Calvert Milton Ivie

7 Apr 1869 - 8 Apr 1951

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Calvert Milton Ivie

7 Apr 1869 - 8 Apr 1951
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VILATE DURFEE (1873-1952) AND CALVERT MILTON IVIE By Vilate Durfee Ivie I was born in Springville the 29th of June 1873; a daughter of Jabez and Celestia Curtis Durfee. Father was one of the first to live in Springville. He did the carpenter work on the first church there and planted the first orcha
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Life Information

Calvert Milton Ivie

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

Pieinthesky

August 14, 2011
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GraveScavenger

August 11, 2011

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Vilate Durfee (1873-1952) and Cavert Milton Ivie

Contributor: Pieinthesky Created: 6 months ago Updated: 6 months ago

VILATE DURFEE (1873-1952) AND CALVERT MILTON IVIE By Vilate Durfee Ivie I was born in Springville the 29th of June 1873; a daughter of Jabez and Celestia Curtis Durfee. Father was one of the first to live in Springville. He did the carpenter work on the first church there and planted the first orchard there and owned the first molasses mill. He owned a brick house with 11 rooms in it and 3 basement rooms, he would fill with fruit. There were three acres of orchard with every kind of fruit trees that would grow in this climate and a grove of black walnuts and butternut and a grove of sugar maple where the people would come to celebrate. He then went to Aurora with a few men and took up land there and started a town called Willow Bend, which was afterward called Aurora. He was the first Bishop there and was Bishop when he died. He would take care of his land there in the summer and Mother would take care of the p1ace in Springville till after his death. Mother soon sold the place in Springville. It was too much for her to care for them both. My brother, Erastus lost his wife and brought his little girls (two) to Mother. I was only a girl, but they took up with me and I had them to care for and just loved them. He decided to take them for his other wife to raise. I begged to keep them, but he thought best to take them. The oldest one died less than a year later with diphtheria. The other is alive yet. Mother died on the 17th of June the year I was 18 on the 29th of June. I was left to care for two brothers and a niece. Her mother died when she was born. LeGrand got married the next May, but lived with us till he got his house finished. Then I got married the next November, but I stayed home until we got a house built and moved out. Brother John got married and took the old home. Milton was Ward Clerk. When our third boy was six days old, Milton got a call for a mission. He left the 5th of July. I was left with three little boys, the cattle, horses and farm to see to, but I got along pretty good until Raymond got rheumatism; then it was hard. He came home after 26 months with chills and fever and was sick for a long time. Our first girl was born the next August, so we thought we were rich. Then two years later Otto came along. He wasn’t very old when Mary Blood died and left two children; they brought them to me and I cared for them for a long time, till her baby got sick and mine got sick then I got sick so was obliged to give them up, but I sure felt bad to part with them. We traded places and got “The Big Rock House,” and Milton was soon put in Bishop; he was Ward Clerk at the time, and Lucille was born the next April. That summer we heard Polly Curtis had a baby and her brothers and sisters had gone against her because this was the second time she had been in trouble and they were making her give the baby away and were making her go off to a mining camp where she wasn’t known, so we went and stopped her from signing the papers to give it away. The old lawyer was there and was he mad! We took her and her two children home and kept them the same as our own children for about two years then she got a good chance and got married and left us. The oldest boy was on a mission and the other was in college the last we heard of them. They would have went to the dogs if we hadn’t of took them. Golden was born just before Polly left us; then we had Frank Taylor and wife for a while; then two sisters driven out of Old Mexico. All they had was a little roll of bedding and a small box of clothes. We took Chloe and her four single children in and her wife (?) and two small children, till they could do better. After a while we fixed up a room so they were to themselves. Then we had a baby and lost it. I was sick for quite a while; then in two years Birdie was born. Frank and Tom were living with us then and when Birdie was a year old, I took five boarders, school teachers, so I had plenty to do with them and my family, washing and ironing for all. Then Byron was called on a mission. He was gone about three years. Oran went in the army while he was gone. Byron came home and got married and then was drafted and we were having his farewell party, when the phone rang and we were told that the Armistice was signed and Byron was released, but Oran never got home for eight months. I was Relief Society teacher for twenty years and had 100% for twelve years then they put me in as head teacher and we had 100% teaching done for two years then I moved to Provo. I was a teacher there and in Alton and in Lynndyl. When Chloe moved, Mariah and husband and two single children moved in and a married girl and two children and another one was born while they were with us. Byron and wife lived with us till their first baby was born and Raymond’s lived with us till their second one was quite a boy and we sure enjoyed them. We had a big house and made good use of it. We moved to Provo and took care of the First Ward Church for a few years, then Milton went to work on the road again. Birdie and I went with him. When we came to Lynndyl and have stayed here. Milton was a Bishop for 13 years and during that time we kept many people overnight and gave them many meals. Now we meet people that will say, “I know you. I have stayed all night with you,” or “…ate with you.” Even the Indians would come and stay and feed their horses. When we tipped over in the canal with our car, one man got in nearly all over to get our things and worked all day with two teams to get our car out and get it so we could go on. Milton asked him what he owed him, and he said, “I have my pay. My name is Abbot. You kept me and my horse all night and give us the best of care and wouldn’t take pay. Now I have a chance to get even with you a little.” They took us in the house and gave us dry clothes and dinner and treated us fine. We didn’t know him till he told us who he was. So you see, a friend in need is a friend indeed and worth more than money. While in Aurora, I did lots of nursing the sick and sitting up with the sick and helping with the dead. One morning at daylight, I was called to go to a place, Ester Kennedy’s, where a little boy three years old was down with Scarlet Fever. They said they couldn’t get anyone to come help them. They were so scared of it. I told them I would go and see if Dessie Mason would go. She went, but the little fellow died about 11 o’clock. We laid him out and made his clothes and put them on him and put him in the casket before he was cold and handed it out for the men to go lay him away. That was sure hard on us. I have been with quite a few when they passed away and some of them in my arms. I have tried to help them out all I could in this way. One time when the flu and measles were so bad I never slept a night in my own bed for a month. I was first in one place then in another and never undressed. At that time I had four down with measles and Sister Chloe had them and nearly died with them. We were a mile apart. I sure kept the road hot. There was five died during that time. I tended Alma Sorensen’s children lots of times so when we moved he said he didn’t know what he would do now. He lost three after we had been gone a little while. Elial Durfee and wife and baby came to our house. He said his wife was sick and he wanted to stay a while with us and see if his wife’s health wouldn’t get better; so we took them in and he said he would help around the place to pay for their board. My chickens were just ready to fry. She made such a fuss over them I felt sorry for her and tried to have fried chicken. After dinner she would go upstairs to rest where it was quiet till I got the work done. They stayed about three months and said if Milton would lend him his team and buggy he would take her to Rabbit Valley and come do the chores while Milton was to Salt Lake to Conference for a week. But the next morning there was the team just unhitched from the buggy and turned loose and not fed and looked like he hadn’t fed them a bite while they were gone. I got to looking around and found she was looking through my things instead of resting and had taken Milton’s underclothes and mine and lots of Birdies clothes, some wide pillow case lace I had just crocheted and some blankets and a sack of baby clothes, long ones, and my nightgowns I only used in sickness, and I don’t know what all she didn’t get. I wanted to send and get my things, but Milton said if they wanted them that bad to let them. I heard from them after that. They said they never seen so many rags in their lives as they had on and it was a joke. . . She wasn’t sick. I had five boarders. School let out on the 4th of May so the boarders left so I got busy and wallpapered three large rooms with ten foot ceilings and put down new rugs and fixed up fine. I just got done and the wind blew very hard. All at once I heard a loud noise in the front room and ran in there and the wind was taking off the paper, so all I could do was get more paper and do it over. I got it done and June was born on the 6th of June. I wonder now how I ever did it. I cleaned and papered some small rooms upstairs too. I often wonder now if it paid. Chloe and I owned about 100 stands of bees. We would take out about 25 gallons of honey in a day with the children helping us. We would get four or five gallons. We would take first prize every year for having the best honey and we would make lots of vinegar and at one stage it was a good drink. We had a barrel of it on the porch; one day I noticed it was all gone. . . Someone must have liked it. I have crocheted and knitted and done fancy work that has gone all over. I made a pair of pillow slips for a woman. She sent them to a friend of hers in New York and I made two little sweaters and booties for Mrs. Trimble. She sent them to friends in California and I made Mr. Trimble a sweater and their baby one. She gave Lucille music lessons for the pay. I made three little pair of stockings and sent to Lloyd Ivie in Japan for their baby. I made a doily for Mrs. Kovitch and sent to Kansas and some booties to Idaho to relatives and some all over Utah and some to John Spencer in Arizona and made 15 quilts that I have given away and sold 4. I have made 33 Temple aprons which I have sold for $109.50, and 29 which I have given away. I’ve earned $133.00, and I have three on hand and one nearly done and another stamped which I hope I can soon finish. I have made 9 shawls and given away and lots of jackets and hoods and booties which I enjoyed. On the 25th of November 1942 was our Golden Wedding Day. The children invited a crowd which came and spent the evening and brought presents to us. The next day Jane, Emmett, Joe and Amy and family came and spent Thursday and left Friday and they brought presents and we had a good time and we went out to Joe Pargis’ for turkey dinner Friday night and Saturday the Bishopric and a crowd came and surprised us with their arms full of refreshments. We had a great time and Sunday all our children came, but Birdie, and spent the day. There were 35 at dinner. We had our picture taken. We got lots of nice presents. I had about four sets of Temple Clothes. People would come to borrow them and I would tell then they could take them if they would do some of the names on our record and I would do the clothes up after they were done with them. This made me quite a bit of work, but I thought I was well paid to get some of our names done. I have done lots of names myself and want to do more. We went to Saint George and worked 5 weeks at one time which we enjoyed and have stayed at Manti two weeks at a time quite a few times. We would go through for two and three names a day. We have gone through the Salt Lake Temple quite a few times too. Note: Retyped by Monica Durfee Anderson, 2013

History of Calvert Milton Ivie

Contributor: Pieinthesky Created: 6 months ago Updated: 6 months ago

Calvert Milton Ivie The Ivies came from the Cornwall, England area and settled in the southern United States in the early l8OO’s. Calvert Milton Ivie was born April 7, 1869 in Scipio, Utah to William Franklin Ivie and Malinda Jane Young, as one of fifteen children. His father, William, was born in Shelby, Tennessee December 16, l826, and his mother, Malinda, was born on November 3, 1833 in Gainesboro, Tennessee. The family were farmers and Calvert eventually became a stock raiser, as well. He had eight years of formal schooling in Scipio schools. On November 25, 1892 he married Vilate Durfee of Aurora, Utah in Richfield and on November 28, 1894 they were sealed in the Manti Temple. President Heber J. Grant gave them their recommends. It is interesting to note that Calvert filled a mission to the Eastern States from 1898 to 1900, eight years into his marriage, leaving three small boys at home. Ten children were born to the Ivies and nine were reared to adulthood. A baby boy had been born dead and Vilate was extremely distraught as it was being taken away from her. She demanded that the baby be blessed with a name. The little body was dressed and readied for the blessing and the other children were allowed to view it. Sometime after the blessing Vilate received confirmation in a dream that she had done the right thing. The family lived in Aurora where Calvert was a school board trustee for 12 years. Calvert worked hard on his farm and also became involved with freighting. He began working with road construction companies in 1925, then moved to Provo in 1930 where he served as foreman for the Young Construction Company until 1938 when he retired and moved to Lynndyl, Utah. They moved to Orem in 1947 and resided there with their son, Golden, until Calvert’s death on April 8, 1951. Vilate died one year later. His entire life Calvert remained true and faithful to the Church. He held many callings: a Ward Clerk for eleven years. Sunday School Superintendent for 5 years. He was ordained Bishop of the Aurora Ward by Orson F. Whitney of the Council of the Twelve, serving for thirteen years from 1907 to 1920. He was High Councilor under two Stake Presidents and then Senior High Councilman in the North Sevier Stake. It seems of all his ceilings in the church he enjoyed none more than being able to do temple work. He said it was a privilege and a joy and did numerous endowments for the dead. It was often an entire weak that was spent in Manti doing as much temple work as possible. While Calvert was a Bishop of the Aurora Ward it was decided to take a company of children to the Manti Temple to do baptisms for the dead. After the first group of children were done they strolled out among the temple grounds to admire the sights and lovely flowers. (Calvert’s daughter, Birdella, was among them.) All of a sudden they heard beautiful singing and they thought it came from the temple to dismiss the services. After inquiry they found out there had been no singing in the temple that day and they had heard a Heavenly Choir singing instead. Calvert had many testimonies of the gospel as he saw miracles take place. At one time he had been having severe abdominal pain and his name was sent to the Manti Temple to be prayed for in the prayer circle. About 11 o’clock in the morning, and at the very time of the prayer circle, his pain left him. While he was being set apart for his mission he was told that he should lay his hands upon the sick and they would recover. Calvert was known throughout his life as being gifted with the power of healing. It was often the case that no doctor resided in the town and Calvert was the first one called. If one of his children were sick they would immediately say, “Go get Dad.” This extended on after the children were married. Once he was called to administer to a child that was born dead. The baby’s mother told him to bless the child and it would live, but the nurse kept saying there was no use, that the baby was already gone. Shortly after the blessing the baby girl started breathing and lived to eventually become a mother herself. Calvert Milton Ivie is thought of with deep love and affection by his posterity and those who knew him. Over time he had become a revered and prominent resident of Sevier County. The Ivie Coat of Arm’s motto is: “To be rather than to appear” and he lived this to it’s fullest. Heidi Johnson November 1988 ©This copy made available through the courtesy of the International Society DAUGHTERS OF THE UTAH PIONEERS may not be reproduced for monetary gain.

Life Timeline of Calvert Milton Ivie

1869
Calvert Milton Ivie was born on 7 Apr 1869
Calvert Milton Ivie was 11 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1879
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Calvert Milton Ivie was 16 years old when Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is published in the United States. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885. Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, the narrator of two other Twain novels and a friend of Tom Sawyer. It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
1885
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Calvert Milton Ivie was 24 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
1893
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Calvert Milton Ivie was 35 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
1903
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Calvert Milton Ivie was 43 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
1912
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Calvert Milton Ivie was 51 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
1920
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Calvert Milton Ivie was 70 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1939
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Calvert Milton Ivie was 73 years old when World War II: The Imperial Japanese Navy made a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, intending to neutralize the United States Pacific Fleet from influencing the war Japan was planning to wage in Southeast Asia. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1941
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Calvert Milton Ivie died on 8 Apr 1951 at the age of 82
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Calvert Milton Ivie (7 Apr 1869 - 8 Apr 1951), BillionGraves Record 112102 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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