Andrew Lee Allen

24 Nov 1791 - 14 Aug 1870

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Andrew Lee Allen

24 Nov 1791 - 14 Aug 1870
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As told by his son, Charles Hopkins Allen, and condensed by Marsha Gold Allen: My Father, Andrew Lee Allen, was born in Limerick, York Co. Maine, 24 November 1791. He was the son of Elijah Allen and his first wife, Mehitable Hall. His mother died 25 June 1800 and his father remarried in 1809. His fa
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Life Information

Andrew Lee Allen

Born:
Died:

Richmond City Cemetery

398 200 E
Richmond, Cache, Utah
United States
Transcriber

DdraigGoch

May 18, 2012
Photographer

doclouie

May 14, 2012

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Andrew Lee ALLEN 1791 NY - 1870 UT

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

As told by his son, Charles Hopkins Allen, and condensed by Marsha Gold Allen: My Father, Andrew Lee Allen, was born in Limerick, York Co. Maine, 24 November 1791. He was the son of Elijah Allen and his first wife, Mehitable Hall. His mother died 25 June 1800 and his father remarried in 1809. His father died 19 October 1839. After his mother's death father went to live with his maternal grandfather, Reverend Avery Hall. He stayed with them until he was 14 years old. Not being satisfied, he left home and never went back again. He worked at the blacksmith trade. He went on aboard a ship to help protect the American vessels during the war known as the war of 1812. After the war he went into Canada, but he got into trouble with the British by drinking a toast at a barn raising. The toast was, "he wished that the Eagle of America would triumph over the crown of Great Britain!” For this he got arrested by the British. Making his escape he went into the state of New York, Cattaraugus County where he obtained one hundred and sixty acres of land, and made himself a very nice home. He planned to settle down there for the rest of his life and soon owned a 1arge grove of trees and a prosperous farm. On the 11th of December 1824, at age 33, he married Clarinda Knapp, daughter of Calvin and Deborah Hopkins Knapp. Charles continues: My parents, Andrew and Clarinda Allen, stayed in Burton, Cattaraugus County New York until they had seven children; Elijah, Lydia, Saphronia, Charles, Andrew, James, and Sidney. They had not joined any religious society, but were honest and upright with all men, waiting for something to come along that would give them better satisfaction than the religions of the day. In September 1833 there were two Latter-day Elders who came through that part of the country and held meetings. Father was not at home at the time and did not hear them preach, but my mother and several of their friends and neighbors did, and they were very impressed. When my Father came home Mother told him of the Elders and the gospel that they preached and he became very anxious to hear them. He learned that they would preach in a place eighty miles from there and he concluded that he would go to hear them. This he did, and he listened to the Gospel of Jesus Christ for the first time. He was much pleased, and being satisfied that it was true. He was baptized on the 3rd of September 1833 by Ezra Landing before he returning home. He received a testimony that never left him. He went home and began to arrange his business according to the spirit of gathering. He sold his beautiful home for a low price and moved to Kirtland, Ohio. Here he met the Prophet Joseph Smith and the Saints and rejoiced with them. My father bought considerable real estate and paid a good price for it, but the price of land soon went down and he did not receive anything for it. He left and started West for Missouri. Because of sickness and the want of means, he stopped on the Illinois River at Bardstown and stayed through the winter. My father cut cordwood all winter and my brother Elijah hauled it. In this way we were sustained. We then moved back [a short distance] east to Virginia, Cass County where we rented a farm from Mr. Levi Springer, who was a Methodist preacher. He treated us very kindly. After farming there one year we moved about twenty-five miles farther East and rented from a man by the name of Alfred Dutch, who lived on the road that Springfield. Mr. Dutch was very kind to our people. While we were there, the Prophet Joseph was taken to Springfield to be tried on a false charge. The Prophet Joseph and his company stayed overnight on the 20th of December 1842 with Captain Dutch, as he was called, and were kindly entertained. The women played on the piano and sang their beautiful songs. Captain Dutch spoke comical recitations and sang his songs. We enjoyed that visit very much! After living there one year, we moved back to Mr. Springer's again and lived there one year longer. Then we moved west again toward Nauvoo and stopped with Mr. Roberts, ten miles east of Carthage (where the Prophet and Patriarch were murdered). We became acquainted with Miner T. Deming who afterwards became the High sheriff of Hancock Co. He was very friendly to our people. On the 22nd of September 1842, while we were living near Plymouth, Illinois, Elder Thomas Crockett came to our house and baptized and confirmed six of the children, viz; Lydia, Saphronia, Charles, Andrew, James and Sidney. In the fall of the year we moved toward Nauvoo, and stopped on Camp Creek, fourteen miles north east of Nauvoo. We moved up to Camp Creek and rented a farm from Mr. Hibbert, where we farmed one year and raised a good crop of corn. We could not get anything for it there, but by hauling it to Nauvoo, fifteen miles away we could get ten cents a bushel for it. So we hauled corn nearly all winter into Nauvoo to sell. When the brethren were called to work on the new Temple at Nauvoo, my father took his turn. The Prophet Joseph required that those who wanted to have the privilege of receiving their endowment in the temple, must work one day in every ten building on it. My parents wanted very much to have that blessing in their lives. On 27 January 1846 my father and mother went into Nauvoo and received their blessings in the Temple of the Lord. (Later my father was ordained a High Priest on June 1847.) In the spring of 1846 we crossed the Mississippi River and started West with the Saints. It was very rainy and muddy which made it slow traveling. My Mother was feeble in health and my oldest sister, Lydia, was also afflicted with poor health (asthma) and they suffered a great deal, as they were exposed to wet and cold with only one wagon and eleven in the family. As we had no tent some of us were obliged to sleep out on the ground in the open air in rain and storm. We traveled on and stopped at Mt. Pisgah where we built a log house and put in some wheat and corn. As our supply of food was about gone we were obliged to go on and leave our improvements for others to enjoy. We traveled to Winter Quarters on the Missouri River and were obliged to go down into the state of Missouri and work for provisions. [At this time, 500 men members were called up into the Mormon Battalion for the Mexican War 1846-1847. Our oldest brother, 20 years old Elijah Allen, enlisted and was in Company B serving under Captain Jesse D. Hunter.] We traveled about seventy-five miles down the river and stopped with Mr. Cole in a small log house where we stayed through the winter. We worked harvesting corn and splitting rails. In the Spring of 1847 we moved down on the bottom to farm with Mr. Jacob H. Rose and we raised a large crop of corn. There was a Government Post about 60 miles up the river and had hoped to sell the corn at the post, but the post was on the west side of the river, and we were not able to sell and got nothing for it. In the Spring of 1848 we moved up toward Kanesville and stopped on Keg Creek, eighteen miles south of Kanesville, where there was a small branch of the Church organized with Elder Libeus G. ***** presiding. We belonged to the *****ville branch, where my father served as a counselor to President *****. We stayed there four years and opened up and improved two farms. My oldest brother, Elijah [returned from the Mexican War], and the younger boys established a sawmill near fathers’ farm and ran it one season before they sold it for $1,000.00. They used the money to get ready to come to Utah. In the spring of 1852 we sold our farms and prepared for starting west with the Saints. We went in the first company of 100 wagons. John M. Higby was the captain. Father was an excellent hand with his teams and took very good care of them. He taught his sons to take good care of their animals and it was said by people in the company that the Allen team was the best in the company and got to Utah in the best condition. Father was an excellent rope maker. He knew how to use weeds and herbs to make bright colored dyes for his tassels and decorations for his harnesses for his oxen. Our trip to Utah was a long and tiresome journey. We were about two months and a half on the road. We arrived in Salt Lake City the 13th of August 1852. In traveling up the Platte River I came near losing my life. We saw a good many buffalo on the road and the hunters killed several which were a great treat. We thought it was the sweetest meat we ever ate! When we got up to the Black Hills, our teams began to fail. Their feet became tired and sore. When we got to Sweetwater some of our cattle got poisoned on the alkali and died on the way. When we got within 110 miles of Salt Lake City, we came to Fort Bridger. A mountaineer, Mr. Bridger lived there about 20 years. He said that we could not raise a bushel of grain in that country on account of frost. He said there was frost there every month of the year. When we reached the Green River, it was so high that it was necessary to raise our wagons six inches high in the bolster in order to keep their loads dry. We stopped a few days in Salt Lake City and then moved south to Provo and made our home there. Father built a home not far from the lake and spent the rest of his life living in Provo. His land was located in section 4, township 7 South, range East. South East of South East. Our mother Clarinda Knapp died 8 Dec 1862 in Richmond, Cache County, Utah. Andrew Lee Allen died 14 August 1870 in Provo, Utah. (No one has found exactly where he was buried.)

Andrew Lee ALLEN - Profile of Kirtland Saints

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

book: A PROFILE OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS OF KIRTLAND, OHIO AND MEMBERS OF ZION'S CAMP, 1830-1839, Milton V. Backman, Jr., 1913 ALLEN, Andrew Lee, Sr. Born: 27 Nov 1791 at Wakefield, Carroll, N.H. Married: 11 Dec 1824 at Burton, Cattaraugus, N.Y. Died: 14 Aug 1870 at Provo, Utah, Utah Father: Elijah ALLEN Mother: Mehitable HALL Spouse: Clarinda KNAPP Born: 10 Aug 1802 at Bethlehem, Litchfield, Conn. Died: 7 Dec 1862 at Richmond, Cache, UT Father: Calvin KNAPP Mother: Deborah HOPKINS Appendix J Shareholders of the Kirtland Safety Society and Witnesses of the Articles of The Kirtland Safety Society : ALLEN, Andrew L. PECK, Martin H.

Andrew L. ALLEN - Pioneers & Prominent Men

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

book: PIONEERS AND PROMINENT MEN OF UTAH, Frank Esshom, 1913 ALLEN, Andrew Lee (son of Elijah ALLEN, born 1763, and Mehitable HALL, both of New Hampshire). He was born Nov 24, 1791, Limeric Parsonfield, N.H. Came to Utah Aug. 12, 1852, John M. HIGBEE company. Married Clarinda KNAPP 1825, who was born Aug 10, 1802, and came to Utah with husband. Their children: Elijah b. Feb 7, 1826 m. Eliza Ann BICKMORE; Lydia b. June 5, 1827; Sophronia b. Nov 6, 1828, m. Abram FOSTER; Charles b. Oct 15, 1830, m. Adelaide HOOPS; Andrew b. Aug 16, 1832, m. Manerva WHITTLE; James b. Oct 12, 1833 m. Mary MATHEWS; Sidney b. Aug 12, 1835, m. Ann COOPER; Susan b. Dec 31, 1837, m. John GOASLIND; Levi b. April 1, 1842, m. Lavinia HENSON; Julia b. June 8, 1844. Family home Provo, UT.

Charles Hopkins ALLEN & Elizabeth Adelaide HOOPES

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Charles Hopkins Allen was twelve years old when he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, along with five of his brothers and sisters. His father and mother, Andrew Lee Allen and Clarinda Knapp were baptized sometime before. He remembered that he was very pleased to become a Mormon even though there was much persecution of the Saints at that time. He was born 15 Oct 1830 in Cattaraugus County, New York, and moved to Kirtland, Ohio, with his family, in 1833. They left Kirtland at the same time the body of the Church moved westward, in 1838. His father's family was one that had to stop on the way to get work to provide for themselves. They rented a ranch from Mr. Springer in Bardstown, Illinois, for one winter and then went 25 miles farther west and rented a farm from Captain Alfred Dutch where they spent a pleasant evening with the Prophet Joseph Smith and Eliza R. Snow and their party as they were returning from a trial where the Prophet was wrongfully charged. Sometime later the family moved ten miles from Nauvoo and rented another farm. They raised a large field of wheat and took it to Nauvoo to have it ground into flour. They passed the home of the Prophet and on one of their trips the Prophet was talking to the men who were helping him put hay into his new brick barn. He suggested that they fill up the stream they were having a hard time crossing and one of his hired men said that it would be better to put a culvert there instead of filling it up. The Prophet laughed and said, "Yes, yes, that will be better and although you can outwit me, I can wrestle you down." The next year the Prophet and his brother Hyrum were murdered and it was a very sad time for the Saints who loved him dearly. When the family moved with the Saints in the spring of 1846 they stopped at the jail and saw the bullet holes in the door and the blood stains on the floor. Elijah, Charles' older brother went to work for and lived with Brigham Young in Nauvoo, so Charles had the responsibility of hauling corn from their farm to Nauvoo. Charles would occasionally stay all night with Elijah at Brigham Young's home. On New Years Day he was returning home with his empty wagon and ox team and it began raining. He walked most of the way so he became soaked to the skin. About sun down it cleared off and a very cold wind from the north brought freezing temperature. Within a mile and a half from home he came to Camp Creek and the water was so high and swift that he could not cross. His clothes started to freeze and he knew he had to do something so he tried to force the oxen into the stream, without success. He did not know how to swim so he waded as far as he could and then crossed by making a big leap, sinking to the bottom and then leaping again as he came up. The third time he could stand on his feet and he waded to the other side. A short distance from his home he had to cross another stream. He was so chilled that he could hardly walk but the water only came up to his hips. He was so weak that he kept falling down and would get up and try again. When he finally reached his home his parents were kind and helpful and made a big fire to warm him but it was too fast and he suffered great pain--more severe than he had suffered with the cold. After the family left Nauvoo Charles and Elijah ran a ferry across the Missouri River which was near where the "Mormon" bridge now stands. Charles was twenty-two when the Saints left Winter Quarters for the Great Salt Lake Valley in the spring of 1852 and he drove one of the teams in the train of 100 wagons. He remembered how good the buffalo meat tasted when the hunters brought the meat into camp for the travelers. The Allens were driving many head of cattle and some of them were poisoned on the alkali at one of their stops and died. After two years Charles and [his brother] Andrew decided to take some freight back to Salt Lake - [from California]. Charles with a six mule team and Andrew with a four horse team. They traveled with a train of fifteen wagons as it was not safe to travel alone. They traveled night and day at first but as they neared the desert they did not make such good time. They visited their parents in Provo and then went to Salt Lake City and unloaded their wares and loaded up again. Their Mother, sister Lydia and brothers Sidney and Levi returned with them to California. It was in the spring and most of the creeks were swollen. Their little mule teams had to swim along pulling their loads. It took the next nine months to make a trip to Carson City, Nevada, to get his sister Saphronia who wanted to visit her mother. The snow was very deep crossing the mountain and they had to ride horseback. Gold had been discovered in Carson City and there was a big boom at that time. Flour was $75.00 for a hundred pounds. Charles hauled lumber for $15.00 per thousand from Jefferson Hunt's saw mill, about twelve miles from town until 1862 when his mother wanted to go back to Utah to see her children as she felt that her days were numbered. It took thirty days to make the thousand miles. They visited Elijah in Ft. Harriman, Susan and Jack Goasland in Ogden, and then went to Richmond where the rest of the children were, except James who had stayed in California to dispose of their property. After seeing all her children that winter his mother became ill and died 7 Dec 1862. She was buried in the Richmond Cemetery. In the spring of 1863 Charles was called to go with a hundred wagon train to Iowa to bring back a group of immigrants who were coming to Utah from England and other parts of the Old World. Charles was also to be on the night watch. He stood guard half the night and helped drive the cattle in the morning. It took six months to make the trip, besides having to wait for the steamboat to arrive with the Saints. He went back to California and sold out his belongings, receiving 100 head of cattle as payment. He and his brother drove them. They had trouble with the Indians while crossing the Indian land. The Indian herder was a trusted man but the next morning they were four short. When he was told about it the Indian got mad and drew his bow at them. After a little calm talk, however, he went out about three miles and brought the cattle in. On 15 Jun 1864, at the age of 33, he married Elizabeth Adelaide Hoopes. Adelaide was one of the pioneer babies born, 9 Sep 1847 to Warner Hoopes and Priscilla Gifford, in a wagon box as their families were being expelled from Nauvoo and when they were traveling through Pottawattamie County in the state of Iowa, sometime before they arrived in Council Bluffs. She was about three years old when her parents moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, to find work as they did not have the means to travel any farther. "My father was a shoemaker by trade and my mother was a woman of great faith and energy. Father secured a job of burning charcoal and things looked good for them at the time. My mother was in poor health and they hoped this climate would make her better." Adelaide grew to be a sparkling black-eyed maiden with plenty of energy, courage and love. She was ten in 1857 when, after the Missouri persecution, they joined her Uncle Hyrum Hoopes, in Florence, Nebraska, and the group of Saints who were the last to leave Winter Quarters. Her job was to look after her baby brother, Daniel. She walked much of the way and carried Daniel on her back when he got too tired to walk. One of the cows in the cattle they were driving had a sucking calf and one of the men told Adelaide if she would catch the calf and tie it up at night she would have the milk in the morning. That sounded very good so she slipped up to the cow when the calf was getting his milk one evening and got the rope around the calf's neck. The calf became frightened and began to run. She hung on to the rope for quite a while but when she was pulled through the bushes and mud she had to let go. She never did get the milk. After they reached Utah and had moved to Richmond, Adelaide was chosen to help her father with herding and shearing the sheep. She learned to spin, weave and sew, besides cooking and keeping a tidy house. Her friend, Belinda Bear, was visiting here when Belinda's boyfriend called for her. His name was Charles Allen. In jest, Adelaide hid Belinda's bonnet and Belinda began to chase her around the house. Charles caught Adelaide, then about 17 years old, and held her until she told where the bonnet was. This began their courtship. Charles and Adelaide built a frame home and lived in Richmond until five children were born and then moved three miles north and homesteaded 160 acres in the canyon and made their home in Cove until five more children came. Charles was Branch President in Cove but the cold winters were too much for him and he was badly crippled with rheumatism. They thought they had better try a warmer climate for his health and decided on Arizona. They took 12 head of horses, two wagons and one white top buggy with them, stopping on the way to work in the St. George Temple a few days. They arrived in Mesa 13 Nov 1882 and bought 160 acres from John Lewis and they moved into the home that was there. Four more children were born, making a total of fourteen. Besides supporting their family, both Charles and Adelaide were active and held positions of leadership in the Church and in the community. Charles became an Indian missionary and labored with them fifteen years, having many spiritual experiences. On 19 Nov 1889 Adelaide died at the birth of her fourteenth child. It was a great sorrow to Charles and the children. The next year he returned to Logan, Utah, to work in the temple, and while working there he became acquainted with Annie Eliza Jones and was married to her in the Logan Temple, and then returned to his family in Mesa by train. Charles adopted her son Ira and they had seven more children.

Andrew Lee and Clarinda Knapp Allen -- Biography by Verleen Allen Comish Manwarring, A Great Great Grandaugther

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Andrew Lee Allen was born on November 24, 1791 in Limerick, York County, Maine, to Elijah Allen and Mehitable Hall. Elijah and Mehitable were married in 1788. Elijah was born in 1763 at Stratham, Rockingham County, New Hampshire. He died on October 19, 1839 at Limerick, York County, Maine. He was 76 years old. Mehitable was baptized March 26, 1769 at Rochester, New Hampshire. She died on June 25, 1800 in Corinth, Orange County, Vermont. She was 31 years old. Andrew was only nine years old when his mother died. After her death Andrew lived with his maternal grandfather, Rev. Avery Hall. He worked as a black smith when in his early teens. When he turned fourteen years old, being unsatisfied with his life, he left home and never went back. He went in the Navy and served in the War of 1812. On discharge from the Navy , he traveled to Canada where he got into trouble with the British by drinking a toast at a barn raising. His toast: “I wish that the Eagle of America would triumph over the Crown of Great Britain.” For this he was arrested by the British, but he managed to escape and leave Canada. He traveled to Burton, Cattaraugus County, New York, where he took up one hundred and sixty acres of land and built a nice home. He planned to settle down for life and soon owned a large grove of sugar maple trees in addition to a prosperous farm. He married Clarinda Knapp on December 11, 1824 in Cattaraugus County, New York. Clarinda was born on August 10, 1802 in Bethlehem, Litchfield County, Connecticut. Her father was Calvin Knapp who was born on April 18, 1770 at Bethlehem, Litchfield, Connecticut. Calvin married Deborah Hopkins on November 12, 1800. Calvin died on December 19, 1823 at Burton, Cattaraugus County, New York. He was 53 years old when he died. Deborah was born in 1778 at Kent, Litchfield County, New York. She was also 53 years old when she died (she was a direct descendant of Stephen Hopkins and his son Giles who both came on the Mayflower. Also Edward and Ann Fuller and son Samuel also came on the Mayflower). Clarinda was a refined, educated woman who was highly skilled in the art of fine painting, sewing, tailoring, and designing ladies leghorn hats, also homemaking. Her gentle upbringing had a great influence on the lives of those around her. She also was a woman of true faith and a Bible scholar. They remained in Burton, New York, where seven of their children were born, namely: Elijah, Lydia, Saphronia, Charles, Andrew, James, and Sidney. In September 1833 there were two Mormon (Latter-day Saint) elders who went through that part of the country as missionaries. They held meetings. Andrew Lee was not at home so did not hear them preach, but his wife, friends and neighbors did, and were very much impressed. When Andrew Lee learned about the elders and the gospel they preached, he became anxious to hear them. He learned they would be at a place 80 miles from there and decided to go hear them, which he did. He was satisfied it was true so he was baptized on September 3, 1833 by Ezra Landing before he left for home. Andrew received a testimony that never left him. After their conversion to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, they sold their home for a low price and disposed of their business and moved to Kirtland, Ohio, where they met the Prophet Joseph Smith and the rest of the saints. The building of the Kirtland Temple by a few hundred persons (including Andrew and Clarinda), who during the period between 1832 and 1836 contributed voluntarily of their money, material, and labor, were regarded with wonder throughout Northern Ohio. The temple was dedicated on March 27, 1836. Andrew and Clarinda’s oldest child, their 10 year old son Elijah, was baptized in the river (there was not baptismal font in the Kirtland Temple) by Elder Rogger Orton and confirmed in the Kirtland Temple by Elder Sidney Rigdon in 1836. While in Kirtland, their daughter Susan was born on December 31, 1837. Andrew purchased considerable real estate and paid a good price for it. Because of the troubles in Kirtland at the close of 1837 and the year 1838, a general exodus was made by those saints in the region of Kirtland who remained loyal to the Prophet. The Andrew Lee Allen family was part of this exodus. They tried to sell their land but got nothing for it. They left and started west for Missouri. Because of sickness and the want of means, they stopped at the Illinois River, at Bardstown and stayed through the winter. Andrew cut Cord wood and twelve year old Elijah hauled it. They then moved back east to Virginia, Cass County, Illinois, where they rented a farm from Mr. Levi Springer. There another son was born on April 1, 1842. He was named Levi. After farming there for one year, they moved about twenty-five miles farther east and rented a farm from Alfred Dutch, who lived on the road to Springfield, Illinois. After living there one year, they moved back to Mr. Springer’s again and lived there one year longer. Moving west again toward Nauvoo, they stopped with Mr. Roberts, ten miles east of Carthage, where the Prophet and Patriarch were murdered. While living there another daughter was born on June 8, 1844, she was named Julia. She was the last child born to the Andrew Lee Allen family, six boys and four girls. In 1844 they moved toward Nauvoo, and stopped at Camp Creek, fourteen miles northeast of Nauvoo. While in Camp Creek, they rented a farm from a Mr. Hibbert, where they farmed for a year and raised a good crop of corn. By hauling it fifteen miles to Nauvoo they received 10 cent a bushel for it. Their son Elijah moved to Nauvoo where he lived with Brigham Young and worked for him. He stayed there until the saints left Nauvoo. He drove one of Brigham Young’s wagons to winter quarters. In the winter of 1846, Andrew and Clarinda traveled to Nauvoo where they received their endowments in the Nauvoo Temple. Andrew was ordained a high priest in 1847. In the spring of 1846, they crossed the Mississippi River from Nauvoo and started west with the saints. It was very rainy and muddy which made for slow traveling. Clarinda was not well and Lydia had asthma so they both suffered a great deal as they were exposed to wet and cold with only one wagon for eleven in the family. As they had no tent, some of them had to sleep on the ground in the open air in the rain and storm. Traveling on they stopped at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa , where they built a long house and planted wheat and corn. As their supply of food was about gone, they had to go on and leave their improvements for others to enjoy. Traveling to Winter Quarters on the Missouri River it was necessary to enter the State of Missouri and work for provisions. After covering about seventy miles down the river, they stopped with Mr. Cole in a log house where they stayed the winter, harvesting corn and splitting rails. In the spring of 1847, they moved down on the bottoms to farm with Mr. Jacob H. Rose and raised a large crop of corn. They moved toward Council Bluffs in the spring of 1848 and stopped at Keg Creek eighteen miles south of Council Bluffs where there was a small branch of the church organized with Libeus G. Combs presiding. They stayed there four years and opened up and improved two farms. Elijah came home from California where he had mustered out of the Mormon Battalion. It was the fall of 1849 they family were still living at Keg Creek. Elijah and his younger brothers established a saw mill near their father’s farm and ran it one season before they sold it for $1000.00. They used the money to get ready to come to Utah. In the spring of 1852 they sold their farms and prepared for starting west with the saints, going in the first company of 100 wagons. John Higby was their Captain. The Allen team was said to be the best of the company and arrived in Utah in the best condition. Andrew was an excellent rope maker and also knew how to dye for bright colors from the weeds and herbs for his tassels and decorations on his harnesses for his oxen. Their trip to Utah was a long and tiresome journey. As they traveled up the Platte River, two of their sons almost lost their lives. Charles and brother Clinton decided to swim to the other side of the river to see some immigrants who were camped there. When they started to swim back the current was against them, carrying them down stream quite a ways but they finally made it ashore. They were thankful their lives had been spared. They saw a great many buffalo and it was a treat to have fresh meat. When they got to the black hills there teams began to fail; their feet became tired and sore. When they arrived at the Sweetwater some of the cattle were poisoned by alkali. They were told that they would be coming soon to Fort Bridger and it would only be 110 miles to Salt Lake. On reaching the Green River, it was so high that it was necessary to raise their wagons six inches in the bolster in order to keep the loads dry. The train of wagons was quite long and they had to make a circle up the river to keep on the ford or shallow water. The loaded wagons went over very well. Each teamster was requested to wade through the river to drive his team, tying a rope to the ox on the nearwheel (front right wheel). They arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah on August 13, 1852. The Journey taking 2 ½ months, they camped on the public square for one week and then moved to Provo where they made their home. Charles, Andrew, and James moved to San Bernardino, California where they lived several years, finally moving back to Utah, settling in Cache Valley, in Northern Utah, in a small town called Richmond. Andrew Lee and Clarinda stayed in Provo. Clarinda was visiting her children in Richmond, Cache County, Utah when she died on December 8, 1862. She was 60 years old. Andrew Lee died on August 14, 1870 in Provo, Utah. He was 79 years old. Andrew Lee was buried in Provo, Utah. Clarinda Knapp Allen was buried in the Richmond Cemetery in Richmond, Utah. (This biography was written by Verleen Allen Comish Manwaring. She is the great great granddaughter of Andrew and Clarinda. Verleen explained, “The information I have gathered for this history came in part from my twin, Verla Allen Comish Harris, that she sent me over the years. I also used the information from the book, ‘Ancestors and Descendants of Andrew Lee and Clarinda Knapp Allen,’ compiled by Gerald Ralph Fuller (1952).”)

Andrew Lee Allen's Life Sketch

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Andrew Lee Allen Andrew Lee Allen was born in Limerick, York County, Maine on 24 November 1791. He was the son of Elijah Allen and his first wife, Mehitable Hall, and was the third of four children born to this union. After Andrew was born, the family moved to Vermont. His mother died there when he was nine years of age. Andrew then went to New Hampshire to live with his maternal grandparents, the Reverend Avery Hall and Hannah Chesley. Andrew lived with his grandparents for five years learning the trade of blacksmithing from his grandfather. He also went to church with them and enjoyed their refined and religious upbringing until his grandmother died. He then decided to leave home and try to make it on his own. He was fourteen years old at the time. He was able to secure some blacksmith work and other odd jobs until he became 21 years of age. It was in the year of 1812 when the United States proclaimed war on Great Britain. He then went on board a ship to help protect the American vessels on the Canadian border. One time the Canadians were going to have a "Barn Raising" and invited the Americans to the party. During the affair, Andrew proposed a toast to the effect that, "the Great American Eagle would triumph over the crown of Great Britain", He was immediately taken into custody by the Canadians who were loyal to Great Britain, but they were so intoxicated that he was able to make his escape back over the border into the United States. He went to the southwest part of New York in Cattaraugus County, in an area known as Burton, and took up 160 acres of land on which was a large grove of sugar maple trees as well as nice farming land. He busied himself by improving the farm and building a new home. He worked on this farm until he was 33 years of age. At a church party Andrew met a beautiful, educated and refined maiden by the name of Clarinda Knapp. After a courtship, he married her on 11 December 1824 and took her back to his home. They remained on this farm until they had seven children. They had not affiliated with any religion but were honest and upright in their values. In September, 1833, two Mormon missionaries came through that part of the country and held meetings. Andrew was not at home at the time and did not hear them preach; but his wife, friends and neighbors did, and they were much impressed. When he returned and was told of the event, Andrew became very “anxious to hear them. He learned that they would preach at a place eighty miles from there and concluded to go and hear them. This he did. He was much pleased and satisfied that it was true and was baptized 3 September 1833 by Ezra Landing before returning home. He received a testimony that never left him. He Went home and began to arrange his business according to the spirit of gathering which he had. He sold his home for a low price and moved to Kirtland, Ohio. Here he met the Prophet Joseph Smith and had a pleasant visit with him. When he told the Prophet about his conversion, he remarked, "Those elders should have ordained you an Elder and sent you out preaching the gospel." He was advised to buy a home in Kirtland and also to invest in some large tracts of real estate. It was here that their daughter Susan was born on 31 December 1837. It was not to last very long, for inside of three years the Saints were driven out of Kirtland. The Andrew Lee Allen family received little money for their holdings as they started West for Missouri. Because of sickness and the want of means, they stopped on the Illinois river at Bardstown and stayed through the winter. Andrew cut cord wood all winter and his son Elijah, age 15, hauled it. In this way they were sustained. They then moved to Virginia, Cass County, Illinois, where they rented a farm from a Mr. Levi Springer who was a Methodist preacher. Mr. Springer treated them very kindly. There another son was born, 1 April 1842, and was given the name of Levi, after the name of the good preacher. After farming there one year they moved about twenty-five miles farther East and rented a farm from a man named Alfred Dutch, who lived on the road that led to Springfield. Mr. Dutch was very kind toward the Mormons. While they were living there, the Prophet Joseph was taken to Springfield to be tried on a false charge. The Prophet and his company stayed overnight on the 29th of December, 1842, with Captain Dutch as he was called and were kindly entertained. Andrew and Clarinda were invited to attend. The women played the piano and sang their beautiful songs. Captain Dutch spoke comical recitations and sang his songs. Sister Eliza R. Snow was with the company and composed some beautiful verses. After living there one year, the Allens moved back to Mr. Springer's place again and stayed one more year. Then they moved West again toward Nauvoo and stopped at a place owned by a Mr. Roberts, ten miles east of Carthage. There they became acquainted with Miner T. Deming who afterwards became the High Sheriff of Hancock County. He was friendly towards the Mormons. While living there, their last child was born. They raised a large crop of wheat on the farm that year so they put a grist mill on the stream to grind wheat for commercial use. Water became low in the streams which ******** the grist mill in grinding the flour, so Andrew sent his two older sons, Elijah and Charles, to Nauvoo to get their grist ground at the steam mill there. They stayed there a few days and happened to see the Prophet out by his brick barn where some men were loading hay into it. While there a very heavy hail storm came one evening and broke out many of the glass windows in the homes. Charles reports, "It was a sad sight the next morning to look at the beautiful buildings in Nauvoo and see nearly every pane of glass broken on the side from whence the storm came." Elijah and Charles returned to their family a few days before the Prophet and his brother Hyrum were murdered while being held in the Carthage jail. In the fall of that year, Andrew moved his family toward Nauvoo but stopped at a location known as Camp Creek, fourteen miles north and east of Nauvoo. As they were traveling, they passed through Carthage and were welcomed by Sheriff Deming and invited to stay overnight. Charles reported in his journal that he and Elijah were allowed to go through any part of the jail that was not occupied. They went into the room where the Prophet and his brother were when they were so cruelly shot and murdered. They saw the blood-stained floor and the ball hole through the door. The ceiling was knocked in many places. He said it made them feel very sorrowful. At Camp Creek, they rented a farm from a Mr. Hibbert and farmed one year, raising a good crop of corn. They could not get anything for it there but by hauling it to Nauvoo, they could get ten cents a bushel for it. Charles did the hauling with two yoke of three year old steers as his brother Elijah had left home to look for work. Elijah ended up living at President Brigham Young's home and later drove a team for President Young through to Winter Quarters when the saints left Nauvoo. Elijah was one who enlisted in the Mormon Battalion and went through to California. He served one year and was discharged at Los Angeles on 16 July 1847. On 27 January 1846, Andrew and Clarinda went into Nauvoo to the temple and received their endowments. Later that spring, they ferried the Mississippi River with a team and one wagon, their children, and all their belongings, and started West with the Saints. It was very rainy and muddy which made the traveling slow. Clarinda was feeble in health and a daughter, Lydia, was also afflicted with poor health (asthma) and they suffered a great deal. They had no tent and were obliged to sleep out on the ground in the open air. When they reached Mt. Pisgah, they built a log house and put in some wheat and corn. Their supply of food was about gone when they were obliged to go on before their crop ripened, leaving their improvements for others to enjoy. The family did not stay at Winter Quarters long as they had to find work. They went on down 18 miles farther along the river bottom to a town called Keg Creek. Elijah, the oldest son, rejoined the family in the fall of 1849 alter his trip to California with the Mormon Battalion. They opened up two new farms and remained there until the spring of 1852 when Brigham Young requested the saints to leave Winter Quarters and come to the Salt Lake Valley. Before starting for the Valley, Elijah and Charles went back to Missouri to buy apples which were selling in Kanesville for a good price. They traveled down into Missouri some distance below St.‘ Joseph and stopped at a Mrs. Thornton's who was a widow. She was well and had a large plantation and lots of negroes. They were treated kindly and were invited into the house to eat meals with the family. They purchased fifty bushels of apples from her and loaded them onto their two wagons. Returning home after the long and hard trip, it was recorded that Levi, their seven year old brother, "wanted an apple so badly but was told they must sell them for money to go to Salt Lake. He was happy to get one small one." The family was part of the first company of 100 wagons that left Winter Quarters that year. John M. Higby was the Captain. Andrew taught his sons to take good care of their animals and it was said by people in the group that the Allen teams were the best in the company and got to Utah in the best condition. Andrew was an excellent rope maker and knew how to make bright colored dye weeds and herbs for the tassels and harness decorations for his oxen. The trip took two and a half months. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 13 Augnst 1852 and, stopping there for a few days, moved south to Provo and made their new home. The men found work at a sawmill and secured enough lumber to build a three room house. The younger children herded the community cows along the Provo River to help. When they went to work, their lunch consisted of a hard crust of bread which they soaked in river water to help get it down. The Saints were pestered with marauding Indians at that time. President Young called many of the men to build several forts around. The Allen men assisted in this effort. Each fort was laid about 40 rods square. Houses were built on two sides and the other sides were closed in by hauling and cutting pine logs sixteen feet long and about one foot in diameter. These were sharpened at the top. The butt ends were set in the ground four feet, then poles were placed in between to batten it well. This made a very strong fort. At one side was a large gate, through which the cattle were driven and kept for the night, safe from the Indians. A man was required to make one rod of wall around the city of Provo for every lot he owned. The Allens worked long enough to receive a lot for each son in the family and then worked for others. They took stock and wagons in exchange for their extra work. With this, each of the boys was able to secure his own wagon and team. Andrew and Clarinda and daughter Lydia, who was sick all her life and never married, belonged to the Provo Second Ward. Others of the family eventually married and left Provo for other areas. Andrew was a faithful Latter-day Saint and did everything he was called upon to do. On 8 December 1862, Clarinda died. After a year he married a Martha Johnson. This marriage did not last long. In 1867, he married Ann Hughes. She was a convert from Wales and was a good, loyal and faithful wife until he died 14 August 1870. He is buried in the Provo cemetery. File:ala

Andrew Lee Allen - written by Charles Allen

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

My Father, Andrew Lee Allen, was born in Limerick, York Co. Maine, 24 November 1791. He was the son of Elijah Allen and his first wife, Mehitable Hall. His mother died 25 June 1800 and his father remarried in 1809. His father died 19 October 1839. After his mother's death father went to live with his maternal grandfather, Reverend Avery Hall. He stayed with them until he was 14 years old. Not being satisfied, he left home and never went back again. He worked at the blacksmith trade. He went on aboard a ship to help protect the American vessels during the war known as the war of 1812. After the war he went into Canada, but he got into trouble with the British by drinking a toast at a barn raising. The toast was, "he wished that the Eagle of America would triumph over the crown of Great Britain!” For this he got arrested by the British. Making his escape he went into the state of New York, Cattaraugus County where he obtained one hundred and sixty acres of land, and made himself a very nice home. He planned to settle down there for the rest of his life and soon owned a 1arge grove of trees and a prosperous farm. On the 11th of December 1824, at age 33, he married Clarinda Knapp, daughter of Calvin and Deborah Hopkins Knapp. Charles continues: My parents, Andrew and Clarinda Allen, stayed in Burton, Cattaraugus County New York until they had seven children; Elijah, Lydia, Saphronia, Charles, Andrew, James, and Sidney. They had not joined any religious society, but were honest and upright with all men, waiting for something to come along that would give them better satisfaction than the religions of the day. In September 1833 there were two Latter-day Elders who came through that part of the country and held meetings. Father was not at home at the time and did not hear them preach, but my mother and several of their friends and neighbors did, and they were very impressed. When my Father came home Mother told him of the Elders and the gospel that they preached and he became very anxious to hear them. He learned that they would preach in a place eighty miles from there and he concluded that he would go to hear them. This he did, and he listened to the Gospel of Jesus Christ for the first time. He was much pleased, and being satisfied that it was true. He was baptized on the 3rd of September 1833 by Ezra Landing before he returning home. He received a testimony that never left him. He went home and began to arrange his business according to the spirit of gathering. He sold his beautiful home for a low price and moved to Kirtland, Ohio. Here he met the Prophet Joseph Smith and the Saints and rejoiced with them. My father bought considerable real estate and paid a good price for it, but the price of land soon went down and he did not receive anything for it. He left and started West for Missouri. Because of sickness and the want of means, he stopped on the Illinois River at Bardstown and stayed through the winter. My father cut cordwood all winter and my brother Elijah hauled it. In this way we were sustained. We then moved back [a short distance] east to Virginia, Cass County where we rented a farm from Mr. Levi Springer, who was a Methodist preacher. He treated us very kindly. After farming there one year we moved about twenty-five miles farther East and rented from a man by the name of Alfred Dutch, who lived on the road that Springfield. Mr. Dutch was very kind to our people. While we were there, the Prophet Joseph was taken to Springfield to be tried on a false charge. The Prophet Joseph and his company stayed overnight on the 20th of December 1842 with Captain Dutch, as he was called, and were kindly entertained. The women played on the piano and sang their beautiful songs. Captain Dutch spoke comical recitations and sang his songs. We enjoyed that visit very much! After living there one year, we moved back to Mr. Springer's again and lived there one year longer. Then we moved west again toward Nauvoo and stopped with Mr. Roberts, ten miles east of Carthage (where the Prophet and Patriarch were murdered). We became acquainted with Miner T. Deming who afterwards became the High sheriff of Hancock Co. He was very friendly to our people. On the 22nd of September 1842, while we were living near Plymouth, Illinois, Elder Thomas Crockett came to our house and baptized and confirmed six of the children, viz; Lydia, Saphronia, Charles, Andrew, James and Sidney. In the fall of the year we moved toward Nauvoo, and stopped on Camp Creek, fourteen miles north east of Nauvoo. We moved up to Camp Creek and rented a farm from Mr. Hibbert, where we farmed one year and raised a good crop of corn. We could not get anything for it there, but by hauling it to Nauvoo, fifteen miles away we could get ten cents a bushel for it. So we hauled corn nearly all winter into Nauvoo to sell. When the brethren were called to work on the new Temple at Nauvoo, my father took his turn. The Prophet Joseph required that those who wanted to have the privilege of receiving their endowment in the temple, must work one day in every ten building on it. My parents wanted very much to have that blessing in their lives. On 27 January 1846 my father and mother went into Nauvoo and received their blessings in the Temple of the Lord. (Later my father was ordained a High Priest on June 1847.) In the spring of 1846 we crossed the Mississippi River and started West with the Saints. It was very rainy and muddy which made it slow traveling. My Mother was feeble in health and my oldest sister, Lydia, was also afflicted with poor health (asthma) and they suffered a great deal, as they were exposed to wet and cold with only one wagon and eleven in the family. As we had no tent some of us were obliged to sleep out on the ground in the open air in rain and storm. We traveled on and stopped at Mt. Pisgah where we built a log house and put in some wheat and corn. As our supply of food was about gone we were obliged to go on and leave our improvements for others to enjoy. We traveled to Winter Quarters on the Missouri River and were obliged to go down into the state of Missouri and work for provisions. [At this time, 500 men members were called up into the Mormon Battalion for the Mexican War 1846-1847. Our oldest brother, 20 years old Elijah Allen, enlisted and was in Company B serving under Captain Jesse D. Hunter.] We traveled about seventy-five miles down the river and stopped with Mr. Cole in a small log house where we stayed through the winter. We worked harvesting corn and splitting rails. In the Spring of 1847 we moved down on the bottom to farm with Mr. Jacob H. Rose and we raised a large crop of corn. There was a Government Post about 60 miles up the river and had hoped to sell the corn at the post, but the post was on the west side of the river, and we were not able to sell and got nothing for it. In the Spring of 1848 we moved up toward Kanesville and stopped on Keg Creek, eighteen miles south of Kanesville, where there was a small branch of the Church organized with Elder Libeus G. ***** presiding. We belonged to the *****ville branch, where my father served as a counselor to President *****. We stayed there four years and opened up and improved two farms. My oldest brother, Elijah [returned from the Mexican War], and the younger boys established a sawmill near fathers’ farm and ran it one season before they sold it for $1,000.00. They used the money to get ready to come to Utah. In the spring of 1852 we sold our farms and prepared for starting west with the Saints. We went in the first company of 100 wagons. John M. Higby was the captain. Father was an excellent hand with his teams and took very good care of them. He taught his sons to take good care of their animals and it was said by people in the company that the Allen team was the best in the company and got to Utah in the best condition. Father was an excellent rope maker. He knew how to use weeds and herbs to make bright colored dyes for his tassels and decorations for his harnesses for his oxen. Our trip to Utah was a long and tiresome journey. We were about two months and a half on the road. We arrived in Salt Lake City the 13th of August 1852. In traveling up the Platte River I came near losing my life. We saw a good many buffalo on the road and the hunters killed several which were a great treat. We thought it was the sweetest meat we ever ate! When we got up to the Black Hills, our teams began to fail. Their feet became tired and sore. When we got to Sweetwater some of our cattle got poisoned on the alkali and died on the way. When we got within 110 miles of Salt Lake City, we came to Fort Bridger. A mountaineer, Mr. Bridger lived there about 20 years. He said that we could not raise a bushel of grain in that country on account of frost. He said there was frost there every month of the year. When we reached the Green River, it was so high that it was necessary to raise our wagons six inches high in the bolster in order to keep their loads dry. We stopped a few days in Salt Lake City and then moved south to Provo and made our home there. Father built a home not far from the lake and spent the rest of his life living in Provo. His land was located in section 4, township 7 South, range East. South East of South East. Our mother Clarinda Knapp died 8 Dec 1862 in Richmond, Cache County, Utah. Andrew Lee Allen died 14 August 1870 in Provo, Utah.

Not Ashamed of the Gospel of Christ

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

On the first Thursday afternoon in December, in the year 1906, the women of the Logan 4th Ward Relief Society met together in the ward meeting house to speak concerning the welfare of their souls. There was really nothing all that unusual about the meeting this day. When they weren’t quilting, the women often used their meetings to bear testimony to one another, as was the custom in Relief Society then. It would be another 8 years before the Relief Society implemented a standardized curriculum, which eventually squeezed out the more free-wheeling, unscripted meetings of the early days. On this day in 1906, the proceedings of the day were captured by the brief, impressionistic minutes kept by the society's secretary. President Laura Ingmann Mikkelsen stood to welcome the women and invite them to sing the opening hymn, “Come, Come ye Saints.” The opening prayer was then given by Harriet Pitkin Robbins, a mother of 3 who had been born in Nebraska on the trail west to Utah in the year 1848. After the prayer, the women sang “Arise, O Glorious Zion.” The roll was then called. President Mikkelsen stood again to say how glad she was to see so many present at the meeting. She could not have been all that surprised by the turnout. It was, of course, the Christmas season, a time when the women good will for the Lord and for all men in their hearts. Mikkelsen had been born in Norway 60 years before. Hers had not been an easy life. Her mother died when she was a child. Her father later drowned at sea. After being baptized a Mormon two weeks before her 16th birthday, she promptly emigrated to Zion, walking all the way—1,000 miles—across the plains. Once in Utah she settled in Cache Valley. After hiring out to help a Danish man with an invalid wife, the man asked her for her hand in marriage. She accepted. They married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Laura became Niels Mikkelsen’s second wife. He was 41. She was 19. She knew then that she would likely outlive Niels Mikkelsen. They had 9 children together, and then he died, in 1894. She would live until 1934, a widow for four decades. The work of Relief Society, the caring of the sick and the needy, people less fortunate than herself, filled much of her time. The women had heard Laura Mikkelsen bear her testimony many times. On this day, she asked the sisters to bear theirs. Mary Haig McAlister, 80, was the first to stand that day. “She was not ashamed to bear her testimony before any one,” she said, “because she knew it was the truth.” McAlister, along with her husband Charles, had converted to the Church way back in 1853 in their native Scotland. Charles was baptized on April 10 of that year. Mary, who had had a baby 10 days before, decided it would be best to let her body rest a while. The stream must have been quite cold at that time of year. She entered the waters after baptism after the temperature had warmed a bit--but not too much--on May 24. She could not bear to wait any longer. That youthful enthusiasm had stuck with the woman who in old age was the first to her feet in testimony meeting. “It is time we were up and doing,” McAlister told the Logan women, “for the time is getting shorter. Let us live humble and pure lives, for the Lord will try this people and we must pray for His care, and protection.” McAlister had probably heard criticism of some of the Church leaders. She didn’t want any part of it. “Let us be faithful to those who are placed over us,” she urged. McAlister concluded by asking the Lord to “bless us this afternoon with His Spirit that we may have a good time together and return home rejoicing. Let us love one another. The destroyer is abroad in the land and we must depend on the Lord for strength that we may be able to stand true and faithful to the end of our days.” Augusta Sievert Spenst stood next. She “knew we all had a testimony and we all have something to thank the Lord for.” Speaking in a thick German accent, Spenst “asked the Lord to help us to be able to help build up His kingdom.” She had done just that by being baptized into the Lord’s church in the spring of 1883 in her native Germany. She and her husband Carl were baptized the same day. Within a month or two they were off for America with their two young boys in tow, eager to heed the prophet’s call to come to Zion. They settled in Logan, had their marriage solemnized in the temple a few blocks from their home, and never looked back. Spenst “thanked the Lord for giving her strength to leave all in the old country and come here to this land. As we live, so we die, and we should live every day as if it was our last.” No one knew when the end would come. It had been 5 years since Carl passed away. By 1906, all three of their children were married and out of the house. Now 60, Augusta lived alone. She no doubt missed Carl. Spenst wasn’t one for spreading gossip. She warned the sisters on different occasions about the need for charity. “We all have faults and failings,” she told them on this day. “Let us speak well of each other.” Susan Allen Goaslind spoke next. “Let us consider our lives and blessings and live in such a way that we may know that the Lord is pleased with our actions, and if He is we will be blessed of Him.” Goaslind may have had longer experience in the Church than any of the women in the room that day. She had observed the Lord’s protecting hand from her earliest years. Her parents, Andrew Allen and Clarinda Knapp, listened to the missionaries who came by their New York neighborhood, converting to Mormonism in the early 1830s. They moved to Kirtland, Ohio, in 1833, and four years later Susan was born at a time when the town was rife was apostasy. Her parents followed the Prophet Joseph and the main body of the saints, and after his death, chose the group who followed Brigham Young. She was glad they did. The family crossed the plains to Utah, where they had remained ever since. Goaslind had seen Utah from the earliest days of pioneer settlement. The growth and development of the valley was a marvel to behold. “We are a select people and we should be thankful for every blessing,” she told the women. “We should do all in our power to advance this work, for God will hold us responsible for the way we use our time.” Johanna Nelson Murdock followed Goaslind in bearing testimony. Born in Sweden in 1856, Murdock and her parents joined the Mormons and journeyed across the sea to Utah when Johanna was three. The family settled in the Cache Valley, and there Johanna married Robert Murdock, a Scottish convert. Having left her native land when she so young, she had lost the Swedish accent her parents would have retained. She was just as committed in 1906 as ever. She told the women she “desired to go on and do all the good she can to help forward this work.” Johanna Murdock had grown up at a time when many Mormons had a deep distrust of medical doctors. Some of them seemed to do more bad than good. That sentiment had begun to change by 1906, due in part to modern science, which produced new and powerful vaccines and explained to everyone how germs worked. Still, Murdock hadn’t lost faith in the priesthood. She “knew the priesthood had power to heal the sick,” she said. She was thankful to the Lord for all His goodness to her, she told the women, and “asked the blessings of God on us all.” Elizabeth Cluff Brossard, who stood next, had caught the spirit of the meeting. She “knew we had had a feast of good things and if we will profit by what we have heard we will be greatly benefited.” Brossard said she was thankful to be present and prayed the Lord to bless the women with his Spirit. Magdalena Farnhi Besslar, a Swiss emigrant, stood on the heels of Elizabeth Brossard. Although she had lived in America since 1878, she felt more comfortable bearing testimony in her native German. Augusta Spenst, who had spoken earlier in the meeting, often translated for Besslar and other German-speaking women in the ward. Besslar, according to Spenst, said she never felt the Spirit of God more powerfully than she had this afternoon. After Besslar and Spenst sat down, President Mikkelsen thought it would be a good thing for the women to take a moment to stretch. They sang a hymn together. “Doxology” was the number, one of the more popular hymns of the period. Following the hymn, Maria Kingsbury Merrill from the nearby town of Richmond stood up. Although she was just a visitor, she was impressed by what she heard that day. “If we could carry out the good instructions given we would be greatly benefited,” she told them. “We should always be on hand to help wherever we can. The Lord is always willing to assist us in all the good we desire to do.” Like many women present that day, Merrill made reference God’s spirit. She longed to have it direct her life and the lives of her fellow Saints. She “hoped we would all have the Spirit of God to guide and help us to set good examples before the young. Hoped we would be faithful and true.” Christine Anderson, who followed Merrill, said she knew the testimonies born today were good and true. She liked what Relief Society represented. “She rejoiced in doing good to the poor. Asked the Lord to bless and help us to be faithful.” Elizabeth Baumann Ochsenbein, who stood next, may have been the most recent convert of the women in Logan 4th Ward. Born in Switzerland in 1858, she and her husband John joined the church in 1899. Two years later they emigrated, settling in Logan. The other Swiss people in the Logan 4th Ward—like Magdalena Besslar—may have drawn the Ochsenbeins to settle there. Having been in the states only 4 years, Ochsenbein felt more comfortable bearing testimony in German. Augusta Spenst translated for Ochsenbein as she had done for Besslar earlier in the meeting. Ochsenbein was grateful to be in a town where a temple was so near. She hadn’t had that in the old country. She “could not thank the Lord enough,” she said, “for helping her to come to this country where she can be a Savior for her kindred.” She was thinking of her deceased ancestors, like her dear parents, whose temple work she had recently done in Logan. Elizabeth Ochsenbein had the promises of the temple on her mind that day. She told the women she “hoped we would live so we could gain the blessings that had been pronounced upon our heads”—the promises made in holy temples. Elizabeth Yates Stoddard, a counselor in the society’s presidency, felt gratified by what she had heard. “It has been a feast to her to listen to the testimonies of her sisters,” she said, exultingly. Stoddard was particularly “thankful to the Lord for every blessing from her youth until now.” Born in England in 1852, she followed her mother and older sisters into the church as a young girl. Where would she be without their courage to join an unpopular sect? Two of these older sisters later sailed for Utah, and Elizabeth came with them at age 18, leaving her parents and several brothers behind in the old country. Her life would never be the same. A few months after arriving in the valley, Elizabeth and one of her emigrating sisters, Sarah, decided to marry on the same day. And they decided it would be best if they married the same man, a Scottish-Mormon convert named John Kerr Stoddard. It was not an uncommon arrangement for a Mormon man to approach sisters with such a proposal, as it lessened the potential for tension within the plural marriage. Elizabeth and Sarah married Brother Stoddard on November 20, 1871, in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, becoming his second and third wives. Sarah would have 4 children with John, Elizabeth 11. John died in 1894, and after living in Ogden for a time, the widowed sister-wives moved together to Logan to be nearer to their children and grandchildren. The sisters lived in separate residences in Logan, each with at least one of her grown children. “We cannot be grateful enough to the Lord for bringing us to this goodly land,” Elizabeth Stoddard told the women, realizing how different her life would have been had she never married John Stoddard. “The young mothers should teach their children the principles of the gospel,” she said. Those principles did not include plural marriage, which was in the process of winding down—but the children should learn to honor the principle as God-honored in its time. (It had, after all, produced much progeny that had built up the church.) “We should be humble ourselves and ask the Lord to lead and guide us,” Stoddard reminded the women. “Let us be awake to our duties and do the best we can that we may have no regrets.” Like Johanna Murdock, Elizabeth Stoddard believed in the power of the priesthood to heal the sick. She advised to women always keep a bottle of consecrated oil in their home at all times. She also advocated self-education. “Let us study the principles of the gospel that we may be able to teach others.” Stoddard “asked the blessing of God to be with us to the end of our days.” Rozina Maurer Schiffman, yet another Swiss convert, followed Elizabeth Stoddard. Her missionary, the young man who baptized her, was a German-born Mormon convert named Henry Eyring, the great grandfather and namesake of the future apostle. A simple, unassuming woman of 64, Schiffman gave thanks for the good instructions and said she desired to profit by them. Echoing temple language, Schiffman said she desired “to be true and faithful.” Christine Oloffson Thomason, 74, then came to her feet. She was “happy to meet with us,” she said, and proceeded to bear “a faithful testimony of the gospel.” Thomason “hoped the Lord would help us to live up to the principles of the Gospel.” She too knew the Spirit of God was present in the meeting. She also knew there was “power in the Priesthood,” as the temple promised. She was fortunate to still have her husband with her, unlike many of the women her age in the ward. But at her age also made her think about the next life. Was she prepared? “If we have the Spirit of God,” she said, “we are content without the wealth of the world, for we cannot take wealth with us when we leave this life.” Bishop Joseph Newbold, who had slipped into the meeting, was impressed what we had heard. As a new bishop, having served for just a few months, he wanted to convey the message that he and the sisters were playing on the same team. He depended on them to help him, he said. “In union there is strength and we should all work together for the good of each other and for the building up of the kingdom of God,” he told them. “Let us learn our duties and perform them. If we do not it will not be well for us, for we cannot do any too much for the work of the Lord.” Born in England in 1858, Newbold came to America at age 14. He settled in Farmington and eventually moved to Logan, where he opened up a successful mercantile store. After marrying Hannah Christensen in 1885, five years into their marriage he returned to his native land as a missionary. He was again called on a mission in 1906 but was out just a short time before being called home to take charge of the Logan 4th Ward. He was still thinking like a missionary when he spoke to the women. “We know that this is the work of God,” Newbold told them, “and we should bear testimony of its truth to others.” Echoing a theme he had heard in the meeting, he reflected on the purpose of coming to Utah: “We should be thankful that we have been called out of the world and brought here to these valleys of the mountains where we can raise our children away from the sins of the world.” How had the women done? “We all have a desire to do right,” the Bishop told them, “but sometimes we forget our duties. We should be examples to others and live lives that are above reproach.” After Bishop Newbold sat down, President Laura Mikkelsen summed up in a few words. We are always ready to assist the bishopric in this work, she said, giving the Bishop their vote of confident. Personally, “she was willing to help the sick and do good wherever she can.” She expected the women to do the same. The women concluded the meeting by singing “We Thank Thee O God for a Prophet.” Minnie Jorgensen, a counselor in the presidency, then dismissed the women in prayer. Sources: Minutes, Dec. 6, 1906, Logan 4th Ward Relief Society Minute Book, 1894-1914, LR 4966 14, v 5, Church History Library, Salt Lake City; 1900, 1910 U.S. Census; Family Search.

Life Timeline of Andrew Lee Allen

1791
Andrew Lee Allen was born on 24 Nov 1791
Andrew Lee Allen was 9 years old when An electoral tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr is resolved when Jefferson is elected President of the United States and Burr, Vice President by the United States House of Representatives. The United States Electoral College is a body of electors established by the United States Constitution, constituted every four years for the sole purpose of electing the president and vice president of the United States. The College consists of 538 electors, and an absolute majority of 270 electoral votes is required to win election. Pursuant to Article II, Section 1, Clause 2, the legislature of each state determines the manner by which its electors are chosen. Each state's number of electors is equal to the combined total of the state's membership in the Senate and House of Representatives; currently there are 100 senators and 435 representatives. Additionally, the Twenty-third Amendment provides that the District of Columbia is entitled to the number of electors no greater than that of the least populous state.
1801
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Andrew Lee Allen was 21 years old when Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is first published in the United Kingdom. Jane Austen was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism. Her use of biting irony, along with her realism and social commentary, have earned her acclaim among critics and scholars.
1813
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Andrew Lee Allen was 34 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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Andrew Lee Allen was 40 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Andrew Lee Allen was 49 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Andrew Lee Allen was 68 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1859
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Andrew Lee Allen was 69 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
1861
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Andrew Lee Allen died on 14 Aug 1870 at the age of 78
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Andrew Lee Allen (24 Nov 1791 - 14 Aug 1870), BillionGraves Record 1128433 Richmond, Cache, Utah, United States

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