Thomas Freestone

10 May 1795 - Sep 1858

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Thomas Freestone

10 May 1795 - Sep 1858
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Rhoda Freestone is the second wife of John Wesley Vance Rhoda Freestone Vance was born December 24, 1844 at Huntsville, Harden County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Thomas Freestone and Ann Fall. Thomas and family joined the church in 1840. They were Methodists before hearing the gospel. They starte
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Life Information

Thomas Freestone

Born:
Died:

Alpine Cemetery

283 N 300 E
Alpine, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

wife - Ann Killed by Indians
Transcriber

smithc

May 31, 2012
Photographer

B Hold

May 31, 2012

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Rhoda Freestone

Contributor: smithc Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Rhoda Freestone is the second wife of John Wesley Vance Rhoda Freestone Vance was born December 24, 1844 at Huntsville, Harden County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Thomas Freestone and Ann Fall. Thomas and family joined the church in 1840. They were Methodists before hearing the gospel. They started for Zion August 1852. They sold their little farm for a light wagon and hitched up two unbroken cows and put all their belongings in it. They averaged about 12 miles per day. The weather was very bad most of the way. On Christmas day they arrived at Pisgah, Iowa. By this time their food supply was practically gone. Rhoda's mother Ann looked out of the wagon and saw a large flock of turkey nearing the wagon. She called her husband and he hurriedly grabbed his gun and shot one large turkey. They knew they had been greatly blessed. It was the only turkeys they had seen during the entire journey. The found what work they could and were paid in corn meal and beef. As soon as weather permitted they continued to Council Bluffs and arrived there in April. Rhoda said she could remember looking back when she was walking in the snow, leaving blood at every step as her shoes were worn out. She walked almost the entire 1000 miles. Only when she was exhausted was she put on the back of one of their faithful animals that she might be relieved for a while. One night when they spent the night on the Platte River, she awoke in the morning with a high fever. It had rained all night. Water was running under her bed which was made on the ground. Her mother took one look at her and pronounced her trouble - measles. It was at Council Bluff that a company of 50 wagons were organized and on June 10 1853 they started for Salt Lake City, arriving in the valley the middle of September 1853 They lived at American Fork for one year and then moved to Mountainville, which later became known as Alpine. Rhoda well remembered when the grasshoppers came and the rescue by the seagulls. Her mother joined the Saints and beat the grasshoppers until she fell exhausted. She had a nursing baby at the time. Food was so scarce they lived on greens for some time - pigweeds being the main source. When Rhoda was between the age of 13 and 14 she did house work to supplement their meager income. She worked in the home of Major John Wesley Vance at the time his wife had a baby. One night, with his wife's permission, the Major asked Rhoda to go to the dance with him, as he played the violin for the dances. The Major's wife Angelia insisted she wear her nice dress. We can imagine the rugged character of these wonderful women when we find that Angelia later made the wedding dress for Rhoda after consenting to the marriage of her husband to this lovely girl. This marriage took place when Rhoda was only fifteen years of age. It was on November 17, 1859, And again on 2 March 1861. I do not know why they were sealed twice, except in the early days of the church the members had ordinances performed again that were out of order.) To this union two sons and a daughter were born. James Wesley was the eldest, then Frances and the youngest, George Frank. When George Frank was but an infant, Major John Wesley was killed by the Indians in an ambush. Sorrow struck a cruel blow again when little Frank passed away, from diphtheria. Her son James Wesley proved to be a faithful and noble son. From the time of his father's death he took care of his mother. Rhoda made her home with her son and family until her death and a devoted daughter could never have given more care or love than Lilly Darnell Vance given to her husband's mother. Rhoda was a faithful Latter Day Saint to the end. Although, her life had been one of many hardships, enduring poor health for the last fifteen or twenty years of her life, she was never heard to complain.

Thomas Freestone history by Angus H. Belliston

Contributor: smithc Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Thomas Freestone, was born in Flixton, Suffolk, England, on 19 May 1795 [Christening record]. [The 1850 census says he was age 50 which must have been an error]. The memorial #8408975 on findagrave.com says his birth date is May 10, 1795.There are several different reports of death dates in 1858: July, Sept and 26 Oct. On Find-a-grave.com the memorial headstone says Sept. 1858. It is not known the exact day or place where he was buried. Read story below for details. This was found in "Pioneer Stories". It was written by Angus H. Belliston with a few modifications and additions by Sharon H. Jewkes. In about 1825 Thomas left England to emigrate to Prince Edward Island, Canada. on 1 August 1836, Thomas, now forty-two years old, married Ann Fall, age twenty-four. Ann was born in England, too, on 6 August 1812 in Aldborough, Yorkshire, and had moved to Prince Edward Island with her parents in about 1818. Ann was a gentle, religious, refined lady. This couple sought to improve their fortunes by moving in 1840 to the U.S.A. They settled on a farm in central Ohio. Life was good for these faithful Methodists. They loved the soil which they farmed, and prospered modestly for a few years while their children were being born . . . George in 1838, James in 1840, Elizabeth Ann in 1842, Rhoda in 1844, Phoebe Ellen in 1847 (she died as an infant), Mary in 1848 (died before Jul 1850), Johanna in 1849, Emma Sarah in 1852 and Jane Marie in 1855 . . . nine children in all, of which seven lived to adulthood. The LDS missionaries came in 1850 and the family joined the church. In about 1851 they lost their farm, which had been mortgaged to pay for a season of severe illness. In 1852, they felt the spirit of gathering to Zion, sold another small acreage they had and all their other possessions, acquired a wagon and, in late summer, joined the Saints who were heading west. They struggled through fall rains and mud and reached Mt. Pisgah in Iowa in a snowstorm on Christmas Day. The family stayed in Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, over the winter of 1852-53, and finally, with help from kind fellow Saints, arrived in deep poverty at Winter Quarters. On their journey, Thomas and older boys had worked at anything they could do for food or money to sustain them. When they reached Council Bluffs in the spring, they found an emigrating company nearly ready to leave for the West. Again they found help from other Saints, quickly acquired an outfit and supplies, and joined them. In late 1853 they arrived in American Fork. One year later the family moved to "Mountainville" (later named Alpine) where they lived in the fort for protection against the Indians, while they began to re-establish their affairs. Exerting all their efforts, they partially overcame their hunger by eating roots, pigweed and wild onions, and beat back enough crickets to raise a full crop of grain. In spite of their many trials the hardy family hung on to their testimonies and endured. In 1858, the Freestone family had been in Utah five years. Thomas was sixty-three years old. The family discussed the possibility of moving to another location where they might find more security. Thomas went to Southern Utah on a scouting mission, probably looking for a new family location. Stories that have been handed down in the Freestone family are: An Indian later found Thomas Freestone after he had been stoned, mutilated and in extreme pain. The Indian felt he would do him a favor by killing him and ending the pain. The Indian killed him, then wrapped him in his blankets and buried him. This Indian sent a message to Ann Fall Freestone or went in person to tell her that her husband was dead by the hand of the Indians and had been killed and buried near Parowan, Iron County, Utah. As far as we know no white man knows where the grave of Thomas Freestone is. It is stated that the Indians had a plot to kill the first white man who crossed a certain trail and he was that man. The older boys became the providers for the growing family. Three years later George married and left home. Four years after Thomas' death, Ann visited with her bishop about their difficult circumstances. He advised her to marry again and introduced her to a man named Andrew Hodnett. The two went to the Endowment House in Salt Lake City and were married the very next day. Hodnett proved to be a good provider for the family. With the unmarried children, they moved to Orderville and put all their sheep into the United Order (retrieving them again later when the Order failed). Ann's health and eyesight failed in her later years and she moved back to Alpine to live in the home of her youngest daughter. She died there on Christmas day in 1888, at age seventy-six.

THOMAS FREESTONE HISTORY

Contributor: smithc Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

by Eva Whitby Lamb, Sept 1999 Thomas Freestone was born 19 May 1795 in Flixton, Suffolk, England the son of George Freestone and Ann Youngman. Thomas was the 4th of 10 children born to his parents. He was described as being dark of complexion, with dark eyes and brows and a serious countenance. He was a strong man, of medium height and blessed with good health. He worked as a gardener, a **** builder and a farmer. A restless person, he was always looking for new frontiers to conquer. When Thomas' older sister Sarah and her husband, William Ward, planned to emigrate to Canada, Thomas joined them on the exciting adventure. They made the voyage about 1835. They came to a country which was green, peaceful and prosperous. On Prince Edward Island Thomas met Ann Fall. She had come to Canada with her family when she was just a child. He was attracted to this intelligent and independent young woman. She was tall, had dark eyes and was a gentle, loyal woman. She was always referred to as a very religious person. They were married 1 Aug 1837 at Craupaud, Prince Edward Island. He was 41 and she 24 years of age. Their first child George was born 13 Aug 1838 on Prince Edward Island. Soon afterwards Thomas and Ann made plans to make a new life on the frontier of the United States. Even though they were expecting their second child they made arrangements to emigrate to the undeveloped but rich and fertile Ohio Valley. They booked passage on a ship, bade farewell to their relatives, and sailed along the east coast bound for Boston, Mass. Just before the ship made port a son James was born 5 May 1840. The couple with their two little boys made their way to Huntersville, Hardin, Ohio. In 1841 they secured 40 acres of land and set about making a home and a farm. On 26 Jan 1842 Elizabeth was born, Rhoda on 30 Dec 1844 and Phoebe in July 1847. However Phoebe did not live long. She died in September. In the succeeding years they had a lot of illness. They had worked hard to improve their land, but with all the debts incurred they mortgaged their farm and then finally had to sell it in 1848. The family moved to Sandusky, Erie, Ohio most likely to seek employment, since Thomas was not a city man at heart. In this city Johannah was born 16 June 1849. As soon as it was financially possible, they returned to the soil, the environment they loved. They purchased 20 acres in the same locality as their former home, and set about once more to make a new home and farm. At this time the Freestones were of the Methodist faith. James, age nine, went to live with neighbors to work for his board. He wrote in his history that although only a small boy, he frequently went into the nearby woods to pray to ask his Father if He had a people on the earth, that he, James, might be able to find them. It was at this time and while he was in this state of mind, that two Mormon missionaries came into the neighborhood and were preaching their message of the restoration of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Meetings were being held every night in the local school house near where James was living, and he went to hear them. The next day he went home and told his mother of the meeting. She agreed to go with him, and both mother and son were converted. Ann was baptized 10 Nov 1850. Thomas took a little longer to gain his testimony, but was finally baptized the following April 1851. A daughter Emma was born to Thomas and Ann 30 May 1852. Following the pattern of faith, after baptism the spirit of gathering entered their hearts. Acting on their keen desire to get to Zion, a distance of 1700 miles, as soon as possible, and unaware of the hardships and suffering they would encounter, in 1852 they sold their farm for a light wagon. They had been told that Mormon immigrants used cows as beasts of burden to draw their wagons, so they hitched their unbroken, untrained, and unwilling cows to the wagon. When their belongings were in the wagon, each small child accounted for, the mother seated as comfortably as possible with the baby Emma in her arms, Thomas gathered up the lines and their historic trek began. It was late summer of 1852 and Thomas was 56 years of age and Ann was 40. It soon started to rain, making the dirt roads most difficult for cows and driver and others who walked. They traveled about 12 miles per day. It was am exceedingly wet fall. Day after day they traveled through rain and mud, weary and sick from being wet most of the time. They reached Pisgah on Christmas Day in a snow storm. The Saints they found at Pisgah were travelers like themselves who had stopped for rest. They had little to share with the Freestones. They were then one hundred miles from Council Bluffs. Winter had set in, the cold was intense. They had no money and Thomas worked around a little to get food to feed his family. Ann wrote a letter to the President of the Branch at Council Bluffs telling of their financial plight. She was afterwards told that when her letter was read in the meeting many tears were shed. The President wrote back and told the family that if they could get to Council Bluffs, the Branch would help them get through to Utah. They stayed at Pisgah a portion of the winter, then moved twenty miles to Winterset. The two young boys, George and James, cut saw logs and husked corn for work and were paid in corn meal and fat beef. Thomas did whatever work he could get. Since one of their cows had died during the winter, Thomas hitched a two year old heifer with the other cow, and the family started early in the spring, reaching Council Bluffs in April. In Council Bluffs they were assigned to the last company organized to go to Utah that year. They were given a more tripworthy wagon. They started on 10 June 1853. Some of the rules and regulations adopted by this group of emigrating Saints while camped on the west bank of the Missouri river were: The camp will be called together at the sound of the trumpet morning and evening for public prayer... When a general attendance is expected, except for those whose camp duties require them to be absent....The corral will not be broken nor any wagon moved from the ground until all the cattle are yoked...We remain in camp on Sundays....meetings at 10:00 a.m. Johanna later said she had a little corner in the wagon where she sat and watched the activity in the rear. James wrote that it was a good company they traveled with. He drove sheep with a man. They had a horse between them. George said that he drove two yoke of four oxen on a heavily loaded freighter wagon across the plains. The captain of the company was Daniel Miller, under the direction of John W. Cooley. Both men were spoken of with high esteem. They arrived in Utah Territory 9 Sept 1853. The following arrived that day: two companies - 282 persons, 27 horses, 470 cattle, 153 cattle, 153 sheep, 70 wagons. The Freestones went to American Fork, Utah Co. and lived one year and then moved to Mountainville, later renamed Alpine. Times were hard for the family, a condition with which they were familiar. It was the time of crickets and grasshoppers and Indian troubles. The first winter the family lived almost entirely on pig weeds and greens. They felt very fortunate when they had a pot of wild onions for soup. Thomas and his sons worked a great deal on a fort President Young had recommended that they build for safety from the Indians. The family fought the crickets every day, and they were the only family in Alpine to raise wheat to maturity and to harvest it. Another child joined the family, Jane, born 1 Dec 1855. In 1857 the U.S. government sent an army to Utah known as Johnston's Army to "conquer the Mormons or annihilate them." All able bodied men stood guard in Echo Canyon and elsewhere to prevent the army from entering the territory. The next year in 1858, largely through the good offices of Colonel Thomas E. Kane, a non-Mormon, and a friend of Brigham Young, this army was allowed to peacefully enter the valley, but not to stop in any of the settlements and to set up camp at Camp Floyd, west of Utah Lake. The tension eased and the Saints who had moved to Utah County started returning to Salt Lake City. Exploring groups returned with reports that the area of St. George, Utah's Dixie, was fertile, well watered and of very mild climate. Groups were settling in Toquerville, Parowan and Beaver. Four years had passed since Thomas and Ann had settled in what they had hoped would be a peaceful home of plenty for themselves and their family. It had however, been a time of tension, fear and unrest, so they now discussed the possibility of looking for another home that might give them the security which they so very much desired. Thomas was 63 years of age. He bade a tender farewell to his wife and children, and left for southern Utah. In the vicinity of Parowan in July 1858, he left whatever group he was with and never returned. It was learned afterward that he had been stoned to death by Indians. Stories that have been handed down in the Freestone family are that the Indians of that area were in a very unfriendly state of mind. They had a pact among themselves that the life of any white man that crossed a given point on their well-worn trail would be forfeit. Of course Thomas was not aware of this agreement, and alone, he had calmly crossed that point of the trail. The evidence suggests that Thomas was first wounded by an arrow that struck him in the back. The redmen then fled, fearing that the white man would have friends nearby. One Indian lingered nearby, and when no friends appeared, he returned to find Thomas in agonizing pain. According to his best judgement of the total situation he decided to "finish him off", put him out of his misery by killing him with rocks he threw at the sufferer. The Indian wrapped the white man in his bedroll, a single blanket, and buried him in an unmarked grave. This Indian sent a message to Ann or went in person to tell her that her husband was dead by the hand of Indians and had been killed and buried near Parowan. Compiled from various histories 1981 by Eva W. Lamb

Elizabeth Ann Freestone Jensen by Mary Price Larsen, Granddaughter

Contributor: smithc Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Elizabeth Ann Freestone Jensen Life History Compiled by Mary Price Larsen, Granddaughter On a farm in Hunterville, Hardin County, Ohio, on 26 January 1842, a sweet little girl blessed the home of Thomas Freestone and Ann Fall Freestone. They named her Elizabeth Ann Freestone. She had two brothers: George, born 13 August 1838 Prince Edward Island, and James, born 5 May 1840 on board ship near Nebo Light House on American waters. While the family was living in Ohio, four other girls were born in this family: Rhoda, born 27 December 1844 Hunterville, Phoebe Ellen, born July 1847 Hunterville, died September 1847, Johanna, born 16 June 1849 Eyre County, and Emma Sarah, born 30 May 1852 Hunterville. Jane Marie was born 1 December 1855 Alpine, Utah. At the time of Elizabeth’s birth, Ann’s parents had a forty-acre farm in Hunterville, but because of much sickness, they sold the farm to pay their debts and moved to Sandusky, Ohio, for a short time and then they moved back to Hunterville and bought twenty acres. While they were still clearing the land, they heard the message of Mormonism from the traveling missionaries. The family members all believed this message from the missionaries and the ones who were of age were baptized. They were formerly Methodists. Elizabeth Ann’s parents learned that the Mormons worked their cows, so they sold their farmland and bought a light wagon. They hitched two unbroken cows to the wagon, put all their earthly belongs into the wagon, and started the trip to Zion, about seventeen hundred miles away. This was in August of 1852. They traveled about twelve miles per day. Elizabeth Ann was just ten years old and she walked much of the way. They traveled through the mud and rain and arrived in Pisgah, Iowa, on the 25th of December 1852, in a big snowstorm. This was probably a memorable Christmas day for Elizabeth Ann and her family. They stayed in Pisgah most of the winter under very dire circumstances. Elizabeth Ann’s mother wrote a letter to the Branch President in Council Bluffs explaining their plight and asking for help. The letter was read in a meeting causing many to shed tears, but they sent word back that they would help this family. So they moved on for twenty miles farther to a place known as Minstat, and there the boys got work cutting logs and husking corn thus procuring food to feed the family. One of their cows died during the winter, but they had a two-year-old heifer that they hitched up with their other cow and they started early in the spring for Council Bluffs. They arrived there in April and found a company of fifty wagons being organized, so they joined this company. They were loaned a young yoke of cattle to hitch with their two cows, and on the 10th of June 1853, this family started once more for Salt Lake City in the Daniel Miller Company. They arrived on 9 September 1853. They went to American Fork for a year and then moved to Alpine, Utah, where they saw many hard times. The grasshoppers ate nearly everything off of their land. They lived on roots and pigweeds. They suffered Indian attacks before they moved into the fort. When Elizabeth Ann was just fifteen years old, her parents arranged for her to marry John Langston, son of Francis Bell Langston and Elizabeth Heathcoat Langston. He was born 8 March 1822 in London, England. He was twenty years older than Elizabeth Ann and already had another wife, Clearlinda Phillips. Elizabeth married him on 7 March 1857. Two children were born to them: Elizabeth Ellen, born 4 April 1858 (She married Lyman Johnson Swett on 24 July 1877 in Payson, Utah. They had thirteen children and she died 11 December 1926 in Vernal, Utah), and George Heber Langston, born 21 September 1860 in Alpine Utah. (He married Anna Mary Neilsen on 1 January 1884. They had seven children and he died 16 April 1939.) Elizabeth Ann often told her family that she was just a child when she was married. While most of her girlfriends were playing with their dolls, she had two live baby dolls to play with and care for. She never loved John Langston. She lived with him only four years and then divorced him and went to Alpine to live with her mother again. John Langston lived in Rookville, Utah, and died there 3 December 1882. Elizabeth Ann was of medium height and had dark hair and eyes. She was quiet and very religious, which was a trait she received from her mother, Ann Fall, who was the dominating religious influence in the family; it was her faith and courage that kept the family together. She implanted in her children a trust in God and a loyalty to their church. While living with her mother, Elizabeth Ann met and fell in live with Lars Rove Jensen, son of Jens Hansen Rove and Christina Jensen. He was born 3 May 1835 in Frederikshavn, Denmark. He had been married before to Jane Dunsdon* and they had had four children, three of whom were still living. They were Lars Jensen, born 14 February 1858, Thomas Hanson Jensen, born 23 April 1860, Christina Jane Maria Jensen, born 29 September 1861, and Jane Maria Jensen, born 2 November 1863 and died 6 December 1863. Elizabeth Ann and Lars Rove Jensen were married 27 August 1864 and they began their married life with Elizabeth’s two children and Lars Roves three children. Lars’ boys, Lars and Thomas were completely raised by Elizabeth Ann. They paid her this tribute at the time of her death, “She was a wonderful woman; our own mother could not have done more for us or taught us better. We will never forget her teaching.” Lars’ daughter, Christina Maria, lived with them most of the time and with her grandmother part of the time. This is a list of the children born to Elizabeth and Lars: Louis Reuben born March 2 1865, married Kirston Marie Sorensen and had eleven children, Annie Louisa, born 16 April 1867, Married Abinidi Porter and had ten children, died 20 March 1934, William Richard, born 7 October 1868 and died 10 October 1869, Joseph, born 19 February 1870 and died the same day, James Franklin, born 31 March 1872, married Laura Estella Whitmill, had three children before she died at age 29, married Eva Law, had one child. Franklin was accidentally shot and killed 1 September 1917, Leonard Alonzo, born 7 September 1874 and died 7 October 1875. All of these children were born in Alpine, Utah. While the family lived in Alpine, they were active in church and civic affairs. Lars played the violin for dances and was known as “Fiddler Jensen”. Some of his sons also played the violin. Elizabeth Ann read to her children each evening from the Bible. She was a lovely seamstress and made all of the children’s clothing. She made pretty lace curtains for their home. She used to scrub the bare board floors with lye until they were white. She taught her girls how to sew. She was a very spiritual person and she taught her children to be the same. In about 1875, they sold their farm in Alpine and moved to Springlake where they bought another farm. There, Rhoda Laura was born. She later married John McDonald Rider 24 April 1894 in St. George, Utah. They had nine children. She died 1 November 1944. On 24 July 1877, Elizabeth Ellen Langston was married to Lyman Johnson Swett and Christina Maria (daughter of Jane Dunsdon* and Lars Jensen) was also married about that time. Elizabeth Ann and Lars raised produce on their farm and sold it around the valley and sometimes Lars would take the produce to Salt Lake City to sell it. In the fall of 1878, Lars sold their farm in Springlake and took the money and rode away to find them another farm. When he reached Salt Lake City, he met a friend who told Lars about a widow, Agnes Work Smith, who needed someone to pay for the fare of her and her five children from Scotland. Lars said he needed his money to buy a farm, but his friend said, “You don’t need a farm, go to Orderville.” So Lars spent the farm money and paid the fare of widow Smith and her five children. Then he took this Agnes Work Smith (who was born 28 December 1840) to the endowment house on 23 September 1878 and married her. He then took her and her five children back to Springlake with him to live with Elizabeth Ann and their family. This was a heartbreaking time for Elizabeth Ann for she loved Lars very much and had been a faithful wife. In the fall of 1878, Elizabeth Ann and her family and Lars Rove and Agnes Work Smith Jensen and her family all moved to Orderville, Utah, where they lived the United Order for five years. This was a very different life for Elizabeth Ann. The houses were small and built side by side forming four walls like a fort with a large hall in the center. In the mornings everyone was called into the center hall and community prayer was held. Then, they all ate breakfast together at the long table in the center hall. No one was allowed food in their living quarters, but all of the food was prepared in a large kitchen where some of the women worked. There was an orchard and fields of vegetables and cotton where members of the order worked. There was a large herd of cows and sheep. They made their own butter and cheese. There was a factory where some of the women worked and made all of the clothing and blankets. There was a carpentry shop where some of the men worked. At noon, a bell was rung and they all gathered together for dinner at the long table. At night a bugle was sounded and everyone was gathered for supper and evening prayer. All of their meetings were held in the center hall also. Lars Rove herded the sheep just outside the fort. Elizabeth Ann did a lot of spinning and knitting. Reuben worked in the carpenter shop and so did Frank when he was old enough. Annie worked in the factory and in the kitchen. Elizabeth Ann and Lars Rove had two children while they lived in Orderville, Emma Jane, born 3 October 1879 (she married David Louis Price on 29 January 1901, had seven children and died 20 September 1950.), and Robert Samuel Hamilton Jensen, born 22 June 1882 and died 16 July 1883. Lars Rove also had two children with Agnes Wark Smith Jensen while they lived in Orderville, Sarah, born 3 August 1879 and Jane, born 11 March 1882. After five years, there was so much dissatisfaction among the people that they stopped eating together at the long table and each family was given their share of food to use as they saw fit and shortly the United Order broke up completely. Lars Rove decided to move his families to the Provo Bench area. Elizabeth Ann did not go with him and she and her family members were left to make it on their own. In 1885, they moved to Vernal, Utah, where Elizabeth Ann’s brother, George, lived. There they lived in much poverty and distress. While they were in Vernal, Emma Jane, who was just seven years old, had typhoid fever twice and was very ill. Elizabeth Ann and her small daughter, Emma Jane, were isolated in a small shed in back of the house. It wasn’t a suitable place for a sick child. If it had not been for the Lord’s blessings and Elizabeth’s constant care, Emma would surely not have survived. That illness left Emma Jane with a weak heart and other ailments. Elizabeth bought land in Carmel and they stayed there until 19 January 1897, when her children decided to move to Basalt, Idaho. She was compelled to go also. It took five weeks and five days to reach Basalt and the weather was very cold and wet and they had a late spring. The fences needed repair and the ditches needed digging in order to irrigate the crops, so there were no crops planted that year. On 9 July 1897, Elizabeth Ann’s son, James, received a mission call. Elizabeth Ann decided to return to Salt Lake City and do the temple work for more of her dead relatives. Her health was very poor and her hearing was poor, so she did not go to the Temple, but stayed at the home of a Brother Rider. On 26 July, she sent for her husband, Lars Rove. Her heart was broken when he left her and she had missed him very much. She returned to Lakeview with him to stay until the temple reopened. She returned to Salt Lake on the 5th of August 1897 to do temple work. It rained that day and she had a trembling of her heart and could not breath normally, so she went to a doctor in Provo. He told her that her heart was very bad and that she was in critical condition. But she returned to Salt Lake City again and went to the temple and had a blessing. On the 10th of August, she again went to the temple and was blessed and received a bottle of consecrated oil for her ear. On this same day she went to Bountiful with a Sister Porter and visited there for a week and returned to Salt Lake on the 17th of August. On 13 October 1897, she went through the temple with her son, James, as he received his endowments. He left that same day on the train for his mission. In March 1898, she received word that her other son, Lewis R. Jensen, had also been called on a mission. Later that year, during the first part of November, she went to Vineyard to see her husband again but became very ill. On 27 November 1898, Elizabeth Ann passed away in Vineyard of ill health and a broken heart for her beloved husband, Lars Rove Jensen. She suffered loneliness from the time Lars married Agnes. She is buried in Alpine, Utah. Lars Rove must have loved her because he requested that he be buried by her side in the Alpine Cemetery. When Elizabeth could not sleep at night, she would compose poetry, prose and songs. She had several books full of her compositions. Her writing show what a kind and thoughtful and patient and faithful woman she was.

Thomas Freeston, The Man

Contributor: smithc Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

By Elsie Maughan Belliston Acknowledgement: This is a brief history of my revered great grandfather. The writing of it has been a labor of love. From it I have become acquainted with a noble spirit. He is my friend. Thomas Freestone is the patriarch of the first family of Freestone (so far as our family research has gone) who, with his equally noble wife, Ann Fall Freestone, accepted and lived the Gospel of Jesus Christ. I am his descendant through their eldest son George and his wife Alice Carlisle. My mother is the second daughter. Her name was Mary. The George Freestones were blessed with four daughters. Alice, Mary, Rhoda, and Drucilla. I truly came of goodly parentage to the first generation. Deep appreciation is here expressed to: Clara F. Seeman for her great book “The Freestone Family”; to Hattie Jensen Price for her history “Ann Fall”; to Lillian Millett for her help to Mrs. Price in the preparation of the “Ann Fall” history; and for material both written and oral which Lillian has given to me. And finally to my mother for the history-stories she often told her children and for the love she instilled in us for “her people” the Freestones. How she loved her tender-hearted father George; her gentle mother Alice who died when mother was four years old; her dear sisters Alice, Rhoda, and little Drucilla who died at age eleven years. Although the Maughans lived far removed geographically in northern Cache Valley she never slackened in her love for them. To me mother’s childhood home, Alpine, Utah, is a place apart. Clara F. Seeman is a descendent of Thomas Freestone and his wife Ann through their second son James. Lillian Freestone Millett is also a descendent of Thomas through James. Mrs. Hattie J. Price is descended through Elizabeth oldest daughter of Thomas. She received her original information from her mother, Marie Jensen who was a great grand daughter in law of Thomas and Ann Freestone. Marie knew Ann well when she lived in Orderville, Utah. Some information was given by Jane Marie Johnson, youngest daughter of Thomas and Ann Freestone, who lived in Basalt, Idaho. The author with her brother, George Harrison Maughn, visited Aunt Jane several times when she was an elderly woman. For the analysis and interpretation of events, thoughts and motives of the people in this story I take complete responsibility. My only hope is that I have done them justice. To me they have become very real. My beloved, not too far removed ancestors, Ann Fall and Thomas Freestone have become warm hearted, loving and lovable people. To me Thomas Freestone was a noble son of God. A quiet man of few words and many deep thoughts, who did the right as he saw the right with no unnecessary questions for his comfort or safety. His wife, his children and church came first. They were his all. --Elsie Maughn Belliston The name Freestone as we know it in 1975 has had an interesting history of change and growth. Clara F. Seeman in her volume “The Freestone Family” records the following: The name Freestone appears in some of the oldest parish records in England in various forms, such as Fryston, Frieston, Friston, Freston, and Freestone. The Oxford Dictionary of English Place Names has the origin of he name as follows: “Freston, and the many variations all come from the same source, an old Frisian settlement on the east coast of England. Friesa (old English) a Frisian; tun, a settlement or estate. Thus the parish Freston, or Fryston, was a place where the Frisians settled.” From F.H. Sunderland, Genealogical Researcher in England, we have the following contribution: “Freestone, Freeston, relates to the old Frisian settlement, and it appears that the original settlers are from the Frisian Islands, a chain extending from the coast of North Schleswig to the Zuider Zee (now a part of the farm land of Holland obtained by pumping the sea water from behind the dikes.) Frisian, the original speech, resembles the older form of English. “East Anglia, including Vorfork, Suffolk, and Cambridge, was founded by Uffa, 575 A.D. It was then the Frisians appeared, some of whom had the name Friston, Freeston, and Freston, kept on them when surnames became fixed, probably because they had all the appearance of their distant ancestors of some six or seven centuries previously. Thus the family of Freestone, as they are known at the present day. The name Thomas Freestone has a sura of destiny about it. He left his home in beautiful Flixton, Suffolk, England with his older sister, Sarah and her husband, William Ward around the year 1835. The England they left was prospering. The people were better fed then perhaps ever before. This was due to improved methods and new crops recently introduced into the country. The prosperity was due to discoveries of methods of spinning and weaving and the steam engine which revolutionized transportation. This well being followed more than one century of political turmoil brought about by Catholic and spendthrift kings, the horrible Bubonic plaque which caused such terrible time of death and sorrow and the great fire of London which brought about financial problems of enormous magnitude. The gently happy Queen Victoria was elevated to the throne of England in 1837. The happiness of her personal life and the wisdom manifest during her long life gave the English people and English homes a new and good quality. The country Thomas Freestone came to was green, peaceful, and prosperous. The Indians called Prince Edward Island “The home cradled in the waves.” The historian, Morrison says: “Nova Scotia, which was not subjected to religious and racial stress for the Canadians obtained responsible government in 1848. The government of …Prince Edward Island underwent a similar peaceful evolution.” The freestones left happiness. They found happiness. Still Thomas was searching in his mind for more. And why did Thomas Freestone go to Prince Edward Island? Because the noble young woman who was destined to become his wife lived there. These two very special spirit-people (in the Freestone family) met, fell in love, and married 4 August 1836, he 41 and she 24 years of age. What type of woman was Ann Fall Freestone? Her mother kept a school for the young girls of the community. Besides teaching her students the usual subjects of reading, writing, spelling, and arithmetic, she taught them to sew. Ann learned to think either from her parents or her own native instincts. All the people in the world have not learned to think for themselves. A picture of Ann in the prime of her life shows her as a tall beautiful figure and intelligent face with thoughtful appearing eyes, dark in color. She was always referred to as “a very religious person.” Her life reveals her as a loyal gentle wife and mother. A poem she wrote reveals a tender heart. She must have had a strong body to survive the hardships and persecutions of her life. She lived to be 76 years of age. What type of man was Thomas Freestone? Certain facts of his life tell many thing about the man. He was 41 years of age when he married. A good-looking bachelor in almost any country is eligible for the shy glances of eligible women or their mothers. He answered his call of destiny: he left home, parents, loved ones for the uncertainty of an ocean voyage and a new land. He recognized his life mate as she did in this new land. And although bachelors are said to be shy, he courted and wooed and married the right girl. Of his education we know nothing. Very likely his formal education was brief but he was educated in the school of life and church. He seems to have been a man of few words and deep thoughts. Of a tender loving hear, a hard worker. Always mindful of those most dear to him- wife and children. In physical appearance as told by those who had seen him or heard his wife’s description of him, he was tall, well built, muscular, with dark hair, eyes and brows and a serious countenance. He was strong and had good health, his life reveals. He lived to be 63 years of age. When the Thomas Freestones had been married two years, their first child, a son, was born, named for his paternal grandfather, George. When this child was about 21 months of age the call of destiny rang in their hearts and they answered it. They again left home and loved ones for a sea journey along the east coast of America. When they were nearing the harbor of Boston their second son was born, named James for his maternal grandfather. The couple with their two little boys made their way to the green fertile land of central Ohio where they secured 40 acres of land and set about making a home and a farm. At this time the Freestones were members of the Methodist faith. Their family continued to increase: Elizabeth Ann was born 26 January 1842; Rhoda, 30 December 1844; Phoebe Ellen, July 1847. In September the same year the spirit of Phoebe left its mortal tabernacle in death. With vowed heads the parents accepted this great loss. George, age 9, James 7, Elizabeth 5, and Rhoda 3 all grieved for their dear little baby sister. The Freestones were subject to much illness. To pay the debts incurred the farm was mortgaged and sold. Thomas Freestone moved his family to the city of Sandusky on Lake Erie, Erie County, most likely for employment since he was not a city man at heart. In this city Johanna was born 16 June 1849. As soon as it was financially possible they returned to the soil, the environment they loved. Little Johanna was filling mother’s arms again. They purchased 20 acres this tiem in the same locality as their former home, and set about to make a new home and farm. George, age 11, remained at home to help. James, age 9, went to live with neighbors and work for his board. James writes in his history that though only a small boy he frequently went into the nearby woods to pray to ask his Father that if He had a people on the earth that he, James, might be able to find them. It was at this time and while young James was in this state of mind that two Mormon missionaries came into the neighborhood and were preaching their message of the Restoration of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. They were holing the meetings every night in the local school house. These meetings were in the vicinity of where James was living and he went to hear them. The next day he went home and told his mother of the meetings and asked her to go with him which she did. Both mother and sons were converted. Why did not Thomas also go? Was he away from home? Was he more inclined to weigh such weighty matters longer? We have no answers. The mother was baptized 10 November 1850. Thomas the following April 1851; James 17 October 1853; Elizabeth and Rhoda 20 November 1853; George 16 August 1854. Thus all eligible members of the family had entered the fold of the Church between late 1850 and August 1854. Following the pattern of the faith, following baptism of members of the Church the Spirit of gathering entered their hearts. They had been told that Mormon emigrants used cows as beasts of burden to draw wagons. In family council they decided to sell the farm and start for the gathering place of the Saints. They were aware that many were in the Rocky Mountains, that the Prophet and his brother, Hyrum, had been murdered and the Saints expelled first from Northern Ohio, then Missouri, and finally Illinois. They also knew that there were “way stations” at Council Bluffs and Winter Quarters and smaller ones in central Iowa. Acting on their keen desire to get to Zion, distance 1700 miles, as soon as possible and unaware of the hardships and suffering they would encounter they sold the farm and home for a light wagon, hitched their unbroken, untrained, and unwilling cows to the wagon. When their belongings were in the wagon each small child accounted for the mother seated comfortable as possible with the baby in her arms, Thomas Freestone gathered up the lines and this historic trek began. At this time the father was 56 years of age, the mother 40, children George, 14, James 12, Elizabeth 10, Rhoda 7, Johanna 3, and Emma 2 ½ months. It is likely that at first Thomas and the four older children walked. It soon started to rain. The dirt roads were most difficult for cows and driver and others who walked. They traveled about twelve miles per day. Where was their camp at night, was it dry and what about food? They reached Pisgah on Christmas Day in his life, the only written record we have. The saints they found at Pisgah were travelers like themselves who had stopped for rest. They had little to share with the Freestones. They were then 100 miles from Council Bluffs. Ann Fall Freestone wrote a letter to the president of the branch at Council Bluffs telling of their financial plight. She was afterwards told that when her letter was read in the meeting many shed tears. The President wrote back and told the family that if they could get to Council Bluffs they would help them get through to Utah. This was a trying time for especially Ann Fall and Thomas Freestone. They had little food during the winter. Thomas got what work he could. They stayed at Pisgah, a portion of the winter, then moved 20 miles to Winterset. The two boys, George and James cut saw logs and husked corn for work. They had a two-year-old heifer that they hitched with the other cow and started early in the spring and reached Council Bluffs in April, seven months after they left Ohio. A company was organized to go to Utah, of fifty wagons. The Freestones joined the company. They were given a young yoke of cattle to work with their cows. Most likely they given a more trip-worthy wagon. They started 10 June 1853. Johanna said she had a little corner in the wagon where she sat and watched the activity in the rear. James writes: “It was a good company we traveled with. I drove sheep with a man. We had a horse between us. It was a good journey.” They arrived in Utah territory 9 September 1853. A “good journey”? A boy of 13? Did he have shoes? George wrote “I drove two yoke of four oxen on a heavily loaded freighter wagon across the plains”. He was 14 years of age, nearly 15. The captain of the company was Daniel Miller under the direction of John W. Cooley. Both men were spoken of with high esteem. These are the rules and regulations adopted by the emigrating Saints of Pottawattamie Co., Iowa bound for Salt Lake City, camped on the west bank of the Missouri River, 8 June 1853: Some of the rules were: The camp will be called together at the sound of the trumpet morning and evening for public prayer… when a general attendance is expected, except those whose camp duties require them to be absent… The corral will not be broken not any wagon moved from the ground until all the cattle are yoked…We remain in camp on Sundays…meetings at 10 A.M. On 9 September 1853 the following arrived: 282 persons, 27 horses, 470 cattle, 154 sheep, 70 wagons. When they left listings were: Persons 294, horses 11, oxen 188, 80 cows, 42 calves, 115 sheep, 44 wagons. Two companies. The Freestones went to American Fork, Utah County, and lived one year and then moved to Mountainville, later renamed Alpine (1854). Times were hard for the family, a condition with which they were familiar. It was the time of crickets and grasshoppers and Indian troubles. The first winter the family lived almost entirely on pig weeds and greens. They felt very fortunate when they had a pot of wild onions for soup. Thomas Freestone and the boys worked a great deal on a log fort Pres. Young had recommended that they build for safety from the Indians. Ann Fall and the children fought the crickets every day and they were the only family in Alpine to raise wheat to maturity and to harvest it. In the year 1857 the United States government sent an army to Utah known as Johnston’s army to “conquer the Mormons or annihilate them.” All able-bodied men stood guard in Echo Canyon and elsewhere to prevent the army from entering the territory. Later, 1858, largely through the good offices of Col. Thomas E. Kane, a non-Mormon, a friend of Brigham Young, this army was allowed to peacefully enter the valley but not to stop in any of the settlements and to set up camp at Camp Floyd in Utah County. Later the army was recalled home because of the Civil War. Gen. Johnston lost his life in one of the bloody battles of he war as a confederate General. In the same year 1857, the U.S. Dept. of War sent Lt. Joseph C. Ives to explore the Colorado River for the purpose of learning whither it could be used to advantage in the transportation of soldiers and munitions on the way to the valley of Salt Lake. Ives expedition went about as far as Las Vegas and then turned back. When the report reached Salt Lake that examination of the Colorado River for navigation was being conducted by the U.S. Government, Pres. Young waited not at all before he sent an expedition under Geo. A. Smith to explore the Rio Colorado and the country adjacent to it for suitable locations for settlements. This group of men left Cedar City 31 March 1858. They returned with the report that no suitable sites had been found. However they did find that the area of St. George, Utah’s Dixie, was fertile, well watered and of very mild climate. Also it was said that Brigham Young had made the that a Temple would be built in southern Utah. It was during this critical and emotionally tense time that four years after Ann Fall and Thomas Freestone had settled in what they had hoped would be a peaceful home of plenty for themselves and their family that these parents discussed the idea of looking for another home that might hive the security which they so very much desired. Another child had joined the family, Jan Marie, born 1 December 1855, two years after reaching the new home. It is altogether likely that Thomas was called to join an exploring party or he may have volunteered, feeling as he did the great responsibility for his large family. And he was no longer a young man. He was 63 hears of age. He bade a sorrowful and tender farewell to his wife who had been all a wife could be: sweetheart, companion of hard and good days, a lovely mother to eight beautiful and loved children and the uncomplaining partner of his heart. It was hard to say goodbye to the children, the two stalwart sons and five lovely daughters, the youngest scarcely out of her mother’s arms. And there was thee little grave left far away to remember. He was a strong courageous man so leave he did. Events would indicate that he left whatever group he was with in the vicinity of Parawan or Cedar City, Iron Co. Thomas Freestone belonged to that brave and venturesome breed of James Wesley Powell, Kim Bridger, and other hardy souls who did so much to open up a new land. The Indians of that area were in a very unfriendly state of mind. They had made a pact among themselves that the life of any white man that crossed a given point on their well-worn trail would be forfeited. Of course, Thomas Freestone was not aware of this agreement and alone and calmly crossed the point on the trail. From concealed Redmen a flying arrow from a bow pulled by a strong arm struck dear Thomas in the back and he lunged froward, mortally wounded. The Redmen fled for this man might have many friends near by. One compassionate member remained near by and when no friends appeared returned. He found Thomas in agonizing pain. According to his best judgement and the total situation he decided to “finish him off, put him out of his misery, killed him with rocks he threw at the sufferer.” Then when he was convinced that life had left the pain-wracked body the Indian wrapped the great man Thomas Freestone in his bedroll, a single blanket? And buried him in an unmarked grave and there he lies until the resurrection. The Indian either went himself or sent word to his grieving wife who by then lived in nearby Orderville and gave her the comfort that comes with knowing. Many noble men and women lie in unmarked graves without so much as a thin blanket for a shroud. What is the measure of a Latter Day Saint man? A great man? Thomas Freestone bravely and wisely left his home in England for America, Canada. There he found love, wooed and won a noble wife. He was to her a good husband. He fathered eight noble spirits into mortality. He provided for their physical and spiritual needs to the best of his ability in an often hard environment. He heard, he listened and accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ. He kept his covenants. He willingly gave his life for his family and the betterment of mankind. Is this not greatness? The Millett Family Foundation 65 S. Mesa Dr., Mesa AZ 85210.

Thomas & Ann Freestone Notes

Contributor: smithc Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

THOMAS FREESTONE & ANN FALL FREESTONE THOMAS FREESTONE 1. BORN IN FLIXTON, SUFFOLK, ENGLAND 12 MAY 1795 2. IMMIGRATED TO PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, CANADA 3. MARRIED AT AGE 41 TO ANN FALL-1 AUGUST 1837 (SEE FAMILY GROUP) 4. IMMIGRATED TO AMERICA, LANDING IN BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 5 MAY 1840, AGE 44, SETTLED IN OHIO 5. JOINED MORMON CHURCH, BAPTIZED APRIL 1851 -LEFT HUNTERVILLE, HARDIN CO, OHIO - AUGUST 1852 6. ARRIVED 25 DECEMBER 1852 IN PISGAH, IOWA IN SNOWSTORM – AGE 56 7. SPRING 1853 - MOVED TO WINTER QUARTERS, IOWA 8. JOINED WITH WAGON COMPANY AT COUNCIL BLUFFS TO GO TO UTAH. BROKE CAMP JUNE 8, 1853 A. IMMIGRATION FROM OHIO TO GREAT SALT LAKE CITY. (AS TAKEN FROM ACCOUNT FOUND IN THE CHURCH HISTORIAN'S OFFICE; UNDER JOURNAL HISTORY FILE) AN ACCOUNT AS GIVEN BY CAPT. DANIEL A MILLER'S COMPANY, OF WHICH THE THOMAS FREESTONE FAMILY WERE A PART OF. UNDER DIRECTION OF JOHN W. COOLEY. ACCORDING TO THE LIST WHICH WAS LONG, THOMAS' FAMILY APPEARED: THOMAS FREESTONE......8 PERSONS...2 COWS....1 WAGON ANN FREESTONE 41 YEARS OLD GEORGE 15 YEARS OLD JAMES 13 YEARS OLD RHODA 9 YEARS OLD ELIZABETH ANN 11 YEARS OLD JOANNA 4 YEARS OLD EMMA (AMY S) 1 YEAR OLD LIST OF COMPANY...IT BEING DIVIDED INTO TWO COMPANIES..... PERSONS...HORSES...OXEN.....COWS....CALVES...SHEEP....WAGONS 194 11 188 80 42 115 44 THERE IS A DAY BY DAY ACCOUNT OF CAMPS MADE..... RULES AND REGULATIONS....ADAPTED BY THE EMIGRATING SAINTS OF POTTAWATAMIE CO. IOWA BOUND FOR SALT LAKE CITY, CAMPED ON THE THE WEST BANK OF THE MISSOURI RIVER, 8 JUNE 1853 1. THE CAMP WILL BE CALLED TOGETHER AT THE SOUND OF THE TRUMPET, MORNING AND EVENING, FOR PUBLIC PRAYER...WHEN A GENERAL ATTENDANCE IS EXPECTED, EXCEPT THOSE WHOSE CAMP DUTIES REQUIRE THEM TO BE ABSENT. 2. NO CARD PLAYING WILL BE ALLOWED IN CAMP. 3. NO PROFANE SWEARING WILL BE TOLERATED. 4. THOSE OWNING DOGS WILL BE REQUIRED TO KEEP THEM TIED UP DURING THE NIGHT. 5. NO NOISE OR CONFUSION WILL BE ALLOWED IN CAMP AFTER 9 PM AT NIGHT. 6. THE HORN FOR RISING WILL BE BLOWN AT HALF PAST 4 O'CLOCK, IN THE MORNING AND THE HORN FOR PUBLIC PRAYERS AT HALF PAST 5 O'CLOCK. 7. THE HORN WILL BE BLOWN AS NOTICE TO HERDSMEN TO BRING IN CATTLE. 8. EVERY MAN WILL BE REQUIRED TO ASSIST IN DRIVING CATTLE TO THE HERD. 9. THE CORRAL WILL NOT BE BROKEN NOR ANY WAGON MOVED FROM THE GROUND UNTIL ALL THE CATTLE ARE YOKED. WE REMAIN IN CAMP ON SUNDAYS....MEETING AT 10 A.M. THE DESCRIPTION OF THEIR DIFFICULTIES BEFORE BEGINNING THE TRIP IS BOTH PATHETIC AND HUMOROUS. IT SEEMS THAT THE "HAD DRIVERS OF THE OX TEAMS KNEW NOTHING ABOUT THE INTRICATE WAYS OF MAKING AN OX DO THE THING NECESSARY TO PULL A WAGON OVER THE ROUGH AND WINDING ROADS. IT WAS ONLY BY THE WISE USE OF WORDS "GEE AND "HAW" AND THE QUICK BUT EFFECTIVE USE OF THE BIG WHIP, COULD THESE BRUTES BE CONTROLLED. ELDER LINFORTH, WHO MUST HAVE BEEN AN EDUCATED MAN WITH A GOOD DEAL OF TALENT FOR TELLING A STORY, WRITES THE DETAILS OF THIS TRAINING. HE CALLED THE DRIVERS, "GREEN" AND SAID THEY KEPT POOR ELDER MILLER IN HOT WATER, RUNNING FROM ONE TEAM TO ANOTHER, TRYING TO UNTANGLE THEIR MISTAKES. ON THE 10TH OF SEPTEMBER, 1853, THE COMPANY TRAVELED 10 MILES TO PAPILLION CREEK, WHICH THEY CROSSED ON A BRIDGE AND ON THE 11TH THEY TRAVELED NINE MILES TO ELKHORN RIVER, 27 MILES FROM WINTER QUARTERS. Ref: General History, Sept 9, 1853 in Church Historian's Office, Salt Lake City, Utah. (List of emigrants was made out on Sweetwater River, four miles from Devil's Gate.) THE IMMIGRATION FUND FURNISHED THEM A YOKE OF CATTLE. EVERYTHING THEY OWNED WAS PUT INTO THE WAGON. THE LARGER CHILDREN HAD TO WALK AS THERE WAS NO ROOM IN THE WAGON FOR THEM TO RIDE. THE COW WORKED IN THE YOKE WITH THE OXEN AND GAVE MILK, THUS SERVING DOUBLE SERVICE. WHAT WAS LEFT OF THE MILK AND CREAM EACH DAY WAS PUT IN A CHURN AND EVERY EVENING THERE WOULD BE A SMALL ROLL OF BUTTER, CHURNED BY THE CONTINUAL BUMPING OVER THE ROCKS AND ROUGH ROADS. THE COMPANY WAS WELL ORGANIZED. THE BUGLE SOUNDED EVERY NIGHT AND MORNING FOR PRAYER, AND AT 7 O'CLOCK THEY WOULD START ON THEIR JOURNEY. THEY NEVER TRAVELED ON SUNDAY, AND ALWAYS HELD SERVICES. EVERY TWO WEEKS ON A THURSDAY THEY WOULD STOP TRAVEL, THE WOMEN WOULD WASH, AND THE MEN WOULD SHOE THE ANIMALS OR DO ANY REPAIRING THAT WAS NEEDED. IN SPITE OF ALL THE HARDSHIPS THE PEOPLE HAD TO PUT UP WITH ON THEIR LONG JOURNEY, THEY WERE HAPPY AND NEVER GAVE UP HOPE. IF THEY CAMPED IN A PLACE SMOOTH ENOUGH, AFTER THE EVENING MEAL THEY WOULD DANCE, AS THERE WERE SOME GOOD MUSICIANS; AND THEY ALWAYS LOVED TO SING THE SONGS OF ZION. 9. ARRIVED IN UTAH FOUR MONTHS LATER, ON FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 9, 1853, IN TIME FOR OCTOBER CONFERENCE 10. COUNSELED TO SETTLE IN ALPINE, UTAH 11. WENT FIRST TO AMERICAN FORK, UTAH COUNTY, LIVED THERE 1 YEAR 12. MOVED TO MOUNTAINVILLE, LATER NAMED ALPINE - 1854 TIMES WERE HARD FOR THE FAMILY, A CONDITION WITH WHICH THEY WERE FAMILIAR. IT WAS THE TIME OF CRICKETS AND GRASSHOPPERS AND INDIAN TROUBLES. THE FIRST WINTER THE FAMILY LIVED ALMOST ENTIRELY ON PIG WEEDS AND GREENS. THEY FELT VERY FORTUNATE WHEN THEY HAD A POT OF WILD ONIONS FOR SOUP. THOMAS FREESTONE AND BOYS WORKED A GREAT DEAL ON A LOG FORT PRES. YOUNG HAD RECOMMENDED THAT THEY BUILD FOR SAFETY FOR THE INDIANS. ANN AND THE CHILDREN FOUGHT THE CRICKETS EVERY DAY AND THEY WERE THE ONLY FAMILY IN ALPINE TO RAISE WHEAT TO MATURITY AND TO HARVEST IT. IN THE YEAR 1857 THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT SENT AN ARMY TO UTAH KNOWN AS JOHNSTON'S ARMY TO "CONQUER THE MORMONS OR ANNIALATE THEM". ALL ABLE BODIED MEN STOOD GUARD IN ECHO CANYON AND ELSEWHERE TO PREVENT THE ARMY FROM ENTEREING THE TERRITORY. LATER, 1858, LARGELY THROUGH THE GOOD OFFICES OF COL. THOMAS E. KANE, A NON-MORMOM, A FRIEND OF BRIGHAM YOUNG, THIS ARMY WAS ALLOWED TO PEACEFULLY ENTER THE VALLEY BUT NOT TO STOP IN ANY OF THE SETTLEMENTS AND TO SET UP CAMP AT CAMP FLOYD IN UTAH COUNTY. LATER THE ARMY WAS RECALLED HOME BECAUSE OF THE CIVIL WAR. GEN. JOHNSTON LOST HIS LIFE IN ONE OF THE BLOODY BATTLES OF THE WAR AS A CONFEDERATE GENERAL. IN THE SAME YEAR, 1857, THE U.S. DEPT. OF WAR SENT LT. JOSEPH C. IVES TO EXPLORE THE COLORADO RIVER FOR THE PURPOSE OF LEARNING WHETHER IT COULD BE USED TO ADVANTAGE IN THE TRANSPORTATION OF SOLDIERS AND MUNITIONS ON THE WAY TO THE VALLEY OF THE SALT LAKE. IVES EXPEDITION WENT ABOUT AS FAR AS LAS VEGAS AND THEN TURNED BACK. WHEN THE REPORT REACHED SALT LAKE THAT EXAMINATION OF THE COLORADE FOR NAVIGATION WAS BEING CONDUCTED BY THE U.S. GOV'T, PRES. YOUNG WAITED NOT AT ALL BEFORE HE SENT AN EXPEDITION UNDER GEORGE _______ TO EXPLORE THE RIO COLORADO AND THE COUNTRY ADJACENT TO IT AS SUITABLE LOCATIONS FOR SETTLEMENTS. THIS GROUP OF MEN LEFT SALT LAKE CITY 31 MARCH 1858. THEY RETURNED WITH THE REPORT THAT NO SUITABLE SITES HAD BEEN FOUND. HOWEVER THEY DID FIND THAT THE SITE OF ST. GEORGE, UTAH'S DIXIE, WAS FERTILE, WELL WATERED AND HAD A VERY MILD CLIMATE. ALSO IT WAS SAID THAT BRIGHAM YOUNG HAD MADE THE STATEMENT THAT A TEMPLE WOULD BE BUILT IN SOUTHERN UTAH. (Taken from "Thomas Freestone, the man" by Elsie Maughan Belliston) 13. FOUR YEARS LATER - AGE 63 - WAS TRAVELING SOUTH TO FIND WARMER CLIMATE TO MOVE FAMILY TO. THE INDIANS OF THAT AREA WERE IN A VERY UNFRIENDLY STATE OF MIND. THEY HAD MADE A PACT AMONG THEMSELVES THAT THE LIFE OF ANY WHITE MAN THAT CROSSED A GIVEN POINT ON THEIR WELL WORN TRAIL WOULD BE FORFEITED. OF COURSE, THOMAS FREESTONE WAS NOT AWARE OF THIS AGREEMENT AND ALONE CROSSED THE POINT ON THE TRAIL. HE WAS AMBUSHED BY INDIANS, NEAR PAROWAN, UTAH. BURIED IN AN UNMARKED GRAVE. ANN FALL FREESTONE 1. BORN 6 AUGUST 1812 IN ALDBROUGH, YORKSHIRE, ENGLAND. 2. BAPTIZED 10 NOVEMBER 1850. (SEE HISTORY BY HATTIE JENSEN PRICE) The Millett Family Foundation 65 S. Mesa Dr. Mesa AZ 85210.

Thomas Freestone--Trouble on the Trail!

Contributor: smithc Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Thomas Freestone and his family lived in a fort in Alpine, Utah. The grasshoppers and crickets ate most of their food. Thomas went with a group of men looking for better living conditions in southern Utah. The Indians had a pact among themselves that the first white man to gross a certain point on their trail would be killed. Thomas was that man! Thomas was first wounded by an arrow that struck him in the back. One Indian stayed nearby. He put Thomas out of his misery, wrapped him in a blanket, buried him in an unmarked grave near Parowan, Utah and sent a message to Thomas’ wife Ann to tell her that her husband was dead.

Life Timeline of Thomas Freestone

1795
Thomas Freestone was born on 10 May 1795
Thomas Freestone was 6 years old when An electoral tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr is resolved when Jefferson is elected President of the United States and Burr, Vice President by the United States House of Representatives. The United States Electoral College is a body of electors established by the United States Constitution, constituted every four years for the sole purpose of electing the president and vice president of the United States. The College consists of 538 electors, and an absolute majority of 270 electoral votes is required to win election. Pursuant to Article II, Section 1, Clause 2, the legislature of each state determines the manner by which its electors are chosen. Each state's number of electors is equal to the combined total of the state's membership in the Senate and House of Representatives; currently there are 100 senators and 435 representatives. Additionally, the Twenty-third Amendment provides that the District of Columbia is entitled to the number of electors no greater than that of the least populous state.
1801
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Thomas Freestone was 18 years old when Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is first published in the United Kingdom. Jane Austen was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism. Her use of biting irony, along with her realism and social commentary, have earned her acclaim among critics and scholars.
1813
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Thomas Freestone was 30 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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Thomas Freestone was 37 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Thomas Freestone was 45 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Thomas Freestone died on Sep 1858 at the age of 63
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Thomas Freestone (10 May 1795 - Sep 1858), BillionGraves Record 1293297 Alpine, Utah, Utah, United States

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