE CANYONS THE WENT IN COMPANIES, WITH THEIR GUNS READY FOR INSTANT USE, AND ALL THE WHILE KEPT A SHARP LOOKOUT FOR INDIANS. THERE PRECAUTIONS WERE CONTINUED FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND PROVED TO BE A VERY WISE PROCEDURE AS NOT ONE WHITE PERSON WAS KILLED OR WOUNDED AND NOT ONE HEAD OF THEIR CATTLE WAS LOST. IN CONNECTION WITH THE INDIAN TROUBLE, IT MIGHT BE WELL TO MENTION HERE A FIGHT THAT OCCURRED LATER, JULY 21, 1867. MY BROTHER HORACE WAS RIDING THE RANGE ON THE PAROWAN BOTTOMS NEAR THE LITTLE SALT LAKE. HE NOTICED THAT A LARGE NUMBER OF CATTLE AND HORSES HAD BEEN GATHERED TOGETHER, BUT NOT A HUMAN BEING WAS TO BE SEEN. HE IMMEDIATELY CONCLUDED THAT IT WAS THE WORK OF THE INDIANS, AND HURRYING BACK TO PAROWAN, GAVE THE ALARM. A NUMBER OF MEN RESPONDED, BUT IT WAS ABOUT DARK AND ALREADY A FEW MEN WHO WERE OUT STANING GUARD IN THE VALLEY HAD OBSERVED WHAT WAS GOING ON AND SOME OF THEM GAVE THE ALARM IN PARAGONAH, WHILE ONE, MY UNCLE JOSEPH FISH LAY DOWN ON HIS HORSE AND MOVED ALONG WITH THE HERD WHICH THE INDIANS WERE FRIVING TOWARD THE MOUTH OF THE LITTLE CREEK CANYON. THIS CANYON IS VERY NARROW AT IT’S MOUTH AND UNCLE JOSEPH STOPPED THE HERD WHEN THEY ARRIVED AT THIS POINT. THE INDIANS, PRESUMABLY, COULDN’T UNDERSTAND JUST WHAT WAS CAUSING THE HOLDUP AND TRIED DESPERATELY TO DRIVE THEM ON. AT THIS TIME SOME OF THE MEN FROM PAROWAN AND PARAGONAH ATTACKED THE INDIANS, WHO RETREATED UP THE SIDE OF THE MOUNTAIN AT THE MOUTH OF THE CANYON AND GOT HEHIND TREES. THE WHITES TOOK THEIR POSITION BEHIND A LARGE BOULDER, PERHAPS TWELVE TO FIFTEEN FEET LONG AND SEVER OR EIGHT FEET HIGH, WHICH WAS AT THE MOUTH OF THE CANYON. HERE THEY KEPT FIRING AT EACH OTHER MOST OF THE NIGHT. MANY PAROWAN PEOPLE GOT ON TOP OF THEIR HOUSES AND COULD PLAINLY SEE THE FLASHES OF THE GUNS DURING THIS ENGAGEMENT. THERE WERE NO WHITES KILLED OR WOUNDED, BUT IT WAS REPORTED THAT THE INDIANS ACKNOWLEDGED HAVING LOST SEVEN OF THEIR NUMBER. OUR MEN FOLLOWED THE RAIDERS THE NEXT DAY AND OVERTOOK ONE OF THEM, WHO SAT DOWN AND WITH AN OLD COLT REVOLVER BEGAN FIRING AT THEM. THEY DIDN’T WISH TO INJURE HIM BUT WERE OBLIGED TO SHOOT IN SELF DEFENSE AND HE WAS KILLED. SOME OF OUR BOYS HAD NARROW EXCAPES. AS THEY WERE GOING UP THE CANYON THE INDIANS BEGAN SHOOTING AT THEM FROM THE CANYON WALL AND ONE BAL GRAZED HEBER BENSON’S HEAD AND STRUCK THE HORSE JUST AHEAD OF HIM. ANOTHER BALL STRUCK THE PISTOL OF ALLEN MILLER, MY BROTHER-IN-LAW, BUT DID NO DAMAGE OTHER THAN A BRUISED SIDE. THE INDIANS, WHOM I HAVE BEEN INFORMED WERE NAVAJO’S GOT OUT OF THE COUNTY AS FAST AS THEY COULD WITHOUT GETTING ONE HEAD OF THE CATTLE OR HORSES THEY HAD ROUNDED UP AND WITHOUT DOING ANY PHSICAL DAMAGE TO THE WHITES. HORACE FISH WAS WELL FITTED FOR PIONEERING. AS WE HAVE STATED, HE BUILT THE WAGON IN WHICH THEY CAME TO THIS PART OF THE COUNTRY. HE HAD BUILT AND RUN A SAW MILL IN CANADA, AND WAS LACKING IN EXPERIENCES WHEN HE ERECTED A SAW MILL IN THE PAROWAN CANYON. HE NOT ONLY SAWED LUMBER, BUT HE ERECTED HOUSES. SHOES WERE VERY SCARCE AND HARD TO GET AT THAT TIME. THERE WAS NO LEATHER SO GRANDFATHER BUILT A SMALL TANNERY AND MADE LEATHER. HE THEN MADE HIS OWN TOOLS FOR SHOEMAKING; LSSTS, AND ETC. AND MADE SHOES. I REMEMBER VERY WELL WEEING A DRAWING KNIFE, SQUARE AND OTHER TOOLS THAT GRANDFATHER HAD MADE AND THEY MIGHT HAVE PASSED AS TOOLS THAT CAME FROM A HARDWARE STORE. THE WRITER HAS ALSO SEEN STUMPS OF LOGS THAT GRANDFATHER HAS CHOPPED AND MARKS OF THE AX WERE NOT ISCERNIBLE. THEY LOOKED AS THOUGH THEY MIGHT HAVE BEEN SAWED. MY FATHER WORKED WITH GRANDFATHER, LOGGING, FOR A TIME AFTER HE CAME TO THE COUNTRY. HE WAS YOUNG AND STRONG AND FELT THAT HE AT LEAST OUGHT TO CUT AS MANY LOGS AS GRANDFATHER, BUT WORK AS HARD AS HE COULD---GRANDFATHER (HORACE FISH) CUT THREE LOGS TO HIS ONE. JOHN CALVIN LAZELL SMITH SEEMS TO HAVE BEEN QUITE AN ABLE MAN. ALTHOUGHT BUT YOUNG HE WAS INSTALLED AS THE FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE PAROWAN STAKE AND WAS LOVED AND HIGHLY RESPECTED. HE AND GEORGE A. SMITH BUILT A LARGE FLOUR MILL (LARGE FOR THAT DAY AND PLACE. IT WAS FOUR STORIES HIGH) AND SEEMED TO HAVE FULLY PAID FOR IT, THOUGH WE ARE UNABLE TO UNDERSTAND JUST HOW THEY WERE ABLE TO DO IT AT THAT TIME. IN THE FALL OF 1855, HE ATTENDED THE DISTRICT COURT AT FILLMORE, WHERE HE BACAME ILL. JUST THE NATURE OF THE ILLNESS WE DO NOT KNOW. BUT HAVE BEEN INFORMED THAT HE HAD SOME LUNG TROUBLE. HE WAS RATHER SLENDER AND SIX FEET FOUR INCHES IN HEIGHT. HIS CONDITION SEEMED TO IMPROVE A LITTLE AND HE REUTRNED HOM BUT SOON BECAME WORSE AND DIED DECEMBER 30, 1855, AT THE AGE OF 33 YEARS, AND HIS FUNERAL WAS HELD JANUARY 1, 1856. HE AND MOTHER (SARAH) HAD FOUR CHILDREN HORACE CALVIN, SARAH JANE, FRANCETT AND LAZELL. LAZELL DIED IN INFANCY. HORACE CALVIN MARRIED LIZZIE MILLER WHO DIED OF CHILDBIRTH MARCH 5, 1873, HER CHILD DYING THE SAME DAY. IN 1875 HE MARRIED ELIZABETH ANN (LIBBIE) BENSON AND THEY HAD ONE CHILD, IDA MAY. IN THE FALL OF 1876 HE ( HORACE CALVIN---GRANDSON OF HORACE FISH) CONTRACTED TYPHOID FEVER. HE WAS QUITE POPULAR, SUNDAY AFTERNOON HIS ROOM WAS FILLED WITH VISITORS. SOMEONE SUGGESTED THERE WERE ENOUGH PRESENT TO HOLD A MEETING. HORACE REMARDED, “YES, THIS MEETING WILL ADJOURN IN 17 DAYS.” ----AND IT WAS JUST 17 DAYS UNTIL HE DIED, NOVEMBER 5, 1876. HIS LAST WORDS WERE, “COME ON GRANDMA, THIS IS THE WAY.” AND GRANDMOTHER (HANNAH LEAVITT FISH) DIED THAT VERY MINUTE. SARAH JANE MARRIED ALLEN MILLER AND THEY SETTLED IN PANGUITCH, AND REARED A FAMILY OF ELEVEN CHILDREN, ALL LIVED BUT ONE . MARION, WHO WAS KILLED BY BEING DRAGGED BY A HORSE WHEN JUST A LITTLE BOY. SARAH JANE DIED IN PANGUITCH. FRANCHETTA MARRIED JOHN BUTLER AND THEY LIVED AT DIFFERENT PLACES ON THE SEVIER RIVER, RAISING A FAMILY OF TEN CHILDREN. JOHN DIED AT RICHFIELD AND FRANCETTA LATER MOVED TO IDAHO WITH SOME OF HER CHILDRE. WHERE SHE DIED IN CAMAS COUNTY, APRIL, 1913 AT THE AGE OF SIXTY YEARS, SHE HAD BEEN BORN IN PAROWAN ON MARCH 4, 1853. WHAT WAS KNOWN AT THE “REFORMATION” BEGAN IN THE FALL OF 1856 AND CONTINUED THROUGH THE WINTER. THE SAINTS GENERALLY WERE REBAPTIZED AND A STRONG EFFORT WAS MADE TO PERSUADE THEM TO LIVE MORE NEARLY TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE GOSPEL. WE ARE INFORMED THAT ONE REASON FOR THE REBAPTIXM WAS THAT MANY OF THE CHURCH MEMBERS HAD NO RECORD OF THEIR BAPTISM, AND, IN ORDER TO CLARIFY THIS MATTER AND TO GET A COMPLETE AND ACCURATE RECORD OF THIS IMPORTANT EVENT, THE FOREGOING PROCEDURE WAS INSTITUTED. AS A RULE, THE SAINTS WERE QUESTIONED QUITE CLOSELY AND SOME TOOK EXCEPTION TO THIS QUIZ AND APOSTATISED, WHILE OTHERS BECAME MORE ZEALOUS IN THE PERFORMANCE OF THEIR DUTIES AND THE LAW OF CONSECRATION WAS AGAIN BROUGHT TO THE FOREFRONT. IN THE SPRING OF 1857, GRANDFATHER AND UNCLE JOSEPH FISH MADE QUITE A LARGE QUANTITY OF TAR. ON MAY 28TH, GRANDFATHER, GRANDMOTHER AND UNCLE FRANK STARTED FOR SALT LAKE WITH SOME OF THE TAR TO PAY THE EXPENSES OF THEIR TRIP. THEY STARTED IN COMPANY WITH RICHARD BENSON, BUT THE FIRST NIGHT OUT, GRANDFATHER’S TEAM WANDERED AWAY AND HE WAS RATHER LATE GETTING STARTED THE NEXT MORNING. BROTHER BENSON FAILED TO WAIT FOR HIM SO THIS ENDED THEIR TRAVELING TOGETHER. THEY HAD A PLEASANT TRIP AND RETURNED IN JULY. DURING THIS YEAR (1857) THE JOHNSON’S ARMY CAME TO OUR TERRITORY AND IT IS ENLIGHTENING TO KNOW THAT THE PEOPLE IN IRON COUNTY HAD THE SAME FEELINGS THAT THEY AFTERWARD LEARNED WERE EXPRESSED BY PRES. AND GOV. BRIGHAM YOUNG WHEN HE SAID: “THESE PEOPLE ARE FREE; THEY ARE NOT IN BONDAGE TO ANY GOVERNMENT ON GOD’S FOOTSTOOL. WE HAVE TRANSGRESSED NO LAW, NEITHER DO WE INTEND TO DO SO; BUT AS FOR ANY NATION COMING TO DESTROY THESE PEOPLE, GOD ALMIGHTY BEING MY HELPER, IT SHALL NOT BE.” THEY WERE ALL READY AND WILLING TO PUT THE TORCH TO THEIR HOMES AND SECURE THEIR FAMILIES IN THE MOUNTAIN RETREATS. UNCLE JOSEPH WAS NOW A LIEUTENANT IN THE IRON COUNTY MILITIA, AND HE LEAD A COMPANY OF 18 MEN WHO LEFT PAROWAN AUGUST 22, 1866, TO JOIN WITH A COMPANY FROM ST. GEORGE UNDER CAPTAIN JAMES ANDEUS. MY FATHER, WILLIAM C. MCGREGOR, WAS WITH THE COMPANY AND THEY WERE SENT OUT TO RECONNOITER (SURVEY) THE SOUTHEASTERN PART OF THE TERRITORY. ASCERTAIN THE STATUS OF THEINDIANS AS WELL AS FOR OTHER PURPOSES. ON THIS TRIP THEY LOST ONE OF THEIR MEN, ELIJAH EVERETT, WHO WAS KILLED BY THE INDIANS. MY MOTHER (SARAH) WAS BORN AT CHARLSTON, QUEBEC, CANADA, OCTOBER 24, 1828, AND SHE DIED AT PAROWAN, MAY 15, 1905. SHE LED A VERY ACTIVE LIFE AND AFTER SHE REACHED HER SIXTIETH BIRTHDAY SHE MIGHT HAVE BEEN TAKEN FOR A GIRL IN HER TWENTIES. SHE WAS EXCEPTIONALLY KIND AND CONSIDERATE TO THE POOR. I THINK VERY FEW DAYS EVER PASSED WITHOUT HER GIVING FRUIT, MEAT, POTATOES, MILK OR SOME SUCH EATABLE TO THE NEEDY. THE CHILDREN OF WIDOWS WOULD BE HEARD TO SAY “WE’LL HAVE MEAT TODAY. MCGREGOR’S HAVE KILLED A PIG.” SHE WAS AN OFFICER FOR MANY YEARS IN THE PAROWAN RELIEF SOCIETY AND WAS WELL-FITTED FOR THAT WORK. ALTHOUGH UNCLE JOSEPH WAS BUT LITTLE SCHOOLED, HE BACAME AN EDUCATED MAN. HE TAUGHT SCHOOL AND WAS QUITE AN EFFICIENT BOOKKEEPER. HE WROTE A HISTORY OF ARIZONA IN TWO VOLUMES WHICH HAS BEEN PUBLISHED. HE ALSO WROTE A VOLUME OF WESTERN HISTORY WHICH HAS NEVER BEEN PUBLISHED. A SOMEWHAT NOTED WRITER FROM THE EAST, WHO WAS PREPARING A HISTORY OF THIS WESTEN COUNTRY, WISHED TO BORROW UNCLE JOSEPH’S MANUSCIPT. UNCLE JOSEPH FELT THAT HE OUGHT NOT TAKE THIS CHANCE OF LOSING IT AND SO HE PROVIEDED THE MAN WITH A ROM AND ALLOWED HIM THE OPPORTUNITY TO COME AND COPY AS MUCH A HE WISHED, WHICH HE DID FOR SEVERAL DAYS, BUT AFTER HE LEFT HE FOUND THAT 110 PAGES OF HIS MANUSCEIPT HAD BEEN TAKEN. THERE IS NOW A BOUND VOLUME, A SORT OF AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF THE FAMILY, WHICH UNCLE JOSEPH WROTE DURING HIS LIFE AND WHICH HAS BEEN BY[E-WRITTEN BY SOME OF HIS GRANDCHILDREN AND HAS BEEN DEPOSITED IN THE CHURCH HISTORIAN’S OFFICE. HE DIED AT ENTERPRISE, UTAH DECEMBER 10, 1926. WE HAVE NO DATA AT OUR COMMAND REGARDING THE LIVES OF AUNT JULIA, BETSY, ANNA MARIA, NOR UNCLE FRANK, BUT WE KNOW THEY HAVE ALL PASSED FROM THIS LIFE. WE HAVE BEEN INFORMED THAT AUNT JULIA WAS PAST 90 AND HAD BECOME AFFILIATED WITH THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCH. UNCLE FRANK LIVED FOR SOME TIME IN ALASKA AND UNDERSTAND HE WAS LIVING IN OREGON WHEN HE DIED. UNCLE FRANK FORMED A PARTNERSHIP WITH GEORGE WARREN, SON OF BISHOP WARREN, AND THEY WERE IN THE CATTLE BUSINESS. THEY WERE ACCUSED OF STEALING CATTLE. UNCLE FRANK WAS ARRESTED AND TRIED BUT WAS ACQUITTED. WARREN WAS ARRESTED AND PUT UNDER BONDS FOR HIS APPEARANCE AT A SPECIFIED TIME IN THE DISTRICT COURT. HE, HOWEVER, WENT TO NEVADA AND LEFT THE BONDSMAN IN THE LURCH. THEY WENT TO NEVADA AND FOUND HIM , BUT HE REUSED TO COME BACK WITH THEM, AND THEY HAD NO LEGAL AUTHORITY FOR BRINGING HIM. A WARRANT FOR HIS ARREST WAS LATER ISUED AND THE SHERIFF OF IRON COUNTY WAS DELEGATED TO APPREHEND AND BRING HIM BEFORE THE DISTRICT COURT. THE SHERIFF FOUND AND ARRESTED WARREN, BUT ON THEIR WAY IN---WARREN GAVE HIM THE SLIP AND WAS NEVER APREHENDED AGAIN. GRANDMOTHER (HANNAH LEAVITT FISH) WORRIED TERRIBLE OVER UNCLE FRANK’S TROUBLE, ALTHOUGH HE WAS FOUND NOT GUILTY BY A JURY, THE WORRY OVER HIM WAS UNDOUBTEDLY THE DIRECT CAUSE OF A NERVOUS AFFLICTION WHICH RENDERED HER HELPLESS AND FROM THE EFFECTS OF WHICH SHE FINALLY DIED ON THE FIFTH OF NOVEMBER, 1876, THE SAME DAY AND MINUTE, BEFORE MENTIONED, THAT HORACE (HER GRANDSON) DIED. DURING THE LATTER PART OF GRANDFATHER’S (HORACE FISH) LIFE, HE HAD SOME PHYSICAL TROUBLE WHICH WAS THOUGHT TO HAVE BEEN DIABETES. THIS, HOWEVER, IS RATHER DOUBTFUL. HE WENT TO BEAVER FOR THE PURPOSE OF GETTING MEDICAL TREATMENT AND DIED THERE ON THE SIXTH OF JULY, 1870, AT THE AGE OF 71. HIS FUNERAL WAS HELD AT PAROWAN WHERE HE WAS BURIED.

Life Timeline of Horace Fish

1799
Horace Fish was born on 6 Jan 1799
Horace Fish was 5 years old when The Lewis and Clark Expedition departs from Camp Dubois and begins its historic journey by traveling up the Missouri River. The Lewis and Clark Expedition from May 1804 to September 1806, also known as the Corps of Discovery Expedition, was the first American expedition to cross the western portion of the United States. It began near St. Louis, made its way westward, and passed through the Continental Divide of the Americas to reach the Pacific coast. The Corps of Discovery was a selected group of US Army volunteers under the command of Captain Meriwether Lewis and his close friend Second Lieutenant William Clark.
1804
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Horace Fish was 20 years old when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founds Singapore. Sir Thomas Stamford Bingley Raffles, FRS was a British statesman, Lieutenant-Governor of British Java (1811–1815) and Governor-General of Bencoolen (1817–1822), best known for his founding of Singapore and the British Malaya.
1819
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Horace Fish was 27 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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Horace Fish was 33 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Horace Fish was 41 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Horace Fish was 61 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Horace Fish was 64 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1862
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Horace Fish died on 6 Jul 1870 at the age of 71
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Horace Fish (6 Jan 1799 - 6 Jul 1870), BillionGraves Record 2623201 Parowan, Iron, Utah, United States

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