Isaac Grace

17 Apr 1820 - 25 May 1871

Register

Isaac Grace

17 Apr 1820 - 25 May 1871
edit Edit Record
photo Add Images
group_add Add Family
description Add a memory

Isaac Grace was born in Liverpool, England, April 17, 1820, to John Grace and Margaret Abbott. He married Elizabeth Williams (Evans) and on January 8, 1851, accompanied by his wife and three children, started on his voyage to America. The steamer 'Ellen' left Liverpool with a company of Saints. The
Register to get full access to the grave site record of Isaac Grace
Terms and Conditions

We want you to know exactly how our service works and why we need your registration in order to allow full access to our records.

terms and conditions

Contact Permissions

We’d like to send you special offers and deals exclusive to BillionGraves users to help your family history research. All emails ​include an unsubscribe link. You ​may opt-out at any time.

close
close
Thanks for registering with BillionGraves.com!
In order to gain full access to this record, please verify your email by opening the welcome email that we just sent to you.
close
Sign up the easy way

Use your facebook account to register with BillionGraves. It will be one less password to remember. You can always add an email and password later.

Loading

Life Information

Isaac Grace

Born:
Died:

Nephi City Cemetery

401-449 N 500 E
Nephi, Juab, Utah
United States

Epitaph

for Isaac - Farewell my wife and children all. From you a father Christ doth call. For Elizabeth - As a wife, devoted. As a mother, affectionate. As a friend, ever kind and true.

Headstone Description

Isaac - born in Liverpool, Eng. Pioneer of Nephi Elizabeth - born in Liverpool, Eng. Wife of Isaac Grace
Transcriber

bussejl

August 28, 2012
Photographer

bussejl

August 27, 2012

Nearby Graves

Nearby GravesTM

Some family members have different last names, but they’re still buried relatively close to one another. View grave sites based on name, distance from the original site, and find those missing relatives.

Upgrade to BG+

Find more about Isaac...

We found more records about Isaac Grace.

Family

Relationships on the headstone

add

Relationships added by users

add

Grave Site of Isaac

edit

Isaac Grace is buried in the Nephi City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

Isaac Grace - Life Sketch

Contributor: bussejl Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Isaac Grace was born in Liverpool, England, April 17, 1820, to John Grace and Margaret Abbott. He married Elizabeth Williams (Evans) and on January 8, 1851, accompanied by his wife and three children, started on his voyage to America. The steamer "Ellen" left Liverpool with a company of Saints. The ship building company for which he was working at the time offered to pay the voyage over and back to Liverpool for him and his family if he would return in a year and take up his work with their company. But he could not promise this. When they had been out to sea for three days, the boat sprung a leak and he was immediately called into service to repair the damage. During the voyage Isaac and Elizabeth had the misfortune of having their 18 month old baby taken in death by measles and it was buried at sea. They were over three months on the water. They docked at New Orleans on March 14, 1851. From there they took the steamer "Alex Scott" four days later, and sailed up the Mississippi to Keokuk. Under Isaac's care, besides his own family, were his mother, a widowed sister, and Margaret Davis with a family of children. Isaac and Elizabeth were well prepared to cross the plains, having procured plenty of provisions for the journey, also two yoke of oxen and one yoke of cows. On reaching Salt Lake City, they camped in the big field, and next day went south to Nephi. Charles Sperry, T.B. Foote, Israel Hoyt and Zimri Baxter had been to Nephi and put up some hay, but had returned to Salt Lake City to take care of their families. Therefore the Grace family were really the first to settle in Nephi. Having been on their journey nine long months it was in October 1851 when they settled in Nephi. A few days after they arrived, the Charles Sperry family arrived to become their neighbors. Before building a home for his own family, Isaac built one for his sister, and then helped the other brethren build theirs, they in turn helped him. Charles Sperry helped by making mud adobe for a chimney. It was freezing weather and they were hurrying to complete it for Christmas. They discovered that the mortar had frozen, and that if a fire was made in the fireplace, it would help to dry it out, so on Christmas day they moved into their snug little log cabin. Everyone was merry as the Christmas dinner was cooking in the fireplace when the awful crash came. The frozen chimney came all to pieces and fell all over the room. With tears in her eyes, Elizabeth picked up her babies and went back to her wagon. The incident of the chimney was a sad blow, but with pluck and energy they built it again with planks and mud. It stood until they could do better. REFERENCE: Written by Florence McCune Lunt for the Daughters of Utah Pioneers and published in Treasures of Pioneer History. Isaac Grace, after settling in Nephi, provided for his family mainly through farming. As the town grew he is known to have helped establish the first nail mill in Utah. He also owned part interest in the first grist mill. In the first election held in Nephi, he was elected to the office of Alderman. REFERENCE: History of Nephi.

Elizabeth Williams Evans - Life Sketch

Contributor: bussejl Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Elizabeth was born on April 29, 1822, in Liverpool, England, the daughter of John Williams and Ann Jones. She remained in Liverpool most of her life, marrying Isaac Grace there and having three children, one dying soon after birth. She and her husband, Isaac, were people of circumstances and of good social standing in old Liverpool. Isaac was a master ship builder and Elizabeth was known to be an expert tailoress. They were devout members of on of the sectarian churches in Liverpool and were active in the choir. They were so loyal to their church in fact that the work of the Mormon missionaries about whom they were told, aroused their resentment and declaration that they would have nothing to do with them. But the gathering influences of our divine cause had recognized the blood of Israel in them, and circumstances brought about their accidental contact with a street meeting of Mormon Elders. Their truth loving, honest hearts heard the words and cause of the Mormon message. They were not long in coming to believe in what they heard, were baptized, and soon made arrangements for passage with a company bound for the land of Zion in Utah. The journey across the plains took about three months with no unusual happenings. A wagon broke down which required them to stop a day for repairs. They were not bothered by Indians in any way throughout the trip. After a short stop at Salt Lake City they moved south, bound for Parowan, but were halted at Salt Creek (now Nephi) by the spraining of the ankle of Margaret Davis, a member of the company. Travel tired and anxious to locate, they decided to remain at Nephi, becoming the first actual settlers there, on November 17, 1851. Serious Indian troubles, the usual hardships, privations and crude facilities of early western life characterized the experiences of these pioneers, transferred from their comfortable and easy circumstances of English civilization. They prospered and led in religious, social and civil activities and the area of Nephi grew. Elizabeth did everything for her family to make their lives more comfortable. She would make clothes for the children from her own clothes. Because of the trouble with the Indians a fort was built for protection. Their livelihood came mostly from the farm which they established. Further hardship was brought by crickets and grasshoppers. Hard work and strong faith built these wonderful people into a strong and solid settlement of saints. Elizabeth was a beautiful singer. She sang in the Nephi choir for many years and added much to the community because of her talent. She had the reputation of being the sweetest natural singer anyone had ever heard. Often Brigham Young and some of the general authorities would visit Nephi and they would always call upon Elizabeth to sing for them. Isaac died in 1871 leaving Elizabeth alone to raise the children, the youngest of which was five years old at the time. Most of the children remember being fed on corn bread most of their lives because there was no white flour for many years around the Nephi area. Elizabeth lived for 28 years after Isaac died, passing away at the age of 78 on February 3, 1899. REFERENCE: Written by Eva Hudson Owen for Highland Park Camp of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers. (1927)

History of Margaret Abbott Grace

Contributor: bussejl Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

History of Margaret Abbott Grace by Fanny Jane Merrill Hampton Margaret was born in 1783 in Newcastle, Northumberland, England. She was the first child of Jonathan Abbott and Sarah Smith. Margaret married John Grace in Walton, Lancashire, England on July 24, 1814 and they settled in Liverpool. John was born in Liverpool on March 13, 1790. They had 4 children Sarah, born June 6, 1815; Margaret, born July 20, 1817; Isaac, born April 17, 1820; and Ann, born July 28, 1822. John died in 1835 and was buried in Liverpool. On the morning of Thursday, July 20, 1837, the merchant ship Garrick slipped into the River Mersey and anchored opposite the bustling English seaport of Liverpool. It was the dawn of the Victorian age, and Liverpool was already establishing an ascendancy as the greatest English port, which it retained for half a century. Among the passengers were seven men who were missionaries from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They were the first missionaries to preach the restored gospel in this dispensation outside North America. Their arrival opened up missionary work in the British Isles. By 1840 Brigham Young and most of the members of the Twelve Apostles were on missions to Britain. Most of them spent time in Liverpool. In 1841 the family learned about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and became some of the early converts to the church in Liverpool. Margaret’s son Isaac and future son-in-law William Evans were the first family members to join the church on December 5, 1841. On May 8, 1842, Margaret herself was baptized. Her daughter Ann Grace Evans was baptized on August 21, 1842 and her daughter Margaret was baptized on July 23, 1843. Apparently the family was desirous to immigrate to Utah. In 1849 Margaret’s son-in-law John Davis and granddaughter Margaret (age 12) were the first in the family to sail to America to join the Saints in Utah. They spent the entire winter in Cincinnati, Ohio. Margaret left Liverpool on January 8, 1851 on board the ship Ellen with the remaining members of her family. The family group included her son Isaac Grace and his wife Elizabeth, and their three daughters, Elizabeth, Margaret, and Annette; her daughter Margaret and her children, Jonathan and Charlotte; her daughter Sarah Grace Mariner and her six year old daughter Jane. Her daughter Ann died before the group left for America. In Treasures of Pioneer History: Vol 1 it says the following about the journey. “When they had been out to sea three days, the boat sprung a leak and Isaac was immediately called into service to repair the damage. During the voyage Isaac and Elizabeth had the misfortune of having their 18 month old baby taken in death by measles and it was buried at sea. They were over three months on the water. They docked at New Orleans March 14, 1851. From there they took the steamer "Alex Scott" March 19, 1851 and sailed up the Mississippi to Keokuk Iowa. Under Isaac's care, besides his own family, were his mother, a widowed sister, and another sister, Margaret Davis with her own children. Isaac and Elizabeth were well prepared to cross the plains, having procured plenty of provisions for the journey, also two yoke of oxen and one yoke of cows. On reaching Salt Lake City, they camped in the big field, and next day went on south to Nephi. Charles Sperry, T. B. Foote, Israel Hoyt and Zimri Baxter had been to Nephi and put up some hay, but had returned to Salt Lake City to take care of their families. Therefore, the Grace family, were really the first to settle in Nephi. Having been on their journey nine long months it was in October 1851 when they settled in Nephi. Later, Margaret’s granddaughter, Elizabeth Grace McCune, wrote the following about the journey: “I was seven years old, when my parents decided to emigrate to Utah, and remember very well going on board the ship Ellen, as she lay at the dock, not far from our home, and we set sail the next morning, January 7th, 1851. Many of our relatives and a lot of our friends came to see us off. We had not been on our way but a few days when our ship met with an accident. I think another ship ran into us, but we were near the Coast of Wales, and our captain turned around and went into Cardigan Bay, and I well remember my dear father being put over the side of the ship, on a plank with ropes and working on the damaged part of the ship. In a few days the repairs were completed and we started on our journey again. There were many passengers on the ship with us all going to Utah and our company was in charge of James D. Cummings and Elder Dunn. I forgot to mention that I had two sisters younger than me, Margaret and Annette, Annette was the baby. After many days at sea, the measles broke out among the children, and my baby sister Annette, took it and died. They sewed her up in canvass, with some heavy weights at her feet and dropped her in the sea. I remember seeing her floating in the water a long time before she sank and I ran down to the cabin where my parents were and told them of it and how angry my father was at me. After eleven long weeks on the ocean we arrived in New Orleans and went on board a river steamer. We were many days going up the Mississippi River. A new dress that my mother had made me was blown over board into the river and was lost. I was broken hearted over loss of it. We finally arrived in St. Louis where my father bought his wagons, and we took steamer for Kanesville, the outfitting point at that time for the Saints, and now called Council Bluffs. We remained here several days ready for the long journey across the plains; my father’s sister, Mrs. Margaret Davis, and her two children, also his aged mother, Grandma Grace, were with us all the way from Liverpool. I was very young and do not remember much of the details of the journey across the plains. My father had two yoke of cattle, one yoke were cows and they were milking, and one evening we stopped at a camp and before father got the cattle unhitched from the wagon I crept in between them, and was milking one of the cows. My father was very angry and said I might have been kicked to death. I did not try it again. My mother made me a large apron and I used to walk ahead of the wagons and gather buffalo chips, for our fire. Buffalos were very plentiful, the prairies were black with them, must have been millions. We arrived in Salt Lake Valley, soon after the October Conference and camped in what was known as the Big Field . . .” (McCune, Elizabeth Grace, [Autobiographical Sketch], IN Autobiography and diaries of Frederick Henry McCune, pp.19 21. Historical Department Archives.) After arriving in Utah the family settled in Nephi, which is in Juab County. Margaret lived in Nephi until she died in August of 1853. She was buried in Nephi.

Brief History of Isaac and Elizabeth Grace

Contributor: bussejl Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

BRIEF HISTORY OF ISAAC AND ELIZABETH GRACE. PIONEERS OF 1851 The curtain which rolled up disclosing the life story of Grandfather and Grandmother Grace to their children took place simultaneously with their hearing and accepting the Gospel Message in 1841. Prior to the year 1841, little is known. They were born in Liverpool, England. Grandfather was put out to service as an apprentice to a ship building firm. Grandmother's natural aptitude for sewing was developed so that she was an accomplished seamstress. Both were given early religious t training so that their minds and souls became a fertile field for the planting of the true gospel seed. Beyond these few items scarcely anything is known about their childhood and youth. Their ready acceptance of the Gospel Plan, their eagerness to reach Zion, their continued integrity to the cause they had espoused, make their descendants appreciative and grateful for the blessings of this precious heritage of such worthy parentage. It makes them feel that the family line from which they sprang contained a goodly amount of the blood of Israel and that their immediate grandparents had lived good lives and had done nothing in their youth for which any of their descendants should be ashamed. And so with a feeling of reverence and gratitude we attempt to get down a few highlights of their life’s history, of their longings, aspirations and accomplishments. About 1840, a little company of friends and relatives in Liverpool, England, attended a Bible Class in Sunday School taught by William Williams, in the church of England. Among the members were Isaac Grace and Elizabeth Williams Evans, David Evans, William Evans and Ann Grace. One Sunday morning William Evans was absent from class. When the others met him the next time they asked: " Where were you last Sunday." He replied: "Where you all should have been.” Then he told them about hearing two men preaching on the street and urged them at their first opportunity to go and hear themselves the doctrines these men were preaching. They became curious and soon learned where these strangers were to preach. At the meeting an Elder J. G. Adams announced that his subject was: "My Reason for Denouncing Methodism and Embracing Mormonism". He was well versed in the Scriptures and a fluent, interesting speaker. He quoted Bible Scripture to prove his assertions which carried conviction to many of his hearers. The young woman, Elizabeth Williams Evans was well versed in the Scriptures, having been required by her brother, a very religious man, to memorize a given number of passages from the Bible every week , so that she knew the speaker was quoting them correctly, She knew that his interpretation of them was right. She turned to Isaac and said "Isaac, that's the truth, and I have always known it and why didn't I think of it before." They were convinced of the truthfulness of Mormonism and helped other members of their families to learn and accept the truth. Isaac Grace was baptized into the new church 5 December 1841, and Elizabeth Williams Evans was baptized 5 January 1842. Others of their families and friends who became members of the church were Isaac's mother, Margarett Abbott Grace, his three sisters, Sarah, Margaret, and Ann, and four Evans brothers, David, William, John, and Charles. Isaac's father died when Isaac was a boy of fifteen. After his father death, the mother apprenticed Isaac to a ship-builder at the Liverpool docks. The boy was sent to school by the company. Isaac was naturally adapted for this line of work and his ability and aptness was noticed and appreciated by William Buckley Jones, the Ship Building Company. After his preparation in the school he became so efficient he could draw the plan for a ship, then take his tools and build it. He became a master builder or, ships architect and was put in as Forman of the shipbuilding yard. There were 500 men under him. He was frequently sent to the forests to select timber for building ships. The young couple were married in 1842. When the family decided to emigrate to America his employers felt that his training totally unfitted him for the life of pioneering and tried to dissuade him from his purpose. But the spirit of "gathering" was so intense that he would not swerve from his decision. His employers were not prejudiced against the new sect. They merely feared for his in ability to cope with the hardships which he was bound to meet in the new life as a frontiersman. They assured him of assistance if he found conditions impossible in the new country. Their kindly forethought led them to present him with a kit of tools to meet the demands of pioneer life. Prior to the time of hearing the glorious message of the restored gospel, Elizabeth Williams Evans recalled an incident of her early childhood. Her mother visited a fortune teller to try to ascertain the whereabouts of a son who had gone to sea and who was apparently lost. The fortune teller to try to ascertain the whereabouts of a son who had gone to sea and who was apparently lost. The fortune teller turned to the child, Elizabeth, and said to the mother: "This child shall be the greatest blessing to you of all your children." The mother had already told her little girl that she would live to see apostles and prophets but she herself would not. Later when Elizabeth heard the missionaries she realized the meaning of the fortune teller's words• A great desire burned in her heart to indeed be a savior to her family who had not the glorious privilege of receiving the fullness of the Gospel. It is thought that the following story of the voyage of "The Ship Ellen", which is taken from the Millennial Star, Volume 13:158, written by James W. Cummings, who was president of the emigrating company of saints, will greatly enhance the interest of the Grace family history, since they were passengers on this ship, under the supervision of Brother Cummings. Under date of March29, 1851, he wrote the following: I will endeavor in a few words a history of our voyage to this place. You are well aware of the labor and anxiety attending the presidency of 470 people in crossing the sea. We weighed anchor in the river opposite Liverpool January 8, 1851, about 11 AM, the wind was fair and we were soon under way: We ran at the rate of seven miles an hour till about 11 o'clock at night, when we struck a schooner, Broke our job-boom and main and fare yards. The captain, the next day, put in to Cardigen bay, North Wales, to repair. The ship was ready in a few days for sea again, but the wind changed the day we put into port to an unfavorable quarter, and remained there for three weeks. Therefore we considered our accident a blessing to us, for we were comfortable in port, while hundreds were being knocked about, many vessels wrecked, and hundreds of human beings consigned to a watery grave. While many were experiencing the awful horrors of shipwreck, as we had great cause to thank our Heavenly Father that we were safe and comfortable and every saint on board the Ellen felt that the invisible hand of God was over them for good and they did not forget to thank Him for the same. The Captain, however, became rather impatient and although the wind continued unfavorable, on January 23, we again weighed anchor and put out to sea, but the wind blew a strong gale from the direction we wanted to sail, so we made little progress for several days, However, on February 1, the wind changed in our favor and we soon lost sight of the Irish coast, and from that time we had pleasant weather, and for the most part fair winds. On the night of March 14 we anchored in the river off New Orleans, making the passage from Cardigan Bay, (which is twelve hour's sail from Liverpool) in seven weeks. We did not encounter a storm on the passage, and after we left the channel it was more like a pleasure trip than a sea voyage, so far as weather was concerned. We had ten deaths on the voyage, two adults, namely James Wright, of Skellow, and the wife of William Allen from the Birmingham conference, who died of fever; and eight children, four of whom died of measles: three of consumption; one of inflammation of the chest. The measles broke out among us the day we left the dock and nearly every child on board had them, besides several adults; I should judge there were more than seventy cases. Many of the children had another disease in the tropical cline that I named the tropical cough. It was similar to whooping cough and many of the small children suffered from it. Immediately after leaving port we divided the company into twelve divisions or wards, allotting ten berths to each division, and appointed a president over each. Then those twelve companies we divided into two, and appointed a president for each; and the second cabin we organizes in like manner, We found this organization to be of great value in preserving peace, good order, and the health and comfort of the saints. Wealso organized the priesthood, and appointed presidents over them, to see that each attended to his duties, my two councilors and I met with them often in council and could learn the condition of every saint on board. If any were sick or in want, or in transgression, we were made acquainted with it, and immediately adopted measures to relieve the wants of the needy, and to prevent iniquity from creeping into our midst. We had men appointed to visit every family twice a day to administer to the sick; and but few days passed but what myself and Brother Dunn and Moss visited each family. Both these councilors acted in concert with me in all things, and they spared no labor nor pains to make the saints comfortable and happy so far as lay in their power. At New Orleans we chartered the steamer Alex Scott to take the company to St Louis. We paid $2.50 for adults, all our baggage included, children half price. We left New Orleans on the morning of March 19, and landed in St. Louis March 26. We had a good passage up the river and I could recommend the Alex Scott as a good, commodious and safe boat, commanded by a good captain by the name of Swan. There were two deaths coming up the river, two children. On the voyage we had ten deaths, one birth, and six marriages, and one birth coming up the river. (Signed) James W. Cummings. When the "Ellen” had to be repaired after the collision with the schooner mentioned in the story, Isaac Grace proffered his services to do the repairing. His little daughter, Elizabeth, age 3, remembered watching her father as he was let down on the ships side by means of ropes so that he could mend the leak. One of the children afflicted with the measles was baby Annett Grace, two months old, who became a victim of the disease. When the precious little body was prepared for burial, the sailors who came to cast it overboard, turned away, they at first could not bring themselves to consign the little bundle to its watery grave. At last, they had to set aside their feelings of sympathy and regret and cast the little one over the ship's rail. We take the following brief account from Aunt Lizzie McCune's autobiography. She was eight years old and the oldest child of the family She says: She died, and I shall never forget how they sewed her up in canvas with some heavy weights at her feet and dropped her into the sea, I remember seeing her floating in the water a long time before she sank, and I ran down to the cabin where my parents were and told them of it. How angry my father was. After arriving at St. Louis, Grandfather Grace began to make preparation for the memorable trek across the plains to Utah. The family travelled into two wagons, one drawn by two cows; the other by oxen. Quoting from Aunt Lizzis McCune's autobiography again, she says: We finally arrived at St. Louis, where my father bought his wagons. Then he took steamer for Kanesville, the outfitting point, at that time, for the saints, now called Council Bluffs. We remained here for several days preparing for our long journey across the plains. My father had three yoke of cattle, one of which was a yoke of milking cows. One evening we stopped at a camp, and before father could get the cattle unhitched from the wagon, I crept in between them and milked one of the cows. Father was very upset and said I might have been kicked to death. My mother made me a large apron, and I used to walk in head of the wagons and gather buffalo chips for our fire. Buffalo were very plentiful; the prairies were black with them. I was too young to remember many of the detail s of the trip but my father has told me that we arrived in Salt Lake Valley soon after October conference and camped in what was known as Big Field. After a week's rest, we started for Parowan but when we reached Salt Creek (now Nephi) my Aunt Margaret Davis, in getting out of her wagon, sprained he ankle. My folks and those with us decided to remain in Salt Creek. They were all tired of traveling, having been on the way since January 3, and it was now late in the fall of 1851. Salt Creek, or Nephi, had just been settled. Charles Sperry, Israel Hoyt, T.B. Foot, Zimiri Baxter had been there to cut hay but they had gone back to Salt Lake for their families. Our family and the Davis family were the first families on the ground. My sister, Margaret and cousin Charlotte Davis and myself were the first white children in Nephi. The family lived in their wagons until a cabin could be built. Their first home was put on the Jeffries lot where the poultry plant now stands. The early comers cooperated constantly in getting their cabins up before the winter set in. All exchanged work. Each doing the thing for which each was best adapted. And so it was that Charles Sperry was assigned to do the mason work on the chimneys. He did this part of the work on Grandfather's cabin. The weather made it possible to get it completed ready for Christmas. In high spirits Grandmother set about planning the Christmas dinner. They moved their things into the little prairie palace and Grandmother got the food supplies assembled to prepare the Christmas dinner. While the food was cooking in the fireplace suspended from the pot hooks, she improvised a tattle by placing Grandfather's tool chest on some boxes or sawed off logs which served as legs. Just as the dinner was about cooked and ready to serve, the chimney adobes came tumbling helter-skelter into the fire place, burying pots and kettles with the precious Christmas dinner. In tears which were the outgrowth of disappointment, Grandmother and her babies trudged back to the bleak wagon where they had to stay until the fallen chimney had been rebuilt. The heart breaking catastrophe was caused by the melting of the adobes which had been made in frosty weather. When the fire was made it melted the adobes into soft mud and the mass of debris poured out into the room. Quoting from as article by Ramona Wilcox Cannon in the Relief Society Magazine for July 1927, we find the following: Sister Grace gave birth to a frail baby girl who was christened Harriet Ann, and soon was called by the name of Etta. She was the first white girl born in Nephi, though a boy baby had shortly proceeded her. Although the Grace family endured the hardships of the frontier in those early days, they never suffered from actual hunger, nor from want of clothing. Sister Grace had been saving up clothes for years before leaving for Zion, so that she always had something on hand to make over for every necessity. Brother Grace was a good provider. His training as a shipbuilder stood him in hand in the growing colony. He could adapt his skill to anything in the line of carpentry and so was constantly in demand. Money was a scarce commodity, but food was welcome pay enough. Sister Grace, being a tailoress, was a good teacher for her girls, and was able to make suits for her husband and some that anyone might have envied. She made the suits of jeans cloth. This of course was homespun, and was heavier than ordinary fabric for men's clothes. Of scraps of this same material, Sister Grace made shoes for her family. Of course, the children went barefoot, when the weather permitted, but in the fall and winter they needed shoes. So mother cut the jeans cloth to fit the feet of the various children and then carried them to the shoemaker, who provided soles and toe caps. The family were very proud of the foot-wear in blue, gray or brown. Perhaps it even matched the suit or dress. During the early days Grandfather Grace, through his knowledge of the use of tools was asked to help build a flour mill at Manti. Brother George Bradley said to Grandfather "Now Brother Grace we haven't any money but we will pay you in flour". In those days most of the work was done with oxen so yokes had to be made, likewise farm implements, so Grandfather applied his knowledge to the making and stalking of plows. He also made rollers, harrows, hay racks, looms and cheese presses. Here we note the spirit of community cooperation because the men for whom he made these things, repaid him in work. Grandfather was noticeably adaptable to any and all of these situations in which he found himself. He was a lover of stock and he raised horses, cattle and sheep. It was a custom each spring and fall to have horses and cattle drives. Frequently disputes would arise as to the ownership of the animals, especially if the brands were not plainly distinguishable. Grandfather often acted as arbitrator in these disputes. Another illustration of his capabilities which grew out of his early training was the art of penmanship and bookkeeping. Knowing of his ability, Bishop Bryan appointed him to care for the tithing affairs while he was absent on a short mission. Another responsibility which he willingly assumed was to build his allotted portion of the Fort Wall which was designated by the committee. Likewise, when it came to the work of fencing the fields lands, each land owner would be required to build so many rods of fence, according to the acreage inside the enclosure. In all these activities incident to developing the resources of the little pioneer town, Grandfather was always enabled to adjust himself to these various requirements. His varied interests led him to start a nail factory in conjunction with Samuel Adams, It was among the first in the state. It was located on second east between first and second south, between the old mill race and the Bishop Warner home. He helped in the construction of the Tabernacle and the old Social Hall. The roofing on both buildings was made of heavy timbers. They were framed together with pins instead of nails. Sometime between the years 1852-57, the family moved from the first little cabin to an adobe house situated on the corner directly west of the Bounty Court House. It was here that the sixth little daughter, Celestia Jane, first saw the light of day. During this same period a third home was built on the spot where the City Hall now stands. The very situation of the Main Street house made it a real friend ship house. Being so easily accessible friends of the family "dropped infrequently for a chat. It was a gathering place for old and young. The friendly latch string was always out to passersby. This home was one like Edgar Guest describes so beautifully in his poem, "It Takes a Heap O’ Livin’ in a House to Make a Home". For a "heap o' living did go on within its walls. In August of the year 1857, one event occurred which brought to Grandfather and Grandmother the congratulations of their many friends. A certain Sunday a baby boy came to live with them, This gift was looked upon as a very precious gift because the Grace family had had six little girls all in a row and this was their first boy. Their friends were so pleased over the Graces' good fortune that an a announcement was made in Sunday meeting of the new baby's arrival and after the services the whole congregation went to the home to see the new baby, named for his father, Isaac. The rest of Grandmother's babies came to them there, their two other sons John William, and Charles Howard, and a daughter Emma Lorette, who died in infancy. In all, Grandfather and Grandmother were the parents of ten children. They believed implicitly in the law of tithing and obeyed it strictly. In fact they thought of turning their tenth child in for tithing and came as near to it as possible because he was eventually sustained as a bishop of the Nephi North ward. In relating some of Grandmother's characteristics which illustrate that she was capable of meeting the demands of pioneer life we find she was noticeably individualistic and unafraid to express her p opinions but even so she was a peacemaker among her companions. She was jovial and optimistic. She loved friends and prized their goodwill and tried to be worthy of their confidence. An incident which pictures her individualism occurred during the time of the worrisome Indian troubles. When the little community was threatened by Indian raids it was customary for all the inhabitants to put out their candles. The little fort would be in utter darkness. Those on guard would watch for flickering tell-tale candles go to the house and order the candles to be snuffed out. One night, a light shown through Grandmother's window. The guard, who was Father Cazier, warned her of the danger. It seems that she was making a cup of tea. She said to him: "Tell Brother Cazier, If my time has come I am determined to go to Heaven happy. I must have my cup of tea." And she did. Because of Grandmother's cheeriness she was a welcome visitor in a sick room. Once, however, when she called to see Sister Miranda Cazier Bryan, who was gravely ill, those who were nursing Sister Bryan said: "Sh-Sh-, you mustn't speak above a whisper, she is very low. Disregarding their anxiety Grandmother went to the bed and said jovially: "Look here, you old frump, you cant1t die until you make Charles that promised suit of clothes.” This remark brought a smile to the wan, still face of Sister Bryan. She roused a little from a semi-stupor and that hour proved to be the turning point. Sister Bryan made a comeback and recovered. And she kept her promise. It seems that at the time of Uncle Charles's birth Sister Bryan said to Grandmother, Sister Grace, if you will name the baby for my husband I'll make him a little suit of clothes." Her husband's name was Charles Hinkle Bryan. Grandmother named the baby Charles Howard. The first name and initials were identical so Uncle Charles got the little suit of clothes. Although Grandmother enjoyed a joke and had the happy faculty of seeing the funny side of a situation, yet when a serious problem confronted her she was able to meet it competently. After Grandfather's death in 1871, her three sons, ages thirteen, eleven and six, became willing helpers but she controlled the family affairs with good judgment. Her children respected her authority but felt sometimes that she kept the thumb screws of that authority down just a bit too tight. Whether they were working for her on the farm or took some other job independently they never had a penny to spend without her sanction, until they were twenty years of age. This rigid training no doubt seemed a bit hard. On the other hand it taught them to have more appreciation for the value of a dollar and to conserve the resources of life with fair judgment. As a result of this training the boys became quite resourceful as they grew up and were better able to appropriate their resources to a better advantage. She was active in the field of women's work in the church organizations, particularly in the Relief Society and choir. The choir often met at the Grace home for practices. Both Grandfather and Grandmother had very sweet voices and were faithful choir members. She had charge of the Belief Society singing for many years. As a choir member her judgment was invaluable in the choosing of hymns which fit in appropriately with the thoughts expressed in the sermons. The spirit of neighborliness was one of Grandmother's characteristics. In case of death she would assist in making the burial cloths and in the preparation of the body or in doing whatever else she could to aid the stricken family. On such occasion she was away from home all day and it so happened that her eldest boy, then eight years of age, was to be baptized, She left word with his sister just older than himself to get the clothing ready for the baptismal service. When the little girl examined the pants she found they were in need of patching. All she could find in the piece bag, which she thought would do for such a patch was a piece of bright red flannel. When her young brother came out of the water everybody laughed and the little boy wondered what it was all about. Of course it was the conspicuous patch on the front of the pants that caused the merriment among the bystanders. Although Grandmother had come from the Old Country where she had been used to comforts, she never once murmured or regretted that she had left her old home. She was always grateful that she was in Zion where she could rear her children in the way which she would have been impossible in the Old World. And though her responsibilities were many due to the early death of her husband, she met all these situations with fortitude and success. She never faltered and as a result her children grew up to honor her and the church as all were faithful members of the church. In conclusion, it is to be hoped that as the years go by that their descendants may ever have the descendants may ever have the desire to follow the gleam of the Gospel light, to honor and obey it, and in so doing pay an ever growing and fitting tribute to this worthy pioneer couple.

Passenger list of the "Ellen" on which Isaac brought his family to America

Contributor: bussejl Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

http://mormonmigration.lib.byu.edu/Search/showDetails/db:MM_MII/t:voyage/id:120/keywords:ellen This is a link to the passenger list of the ship “Ellen” on which Isaac and his family sailed from Liverpool on 8 January 1851 to arrive in New Orleans on 14 March 1851. There are also many accounts of the trip as recorded in diaries, letters and biographies. The Graces are listed on page 20 of the passenger list. Isaac’s occupation is listed as “shipwright”.

Elizabeth Williams Evans and Isaac Grace

Contributor: bussejl Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

[Tricia compilation – draft January 25, 2010 updated March 7, 2011] Elizabeth Williams Evans Elizabeth Williams Evans was born April 29 1822 in Liverpool, England to Ann Jones and John Williams Evans. Her parents were married in 1805, 17 years before Elizabeth’s birth, so it is possible that she was the youngest child. Only a few things are known of her childhood. She had a natural aptitude in sewing, and this talent was well developed in her youth until she became an accomplished seamstress. Her father came from Wales, a country famous for it’s music and singing, and the whole family was active in their church choir. Elizabeth in particular had a very beautiful singing voice and an ear for good music. Elizabeth also grew up with rigorous religious training and was well schooled in the Bible. She had four brothers, David, William, John and Charles. One of them, possibly the oldest, was “a very religious man and required her to memorize a given number of passages every week.”* They all were devout members of one of the sectarian churches in Liverpool where they sang in the choir. Even though these sects did not preach a restoration of Christ’s church as outlined in the Bible (with prophets, apostles, etc), when Elizabeth was just a young girl her mother Ann told her that she would live to see apostles and prophets, but that Ann would not. While Elizabeth was still a devout member of the Liverpool congregation, she recalled an incident of her early childhood. Although her mother was a religious woman, she was desperate to know what had happened to her son who had gone off to sea and was apparently lost. So it was that Ann visited a fortuneteller to ascertain the whereabouts of this son. It is not remembered if she gave Ann any answer about her missing son, but the fortuneteller turned to the child, Elizabeth, and said to the mother, “This child shall be the greatest blessing to you of all your children.” Other than these stories, little is known of Elizabeth’s childhood, although it is known that the family was of good social standing. Isaac Grace Isaac was born April 17, 1820 in Liverpool England, son of John Grace and Margaret Abbot, both from the beautiful rolling country of Lancashire, England. He had three sisters, Sarah, Margaret and Ann. Isaac’s father John died when Isaac was a boy of fifteen, and thus his mother Margaret apprenticed 15-year-old Isaac to a ship-builder at Liverpool docks shortly thereafter. It wasn’t long before the boy’s intellect was apparent, and soon the company paid for him to attend school. Isaac was naturally adapted for this line of work and his ability and aptness was noticed and appreciated by William Buckley Jones, the president of the Ship Building Company. After his preparation in school he became such a master architect and craftsman that he could draw the plan for a ship, then take his tools and build it. He became so astute in understanding the attributes of different woods that he was frequently sent to the forests to select timbers for building ships. He became a master builder or ship architect, and was put in as foreman of the shipbuilding yard with five hundred men under his direction. “Mormonism” Isaac’s family was also of good social standing and was devout in the same sectarian church as the Evans family. With all his ship building education Isaac apparently also gained an education in religion, for around 1840, a little company of friends and relatives in Liverpool attended a Bible class in Sunday school taught by William Williams in the Church of England. Among the members of the class were bother and sister Isaac and Ann Grace and sister and brothers Elizabeth David and William Evans. One Sunday morning William Evans was absent from class. When the others met him the next time they asked, “Where were you last Sunday?” He replied, “Where you all should have been.” He proceeded to tell them about hearing two men preaching on the street and urged them at their first opportunity to go and hear themselves the doctrines these men were preaching. According to a short biography written by Eva Hudson Owen, both Elizabeth and Isaac “were both devout members of one of the sectarian churches in Liverpool … and were so loyal to their church that the work of the Mormon missionaries about whom they were told aroused their resentment to the point that they declared that they would have nothing to do with them.” But they became curious enough to investigate and soon learned where these strangers were to preach. Many years later Elizabeth told her daughter Elizabeth that both she and Isaac were first attracted and impressed with the singing. “My mother had a very beautiful voice for singing, and it was through the “Mormon” elders’ singing on the street that my parents were attracted and they first heard the gospel. But Elder J.G. Adams was also well versed in the scriptures as well as an interesting and fluent speaker. At the meeting an announced that his subject was: “My Reasons for Denouncing Methodism and Embracing Mormonism.” He quoted Bible scripture to prove his assertions, which carried conviction to many of his hearers. Elizabeth, being well versed in the scriptures because of her early rigorous tutoring and memorization, knew the speaker was quoting them correctly. She knew that his interpretation of them was right. She turned to Isaac and said, “Isaac, that’s the truth” and “I have always known it” and “Why didn’t I think of it before?” They were convinced of the truthfulness of Mormonism and communicated to other members of their families the simple principles that had become so clear to them. Isaac Grace was baptized into the new church December 5, 1841, and Elizabeth Williams Evans was one month later on baptized January 5, 1842. Others of their families and friends who became members of the church were Isaac’s mother, Margaret Abbott Grace, his three sisters, Sarah, Margaret and Ann, and four Evans brothers, David, William, John and Charles. Their mother Ann Evans was alive at this time, but died shortly after in March of 1843. One of the doctrines taught to Elizabeth and Isaac by the Mormons was that everyone, whether in this life or the next, has the opportunity to accept or reject the gospel of Christ. The heart of that gospel is that Christ came into the world to heal all from the pains and sorrows they suffer in this life and thus be free to experience great joy and peace. This process officially starts with baptism by those having authority, but this is an ordinance that must be performed on earth. For those not baptized in this life, a proxy baptism can be performed for the deceased, thus giving them the opportunity to accept or reject the Gospel in the next life. The Mormons taught that this doctrine was practiced by the original church, and referenced the Apostle Paul’s words in 1 Corinthians 15:29. In addition, they taught that the whole point of the Gospel is for families to live together in love and happiness, and that all can have this happiness in the next life as well as this life if they are sealed together with the proper authority. When Elizabeth heard the missionaries’ message, she wanted the happiness she was experiencing to be had by all her family; she believed that the meaning of the fortuneteller’s words spoken so long ago – “This child shall be the greatest blessing to you of all your children” – referred to this work that she could do for her forbearers as well as her future family. Isaac and Elizabeth marry and immigrate The young couple was married some time in 1842.*** Eight years later with Isaac’s success as a ship builder, they were quite prosperous and comfortably situated with a growing family. Little Elizabeth was seven years old and there were two more small girls, Margaret and the baby Annette. In this happy circumstance, Isaac and Elizabeth’s commitment to their new faith was also growing stronger. Although discrimination apparently passed them by, many others Mormons were experiencing persecution in England. During this same time period a request came from the distant Salt Lake Valley for converts to go west. With Isaac’s highly respected situation and their position of comfort in society, it must have been a carefully weighed decision, but Isaac and Elizabeth decided to leave all their comforts and to immigrate. Both Elizabeth’s parents had died by this time, but Isaac’s aged mother, known as Grandma Grace, also decided to accompany them. With a son as a shopbuilder, the plucky 58 year-old widow must have had a sense of the treacherous ocean crossing ahead of them, and the hardships they would face crossing of the Great Plains. But she was not to be left behind. When Isaac and Elizabeth announced their decision to immigrate to the untamed wilderness of the Rocky Mountains, Isaac’s employers felt that, as gifted as he was, Isaac’s training left him totally unsuited for the life of pioneering, and they tried to dissuade him from him from going. These men were not prejudiced against the new sect, they merely feared Isaac and Elizabeth’s ability to cope with hardships they had only heard stories of and could only imagine. They knew as pioneers of the Wild West, he and his family were bound to meet these unknown hardships. But once they made up their minds, Isaac and Elizabeth would not be persuaded. Isaac was so highly respected and well liked that even though the company objected, they assured him of assistance if he found conditions impossible in the new country. Their kindly forethought led them to present him with a kit of tools to meet the exigencies of pioneer life. These tools proved invaluable to him later on. Passage on “The Ship Ellen” The Grace contingency set sail on “The Ship Ellen” midwinter, January 8, 1951. The following story of the voyage of “The Ship Ellen” is taken from the millennial Star, Volume 13:158, and written by James W. Cummings, designated president of the emigrating company. Under the date of March 29, 1851, he wrote the following, indicated in italic: “I will endeavor in a few words a history of our voyage to this place……you are well aware of the labor and anxiety attending the presidency of 470 people in crossing the sea…… We weighed anchor in the river opposite Liverpool January 8, 1851, about 11A.M., the wind was fair and we were soon under way. We ran at the rate of seven miles an hour till about 11 o’clock at night, when we struck a schooner, broke our jib boom and main and fare yards. The captain, the next day, put into Cardigan Bay, North Wales, to repair.” The ship was fortunate to have a master ship builder on board. When the “Ellen” had to be repaired after the schooner collision, Isaac Grace proffered his services to do the repairing. Little Elizabeth, age 8, remembered watching her father as he was let down on the ship’s side by means of rope so that he could mend the leaks. The ship was ready in a few days for sea again, but the wind changed the day we put into port to an unfavorable quarter, and remained there for three weeks. Therefore we considered our accident a blessing to us, for we were comfortable in port, while hundreds were being knocked about, many vessels wrecked, and hundreds of human beings consigned to a watery grave. While many were experiencing the horror of shipwreck, we had great cause to thank our Heavenly Father that we were safe and comfortable and every saint on board the Ellen felt that the invisible hand of God was over them for good and they did not forget to thank Him for the same. The Captain, however became rather impatient and although the wind continued unfavorable, on January 23, we again weighed anchor and put out to sea, but the wind blew a strong gale from the direction we wanted to sail, so we made little progress for several days. However, on February 1, the wind changed in our favor, and we soon lost sight of the Irish coast, and from that time we had pleasant weather, and for the most part fair winds. On the night of March 14, we anchored in the river off New Orleans, making the passage from Cardigan Bay (which is twelve hour’s sail from Liverpool) in seven week. We did not encounter a storm on the passage, and after we left the channel it was more like a pleasure trip than a sea voyage so far as weather was concerned. We had ten deaths on the voyage, two adults, namely James Wright of Skellow, and the wife of William Allen from the Birmingham conference, who died of fever: and eight children, four of whom died of measles, three of consumption, one of inflammation of the chest. The measles broke out among us the day we let the dock and nearly every child on board had them, besides several adults. I should judge there were more than seventy cases. Many of the children had another disease in the tropical clime that I named tropical cough. It was similar to whooping cough and many of the small children suffered from it. The baby Annette Grace, two months old, became a victim of the measles. When she was prepared for burial, the sailors who came to cast the body overboard, turned away, they at first could not bring themselves to consign the little bundle to its watery grave. At last, they had to set aside their feelings of sympathy and regret and cast the little one over the ship’s rail. Daughter Elizabeth wrote, “She died, and I shall never forget how they sewed her up in canvas with some heavy weights at her feet and dropped her into the sea. I remember seeing her floating in the water a long time before she sank and I ran down to the cabin where my parents were and told them of it. How angry my father was!” Immediately after leaving port we divided the company into twelve divisions of wards, allotting ten berths to each division, and appointed a president over each. Then those twelve companies we divided into two, and appointed a president for each, and the second cabin we organized in like manner. We found this organization to be of great value in preserving peace, good order and the health and comfort of the saints. We also organized the priesthood, and appointed presidents over them, to see that each attended to his duties. My two counselors and I met with them often in council and could learn the condition of every saint on board. If any were sick or in want, or in transgression, we were made acquainted with it, and immediately adopted measures to relieve the wants of the needy, and to prevent iniquity from creeping into our midst. We had men appointed to visit every family twice a day to administer to the sick; and but few days passed but what myself and Brothers Dunn and Moss visited each family. Both these councilors acted in concert with me in all things, and they spared no labor nor pains to make the saints comfortable and happy so far as lay in their power. At New Orleans we chartered the steamer “Alex Scott” to take the company to St. Louis. We paid $2.50 for adults, all our baggage included, children half price. We left New Orleans on the morning of March 19, and landed in St. Louis, March 26. We had a good passage up the river and I would recommend the Alex Scott as a good, commodious and safe boat, commanded by a good captain by the name of Swan. There were two deaths coming up the river, two children. On the voyage we had ten deaths, one birth, and six marriages, and one birth coming up the river.” (Signed) James W. Cummings The first white families in Salt Creek After arriving at St. Louis, Isaac and Elizabeth began to make preparation for the trek across the plains to Utah. The family traveled in two wagons, one drawn by two cows; the other by oxen. Quoting from daughter Elizabeth Grace McCune’s autobiography again, she says: “We finally arrived at St. Louis, where my father bought his wagons. Then we took steamer for Kanesville, the out-fitting point for the Saints at that time, now called Council Bluffs. We remained here for several days preparing for our long journey across the plains. “I was too young to remember many of the details of the trip, but my father has told me that we arrived in Salt Lake Valley soon after October Conference and camped in what was known as “Big Field. After a week’s rest, we started for Parowan, but when we reached Salt Creek (now Nephi) my Aunt Margaret Davis, in getting out of her wagon, sprained her ankle. My folks and those with us decided to remain in Salt Creek. They were all tired of traveling, having been on the way since January 8, and it was late in the fall of 1851. “Salt Creek, or Nephi, had just been settled. Charles Sperry, Israel Hoyt, T.B. Foot, Zimiri Baxter had been there to cut hay but they had gone back to Salt Lake for their families. Our family and the Davis family were the first families on the ground. My sister, Margaret and cousin Charlotte Davies and myself were the fist white children in Nephi.” The melting chimney The family lived in their wagons until a cabin could be built. Their first home was put up on the Jeffries lot where the poultry plant now stands. The early comers cooperated constantly in getting their cabins up before each was best adapted. [?] And so it was that Charles Sperry was assigned to do the mason work on the chimneys. He did this part of the work on the Grace’s cabin. The weather made it possible to get it completed and ready for Christmas. In high spirits Elizabeth set about planning the Christmas dinner. They moved their things into the “little prairie palace” and Elizabeth got the food supplies assembled to prepare the Christmas dinner. While the food was cooking in the fireplace suspended from the pothooks, she improvised a table by placing Isaac’s tool chest on some boxes, which served as legs. Just as the dinner was about cooked and ready to serve, the chimney adobes came tumbling helter-skelter into the fireplace, burying pots and kettle with the precious Christmas dinner. In tears of disappointment, Elizabeth and her young family trudged back to the bleak wagons where they had to stay until the fallen chimney had been rebuilt. The catastrophe was caused by the melting of the adobes, which had been made in the frosty weather. The hot fire melted the adobes into soft mud and the mass of debris poured out into the room. Elizabeth as a pioneer homemaker Quoting from an article by Ramona Wilcox Cannon in the Relief Society Magazine for July 1927: “Sister Grace gave birth to a frail baby girl who was christened Harriet Ann, and soon was called by the name of Etta. She was the first white girl born in Nephi, though a white boy baby had shortly preceded her. “Although the Grace family endured the hardships of the frontier in those early days, they never suffered from actual hunger, nor want of clothing. Sister Grace had been saving up clothes for years before leaving for Zion, so that she always had something on hand to make over for every necessity, Brother Grace was a good provider. His training as a shipbuilder stood him in hand in the growing colony. He could adapt his skill to anything in the line of carpentry and so was constantly in demand. Money was a scarce commodity, but food was welcome pay enough. “Sister Grace, being a tailoress, was a good teacher for her girls, and was able to make suits for her husband and sons that anyone might have envied. She made the suits of Jeans cloth. This, of course, was homespun, and was heavier than ordinary fabric for men’s clothes. “Of scraps of this same material, Sister Grace made shoes for her family. Of course, the children went barefoot, when the weather permitted, but in fall and winter they needed shoes. So their mother cut the jeans cloth to fit the feet of the various children and then carried them to the shoemaker, who provided soles and toe-caps. The family members were very proud of the footwear in blue, gray or brown. Perhaps it even matched the suit or dress.” According to Harriet, her mother was a good cook. She could concoct something savory even when raw materials were very sparse. For instance, she created delicious pies made from native currants that the children helped pick from the canyons. There were tasty vinegar pies as well, made long before lemons were seen in the valley. And custard pies! Isaac’s skills put to wide use During the early days Isaac, because of his knowledge of use of tools, was asked to help in building a flourmill in Manti. Brother George Bradley said to Isaac, “Now, Brother Grace, we haven’t any money but we will pay you in flour.” In those days most of the work was done with oxen so yokes had to be made, likewise farm implements, so Isaac applied his knowledge to the making and stalking of plows. He also made rollers, harrow, hayracks, looms and cheese presses. There was a spirit of community cooperation; as Isaac built such things for other families, the men for whom he made these things repaid him in work. Isaac was noticeably adaptable to any and all of these situations in which he found himself. He was a lover of stock and he raised horses cattle and sheep. It was a custom each spring and fall to have horse and cattle drives. Frequently, disputes would arise as to the ownership of the animals, especially if the brands were not plainly distinguishable. Isaac often acted as an arbitrator in these disputes. Other illustrations of his capabilities developed in his early training, were the arts of penmanship and discipline of bookkeeping. Knowing of his ability, Bishop Bryan appointed him to care for the tithing affairs while he was absent on a short mission. Another responsibility that he willingly assumed was to build his allotted portion of the Fort Wall, which was designated by the committee. Likewise, when it came to the work of fencing the field lands, each landowner would be required to build so many rods of fence according to the acreage inside the enclosure. In all activities incident to developing the resources of the little pioneer town, Isaac was always able to perform what was needed. His varied interests led him to start a nail factory in conjunction with Samuel Adams. It was among the first in the state, with the first nails coming from iron in the wagons of Johnson’s army. The wagons had carried supplies to the army and were sold cheap. With a slice of inspiration mixed with innovation, Isaac bought many of the wagons and removed the metal from them to make nails. Their factory was located in Nephi on second east between first and second south; between the old millrace and the Bishop Warner home. Isaac helped in the construction of the Tabernacle and the old Social Hall. The roofing on both buildings was made of heavy timbers and each building was framed together with pins instead of nails. The Friendship House Sometime during the interim between the years 1852-1857, the family moved from their first little cabin to an adobe house situated on the corner directly west of the County Court House. It was here that the sixth little daughter, Celestia Jane, first saw the light of day. The story goes that her mother was hoping for a son, and when she was told that it was a girl she exclaimed, “ Oh! Put her back!” Of course they loved her dearly, and three boys eventually came along. During this same period a third home was built on the spot where the City Hall now stands. The very situation of the Main Street house made it a veritable friendship house. Being so easily accessible in the center of town, friends of the family dropped in frequently for a chat, and it was a gathering place for old and young. The friendly latchstring was always out to passersby. This home was one like Edgar Guest describes so beautifully in his poem “Home.” For a “heap o’ living” did go on within its walls.* 
 In August of the year 1857, one event occurred which brought to Isaac and Elizabeth the congratulations of their many friends. A certain Sunday morning a baby boy came to live with them. [Is this language a quote?] This gift was looked upon as a very precious gift because the Grace family had six little girls all in a row and this was their first boy. Their friends were so pleased over the Graces’ good fortune that an announcement was made in Sunday meeting of the new baby’s arrival and after the services the whole congregation went to the home to see the new baby, named for his father, Isaac. The rest of the Lizzie’s babies came to them there, their two other sons, John William and Charles Howard, and a daughter Emma Lorette, who died in infancy. In all, Isaac and Elizabeth were the parents of ten children. They believed implicitly in the law of tithing and obeyed it strictly. In fact, they joked about turning their tenth child in for tithing. In the eyes of their good natured family this joke came as near to reality as possible because he was eventually sustained as a bishop of the Nephi North Ward. A New Years Day ride Supporting such a large family in the barren frontier of the Great Basin was no easy task. Even with Isaac’s many capabilities, the work was backbreaking and unrelenting. As is true on any farm with livestock and crops, chores still had to be done every day, even in the winter. Isaac’s granddaughter, Helen Hoyt, relates this story that came down through her father, Isaac Henry. “You know, back in the early day people of course, had to make their own fun. They had to plan on something they could do that would work out. Well, it happened that the little boys, young boys, all on a New Years Day or any holiday, they loved to go riding. To have a pony, you know, and go riding. That was the highlight of the day to them. Now, as it happened, Grandpa Grace, he was quite a stern man, papa used to say, for instance, on New Years morning, everything had to go…they must forget the holidays on New Years morning. Starting life anew. They had to be up early! And they had to work all that day and all that. He was quite stern. But anyway, on this particular New Year’s morning, Uncle Will, - I think Uncle Charles was too little – but Uncle Will and Papa, oh, they wanted to go with the boys! All the boys in town would just ride for hours, all around the area, you know. They just loved it. Well, this New Year’s morning, Grandpa, of course, he was up early and going about his work. I think they had some horses up there in the yard, and they were going to put them out, don’t you know, to feed and so on, he told them, to put them out. Oh, Papa’s heart went down to his shoes because he thought he wouldn’t be able to ride on New Year’s Day. But just as they were about to open the corral gate to let the horses out, Grandpa said, ‘Oh say, it IS New Years day, maybe you boys would like a pony to ride.’ Well, of course that just changed the day for them! They were just happy!” Such were the simple pleasures of young and old alike, and the appreciation of a son many decades after the act of kindness of a father was rendered. Elizabeth, the jovial, optimistic individualist or, “I am determined to go to heaven happy. Elizabeth possessed a number of characteristics that illustrated she was capable of meeting the exigencies of pioneer life. She was noticeably individualistic and unafraid to express her opinions, but even so she was a peacemaker among her companions. She was jovial and optimistic. She loved friends and prized their good will and tried to be worthy of their confidence. An incident that illustrates Elizabeth’s individualism occurred during the time of worrisome Indian troubles. When the little community was threatened by Indian raids, it was customary for all the inhabitants to put out their candles. The little fort would be in utter darkness. Those on guard would watch for flickering tell-tale candles, go to the house and order the candles to be snuffed out. One night a light shown through Elizabeth’s window. The guard, who was Father Cazier, warned her of the danger. It seems she was making a cup of tea. She said to him, “Well, Brother Cazie, if my time has come I am determined to go to heaven happy. I must have my cup of tea.” And she did. “Look here, you old frump!” Because of Elizabeth’s’s cheeriness she was a welcome visitor in a sickroom. Once, however, when she called to see Sister Miranda Cazier Bryan who was gravely ill, those who were nursing Sister Bryan said, “Sh-sh, you mustn’t speak above a whisper she is very low.” It has been observed that humor is the instinct for taking pain playfully. Elizabeth knew how to use humor, even in painful situations. Disregarding the anxiety of the women around her, she went to the bed and said jovially, “Look here, you old frump, you can’t die until you make Charles that promised suit of clothes.” This remark brought a smile to the wan, still face of Sister Bryan. She roused a little from a semi-stupor and that hour proved to be the turning point. Sister Bryan made a comeback and recovered and kept her promise. At the time of Charles’s birth Sister Bryan said to Elizabeth, “Sister Grace, if you will name the baby for my husband, I’ll make him a suit of clothes.” Her husband’s name was Charles Hinkle Bryan. Grandmother named her baby Charles Howard. His first name and initials were identical so Sister Bryan lived and Uncle Charles got the little suit of clothes. Elizabeth’s mettle is tried anew after Isaac’s death Although Elizabeth enjoyed a joke and had the happy faculty of seeing the funny side of a situation, yet when a serious problem confronted her she was able to meet it competently. Her son-in-law, Harry, recalls, “My dear wife’s father, Isaac Grace, died, 51 years of age [from] consumption of the bowls. He was a man highly respected in the community and a most useful man. The stern realities of life fell upon my dear mother-in-law. She felt most keenly the loss of her beloved husband. Her sons were quite young, (ages thirteen, eleven and six) and unable to manage the affairs of the farm. They were willing and obedient boys and it was wonderful what these little boys accomplished with a little help that Brother James Jenkins and I gave them and they are today leading citizens of the state, and like their parents and sisters are highly respected….[Henry F. McCune biography] Elizabeth controlled the family affairs with good judgment. Her children respected her authority, but felt sometimes that she kept the thumbscrews of that authority down just a bit too tight. Whether they were working for her on the farm or took another job independently they never had a penny to spend without her sanction until they were twenty years of age. This rigid training no doubt seemed a bit hard. On the other hand, it taught them to have more appreciation for the value of a dollar and to conserve the resources of a life with fair judgment. As a result of this training the boys became quite resourceful as they grew up and were better able to appropriate their resources to a better advantage. [–add more detail??] Elizabeth was active in the field of women’s work in the church organizations. Particularly in the Relief Society and choir. The choir often met at the Grace home for practices. Both Isaac and Elizabeth had very sweet voices and were faithful choir members. She had charge of the Relief Society singing for many years. As a choir member her judgment was invaluable in the choosing of hymns, which fit in appropriately with the thoughts expressed in the sermons. In those days the members of the community filled every role that living required of them. The spirit of neighborliness continued to be one of Elizabeth’s characteristics. In case of death she would assist in making the burial clothes and in the preparation of the body or in doing whatever else she could to aid the stricken family. On one such occasion she was away from home all day and it so happened that her eldest boy, then eight years of age, was to be baptized. She left word with his sister just older than himself to get the clothing ready for the baptismal service. When the little girl examined the pants she found they were in need of patching. All she could find in the piece bag, which she thought would do for such a patch was a piece of bright red flannel…when her young brother came out of the water everybody laughed and the little boy wondered what it was all about. Of course, it was the conspicuous patch on the front of the pants that caused the merriment among the bystanders. The Grace Sense of Humor Certainly, those early pioneers needed all the humor they could gather. Henry Ward Beecher observed, “A person without a sense of humor is like a wagon without springs. It’s jolted by every pebble on the road.” Pioneer life was filled with pebbles and chuckholes and rocks galore. To their credit, the Grace sense of humor has become a legacy down through the generations. Even as Elizabeth aged, her sense of humor remained intact. Elizabeth’s surprise for Isaac Henry’s wedding Isaac and Elizabeth’s granddaughter, Helen Hoyt tells this story: “My parents were married in the winter time, on the 19th of January. Oh, yes, I remember, I was there! As Papa used to say, I was up in heaven making faces at them! But here’s the thing that was funny. They went to the Endowment House in Salt Lake, you know, and I’ve heard them say that it was just a beautiful day, a lovely day, snow on the ground, the sun was shining, just a beautiful day. Well, anyway, they didn’t get home until late at night. The train didn’t get back until way after dark, in the winter time, you know, and so Papa was kind of hoping that Grandma would have a meal for them, or something to eat, and so on, and he was kind of hoping that she would have his brothers and sisters in to spend the evening. “When they walked up from the station, the house was as dark as the ace of spades, and they finally went around to the back to the little back kitchen. There sat Grandma Grace with an old friend, Brother Cunnaly, and they had just a little – one little bit of a lamp burning, you know, and Papa got madder every minute, I’ve heard him say. He was just so disgusted to think that Grandma didn’t have some food ready for them. And there this old couple sat, Brother Cunnaly and Grandma chatting in the kitchen. And papa got – Oh, I have heard him tell it, it was just so funny! – he kept getting madder and madder inside, so he jerked off his overcoat and opened the door to the next room to take his overcoat, turned up the lights, and there was the whole family! With the table all set and everything! “Mama said that she has often wondered and wondered how the women managed to keep the babies quiet. And when they came around there wasn’t a sound! And all the blinds were drawn tight, you know, and they put down the lamps so low that they didn’t show. Years ago they used to have blinds that were very dark – they didn’t have light blinds like we do today. Well, the folks were taken aback when they opened that door, and the lights came on, and there the table was all set and the family all there!” The Three Graces Growing up in a home where humor was valued set the tone for all the children as well as future generations. Helen also relates this story: “Back in those days people had to prepare for their own fun. So at one time there was going to be a show by the youth, and the program was all printed, and among the things that were listed was “The Three Graces”. The president of the YLMIA 2nd Ward in Nephi, Ella Chase Cole, thought it would make a lot of fun to show the three Grace brothers as the Three Graces. She knew that it must not leak out, that would ruin it, you know. So anyway, I don’t think she even told her counselors about it, or anybody else, but she had this thought in mind. She went to the folks and asked them if they would take part in the tableau. Back in that day and time they had tableaus, and they were very pretty and very effective. Well, anyway, the three brothers consented, and they were willing, but she just kept that hushed up so that nobody knew, except she and the three Grace Brothers. “So anyway, the night of the party, Mama and I were sitting in the audience and a little lady sitting in back of us had her two little girls ask, “ Mama, what are ‘The Three Graces?’ And their mama said, ‘Well, they are three beautiful young women, and they represent Faith, Hope and Charity, and we read about them in the Bible, so you’ll be seeing three lovely girls when that tableau comes on.’ So of course these little kids were interested in looking, you know. “Well, of course back in that day and time, they had these draw curtains, and when the tableau happened, and there were those three men, kneeling, back of the sacrament stand, your Grandfather, Uncle Harry, just threw both hands up and, my land, he could hardly quit laughing…. I think Uncle Will Grace was about the shiest of the three, and a little more reticent, you know, and retiring, and my land, he felt so embarrassed he just ducked his head behind the rail! But there they stood back of the sacrament table. Well, the people, they just roared! The hall was in an uproar!” [both stories taken from incomplete document, hand-typed with no date - found among Florence’s files] No Regrets Elizabeth’s biographer made this final observation on her life: “Although Grandmother had come from the old Country where she had been used to comforts, she never once murmured or regretted that she had left her old home. She was always grateful that she was in Zion where she could rear her children in the way she felt would have been impossible in the Old World. And though her responsibilities were mainly due to the early death of her husband, she met all these situations with fortitude and success. She never faltered and as a result, her children grew up to honor her and the Gospel and all were faithful members of the church for which she and Isaac gave their life. In conclusion, it is to be hoped that as the years go by that their descendants may ever have the desire to follow the gleam of the Gospel light, to honor and obey it, and in so doing, pay an ever-growing and fitting tribute to this worthy pioneer couple.” *Almost this entire history is taken from an incomplete and yellowed manuscript found in Florence’s files with a note attached from her sister Margaret: Note from Margaret “This is a story of my great-grandfather and great- grandmother, Isaac and Elizabeth Grace. It was probably written by Helen Grace Hoyt, daughter of Isaac junior.” Margaret Musser Applequist Also, a note on stationary attached to the manuscript: Hi! Found it! I think it is rather nice. Helen Hoyt was always a great one for being able to recall connections by blood and marriage. She used to recite relatives by the hour. I heard her clarifying a relationship for Aunt Florence and Mother one time. Fun! **Other facts are integrated from genealogical sheets and the biography of Elizabeth Grace MuCune as well as her husband’s biography, Henry Frederick McCune. ***[although Genealogical records report this marriage as occurring on January 2, 1843, their daughter Elizabeth Grace was born on July 27th, 1843, so it is most likely the marriage took place in 1842] Also included in the biography: Geneology Parents of Isaac Grace: John Grace and Margaret Abbott Of Liverpool, England Married July 24, 1814 at Walton, (near Liverpool) Source: parish records Isaac Grace Born: April 17, 1820, Liverpool, England Died: May 25, 1871, Nephi, Utah Parents of Elizabeth Williams Evans: John Williamas Evans Ann Jones From Beaumaris, Anglesea Co. Wales Elizabeth Williams Evans Grace Born: April 29 1822, Liverpool, England Died: Feb. 3, 1899, Nephi, Utah It takes a heap o' livin' in a house t' make it home,
A heap o' sun an' shadder, an' ye sometimes have t' roam
Afore ye really 'preciate the things ye lef' behind,
An' hunger fer 'em somehow, with 'em allus on yer mind.
It don't make any differunce how rich ye get t' be,
How much yer chairs an' tables cost, how great yer luxury;
It ain't home t' ye, though it be the palace of a king,
Until somehow yer soul is sort o' wrapped round everything. Home ain't a place that gold can buy or get up in a minute;
Afore it's home there's got t' be a heap o' livin' in it;
Within the walls there's got t' be some babies born, and then
Right there ye've got t' bring 'em up t' women good, an' men;
And gradjerly as time goes on, ye find ye wouldn't part
With anything they ever used—they've grown into yer heart:
The old high chairs, the playthings, too, the little shoes they wore
Ye hoard; an' if ye could ye'd keep the thumb-marks on the door. Ye've got t' weep t' make it home, ye've got t' sit an' sigh
An' watch beside a loved one's bed, an' know that Death is nigh;
An' in the stillness o' the night t' see Death's angel come,
An' close the eyes o' her that smiled, an' leave her sweet voice dumb.
Fer these are scenes that grip the heart, an'when yer tears are dried,
Ye find the home is dearer than it was, an' sanctified;
An' tuggin' at ye always are the pleasant memories
O' her that was an' is no more—ye can't escape from these. Ye've got t' sing an' dance fer years, ye've got t' romp an' play,
An' learn t' love the things ye have by usin' 'em each day;
Even the roses 'round the porch must blossom year by year
Afore they 'come a part o' ye, suggestin' someone dear
Who used t' love 'em long ago, an' trained 'em jes t' run
The way they do, so's they would get the early mornin' sun;
Ye've got t' love each brick an' stone from cellar up t' dome:
It takes a heap o' livin' in a house t' make it home.


from Collected Verse of Edgar Guest
NY:Buccaneer Books, 1976, pg. 12

Life Timeline of Isaac Grace

1820
Isaac Grace was born on 17 Apr 1820
Isaac Grace was 12 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
See More
Isaac Grace was 20 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
See More
Isaac Grace was 39 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
See More
Isaac Grace was 41 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
1861
See More
Isaac Grace died on 25 May 1871 at the age of 51
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Isaac Grace (17 Apr 1820 - 25 May 1871), BillionGraves Record 2056494 Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States

Loading