Robert Reeder

24 May 1837 - 22 Dec 1917

Register

Robert Reeder

24 May 1837 - 22 Dec 1917
edit Edit Record
photo Add Images
group_add Add Family
description Add a memory

Being moved by the spirit of gathering, my father, David Reeder, my sister Caroline, age 17, my sister Eliza and her husband, James Hurren, with their three little girls from ages 2 to 8 years old, and myself, age 19, started for Liverpool, where we met with others from different parts. There were 7
Register to get full access to the grave site record of Robert Reeder
Terms and Conditions

We want you to know exactly how our service works and why we need your registration in order to allow full access to our records.

terms and conditions

Contact Permissions

We’d like to send you special offers and deals exclusive to BillionGraves users to help your family history research. All emails ​include an unsubscribe link. You ​may opt-out at any time.

close
close
Thanks for registering with BillionGraves.com!
In order to gain full access to this record, please verify your email by opening the welcome email that we just sent to you.
close
Sign up the easy way

Use your facebook account to register with BillionGraves. It will be one less password to remember. You can always add an email and password later.

Loading

Life Information

Robert Reeder

Born:
Died:

Hyde Park Cemetery

2-84 S 400 E
Hyde Park, Cache, Utah
United States
Transcriber

Diannejones

May 7, 2012
Photographer

doclouie

May 5, 2012

Nearby Graves

Nearby GravesTM

Some family members have different last names, but they’re still buried relatively close to one another. View grave sites based on name, distance from the original site, and find those missing relatives.

Upgrade to BG+

Find more about Robert...

We found more records about Robert Reeder.

Grave Site of Robert

edit

Robert Reeder is buried in the Hyde Park Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

Robert Reeder-Written By Anna Young for Centerville 20th Ward

Contributor: AYoung Created: 5 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

From Robert’s own writings we learn much about this trek: 
“On the 5th of May we sailed out from Liverpool, England, on the great ocean, which took us a little over six weeks to cross. I was very sick on the way and could not eat such food as they had on ‘seafare,’ which consisted of what they called sea biscuits and salt pork and salt beef, also brown sugar and vinegar and very little other food. I got very feeble living principally on sugar and vinegar for three weeks. 
“I was glad when we arrived at Castle Garden, New York, where we could get a piece of bread once more. We rested here a few days, then pursued our journey by railroad and steamboats, changing from one to the other until we arrived at the Iowa camping ground, where we had to lay over two or three weeks waiting for our outfits. 
“While laying over there, we had to herd those cattle night and day. There were lots of us to change off if all would have taken a part, but it was a very rainy country, and some would not take their turn, especially in the nighttime. I can well remember those who had charge used to come to us and say, ‘Will you go and herd again tonight as we cannot get anyone else to go.’ Me and my father and my brother-in-law, James Hurren, have gone three and four nights out of a week in the pouring rain, wet through from head to foot and in the water part of the time up to our knees - anything to help get fitted out and started on the road. 
“When our handcart company got out about three hundred miles on the road, our cattle stampeded, most all of our best oxen leaving, which left us in a bad state to move any farther. We stayed there for several days, hunting as far as we dared to go to find some of our cattle but could not find any, believing the Indians must have driven them away. Then some of the flour was taken out of the wagons and put on the handcarts according to the strength of the party drawing them. Some had one, others two or three, and, if my memory serves me right, Brother Hurren, [Robert’s brother-in-law] being considered the strongest man in the company, had five sacks put on his cart besides two small girls that were not able to walk and all his baggage and cooking utensils. His wife [Robert’s sister Eliza] helped in pulling the cart and walked the entire trail. 
“My father, David Reeder, would start out in the morning and pull his cart until he would drop on the road. He did this day after day until he did not arise early on October [1] 1856. He was found dead in his bed, and his fellow bedmate had not heard a thing during the night. Sister Eliza wrapped a cherished sheet around him, and we placed him in a shallow grave, hoping the wolves would not disturb. We must go on our way in silent mourning and in a weakened condition. 
“Our rations were growing shorter, and we reduced them by common consent from day to day. Nights were getting colder, and some would sit down by the roadside and die. My younger sister, Caroline, seventeen years old, after traveling all day and seeing the camp being made for the night, took off her apron to tie some sagebrush in to bring into the camp. She sat down to rest, leaning on her bundle, exhausted. They found her chilled and dying and carried her to camp. She died without gaining consciousness. She, too, was placed in an unmarked grave near Three Crossings - Sweetwater River. She died the evening of October 15, 1856. Her death was another real loss to us, but we must hurry on in threatening weather and colder nights on the Wind River Pass. So it was with others, as many as thirteen being buried in one grave at one time. I think fully one hundred died on this trip. 
“On October 17*, we awoke covered with eight inches of snow and rations about gone. We pulled our carts sixteen miles in a blinding snowstorm and arrived at Rock Creek, where we sheltered against the hill as best we could to avoid the north wind and blowing snow. Weakened to such an extent and without food, thirteen died that night. All the able-bodied men dug one large grave, but not too deep. My brother-in-law, James Hurren, held out his eight-year-old girl, Mary, to see her little playmate lying among the dead. They were laid away in the clothes they wore, in a circle with feet to center and heads out. We covered them with willows and then earth and slid rocks down the hill to keep the wolves from disturbing them. Two of the men who helped dig the grave died and were buried in another nearby. We could go no further. The weather was severe. 
Through snow and wind we mostly walked behind the relief wagons about three hundred miles to Salt Lake City and arrived on Public Square [where the Joseph Smith Memorial Building now stands] November 9, 1856. We stopped for about two hours, and many of the Church authorities came and talked to us. Then we were given over to the bishops of the different wards. Each bishop took a few, whom they saw got some kind of work to pay for their keep during the winter.” 
Robert Reeder made two trips back to the Missouri River to help other emigrants on their way to Utah. While on the first trip he found the grave of his father, David Reeder. Robert married and was among the earliest settlers in Hyde Park, Cache County, Utah. He became the father of fourteen children. He was a cattle man, butcher, deputy sheriff and hay merchant. 
* On October 17 or 18, the Willie Company reached their last camp that had available water. The next water (the sixth crossing of the Sweetwater) was 16 miles away and so the Company was forced to get through in one day in order to survive. It was at this last camp that the rations were completely depleted and the snowstorm of October 19 further stranded the Company. It was here that James Willie (see his biography) left to find the rescuers. When he returned with a few of them, the Company then pushed on, the second day crossing Rocky Ridge and on to Rock Creek, in a ‘blinding snowstorm.’ 

Robert Reeder - Pioneer

Contributor: Diannejones Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Being moved by the spirit of gathering, my father, David Reeder, my sister Caroline, age 17, my sister Eliza and her husband, James Hurren, with their three little girls from ages 2 to 8 years old, and myself, age 19, started for Liverpool, where we met with others from different parts. There were 721 persons very much on the same errand, when we sailed out on the great ocean. On the 5th of May 1856, we sailed on the great ocean, which took us a little over 6 weeks to cross. I was very sick on the way and could not eat such food as they had on "sea fare" which consisted of what they called sea biscuits and salt pork and salt beef, also brown sugar and vinegar and very little other food. I got very feeble living principally on sugar and vinegar for 3 weeks. (It was reported that when he arrived in New York, he was so weak through the hardships of the voyage that he could not walk without assistance). I was very glad when we arrived at Castle Gardens, New York, where we could get a piece of bread once more. We rested here for a few days then we pursued our journey by railroad and steamboats, changing from one to the other until we arrived at Iowa camping ground where we had to lay over 3 or 4 weeks waiting for our outfits. The Church had a herd of cattle there, which was at the time a general fitting out place. While laying over we had to herd those cattle night and day. There were lots of us to change off if all would have taken a part, but it was a very rainy country and some would not take their part, especially in the night time. I can well remember those who had charge used to come to us and say, "Will you go and herd again tonight as we cannot get anyone else to go." My father and I and my brotherin-law, James Hurren have gone 3 or 4 nights out of a week in the pouring rain, wet through from head to foot and in the water part of the time up to our knees, anything to help get fitted out and started on the road. Eventually we got our outfits of 4 wagons with ox team, loaded with flour which was calculated to take us to Salt Lake City making calculations for 60 days and one pound of flour for each grown person per day and half that for all children under 12 years of age. Beside that, we had one wagon with 4 mules loaded with bacon and groceries for the trip and one saddle pony belonging to an elder returning home which was used for hunting camp grounds, and the rest were handcarts about 120 of them. As a general rule, one handcart to each family and in some cases, two young men and two young women per handcart. Those with handcarts were loaded with their baggage and children that were unable to walk. The company comprised of about 500 people. In this way we traveled to what was called Florence, this side of the Missouri River. We were again detained, waiting for some Independence emigrants who wanted to travel with us, as it was very dangerous to cross the Plains in those times one thousand miles of wild Indian country. There was one outfit belonging to A.W. Babbit and consisting, I think, of about 5 men, 1 woman, and 1 child about 3 or 4 years old, concluded to start 2 or 3 days before we were ready. I think we left this place about the 20th of Sept with an addition to our outfit of about 30 head of cows, some to give milk, other to kill for beef. Our company came to where the Babbit Company had camped the the Indians having killed them all and burned their wagons, nothing being left only the irons and the bodies half buried. This looked very discouraging to us but we traveled on looking back for nothing. We were surrounded by Indians on two or three occasions, but we got out by giving them some flour and tobacco which some of our company had with them. When we got out about 300 miles on the road, our cattle stampeded, most all of our best oxen leaving, which left us in a bad state to move on any father. We stayed there for several days hunting as far as we dared to go to find some of our cattle, but could not find any, believing the Indians must have driven them away. Some of the flour was taken out of the wagons and put on the handcarts according to the strength of the party drawing them. Some had one (sack), others had two or three. And if my memory serves me right, Brother Hurren, being considered the strongest man the company had, had five sacks put on his cart besides two small girls that were not able to walk and all his baggage and cooking utensils. His wife, my sister Eliza, helped in pulling the cart and walked the entire trail. We made up with the few cattle we had left, - one yoke of cattle and one cow to each wagon, and on account of weak teams and handcarts loaded too heavy, we traveled only a few miles each day. Our provisions were going fast while we were making but little headway. Our rations had had to be cut down half and some (people) were sick with bowel and other sickness. My father, David Reeder, would start out in the morning and pull his cart until he would drop on the road. He did this day after day until he did not rise early October 7, 1856. He was found dead in his bed and his fellow bed mate had not heard anything all during the night. "Sister Eliza wrapped a cherished sheet around him and we placed him in a shallow grave, hoping wolves would not disturb. We must be on our way in silent mourning and in a weakened condition. "Our rations were growing shorter and we reduced them by common consent from day to day. Nights were getting colder and some would sit down by the roadside and die. My younger sister, Caroline, 17 years old, after traveling all day and seeing the camp being made for the night, took her apron to tie some sage brush in to bring into camp. She sat down to rest, leaning on her bundle, exhausted. They found her chilled and dying and carried her to camp. She died that night, not gaining consciousness. "he died the evening of 15 October, 1856. She too, was placed in an unmarked grave near Three Crossings, Sweetwater. Her death was another real loss to us but we must hurry on in threatening weather and colder nights on the Windriver Pass. I think fully 100 died on this trip. On Oct 17, we awoke covered with 8 inches of snow and rations about gone. We pulled our carts 16 miles in the blinding snowstorm and arrived at Rock Creek where we sheltered against the hill as best we could to avoid the north wind and blowing snow. Weakened to such an extent and without food, 13 died that night. All the able-bodied men dug one large grave, but not too deep. My brother-in-law, James Hurren, held his 8-year old girl, Mary, to see her little playmate lying among the dead. They were laid in the clothes they wore, in a circle with feet to the center and heads out. We covered them with willows and then earth and slid rocks down the hill to keep the wolves from disturbing them. "Two of the men who helped dig the graves, died that night and were buried near by. We could go no further. The weather was severe and we had not a morsel of food in camp. We had heard that assistance was on the road and we still had hope. "We had one pony and one mule that were not entirely exhausted and two of the men took these animals and started out to find some relief, which they did after going to Pacific Springs. The relief party had laid over there because of the storm, not knowing the dire distress which the handcart company was in at that time. When they heard the report, they left part of the wagons, doubled up teams and came to us as quickly as possible. They reached us after we had been in camp 48 hours. They dared not give us food for fear of killing us all, which would most likely have done. For food we had been using rawhide. I myself sat by the campfire with Brother Hurren and scraped and singed the hair off a piece of hide some that had been taken from discarded handcarts. It was hard but we would boil and soften them and cut them up in small pieces and put in our pockets to chew on the road the next day. It helped to keep life in us. Through snow and wind we mostly walked behind the relief wagons about 300 miles to Salt Lake City and arrived on Public Square November 9, 1856. We stopped for about 2 hours and many of the church officials came and talked with us. Then we were given over to the bishops of the different wards. Each bishop took a few, some they saw got some kind of pay for their keep during the winter. Company: ********************************************************************************** Parents: David Reeder (1801 - 1856) Lydia Balls Reeder (1803 - 1839) Spouses: Lydia Wilkinson Reeder (1841 - 1884)* Ellen Flatt Reeder (1852 - 1914)* Children: Martin Charles Reeder (1871 - 1942)* Amanda Lydia Reeder Richards (1873 - 1962)* Virginia May Reeder Lee (1873 - 1901)* Rose Harriet Reeder Jeffs (1875 - 1960)* Aletha Ellen Reeder Bowen (1875 - 1905)* Hattie Vilate Reeder Lee (1880 - 1963)* Jonathan Flatt Reeder (1882 - 1976)* Edna Reeder (1885 - 1901)* Moses Reeder (1888 - 1960)* Florence Reeder Hancey (1891 - 1944)* Golden Flatt Reeder (1894 - 1962)*

Robert Reeder writings on Willie Handcart Company

Contributor: Diannejones Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

From tellmystorytoo Page 118 ROBERT REEDER Born 1837: England Age: 19 Willie Handcart Company: From Robert’s own writing, we learn much about this trek. “On the 5th of May we sailed out from Liverpool, England, on the great ocean, which took us a little over six weeks to cross. I was sick on the way and could not eat such food as they had on ‘seafare’ , which consisted of what they call sea biscuits and salt pork and salt beef, also brown sugar and vinegar and very little other food. I got very feeble living principally on sugar and vinegar for three weeks. “I was glad when we arrived at Castle Garden, New York, where we could get a piece of bread once more. We rested here a few days, then pursued our journey by railroad and steamboats, changing from one to the other until we arrived at the Iowa camping ground, where we had to lay over two or three weeks waiting for our outfits. “While laying there we had to herd those cattle night and day. There were lots of us to change off if all would have taken a part, but it was a very rainy country, and some would not take their turn, especially in the nighttime. I can well remember those who had charge would come to us and say, ‘Will you go and herd again tonight as we cannot get anyone else to go.’ Me and my father and brother-in-law, James Hurren have gone three and four nights out of a week, in the pouring rain, wet through from head to foot and in the water part of the time, up to our knees - anything to help get fitted out and on the road. “When our handcart company got out about three hundred miles on the road, our cattle stampeded, most all of our best oxen leaving, which left us in a bad state to move any farther. We stayed there for several days, hunting as far as we dared to go to find some of our cattle but not find any, believing the Indians must have driven them away. Then some of the flour was taken out of the wagons and put on the handcarts according to the strength of the party drawing them. Some had one, others two or three, and, I my memory serves me right, Brother Hurren, (Robert’s brother-in-law) being considered the strongest man in the company, had five sacks put on his cart besides two small girls that were not able to walk and all his baggage and cooking utensils. His wife (Robert’s sister Eliza) helped in pulling the cart and walked the entire trail. “My father, David Reeder, would start out in the morning and pull his cart until he would drop on the road. He did this day after day until he did not arise on October (1), 1856. He was found dead in his bed, and his fellow bedmate had not heard a thing during the night. Sister Eliza wrapped a cherished sheet around him, and we placed him in a shallow grave, hoping that the wolves would not disturb. We must go on our way in silent mourning and in a weakened condition. “Our rations were growing shorter and we reduced them through common consent day to day. Nights were getting colder, and some would sit down on the roadside and die. My younger sister, Caroline, seventeen years old, after traveling all day and seeing the camp being made for the night, took off her apron to tie some sagebrush in to bring into the camp. She sat down to rest, leaning on her bundle, exhausted. They found her chilled and dying and carried her to camp. She died without gaining consciousness. She, too, was placed in an unmarked grave near Three Crossing - Sweetwater River. She died the evening of October 15, 1856. Her death was another loss to us, but we must hurry on in threatening weather and colder nights on the Windriver Pass. So it was with others, as many as thirteen being buried in one grave at one time. I think fully one hundred died on this trip. “On October 17*, we awoke covered with eight inches of snow and rations about gone. We pulled our carts 16 miles in a blinding snowstorm, and arrived at Rock Creek where we sheltered against the hill as best we could to avoid the north wind and blowing snow. Weakened to such an extent and without food, thirteen died that night. All the able-bodied men dug one large grave, but not too deep. My brother-in-law, James Hurren, held out his eight year old daughter, Mary, to see her little playmate lying among the dead. They were laid in the clothes they wore, in a circle feet to center and heads out. We covered them with willows and then earth and slid rocks down the hill to keep the wolves from disturbing them. Two of the men who helped dig the grave died and were buried in another nearby. We could go no further. The weather was severe. “…Through snow and wind we walked mostly behind the relief wagons about three hundred miles to Salt Lake City and arrived on Public Square (where the Joseph Smith Memorial now stands) November 9, 1856. We stopped for about two hours and many of the Church authorities came and talked to us. Then we were given over to the bishops of the different wards. Each bishop took a few, whom they saw got some kind of work to pay for their keep during the winter.” Robert Reeder made two trips back to the Missouri River to help other emigrants on their way to Utah. While on the first trip he found the grave of his father, David Reeder. Robert married and was among the first settlers in Hyde Park, Cache County, Utah. He became the father of fourteen children. He was a cattleman, butcher, deputy sheriff and hay merchant. On October 17 or 18, the Willie Company reached their last camp that had available water. The next water (the sixth crossing of the Sweetwater) was 16 miles away and so the company was forced to get through in one day in order to survive. It was at this last camp that the rations were completely depleted and the snow storm of October 19 further stranded the Company. It was here that James Willey (see his biography) left to find the rescuers. When he returned with a few of them, the Company then pushed on, the second day crossing Rocky Ridge and on to Rock Creek, in a blinding snow storm. From book, “Tell My Story, Too”, A collection of biographical sketches of Mormon pioneers and rescuers of the Willie Handcart, Martin Handcart, Hodgett Waton, and Hunt Wagon Companies of 1856. See www.tellmystorytoo.com

Remembering

Contributor: Diannejones Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Story was found and written by Virginia Daines Nelson Robert gazed through the frosted window, the cold coming off the panes almost unnoticed. Fresh snow lay deep on the ground and a starry sky had replaced the storm, but visions of the storms thirty years ago invaded Robert's mind. They always came back when it snowed. His hands traced slowly across his hips as he unconsciously sought to soothe the pain in his joints. The pain always came with the storms as well. It never went away, but the snow and cold always made him feel like he was again wading the icy depths of the Sweetwater River or struggling to cross Rocky Ridge in a blinding blizzard.

Life Timeline of Robert Reeder

Robert Reeder was born on 24 May 1837
Robert Reeder was 3 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
See More
Robert Reeder was 22 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
See More
Robert Reeder was 24 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
1861
See More
Robert Reeder was 38 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
1874
See More
Robert Reeder was 50 years old when Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show opens in London. William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody was an American scout, bison hunter, and showman. He was born in Le Claire, Iowa Territory, but he lived for several years in his father's hometown in Toronto Township, Ontario, Canada, before the family returned to the Midwest and settled in the Kansas Territory.
1887
See More
Robert Reeder was 59 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
1895
See More
Robert Reeder was 68 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
1905
See More
Robert Reeder died on 22 Dec 1917 at the age of 80
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Robert Reeder (24 May 1837 - 22 Dec 1917), BillionGraves Record 1030079 Hyde Park, Cache, Utah, United States

Loading