William Elmer

16 Sep 1820 - 14 Dec 1894

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William Elmer

16 Sep 1820 - 14 Dec 1894
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Grave site information of William Elmer (16 Sep 1820 - 14 Dec 1894) at Ogden City Cemetery in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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William Elmer

Born:
Died:

Ogden City Cemetery

11th Avenue
Ogden, Weber, Utah
United States
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rgrua

May 28, 2012
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rgrua

May 28, 2012

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William A. Gheem family

Contributor: rgrua Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

This is a copy, of a copy, of the writings of Stephan Harris Gheen, Pearl Wyoming, 26th of February 1891. I do not know when or how it fell into the hands of my family. * * * * * * Great-great-grandmother Esther Ann Pierce Gheen arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in the spring of 1849. I Stephen Harris Gheen, knowing as I do that life is uncertain and that death is certain sooner or later and while I am in my right mind, I deem it necessary for my children to understand who I am. I here state my father, William A. Gheen, who was the son of Thomas and Alice Gheen, was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, on the 22nd of September, 1798. My mother was the daughter of Thomas and Margaret Pierce and was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, December 24, 1801. Our family consisted of eight children; Margaret P. was married to James Browning in Nauvoo, Ill. by Joseph Smith the Prophet. Thomas P. was lost. Ann Alice and Amanda were wives of Heber C. Kimball. Mary Ann, married William Elmer is now in Ogden. Myself, off here in the mountains. Levi A., we don’t know where he is. My father, nor mother never belonged to any sect or society. Their parents were Quakers. In the spring of 1840 the first Elders came to Chester Co. Pennsylvania. And in August the same year; father, mother and Margret were baptized. In the fall of 1841 my father and Brother Hunter came to Nauvoo to visit the prophet and other friends and received his Patriarchal Blessing and (he) was ordained an Elder by Hyrum Smith. He returned home in good health and spirits. And on the 21st of January 1842 he sold his farm and prepared to leave our native land, friends and relations for the Gospels sake. The 11th of May 1842, we started west by team, well fitted out with every thing for our comfort. We were blessed on our journey and arrived in the city of Nauvoo on the 28 of June. My Father bought a city lot two blocks west of the temple and built a fine brick house and a frame barn. He bought 80 acres of land on the Carthage Road four miles from the city from Joseph Smith for which he paid $800 but he received no title for it, so he could not sell it. He labored hard and made his family comfortable. He helped to build the temple both with means and Labor and helped also on the Nauvoo House. My father went out to visit Joseph and Hyrum in the Carthage Jail the day before they were killed. He received some good instructions and a blessing from them. He assisted in bringing them home and burying them. He was very anxious to see the temple finished but was sick and died, July 15th 1845. President Brigham Young preached his funeral sermon. He said that he had known Brother Gheen For 3 years and said; If father had his life to live over again he didn’t think he could mend it, that he was a good man. At the tine of my father’s death the five youngest children had the whooping cough and Sarah, the baby, only seven months old, nearly died; but mother Chase came and washed and anointed her, and she lived to have a nice family. One can see the responsibility that rested upon my Mother with so many of the family sick. But she was a woman of good sound mind and (had) a splendid education to help her. In the spring of ’46 we left the beautiful city of Nauvoo and crossed the Missouri with two wagons and three yoke of cattle to each wagon. We journeyed west with the main body of the church. I got the mountain fever and was baptized for my health. I was only about 11 years old. We stayed on the Missouri just about where Omaha is now. We lived that winter in what is known as Winter Quarters. We witnessed and participated in (the) trials, privations and suffering that a great many pasted through. In the spring of ‘47 the pioneers journeyed westward. My mother and the four youngest children bid good-bye to my three oldest sisters, that left us and went with Brother Kimball. We went down the river about 40 miles below and stayed with an old friend of ours, that summer. The following winter Edward Egan came to our place from Salt Lake City and told us all about the folks and country there. He had some freight to take out to the Valley. He counselled with my mother about fitting me out with a team we had then and two yoke of oxen and the wagon and take a load of freight, which I did to raise means to bring my mother and the rest in the following spring. (1849) I was 14 years old. As near as I can understand that freight with some others at the same time was the first merchandise to be sold in Salt Lake. After my mother and the rest of the family came to the valley we went to Ogden. I was there to witness the trouble with the Indians in 1850. I helped to break some of the first land in North Ogden. (The) next spring I went to Willard Creek, now known as Willard. In 1852 I witnessed another scare with the Indians but no one was killed. I helped plow, plant and harvest the first crops raised in what is known as Three Mile Creek, from there to the old Bingham Fort.

Rescue Party 1856

Contributor: rgrua Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Harriet Gould Elmer Individual Information Birth Date 11 August 1802 Death Date 31 July 1879 Gender female Evidence from church, newspaper, and genealogical records proves she traveled to Utah in 1851. She appeared on the 1850 Iowa census, enumerated in Oct. 1850 and received her endowments in Salt Lake City on 30 Mar. 1852. The window of those two events prove that she could have only traveled to Utah in 1851. Her obituary stated that she came to Utah in fall 1851. Companies John G. Smith Company (1851)Age at departure: 48 Sources "Obituary," Deseret News, 13 Aug. 1879, 448. Source Location •Church History Library, Salt Lake City 1850 Iowa Census Source Location •Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah New FamilySearch/Family Tree

Church history Catalog-- Mormon Pioneer Overland travel

Contributor: rgrua Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Skip Main Navigation . Uriah Curtis Company William Elmer William Elmer Individual Information Birth Date 16 September 1820 Death Date 14 December 1894 Gender male Captain of First Ten Companies Uriah Curtis Company (1852)Age at departure: 31 Sources "16th Company," Deseret News [Weekly], 18 Sep. 1852, 2. Trail Excerpt Source Location •Utah Digital Newspapers Website •Church History Library, Salt Lake City "Obituary Notes," The Deseret News [Weekly], 19 Jan. 1895, 159. Source Location •Church History Library, Salt Lake City Journal History, Supp. to 1852, p. 101 New FamilySearch/Family Tree .

William Elmer

Contributor: rgrua Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

WILLIAM ELMER William Elmer, son of John Elmer and Sally Peaque, was born in Norwich, Orange County, Vermont on 16 September 1820. In the spring of 1838 William was 18 years old. William, his parents and family, one wagon and one team of horses started west. Their goal was to move close to the church. When they had come as far as Orsen, Ohio they stopped to rest. It was most unfortunate because here is where Mother and Father contacted typhoid fever and both of them passed away. It was hard indeed to leave them behind but after a short time they took courage and again started their journey. They traveled as far as Illinois where they stayed until the year 1846. On March 26 1846 William married Hannah Polina Child in Lee County, Iowa. When these two young people decided to marry they found that by crossing a river into another state their marriage could be performed free of charge. Since they wished to hold on to their meager means, they crossed to the other side of the river and were married by a preacher as they stood in the back of their wagon. They settled for a time in Desmoine, Iowa. Three children were born in Iowa, they were: John Samuel, born October 13, 1847, Mark Alfred, born December 16, 1848, and William Warren, born November 23, 1850. These three children came with them into Utah on October 3, 1852. After a short stay in Salt Lake City they came on into Ogden and settled at Binghams Fort in Weber County. Soon after their arrival a daughter Cynthia Trephenia was born. This was on December 16, 1852. Many hardships faced them at this time, food was scarce, their clothing they made from wool they combed, cleaned, and wove. They exchanged food with one another for variety with everyone, becoming well acquainted with “Flour lumpy dick”. They tried some farming but were bothered with soggy low lands which were not very productive. Hostile Indians were a worry to them at this time. For protection a home guard was established. William was made Captain of cavalry Company A. When not on duty he often assisted others in building houses. Another daughter was born to William and Hannah on February 13, 1854. She lived to be just three years old, dying in 1857. Another daughter Polly Ann was born December 16, 1856. April 9, 1857, William married a second wife Mary Ann Gheen. About this time he was asked to go to Green River to help bring some of the Hand Cart Companys. He did this leaving his family to get along as best they could. During the year of 1857 he was commissioned a Colonel by Brigham Young, who was then Governor of the State of Utah. At this time due to the trouble starting because of Johnsons Army protesting the Mormons, William was advised to take his family and move them south. He took them to Payson, Utah. They moved into a small log cabin, the only shelter available. The roof was not even completely closed in over their heads. While there Hannah gave birth to a daughter Phebe Oninda and Mary gave birth to a son, Levi James. Family history tells us that when the children were born kind neighbors placed their carpet pieces and blankets over the inadequate roof to make them more comfortable. During this same year William and Hannah's first son John Samuel passed away. It had been said that William before leaving Ogden stored some flour away in the ground for later use. In the winter of 1859 it was considered safe for him to bring his family back to Ogden. They moved into a small adobe home east of Washington Avenue. The winter was bitter cold with five feet of snow. William located the spot where he had left the flour and dug it up. Once again they were glad for “Flour Lumpy Dick.” We are told they used this flour most sparingly making it last until spring. Another daughter Sally Rosa Bell was born November 15, 1861 to Hannah. She died at the age of seventeen in the year 1878. At this time William was given badly needed employment on the railroad and daughter Polly Ann in her family narration wrote, “With the first money my Father earned on the railroad he bought me my first pair of real grown up shoes.” She was then 12 years old. William was a hard worker being a man of great physical strength. He made shingles and is believed to be the first to make shingles in the Ogden area. William’s farm land was in Marriott, Utah. Although he was always bothered by wet soggy lowlands, he did succeed in making his ground pay. Two more children were born to William and his first wife Hannah. They were Charles Asa, born August 17, 1869, died 3 July 1870 and Hyrum Barney born Feb 11, 1871. Charles Asa lived to be 11 months old, Hyrum Barney lived to be one year old. William Elmer was the Father of 16 children…twelve (12) of them with his first wife Hannah Palina and four (4) of them with Mary Ann Green. For the benefit of future history let it be known and attested that these two women loved each other, they laughed together, suffered together, shared and grieved together when sorrow struck. They both loved their God and followed the principles of their gospel. William Elmer was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Nauvoo Legion and a high priest in the church. He was loved and respected by all who knew him. After the Manifesto it was necessary for him to be away from his family. This was hard on him. His health was failing and this proved to be one of his greatest trials. He was, however, able to spend his last years with his first wife Hannah in the small house east of Washington Avenue. He died true to the gospel and to his maker on December 15, 1895. Hannah was made the administrator of his property. She allocated his twenty (20) acre farm in Marriott to his two sons Levi and Heber. They and their Mother Mary Ann Gheen moved there to make their home. Hannah remained in Ogden until her death on December 22, 1897. Mary Ann passed away seven years later on April 18, 1903. It was recalled that at the death of Hannah, Mary Ann was inconsolable. She said, “She was the best friend I ever had”. Presented by Great Granddaughter Cynthia Grace Wilde The above was submitted to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers by Cynthia Grace Wile in January 1968. It was noted under “Company Arrived With” Independent.

William Elmer

Contributor: rgrua Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

ELMER, WILLIAM (son of John Elmer and Sally Peaque). Born September 16, 1820, Norwich, Orange county, Vermont. Came to Utah October 3, 1852. Married Hannah Plina Child March 26, 1846, in Lee county, Iowa (daughter of Alfred B. Child and Polly Barber), who was born January 24, 1828, and came to Utah with husband. Their children: John Samuel born October 13, 1847, died; Mark Alfred born December 16, 1848, married Minnie Jost; William Warren born November 23, 1850, married Adelaide Hall; Cynthia Tryphenia born December 16, 1852, married John Q. Leavitt August 16, 1869; Hannah Plina, born February 13, 1854, died 1857; Polly Ann born December 6, 1856, married Mark Hall December 7, 1874; Sally Rosa Bell born November 16, 1861, died 1876; Sarah Josephine born April 15, 1863, married W. W. Browning; Electa Ann born January 28, 1865, married Chris. J. Brown; Charles Asa born August 17, 1869, died July 3, 1870; Hiram Barney born February 11, 1871, died May 21, 1872. Family home Ogden, Utah. Married Mary Ann Gean April 1857, Salt Lake City (daughter of William A. Gean and Esther Ann Pierce, pioneers 1850). She was born December 29, 1832. Their children: Levi James born October 1, 1858, married Treen Louise Peterson February 20, 1895; Esther Ann born December 27, 1861, married Francis Keyes October 27, 1878; Amanda Vilate born July 5, 1863, married James Green Browning April 26, 1883; William Heber born February 13, 1869, married Inga Peterson December 20, 1899. Lieutenant-colonel Nauvoo Legion; captain cavalry Company A. Assisted in building first railroad in Ogden, and first road in Ogden Canyon. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah 1856. High Priest. This was with information sent from the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers. It appears to have come from a book. Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868 This Church History site lists William Elmer as Male, 31, and coming to Utah in the Uriah Curtis Company (1852). It also states that he was Captain of First Ten. Obituary of William Elmer Deseret Weekly 19 January 1898 Utah Digital Newspapers Website Ogden City, Utah, Jan 6, 1895,-Elder William Elmer, whose demise occurred December 15, 1894, joined the Church of Jesus Chrst of Latter-Day Saints in very early times. He was the son of John Elmer and Sally Peque. He ws born at Norwich, Chitiendeu County, Vermont, September 18, 1820. He with all his father's family were baptized into the Church on the 11th of July, 1835. In 1838 they removed from Vermont and settled about eight miles west of Navoo. Here they remained for eight years. when they traveled westward to Council Bluffs, where they remained four years. On March 26, 1847 William Elmer married Miss Hannah Polina Child, daughter of Alfred B. Child and sister of Warren G. Child. On July 8, 1852 they commenced their long overland march for Utah. They traveled in Company 16, Captain Curtis being in command. They arrived in Salt Lake City October 2nd that same year. Shortly after reaching Utah, William Elmer and his family came north and settled in Weber county, near where Bingham's Fort (now called Lynne) was built. during the fall and winter he hauled logs from the canyon and built a jog cabin, the roof of which was made of poles and dirt, and into this house he installed his family. In the fall of 1853 the Indian troubles commenced in that part of the county, when the Saints were instructed to build a fort and gather into it for safety. This they did, and built a Spanish wall around it a good portion of which was done by William Elmer. This place was called Binghams Fort. In the winter of 1854 he suffered from a severe attack of Mountain fever, which nearly proved fatal to him. By the mercy of God he was spared, but from the effects of the sickenss he never fully recovered his normal physical strength. During the summer of 1855 the grasshoppers raided the farms, fields and gardens. They came in countless millions--in clouds which at times darkened the upper deep. They destroyed nearly everything that was used for food for man or animals, fowl or creeping things. But by hard fighting he managed to save a little food from their ravages to feed his family. In the spring of 1856 he located in Ogden City. Late in the fall of 1856 he was called with a number of others to go back on the plains and help to bring in the hand cart companies of Saints who were blockaded by the deep snows. To this call he responded cheerfully and rendered efficient aid to the suffering emigrants. In 1857 he was commissioned captain of calvary, company A, Nauvoo Legion, and with his men marched to Echo canyon to defend the people's rights-which were then invaded-in the "Mormon War." In 1858 he participated in the move south. He stayed at Payson during the winter and returned to Ogden City in 1859 where he continued his residence for the remainder of his mortal career. He was subsequently commissioned major in the Nauvoo Legion, which office he held until the Legion was disorganzed by order of the Governor of Utah. The funeral, which was largely attended, was held in the Second ward meeting house. Addresses were delivered by Elders Charles F. Middleton, Bishop Robert McQuarrle, Joseph Hall and others who were intimately acquainted with him for a great number of years. All the speakers bore testimony of his great worth as a man, a citizen, a soldier, a husband and father, and a faithful Latter-day Saint. His posterity was large, seventy-eight in all to date. He had sixteen children, fifty-five grand children and seven great-grandchildren, most of whom survive him. He was of a peaceful disposition, a patient sufferer in affliction. He was upright and honest in all his dealings with his fellow men. He was formerly a Seventy, and at the time of his death was a member of the High Priest quorum. Yours truly, Joseph Hall

ELMER William b 1820

Contributor: rgrua Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

William Elmer, son of John Elmer and Sally Peaque, was born in Norwich, Orange County (or Chitiendeu County), Vermont on 16 September 1820. His father was John Elmer, born September 22, 1778, in Sommers, Toland County, Connecticut. His mother was Sarah (Sally) Peake, born July 9, 1784, in Pomfret, Woodstock County, Vermont or Promfret, Lower Canada. William and all of his father's family were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on the July 11, 1835, in Vermont. In the spring of 1838, when William was 18 years old, he, his parents and family, one wagon and one team of horses started west. Their goal was to move close to the church. When they had come as far as Orsen, Ohio, they stopped to rest. It was most unfortunate because here is where his mother and brother Samuel contacted typhoid fever and both passed away. It was hard indeed to leave them behind but after a short time they took courage and again started their journey. They settled about eight miles west of Nauvoo, Illinois. After reaching Illinois, John and his sons began to build a cabin to live in. As soon as the walls were up and a roof on, father and sons went to work, as their supplies were running low. While away, the cabin, with all their possessions, burned to the ground. They managed to find enough work to buy more clothes and live through the winter. In the spring John married Harriet Gould Brunson (a widow) and they lived in Harriet's home. Here they remained for eight years. Then they traveled westward to Council Bluffs, where they remained four years, until the year 1846. (Story continued under ELMER William b 1820 and CHILD Hannah Polina b 1828.)

ELMER William b 1820 and CHILD Hannah Polina b 1828

Contributor: rgrua Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

On March 26, 1846, William married Hannah Polina Child in Lee County, Iowa. William was 26 years old and Hannah was 18 years old. When these two young people decided to marry they found that by crossing a river into another state their marriage could be performed free of charge. Since they wished to hold onto their meager means, they crossed to the other side of the river and were married by a preacher as they stood in the back of their wagon. Hannah’s brother Myron and his wife rented a house with William and Hannah, and they all lived together and saved to continue on to the west. Hannah’s father, with his family, and the rest of the Saint’s left for Council Bluffs. The parting was hard for Hannah, as her little brother Asa tried to stay with her. Hannah worked so hard and worried till she had brain fever (an infectious disease characterized by inflammation of the tissues surrounding the brain) and was sick again for two months. There was no help to be had, except a small boy to run errands. All were sick or afraid of the fever. They had to haul water three miles from the river and endured many hardships. William went to Keokuk, Iowa, twelve miles to get medicine. He took sick on the way and had to be brought home. He lay beside her on the bed for three days burning with fever before help came. An over-dose of medicine nearly ended his life at this time. The year was a very trying one and they were not able to save enough to start west, but in September, John, Hannah’s brother, came back and she was so happy to see him. Her first baby was born in three weeks and was named John after him. There was no help to be had so John and a neighbor lady took care of her. She got along splendidly and in two weeks took in two boarders to cook for at one dollar per week apiece. William was making fifty cents a day, and they were able to save enough to buy a wagon and the things they needed to start west. In the spring of 1848 the two couples, each with a baby, started out. It was very stormy and muddy traveling and the Indians were hostile, but there was plenty of grass for the horses. It took three weeks to go from Des Moines to Council Bluffs, where the folks had stopped to recruit before starting for Salt Lake. A neighbor met them three miles out and said the folks were well, but little Asa had died. Both John and Hannah were heart-broken, for they had looked forward to this reunion. It took some time before she could be reconciled and enjoy herself. Little Johnnie was seven months old and the first grandchild – so much was made over him. The following spring the two couples returned to Des Moines to please John Elmer (William's father) and get the rest of his children, who had stayed behind. The trip was full of hardships and privations but they managed to persuade the rest of the brothers and sisters to go back with them. John was overjoyed. They remained at the Bluffs until July 8, 1852, when they all started for Salt Lake, about three hundred families in all. They traveled in Company 16, Captain Uriah Curtis being in command. They had one wagon and one horse. When they got to the Platt River, cholera broke out. A great many died and many more were sick. Hannah did much to ease the suffering and help bury the dead. She finally contracted cholera herself and was unable to do anything until they reached the mountains. The high dry air seemed to revive her. When they got to Salt Lake on October 2, 1852, the company was divided, part going south and the others north. The Elmers and part of the Child family went north to where Ogden is now. There were just two houses, a patch of oak and wild cherry bushes. They took up a farm at Harrisville, living in their wagons until houses could be built. During the fall and winter William hauled logs from the canyon and built a log cabin, the roof of which was made of poles and dirt, and into this house he installed his family. Hannah’s father ran Brother Farr’s saw mill day and night to get lumber cut for their homes. During this time he contracted brain fever from which he died. Soon after their arrival a daughter Cynthia Trephenia was born. This was on December 16, 1852. Many hardships faced them at this time. They made their clothing from wool they combed, cleaned, and wove. Food was scarce. They exchanged food with one another for variety with everyone becoming well acquainted with “Flour Lumpy Dick.” They tried some farming but were bothered with soggy low lands, which were not very productive. In the fall of 1853 the Indian troubles commenced in that part of the county. The Saints were instructed to build a fort and gather into it for safety. This they did and built a twelve-foot Spanish wall around it, a good portion of which was done by William Elmer. This place was called Bingham’s Fort (now called Lynne). For protection a home guard was established. William was made Captain of cavalry Company A. When not on duty he often assisted others in building houses. FEAR OF INDIAN ATTACKS prompted settlers on Bingham’s Lane (2nd Street, Ogden, Utah) to construct what came to be known as Bingham’s Fort. The fort was surrounded by a wall made of wooden posts, woven willows and mud as shown under construction in this painting by Farrell R. Collett. In the winter of 1854 William suffered from a severe attack of Mountain fever. He was sick for three months and it nearly proved fatal to him. By the mercy of God he was spared, but from the effects of the sickness he never fully recovered his normal physical strength. Another daughter was born to William and Hannah on February 13, 1854. She lived to be just three years old, dying in 1857. During the summer of 1855 the grasshoppers raided the farms, fields and gardens. They came in countless millions, in clouds which at times darkened the upper deep. They destroyed nearly everything that was used for food for man or animals, fowl or creeping things. By hard fighting they managed to save a little food from their ravages to feed the family. Many had to kill their stock and dig roots to keep alive. That winter all the children had scarlet fever, five down at one time. All survived but in the spring they all had measles and the baby, Hannah Paulina, thirteen months old, died. Poverty seemed nothing to this sorrow. In the spring of 1856 they moved into Ogden where there were a few more people. They took up ground on the Bench, built a house and raised a fine garden. William kept the farm in Harrisville. Late in the fall of 1856 William was called with a number of others to go back on the plains and help to bring in the hand cart companies of Saints who were blockaded by the deep snows. William was gone two months. It was a terrible trip, all were half frozen and starved, and many died. To this call he responded cheerfully and rendered efficient aid to the suffering emigrants. Three scouts left Devil’s Gate to find the Martin Company, arriving at the Red Buttes camp on 28 October. (Painting by Robert T. Barrett.) Hannah and the little boys (the oldest eight years) gathered the crops and dug the potatoes. She tended what stock they had. It was bitter cold and the snow was deep. Another baby, Polly Ann, was born December 6, just after William’s return. The house was not finished and wood supply was gone, but they gathered willows and dried them and managed to keep warm. There was no doctor or medicine to be had at this time. The next spring they sold the farm and bought fifteen acres in Marriott close to Weber River. They cleared the land and planted ten acres of wheat, corn, potatoes, etc., and raised a good crop. William married a second wife, Mary Ann Gheen on April 9, 1857. Mary Ann was 25 years old and William was 37 years old. Hannah shared what she had with her, although it wasn’t much. They all lived together and managed to be happy even though these were trying times. For the benefit of future history let it be known and attested that these two women loved each other, they laughed together, suffered together, shared and grieved together when sorrow struck. They both loved their God and followed the principles of their gospel. Hannah and small children went to the farm and helped with the vegetable garden and gleaned wheat. Just as the last of the crop was gathered, William was called to go meet Johnson’s army. During the year of 1857 he was commissioned a Colonel in the Nauvoo Legion by Brigham Young, who was then Governor of the State of Utah. With his men William marched to Echo Canyon to defend the people's rights, which were then invaded in the "Mormon War." This left the gathering and hauling of the winter wood to Hannah and her little boys. Mary Ann tended the smaller children, and they managed very well, even to helping neighbors who were sick or ailing. In 1858, due to the trouble starting because of Johnson’s Army protesting the Mormons, William was advised to take his family and move them south. He took them to Payson, Utah. They moved into a small log cabin, the only shelter available. The roof was not even completely closed in over their heads. While there Hannah gave birth to a daughter, Phebe Arinda, and Mary gave birth to a son, Levi James. Family history tells us that when the children were born kind neighbors placed their carpet pieces and blankets over the inadequate roof to make them more comfortable. During this same year William and Hannah's first son John Samuel passed away. William was subsequently commissioned major in the Nauvoo Legion, which office he held until the Legion was disorganized by order of the Governor of Utah. It had been said that before leaving Ogden William stored some flour away in the ground for later use. In the winter of 1859 it was considered safe for him to bring his family back to Ogden. They moved into a small adobe home east of Washington Avenue. The winter was bitter cold with five feet of snow. William located the spot where he had left the flour and dug it up. Once again they were glad for “Flour Lumpy Dick.” A "dick" is simply a boiled pudding, and this dish is kin to the infamous "spotted dick." There is no doubt that, even with vigorous stirring of the flour during its addition and cooking, this dish indeed would be lumpy. While the dish is associated with Mormons in San Bernardino, it is a traditional English dish of the poor. Lumpy Dick 3 quarts rich milk 6 cups flour 1 teaspoon salt 3 cups cream Heat milk to boiling - stir continuously. Mix flour, salt, and cream to pie dough consistency. Add by handfuls to hot milk until it thickens. Stir constantly. Dish up in bowls, sprinkle with sugar, serve with milk. Delicious! We are told they used this flour most sparingly, making it last until spring. Another daughter, Sally Rosabella, was born November 16, 1861, to Hannah. She died at the age of seventeen in the year 1878. At this time William was given badly needed employment on the railroad and daughter Polly Ann in her family narration wrote, “With the first money my father earned on the railroad he bought me my first pair of real grown up shoes.” She was then 12 years old. William was a hard worker being a man of great physical strength. He made shingles and is believed to be the first to make shingles in the Ogden area. William’s farm land was in Marriott, Utah. Although he was always bothered by wet soggy lowlands, he did succeed in making his ground pay. Two more children were born to William and his first wife Hannah. They were Charles Asa, born August 17, 1869, died July 3, 1870, and Hyrum Barney born February 11, 1871. Charles Asa lived to be 11 months old, Hyrum Barney lived to be one year old. After the Manifesto (a statement officially disavowing the continuing practice of plural marriage) it was necessary for William to be away from his family. This was hard on him. His health was failing and this proved to be one of his greatest trials. He was, however, able to spend his last years with his first wife Hannah in the small house east of Washington Avenue. He died true to the gospel and to his maker on December 15, 1895. The funeral, which was largely attended, was held in the Second ward meeting house. Addresses were delivered by Elders Charles F. Middleton, Bishop Robert McQuarrle, Joseph Hall and others who were intimately acquainted with him for a great number of years. All the speakers bore testimony of his great worth as a man, a citizen, a soldier, a husband and father, and a faithful Latter-day Saint. His posterity was large, seventy-eight in all at the time of his death. He had sixteen children, fifty-five grand children and seven great-grandchildren, most of whom survived him. He was of a peaceful disposition, a patient sufferer in affliction. He was upright and honest in all his dealings with his fellow men. He assisted in bringing the railroad in Ogden and the first road in Ogden Canyon. He was formerly a Seventy, and at the time of his death was a member of the High Priest quorum. William Elmer was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Nauvoo Legion. He was loved and respected by all who knew him. Hannah was made the administrator of his property. She allocated his twenty-acre farm in Marriott to his two sons Levi and Heber. They and their mother Mary Ann Gheen moved there to make their home. Hannah remained in Ogden until her death on May 22, 1897. Hannah was the mother of twelve children, all born during this period of poverty and privation. She gave many hours of her time helping others, and being a midwife, brought hundreds of babies into the world. She lived a good and faithful life, and was loved by all. Mary Ann passed away seven years later on April 18, 1903. It was recalled that at the death of Hannah, Mary Ann was inconsolable. She said, “She was the best friend I ever had.”

History of John Elmer

Contributor: rgrua Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

We don't know just when John Elmer moved from Vermont to Indiana, but records show that his wife, Sarah died there in 1838. It seems John Elmer,his sons and their families came from Indiana to Adams County Illinois, and from there to Council Bluffs, Iowa, the gathering place of the Mormon Saints who had been driven out of Nauvoo, Illinois and the surrounding area. Finally in 1852 John his sons, William, Hyrum, and Ira Bartlett with their families were ready to leave with the Uriah Curtis Company for the great Salt Lake Valley. They left Council Bluffs in June and arrived in Utah, October 1, 1852. By this time John was 16 Years old. The Elmers moved to Payson (we don't know just where). At the DUP (Daughters of the Utah Pioneers) building there is a history of John Elmer which gives some important facts. John Elmer married his second wife, a widow, Harriet Gould Bronson, the widow of Seymore Bronson. (NOTE: We don't know whether he married her before he crossed the plains or after he reached Payson). However he did have two children by Harriet. Their names Lercrialea (sp) and Jerusha. It's said that John Elmer was a large well built man. That he had a pleasant personality, and had a keen sense of humor. He was honest and upright in his dealings with his fellow man, consequently he had a host of friends where ever he went. In his native state of Vermont, he was one of the best shingle makers in his area. He was also a shoe maker by trade. After coming to Utah he followed these two professions. He was also a farmer in Payson. John Elmer lived a long and useful life and died at the ripe old age of 94 years in Payson, Utah on 11 February 1871. He was laid to rest in the cemetery in the little town that he helped to pioneer. His children by his wife Sarah, married the following companions: Tryphena married John Chamberlain Johnson Cynthia married James Sweat Samuel Fifield married Sarah Bennett Wealthy married David Elmer John married Lucy Rich Sally married John Loveless Hyrum King married Lucina Elmer William married Hannah Pauline Child Ira Bartlett married 1st Eveline Elizabeth Wright 2nd Sarah Selina Lecht.

Life Timeline of William Elmer

1820
William Elmer was born on 16 Sep 1820
William Elmer was 11 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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William Elmer was 20 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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William Elmer was 39 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1859
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William Elmer was 40 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1860
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William Elmer was 54 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
1874
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William Elmer was 68 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
1888
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William Elmer died on 14 Dec 1894 at the age of 74
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for William Elmer (16 Sep 1820 - 14 Dec 1894), BillionGraves Record 1239025 Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States

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