Wiley P Allred

31 May 1818 - 28 Mar 1912

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Wiley P Allred

31 May 1818 - 28 Mar 1912
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Wiley Payne Allred Born 31 May 1818 to James Allred and Elizabeth Warren Married Elizabeth Ann Davies 2 July 1851 Wiley Payne-Mary Eliza-Mary Eliza-Eudean-Earl Died 28 March 1912 Buried in the Emery Cemetery Wiley Payne Allred was born in Farmington, Bedford County, Tennessee, 31 May 1818. His fathe
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Life Information

Wiley P Allred

Born:
Died:

Emery Cemetery

300 W. 525 N.
Emery, Emery, Utah
United States
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paulkillpack

May 28, 2012
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paulkillpack

May 28, 2012

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Wiley Payne Allred

Contributor: paulkillpack Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Wiley Payne Allred Born 31 May 1818 to James Allred and Elizabeth Warren Married Elizabeth Ann Davies 2 July 1851 Wiley Payne-Mary Eliza-Mary Eliza-Eudean-Earl Died 28 March 1912 Buried in the Emery Cemetery Wiley Payne Allred was born in Farmington, Bedford County, Tennessee, 31 May 1818. His father’s name was James Allred and his mother was Elizabeth Warren. He was baptized by George N. Hinkle on 10 September 1832. He was confirmed by Daniel Cathcard on 10 September 1832. He was ordained a Seventy by Jacob Gates April 6, 1841. He was ordained a High Priest by Rubin W. Allred in 1853. While a boy of twelve years he left Tennessee and went to Missouri. He joined the Mormon Church in 1832. Joseph Smith blessed him at 18 years of age to practice medicine. He was a herb doctor. He worked in Sanpete County, Utah, and later in Emery County, Utah. He came to Utah in 1851. He was Bishop in Sevier County in 1853. He moved to Emery County from Spring City 19 November 1884. He was a doctor and a stone cutter. He had blue eyes and black hair. He died 28 March 1912 at Emery, Utah, of old age. His wives and children in chronological order: Sarah Zabriskie, married 26 June 1836 (daughter of Henry Zabriskie and Ellen Galpin, of Eugene County, Indiana, pioneers 1851). She was born 8 October 1814 in Eugene County, Indiana and died 22 May 1851 while en route to Utah. She was baptized in October 1835 by Thomas B. Marsh, confirmed October by Thomas B. Marsh. Their children were James Henry, born 17 June 1837; Parley Pratt, born 8 July 1839, and married Caroline Anderson; Elizabeth Hannah born 27 September 1843 and married Sanford Holman; Wiley Payne, born 19 January 1847 and married Emma Anderson; Sarah Eleanor, born 10 June 1850. After Sarah's death her family lived in Provo and Fountain Green, Utah. Elizabeth Ann Davies, married 2 July 1851. She was born 15 July 1815. Their child, Mary Eliza, was born 31 July 1852 and married Andrew Anderson. She lived in Provo briefly after arriving in Utah and then in Fountain Green. Johannah Olsen, married 28 October1863 in Salt Lake City, Utah. (She was the daughter of Hans Olsen of Hydleberg, Sweden. She was born 10 November 1835 and came to Utah in 1863. Their children: William Alma, born 28 July 1864 and married Nancy Miles. Hulda Deseret, born 10 March 1866 and married Joseph Nielson; Martin, born 11 June 1868 and married Susan Jane Barney; Isaac, born 7 September 1870 and married Johannah Christina Christensen; Reuben, born 26 April 1874 and died February 1875; Sena, born 15 December 1875 and died January 15, 1876; John Taylor, born 31 November 1879. Caroline Andrea Frederickson, married 31 July 1871 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was born 18 November 1841 and died 10 November 1873. No children. She was born in Copenhagen, Denmark. Mother’s name was Me Devey. Wiley Payne was a friend of the Prophet Joseph Smith. He and his family moved to the Muddy (now Emery, UT) in 1884. As a young man, he received a special blessing from the Prophet Joseph Smith who told him that if would study herbs and their healing power he would obtain great knowledge along this line. He had many experiences while living in Spring City, Utah during both the Walker and Blackhawk Indian Wars, rendering valuable help in this town. He was considered very good at setting bones, pulling teeth and treating wounds. He always said the only broken bone that hurt was his own, which he set while he was along after a load of wood. Wiley Payne Allred Material for this biography was taken from a history written by his granddaughter, Grace H. Sainsbury. Stories by his son Isaac Allred and his daughter, Hulda Nielsen and includes his personal testimony which he dictated to his granddaughter, Mary Johannah Allred. Wiley Payne Allred was born 31 May 1818 in Farmington, Bedford County, Tennessee. He was the son of James and Elizabeth Warren Allred. On September 19, 1832, he was baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. From Tennessee, he moved with his parents to Missouri where he passed through the persecutions of the Saints in that state and was driven into Illinois. At Nauvoo, he was the Prophet Joseph Smith’s hired hand and lived in his home. He was also a member of the Prophet’s body guard. He always enjoyed telling his experience of helping build a barn for the Prophet. He said many times when he was working around the place, the Prophet would come bounding out of his office and demand that he stop his work and engage in jumping or wrestling with him or some other athletic sports. He was with the Prophet on some of his most trying and dangerous times, disguising himself, going with the mob to find out their plans so that he might protect him (Joseph Smith). He was working in the mob as a spy the night the Prophet was killed and he saw him fall from the window of the Carthage Jail. After the assassination at Carthage Jail, John Taylor was rescued and taken to Wiley Payne’s father’s home, James Allred. Wiley Payne had known the names of the different herbs that grew about their home when he was only seven years old. While he was living in the Prophet’s home, the Prophet told him that he was a natural born doctor and that he should follow that profession. (This happened at a time when the Prophet’s leg was badly hurt and gangrene had set in. Wiley P. Allred and his father, James Allred, doctored the Prophet’s leg at that time.) The Prophet gave Wiley Payne a Doctor’s book on herbs and their uses. Then he gave him a special blessing and told him that if he would make a study of this book and of herbs that he would be able to put his finger on the spot where the trouble was in his patients. He was really able to do that. He studied and used the book carefully and treasured it throughout his life. He and his family have thought of it as something sacred. It is still in the family. In the last years of Wiley Payne’s life he made the claim that no living person knew the Prophet more than he. Wiley Payne Allred was with the Allred branch which was one of the forty LDS Branches of the Church organized in Pottawattamie County, Iowa, in 1846 and continued until 1852. The center of the Branch was about five miles east of Council Bluffs. In 1848 the Saints of the Allred Branch raised crops of wheat for spring harvest. One year they planted 24 acres of wheat. They also raised corn, buckwheat, turnips, etc. The Allred Branch, or as it was sometimes called “Allred’s Camp” was frequently mentioned in the Frontier Guardian. The settlement was broken up in 1852 when all the saints who had located temporarily in Pottawattamie County migrated to Utah. In June 1846 Wiley Payne married Sarah Elizabeth Zabriaskie of Eugene County, Indiana. They had five children, James Hon., Parley Pratt, Elizabeth Hannah, Wiley Payne, II, and Sarah Eleanor. On May 22, 1852 Wiley Payne with his family started to Utah in Captain Kelsey’s Company. His wife was ill at the time but she was very anxious to go to Utah and thought she could make the trip. However it was too much for her and she passed away the first night they camped. They had stopped by the ranch of a man, Mr. Dapree. He walked up to the fence cursing the Mormons and telling them to drive on, but when he saw what had happened, he was so touched by the family’s grief that he told them to stay. Wiley Payne was so overcome with grief that he almost persuaded himself to return to Council Bluffs with the rest of his family. Finally he decided to return to Council Bluffs and bury his wife and then continue the journey. Before they reached Utah, the leaders of the Church advised him to marry Elizabeth Ann Davies, a widow lady. They were married and had one child, Mary Elizabeth. When they arrived in Utah, they settled in Sessions for a short time. Then they moved to Provo; and from there, they were called to go to Spring City, Sanpete County, in 1853. Because of Indian troubles, the settlers were forced to move from place to place. Wiley Payne moved to Manti, to Fountain Green and back to Spring City. He went through all the hardships of both the Walker and Blackhawk wars. Much of his property was destroyed by the Indians. Wiley Payne believed his children should have some education and he taught them to care for themselves. He was a brilliant man himself and took care of all of his family business affairs. He was very strict and stern with his children. In Spring City, he had a big blackboard hanging on the wall and the alphabet written on the board. The children had to study from that. Every night that he was home, they held a class period which he instructed. Some of his children had very little schooling except what he gave them. On July 31, 1871, he married Caroline Andrea Frederickson. She was a very refined and lovable woman but only lived a short time, passing away the 8th of November 1871. In 1884 Wiley Payne and his family moved to the Muddy (Emery) in Emery County. He spent the last eighteen years of his life there and did much to help settle the town of Emery. During all these years he was the Doctor in each community where he lived, using herbs as his medicine to fight contagious diseases and crude instruments to perform many surgical operations; having faith in the Supreme Being and the blessing he had received from the Prophet. At one time a man living in Idaho sent for him to come and doctor his wife who had dropsy. He made the trip on a horse, cured the woman and for his pay he received a cow which he drove back to Fountain Green. People had a great deal of confidence in him as a pioneer doctor. He deserves a prominent place in history. He was also a very skillful stone cutter and made many tombstones from native rock. He was of medium weight, had blue eyes and black hair, which turned a snowy white as he grew older. He had a very erect posture, was an athlete when young and was very active in his old age. He was very stern, yet kind and tender hearted. He had a very strong testimony of the gospel and proclaimed right up to his dying day that Joseph Smith was a true Prophet of God. A while before his death he dictated his testimony to his granddaughter, Mary Johanna Allred. She wrote it in her autograph book and he signed his name. His hand was very shaky and trembling, but the words he dictated rang strong and true. They are as follows: "Joseph Smith was the greatest man I have ever known, and a true Prophet of God." Signed, Wiley Payne Allred. He passed away March 28, 1912, at Emery, Utah, at the age of 94, a true and faithful Latter-day Saint. Wiley Payne used what is now called the Emery County Cabin as a doctor's office where he set limbs, pulled teeth, and applied herbal remedies. The Wiley Payne Allred house is in Spring City.

Life story by his grand daughter

Contributor: paulkillpack Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Biography of Wiley Payne Allred Material for this biography was taken from a history written by his granddaughter, Grace H. Sainsbury; Stories by his son Isaac Allred and his daughter, Hulda Nielsen and includes his personal testimony which he dictated to his granddaughter, Mary Johannah Allred. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­___________________________________ Wiley Payne Allred was born 31 1818 in Farmington, Bedford County, Tennessee. He was the son of James and Elizabeth Warren Allred. On September 10, 1832 he was baptized into the Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter-Day Saints. From Tennessee he moved with his parent to Missouri where he passed through the persecutions of the Saints in that state and was driven into Illinois. At Nauvoo he was the prophet Joseph Smith's hired hand and lived in his home as well as being a member of the Prophets body guard. He always enjoyed telling his experience of helping build a barn for the Prophet: He said many times when he was working around the place, the Prophet would come bounding out of his office and demand that he stop his work and engage in jumping or wrestling with him or some other athletic sports. He was with the Prophet on some of his most trying and dangerous times, disguising himself, going with the mob to find out their plans so that he might protect him. He was working in the mob as a spy the night the Prophet was killed and he saw him fall from the window of the Carthage jail. After the assassination at Carthage jail, John Taylor was rescued and taken to Wiley Payne’s father's home, James Allred. Wiley Payne had known the names of the different herbs that grew about their home when he was only seven years old. While he was living in the Prophet's home, the Prophet told him that he was a natural born doctor and that he should follow that profession. (This happened at a time when the prophet's leg was badly hurt and gangreen had sat in. Wiley P. Allred and his father, James Allred, doctored the Prophet's leg at that time.) The Prophet gave Wiley Payne a Doctors book on herbs and their uses. Then he gave him a special blessing and told him that if he would make a study of this book and of herbs that he would be able to put his finger on the spot where the trouble was in his patient, and he was really able to do that. He studied and used the book carefully and treasured it through­out his life. He and his family have thought of it as something sacred. It is still in the family. In the last years of Wiley Payne's life he made the claim that no living person knew the Prophet more than he. Wiley Payne Allred was with the Allred branch which was one of the forty L.D.S. Branches of the Church organized in Pottawattamie County, Iowa, in 1846 and continued until 1852. The center of the Branch was about five miles east of Council Bluffs. In 1848 the Saints of the Allred Branch raised crops of wheat for spring harvest. One year they planted 294 acres of wheat. They also raised corn, buckwheat, turnips, etc. The Allred branch, or as it was sometimes called "Allred's camp" was frequently mentioned in the Frontier Guardian. The settle­ment was broken up in 1852 when all the saints who had located temporarily in Pottawattamie County, migrated to Utah. In June 1846 Wiley Payne married Sarah Elizabeth Zabriski of Eugene County Indiana. They had five children, James Henry, Parley Pratt, Elizabeth Hannah, Wiley Payne Jr. and Sarah Eleanor. On May 22, 1852 Wiley Payne with his family started to Utah in Captain Kelsey’s Company. His wife was ill at the time but she was very anxious to go to Utah and thought she could make the trip. However it was too much for her and she passed away the first night they camped. They had stopped by the ranch of a man, Mr. Dapree. He walked up to the fence cursing the Mormons and telling them to drive on, but when he saw what had happened he was so touched by the family's grief that he told them to stay. Wiley Payne was co overcome with grief that he almost persuaded himself to return to Council Bluffs with the rest of his family. Finally he decided to return to Council Bluffs and bury his wife and then con­tinue the journey. Before they reached Utah, the leaders of the Church advised him to marry Elizabeth Ann Davis, a widow lady with one child. They were married and had one child, Mary Elisabeth. When they arrived in Utah they settled in Sessions for a short time. Then they moved to Provo and from there, they were called to go to Spring City, Sanpete County, in 1852. Because of Indian trouble the settlers were moved form place to place. Wiley Payne went to Manti in 1853, then to Ephraim and Sevier where he was Bishop. In 1859 he again moved to Spring City, in 1862 Fountain Green and Finally to Castle Valley (on the muddy) in 1884 and did much to help settle the town of Emery. He spent the last twenty years of his life in Emery County. He went through all the hardships of both the Walker and Black Hawk wars. While living in Spring City the Indians made a raid killing every pig and chicken they had. They opened their feather beds letting feathers fly all over the place and then set fire to the house. The only thing that was left standing was the white rock chimney which stood out as a sentinel against the blue horizon for many years. Another trying experience was when his wheat was just ready to cut he had made arrangements to have it done the next day, but the grasshoppers swept down upon it and entirely devoured it, the field was swept clean. Grandfather walked the floor and grieved most of the night because he did not know where to get bread for his family. In 1863 he married Johannah Olsen. They had seven children; William Alma, Hulda Deseret, Martin, Isaac, Reuben, Lena and John Taylor. Wiley Payne believed his children should have some education and be taught to care for themselves- He was a brilliant man himself and took care of all his family business affairs. He was very strict and stern with his children. In Spring City he had a big black board hanging on the wall and the alphabet written on a board. The children had to study from that. Every night that he was home they held a class period which he instructed. Some of his children had very little schooling except what ho gave them. On July 31, 1871 he married Caroline Andrea Frederickson. She was a very refined and lovable woman but only lived a short time, passing away the 8th of November, 1871. In 1884 Wiley Payne and his family moved to the Muddy in Emery County. He spent the last eighteen years of his life there and did much to help settle the town of Emery. During all these years he was the Doctor in each community where he lived, using herbs us his medicine to fight diphtheria and other diseases, crude instruments to perform many surgical operations; having faith in the Su­preme Being and the blessing he had received from the Prophet. At one time a man living in Idaho sent for him to come and doctor his wife who had dropsey. He made the trip on a horse, cured the woman and for his pay he received a cow which he drove back to Fountain Green. People had a great deal of confidence in him as a Pioneer Doctor. He deserves a prominent place in history. He was also a very skillful stone cutter and made many tombstones from native rock. He was clever in carving things with his knife. He was of medium height and weight, had blue eyes and black hair, which turned a snowy white as he grew older. He had a very erect posture, was an athlete when young and was very active in his old age. He was very stern, yet kind and tenderhearted. When he was 78 years old he rode a white horse from Emery to Fountain Green and said he was not very tired as he could get off and walk the rest himself. He had a very strong testimony of the gospel and proclaimed right up to his dying day that Joseph Smith was a true Prophet of God, A while before his death he dictated his testimony to his granddaughter, Mary Johannah Allred. She wrote it in her autograph book and he signed his name. His hand was very snaky and trembling, but the words he dictated rang strong and true, They are as follows: "Joseph Smith was the greatest man I have ever known, and a true Prophet of God." signed, Wiley Payne Allred. He passed away March 28, 1912, at Emery Utah, at the age of 94. A true and faithful Latter Day Saint.

Brief History of Wiley Payne Allred and Elizabeth Ann Davies

Contributor: paulkillpack Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

BRIEF HISTORY OF WILEY PAYNE ALLRED AND ELIZABETH ANN DAVIES By Reed W. Anderson Wiley Payne Allred, son of James Allred and Elizabeth Warren, was born Nay 31, 1818 in Farmington, Bedford County, Tennessee. He married Sarah Zabriskie, June 26, 1836. She was the daughter of Henry Zabriskie and Ellen Galpin of Eugene County, Indiana. She was born October 8, 1814 in Eugene County, Indiana. Sarah Zabriskie died May 22, 1851 at the farm of a Mr. DePuc in Nebraska while en route to Utah. She was buried at Council Bluffs, Iowa. They were the parents of the following children: James Henry, Born 17 June 1837 at Far West, Dvss . County, Mssr; Parley Pratt, born 8 July, 1839, Adams County, Illn; Elizabeth' . Hannah, born 27 Sept., 1843, Lee County, Iowa; Wiley Payne, Jr., born 19 Jan. 1847 and Sarah Eleanor, born 10 June, 1850, the last two children being born in Pttwtt County, Iowa. Wiley Payne Allred married Elizabeth Ann Davies on July 2, 1851. It is said that the marriage was performed by President Brigham Young. Elizabeth Ann was born 4 March 1816 in Liverpool, Lanch, Engl to Joseph Davies and Ann Nichols. She and her first husband, George Chapple or possibly George David Chapple were converts to the LDS Church and were on their way to Utah when he died. Wiley Payne Allred and Elizabeth Ann Davies had but one child, (i.e.) my Grandmother, Mary Eliza who was, born 31 July, 1852 in Provo, Utah. (More.will be said about Mary Eliza in another biography) Wiley Payne Allred had two other wives, Johannah Olsson, who he married on 22 Oct 1863. They had seven children; William Alma, born 29 July 1864; Hulda Deseret, born 10 Mar 1866; Martin Ralph, born 11 June 1868, Isaac Allred, born 7 Sep 1870; Reuben Allred born 28 Apr 1874, Senie Allred born 15 Dec 1875 and John Taylor born 31 Dec 1879. Wiley Payne Allred was a friend of the Prophet Joseph Smith and at one time served as his body guard. Wiley Payne Allred and his family moved to the Muddy (now Emery in 1884. As a young man he had received a special blessing from the Prophet Joseph Smith who told him that if he would study herbs and their healing power he would obtain great knowledge along this line. He was given a huge doctor book by the Prophet and with its help and the blessings from the Lord he went about healing the sick He had many experiences while living in Spring City, Utah during both the Walker and Blackhawk Indian Wars, rendering valuable in this town. He was considered very good at setting bones, pulling teeth and treating wounds. He always said the only broken bone that hurt was his own, which he set while he was alone after a load of wood. The manner in which he practiced medicine and did surgery in the early days were very crude. Whiskey was about the only anesthetic available and was only used in extreme cases. For minor things like pulling teeth the patient simply had to suffer through it.

Wiley Payne Allred

Contributor: paulkillpack Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

By Unknown Author Wiley Payne Allred and his family moved to the Muddy in 1884. As a young man he had received a special blessing from the Prophet Joseph Smith who told him that if he would study herbs and their healing power he would obtain great knowledge along this line. He was given a huge doctor book and, with its help and the blessings from the Lord, he went about healing the sick. He lived in the Prophet's home as a bodyguard. He had many experiences while living in Spring City, Utah, during both the Walker and Blackhawk Indian wars, rendering valuable service to his town. He was considered very good at setting bones, pulling teeth, and treating wounds. He always said the only broken bone that hurt was his own, which he set while he was alone after a load of wood. The ways he practiced medicine and did surgery (in the early days) were very crude. Whiskey was about the only anesthetic available and was only used in extreme cases. For minor things like pulling teeth the patient simply had to suffer through it. His promise of great knowledge in the use of herbs grew with the years. Following is a small list of the common things gathered from garden and field which he used with great success. Herbs and leaves were gathered throughout the summer, dried, and kept in a clean place to be used for sickness. Sena tea was a good laxative. Sage tea, and sulphur and molasses were used for spring tonics. Peppermint, spearmint, yarrow, and horehound teas eased and often cured a stomach ache. Nanny berry tea, made from sheep manure helped to bring out measles and other rashes, catnip tea induced sleep, especially soothing a fretful child, even a tiny baby. An asafetida bag worn on a string around the throat was a "sure thing" for warding off colds. (A germ wouldn't dare get near for the smell.) A few herbs administered with faith cured many small ailments. Tea from boiled dandelion roots and also stone slack parsley tea were used for kidney and liver infection. For an upset stomach, teas from raspberry leaves and ginger root were very good. Foxglove was a good heart stimulant and sumac a cardiac depressant. As poultices to draw out infection, the red petals from slippery elm blossoms mashed into a pulp, and egg yolk mixed with common table salt were both very effective. A salve made by melting and mixing tallow, resin, and sticky gum from pine trees healed chapped skin in just a few hours, although it was quite messy. For bad burns soft, fresh cow manure was unbeatable. Heliotrope was used as a sedative and tranquilizer. Lobelia tea was used for cleansing wounds and as a depressant. Powdered fire weed stopped bleeding. Brother Allred set broken bones and doctored different diseases over a great many years. One time he fell and broke his leg. He said, "That is the only broken leg I have ever known to hurt." In 1889 his daughter, Mary Eliza Anderson, came to the Muddy with her eight children, ranging from age 17 to a baby of two years. Her husband was a polygamist who had two other wives and had to go into hiding. It was decided she and her family would be better off in Castle Valley with her father to look after them. There is no record of why Mr. Lisenbee left the Muddy after a few short years, unless his business venture didn't payoff. At any rate, Mary Eliza finally moved into his abandoned dug-out, which by this time was without the rock front, possibly washed away in one of the frequent floods that came down the creek. Her father had trained Mary Eliza (Aunt Liza, as she was lovingly called) in obstetrics and practical nursing. In the years following, she delivered many babies as well as caring for the sick. In all her practicing she went forth with a prayer in her heart for assistance from on high. Untold wonders, even miracles, were performed during her nursing years. She moved back to Fountain Green in 1894 and took care of her aging husband, Andrew Anderson. After his death in 1899 she returned to Emery, where she resumed her nursing duties. Her sons were all successful farmers and added much to church and civic activities. Her daughters, Mary Eliza Worthington (Aunt Lide) and Loretta Foote followed in their mother's footsteps, using the knowledge taught to them by their mother and Dr. Ellis R. Shipp. Loretta Foote was a licensed practical nurse. She was a great help during the flu epidemic in 1918. From then until 1923 she was kept busy delivering babies and tending to the needs of the sick. She then moved to Sanpete and Salt Lake City where she pursued her nursing career until her death at the age of eighty years. Wiley Allred's son Isaac helped his father with some of his patients, in setting broken bones, etc., and in later years when his father became too old and infirm to carry on, Isaac helped a great deal in minor illnesses and operations when a regular doctor was not available, or when epidemics struck the town, which was many times. He became quite skilled at setting broken limbs, extracting teeth, etc.

Wiley Payne Allred

Contributor: paulkillpack Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

WILEY PAYNE ALLRED By Unknown Author Wiley Payne Allred was born 31 May 1818 in Farmington, Bedford County, Tennessee. He was the son of James and Elizabeth Warren Allred. He had blue eyes and black hair. In 1830, while but a boy of twelve, he left Tennessee and went to Missouri. On 10 September 1832 he was baptized by George N. Hinkle and confirmed by Daniel Cathcart. He married Sarah Zabriskie 22 June 1836. They had five children. They lived in Far West, Missouri and later moved to Nauvoo, Illinois. He went through all the persecutions with the Saints both in Missouri and in Illinois. He learned to be a stone cutter while he worked on the Nauvoo Temple. He used this skill many times throughout his life. He was ordained a Seventy by Jacob Gates 6 April 1841. In Nauvoo, he lived with the Prophet Joseph Smith as a hired man and was also a member of his bodyguard. At one time, there was a mob with blackened faces who were plotting against the Prophet. Wiley blackened his face and joined the mob. After he had learned of their plans, he slipped away to warn the Prophet, and Joseph was able to get away. When Joseph Smith was being harassed by his enemies, he frequently went out to the Allred farm, which was a short distance from Nauvoo. He would stay for several days and live with the Allred family. While he was a young man living in Nauvoo, he was set apart by the Prophet Joseph Smith to be a doctor among the Saints. He doctored with herbs and had a gift of healing. He also pulled teeth and set broken bones. There were no pain-killing drugs available in those days. At one time, he set his own broken leg himself. He later said, "That was the only broken bone I ever set that hurt." This gift of healing has carried over for at least two or three generations. His first wife, Sarah Zabriskie, died at Winter Quarters 22 May 1851. She left five children, the oldest 14 years old and the youngest 1 year old. Wiley married Elizabeth Ann Davies Chappel 2 July 1851 for time only. She was the widow of George David Chappel. They had joined the Church in England and had started for Zion when he died enroute. She was later sealed to her first husband for time and eternity. She cared for Wiley Payne's five children until they were grown. They came West in 1851 and first settled near the Provo River. Here their daughter, Mary Eliza, was born 31 July 1852. She was their only child. He also married Johanna Olsen 28 October 1863 in Salt Lake City. They had seven children. He also married Caroline Andrea Fredrickson 31 July 1871. They had no children. He was ordained a High Priest by Rubin Allred in 1853. He served as a Bishop in Sevier County. He traveled through Sanpete and Sevier Counties on horseback, doctoring the sick. He was dearly loved for his wonderful and skillful service. He moved to Emery County 19 November 1884. He traveled through Emery County doctoring the sick. He had a "gift of healing." He could look at a sick person and tell them just where their pain was. He used herbs and had good results. His farm was by the Muddy Creek. The Saints in this ares were organized into the Muddy Ward. Food was scarce among all the Saints, but when someone was in distress, Wiley would give them a sack of flour or some other food from his meager supply. He helped build the tunnel that first brought water to Emery. He was a veteran of the Black Hawk Indian War and was a member of the Lot Smith Company. He lived to the age of 94 years 9 months and 3 days. When he was an old man, he frequently bore his testimony by saying, "I am a Josephite, but I am not one of those Reorganized Josephites. I am a Josephite because I know that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God. I don't just believe it, I know it. I have eaten with him, slept with him, pitched horseshoes with him, wrestled with him (I never could throw him,) I even risked my life to save his life. There are very few people still living who knew him as well as I did. I testify that he was a true prophet of God." He died 28 March 1912 in Emery, Utah and is buried in the Emery Cemetery.

Wiley Payne Allred - Personal History written by Caroleen Mellen May

Contributor: paulkillpack Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

WILEY PAYNE ALLRED Wiley was the sixth generation of Allred’s to have been born in America. In 1675, when his great-great-great-grandfather was born, the name was Aldridge. It evolved from Aldridge to Aldred and finally to Allred. Wiley Payne Allred was born May 31, 1818, in Farmington, Bedford County, Tennessee. He was the seventh child of James and Elizabeth Warren Allred. The children born into this family were: William Hackley, Martin Carrell, Hannah Caroline, Salley, Isaac, Reuben Warren, Wiley Payne, Nancy Chumy, Eliza Maria (also known as Elizbeth), James Tillman, John Franklin Lafayette, and Andrew Jackson. From Tennessee his entire family moved 1,000 miles west to Missouri in the spring of 1831 when he was about thirteen years of age. He, his parents, two brothers William and Isaac, and his Uncle Isaac were converted to the gospel. On September 10, 1832 they were all baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by George Hinkle and confirmed by Daniel Cathcard. Within the next three years the rest of his siblings were baptized. On June 26, 1836 he married Sarah Elizabeth Zabriskie while in Missouri. She was the daughter of Henry and Ellen Galpin Zabriskie of Eugene County, Indiana. She was born August 8, 1814. He was eighteen and she was twenty-two. Their first son James was born while living at Far West, Missouri. They had five children, James Henry, Parley Pratt, Elizabeth Hannah, Wiley Payne and Sarah Eleanor. In Missouri, Wiley was the Prophet Joseph Smith’s hired man and lived in his home, and was one of the prophet’s body guards. He always enjoyed telling his experiences of helping build a barn for the prophet. He said when they had worked a certain length of time, the Prophet would insist on them stopping and going out, engaging in a game of ball, jumping or enjoying other athletic sports. It was at Far West when he was living in the Prophet’s home that the Prophet told him he was a natural doctor and for him to follow that as a profession. He gave him a special blessing and a doctor book on herbs and their uses. He told him he would be able to put his finger on the spot where the trouble was in his patient---and he was able to do this. He knew the names of the herbs when he was seven years old. He studied, used the book carefully, and treasured it throughout his life. He and his family have regarded it as something sacred. It is still in the family. In the late years of his life he made the claim that no living person knew nor loved the prophet more than he. On April 6, 1841, Wiley Payne Allred was ordained a Seventy in the Melchezedek Priesthood. He was with the Prophet in some of his most trying and dangerous moments, disguising himself and going with the mob in order to find out their plans so that he might protect him. The Allred family went through the persecutions, being driven from one settlement to another, along with all the saints at that time. With no peace in Missouri, they moved onto a swampland on the banks of the Mississippi River. The work of draining it was hard, but through their efforts, a beautiful city, they named Nauvoo, was created. They worked hard to build a temple and formed a well-trained militia. During the few years they lived there, the persecutions did not cease. Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were martyred, homes were destroyed, and the saints eventually felt it necessary to seek peace in the west. By December10, 1845, the temple in Nauvoo was sufficiently completed that they could begin performing ordinances. Less than one month later Sarah and Wiley received their endowments. They were among the 105 persons having work done in the temple on January 9, 1846. It was very important to the saints that they attend the temple and receive their endowment before the great exodus from Nauvoo occurred. A lot of preparation and prayer went into the great exodus from Nauvoo. In the cold of the winter, during the month of February, they were able to drive the wagons across the Mississippi River on ice. They made their way to Iowa and formed a settlement named Winter Quarters in Pottawattamie County. Wiley was with the Allred Branch which was one of the forty LDS branches of the church organized in Pottawattamie County, Iowa, in 1846 and continued until 1852. The center of the branch was about five miles east of Council Bluffs. His father James Allred was over the branch. In 1848, the saints of the Allred Branch raised crops of wheat, corn, buckwheat, turnips, etc. The Allred Branch, or as it is sometimes called, Allred’s Camp, is frequently mentioned in the “Frontier Guardian.” The settlement was broken up in 1852 when nearly all the saints who had located temporally in Pottawattamie County, Iowa migrated to Utah. The Allred families and perhaps others from the Allred’s Branch, traveled toward the outfitting post outside Kanesville (Council Bluffs) near the Missouri River. Wiley’s wife was ill at the time, but was anxious to go to Utah and thought she could make the trip. However it was too much for her and she passed away the first night they camped on May 22, 1851. She lived to the age of thirty-seven. They had camped by the ranch of a Mr. DePue who walked up and down the fence the following morning, cursing the Mormons and telling them to drive on, but when he saw what had happened he was touched by the family’s grief and told them they could stop there. Wiley Payne Allred wanted to give up the trip and take his family of five children back, but the others persuaded him to go back and bury his wife while they waited for him. [It would be assumed that the close members from his family went with him.] He did this and upon his return they continued their journey to the outfitting post. His children ranged from fourteen down to a baby less than one year. After one hundred wagons arrived on the East Bank of the Missouri River, they were organized into a company. A meeting was held where Wiley’s father James Allred was the Chairman. Brother Easton Kelsey was nominated Captain of the wagon train, with Brother Luman A. Shirtliff Captain of the first fifty and Wiley’s brother Isaac Allred over the second fifty. They were seconded and all present were in favor. They were then organized into companies of tens with a captain over each ten wagons. The journey started from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa (present day Council Bluffs). They departed June 9, 1851. They went out to the Six Mile Grove where they waited until the whole company was ferried across the river. The entire company was together as they moved toward the Elk Horn River. The Elk Horn was very high and it was raining hard. They got word at the ferry that a company 16 miles west was surrounded by water and in danger of being swept off. So with Elder Hyde’s council, they spent the night at the ferry and turned north and traveled 18 miles up the Elk Horn River on June 13th. It was very slow going, the rain fell in torrents and the thunder shook the earth. Two of the brethren were knocked down with lightning on June 14th while standing by a stove which was struck by lightning in Captain Allred’s company, but none were badly hurt. All streams were high and overflowing their banks. At one point of the trek, they were building a bridge to cross over a swollen creek. Their camp was on the side of a hill and about dark there came a very hard rain, the water ran down the hill under their wagons so strong that it washed frying pans, plates and even chains down the hill. It rained all night and in the morning their bridge was gone, not one stick left. Elder Hyde was the person in charge of organizing, supplying and sending off the companies at Council Bluffs. He sent a company of horsemen from Kanesville (Council Bluffs) out to turn them back. They were informed that a difficulty had arisen between the Indians and the Mormons for which the emigration was threatened, that they were collecting to oppose their march. They returned to Six Mile Camp, arriving on June 22nd. After all this time and hard efforts they had only advance 10 miles toward the west. On June 27th or 29th they left again. Soon after leaving Six Mile Grove, a company from Garden Grove fell in with them. They corralled the animals and made camp. In the morning they found that several horses were taken from Captain Allred’s Company. They tracked the horses down the creek to a small Indian camp and all but two of the horses were recovered. On June 30th, they remained in camp to repair a wagon damaged by the oxen being frightened in the night. Isaac Allred’s Company had three stampedes and one of which there was a woman and child killed by the oxen. One time it was all they could do to turn them before they ran through camp. They found the oxen twenty miles away after one stampede. The oxen being not well broken, improved as they traveled. They hunted buffalo, antelope and fished along the way. At one time, they sent men on horses ahead to cut a path through a heard of Buffalo so the company could pass through. In the evenings there was merriment around the camp fires with singing and dancing. The weather was much more pleasant, but even though it was July, the nights were chilly. Three hundred miles before they reached the Valley, Captain Kelsey left the Shirtliff Company as he heard that Captain Allred’s Company was camped off the road and had gotten into trouble and could not travel. No record of the problem exists. Captain Kelsey then traveled to the Valley with Captain Allred and his company. That was the last the two camps seen of each other until they all reached Salt Lake. The Shirtliff group arrived on September 22nd, while the Allred group were delayed, arriving October 2nd on one record and October 7th on another. Before they reached Utah, some of the leaders advised Wiley to marry Elizabeth Ann Davis, an English woman, which he did. They later had one child, Mary Eliza. When they arrived in Utah, they settled in Sessions (now Bountiful in Davis County, Utah) for a short time, then Provo, but were called to go to Spring City, Sanpete County in 1852. His father and mother were there. Because of Indian troubles the settlers were moved from place to place. He went to Manti in 1853, then to Ephraim and Sevier County where he served as Bishop in 1853 and was ordained a High Priest. In 1859 he again moved to Spring City and in 1862 to Fountain Green and finally to Castle Valley (on the Muddy) where he spent the last twenty-five years of his life. He went through all the hardships of both the Walker and Black Hawk Wars. While living in Spring City, the Indians made a raid, killing every pig and chicken he had. The Indians opened their feather beds, letting feathers fly all over the place and set fire to the house. The only thing that was left standing was the white rock chimney which stood out as a sentinel against the blue horizon for many years. Another trying experience was when his wheat was ready to cut. He had made arrangements to have it harvested the next day, but the grasshoppers swept down upon it and entirely devoured it. The field was swept clean. He walked the floor and grieved most of the night because he did not know where to get bread for his family. On Oct. 28, 1863 he married Johannah Olsen. They had eight children: William, Hulda, Martin, Isaac, Ruben, Lena, Senie and John Taylor. On July 31, 1871, he married Caroline Andrea Frederickson. She was a refined, lovable woman but lived only a short time, passing away a few months later on November 8, 1871. During all this time, he was the doctor in each community in which he lived, using herbs as his medicine to fight diphtheria, small pox, dropsy and many diseases so prevalent at that time. He had only crude instruments to perform many surgical operations, but had faith in the Supreme Being and the blessings in which he had been promised. A man who moved to Idaho sent for him to come and doctor his wife who had dropsy. He made the trip by horse back and the woman recovered. For payment for his services he was given a cow, which he drove back to Fountain Green, walking and riding at intervals. People had a great deal of confidence in him, and as a pioneer doctor he deserves a prominent place in history. He was also a skillful stonecutter and was clever in carving things with his knife. He was of medium height and weight. He had blue eyes and black hair which turned snowy white as he grew older. He had an erect posture, was an athlete when young and very active in his old age. At the age of eighty-three years, he rode a white horse from Emery to Fountain Green, and said he was not very tired as he would get off and walk to rest himself. He was very stern, yet kind and tender-hearted. It is not know when Wiley moved to Emery County, but his daughter Hulda and her family moved there by 1887. Six of his thirteen children preceded him in death. At the time of his death he had in his possession a gun once owned by the Prophet Joseph Smith. He passed away on March 28, 1912 in Emery, at the age of ninety-four, a faithful Latter-day Saint. He is buried in Emery, Utah

Life Timeline of Wiley P Allred

1818
Wiley P Allred was born on 31 May 1818
Wiley P Allred was 7 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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Wiley P Allred was 14 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Wiley P Allred was 22 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Wiley P Allred was 41 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Wiley P Allred was 44 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1862
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Wiley P Allred was 60 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1877
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Wiley P Allred was 70 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
1888
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Wiley P Allred was 73 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1891
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Wiley P Allred was 90 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
1908
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Wiley P Allred died on 28 Mar 1912 at the age of 93
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Wiley P Allred (31 May 1818 - 28 Mar 1912), BillionGraves Record 1237029 Emery, Emery, Utah, United States

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