William W. Welch

1867 - 1920

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William W. Welch

1867 - 1920
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WILLIAM WALLACE AND ELIZABETH DICKSON McARTHUR WELCH (Taken from the Sketch of their lives by John William Welch, their son, as dictated to his wife, Ada C. Welch) My father, William Wallace Welch was born on February 26, 1867 at Three Mile Creek, Box Elder County, Utah. He was the ninth child of Jo
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Life Information

William W. Welch

Born:
Died:

Teton-Newdale Cemetery

East 3000 North
Teton-Newdale Cemetery, Madison, Idaho
United States

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William Wallace Welch and Elizabeth Dickson McArthur

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

WILLIAM WALLACE AND ELIZABETH DICKSON McARTHUR WELCH (Taken from the Sketch of their lives by John William Welch, their son, as dictated to his wife, Ada C. Welch) My father, William Wallace Welch was born on February 26, 1867 at Three Mile Creek, Box Elder County, Utah. He was the ninth child of John and Eliza Billington Welch. The family moved to Brigham City in 1874. In 1877, his father was made Bishop of the Fourth Ward of Brigham City. At that meeting, President Brigham Young made his last public address. This was Sunday, August 19, 1877 at a special conference held in Brigham City for the purpose of organizing the Box Elder Stake of Zion. The Walch Family moved to Paradise, Utah when William Wallace was about eighteen years old. It was there that he met Elizabeth Dickson McArthur. She was daughter of John Dickson and Sarah Elizabeth Abbott McArthur and was born in Paradise on March 28, 1870. Elizabeth, being the oldest girl in the family, had to work very hard. Knitting stockings for the family one of her regular jobs. They were usually of black or gray yarn spun by her grandmother Abbott She became a very good seamstress. The McArthur Family was very musical. They had a quartette that consisted of the father who sang bass; Elizabeth soprano, Jacob, tenor and Minerva, alto. They sang for socials and funerals. Elizabeth was the one to sing the solo part. William Wallace Welch and Elizabeth McArthur were married on December 29, 1887. Their marriage was solemnized in the Logan Temple on June 28, 1889. In the winter of 1887-88, they moved to Bennington, Bear Lake Country, Idaho. Will's brother-in-law and sister, Orson and Eliza Tippetts lived there, and they thought it would be a better place to live. They built a two-room log house with a lean-to. They had about five acres of land. Will helped other farmers besides doing the work on his own place. William Welch and John D. McArthur, father of Elizabeth (Lizzie), made a trip to the Upper Snake River Valley to see the country. They decided that they wanted to settle here and returned to Bennington to prepare to make the move. The families moved to Wilford in the summer of 1896, traveling with four horses and two wagons loaded with household and personal belongings. When they arrived in Wilford, they traded one of the teams of horses with the harness and wagon to William C. Pratt for a small acreage with a two-room log house on it. Will removed the dirt roof and put a shingled roof on it. He farmed his land and worked for wages on farms and also did butchering, especially for Tom Birch, the storekeeper in Wilford. Lizzie Welch served for many years on the Sewing Committee of the Relief Society. She was well known for h er skill at sewing, knitting and hat making. She nursed the sick and often helped to “lay out the dead,” and to make burial clothes. William Welch loved music. He played the guitar, mandolin and mouth harp. He was a good singer and would sing for the children by the hour in the evenings while sitting around the fire. He bought one of the first Victrola’s and whenever he made a trip to town, he would buy a new record. His favorites were those by Bill Lowder, a Scotch singer of those days. He was a very timid man. He seldom attended church for fear of being called upon. He was very generous with his poor neighbors a large part of it. If he knew of a family in need, he would send them flour and anything he happened to have that they could use. His son remembered taking a whole butchered pig to a family that was sick with diphtheria. The stock was watered twice a day in the winter time at the canal about a block away. Sometimes the ice would be two feet thick on the canal. A hole would be chopped in the ice and sometimes the water dipped up into tubs for the stock to drink out of. The water for the house was carried from the canal. In the winter time, it was hauled in a fifty-gallon barrel on a toboggan. Sometimes the water in the barrel would freeze almost solid. A tub was kept over the barrel to keep it clean. Later a ditch was made closer to the house. The water from it was used for washing and watering the stock, but the drinking water was still hauled from the canal. Father was not a man to loaf about town. If he had any business to transact, he would attend to it while mother did the shopping she wanted to do and would go right back home. He liked to read whatever he could find. Books were scarce and were highly prized in those days. He liked to sit in front of the fire and read while one of us children combed his hair with a fine-toothed comb. He had shiny black hair. At the turn of the century (New Year's Eve 1900), he told us children that he was going to stay up to see the New Year in. he told us it was something that none of us would probably see again. We older children stayed up with him. He took us outside. The stars were bright and the night was very cold, maybe fifteen degrees below zero. l we stayed outside as long as we could stand the cold, and it was after midnight. l it was an incident that all of us older children have remembered all of our lives. He used to do a lot of fishing and would usually take me with him. I remember one time when he was trying to hook a big fish. He stepped off into a big hole and fell out of sight, losing his fishing pole. When he came up, he saw me sitting there laughing at him. He said, “You would laugh if a fellow were drowning, wouldn't you.” I had not been worried because I knew father was a very good swimmer. Another time we were fishing on the Teton River. I was testing the ice ahead of me with an ax. All at once the ice broke and I fell through. Father yelled, “Save the ax.” it would embarrass him when I would tease him about it later. In about 1918, father drove into St. Anthony after some groceries. On his way back home something frightened the horse. It broke into a run and ran the buggy into a telephone pole. He got home all right but after that he was subject to bad headaches and high blood pressure. I took him to the hospital in Idaho Falls when he died three days later on May 22, 1920. After her husband died, Elizabeth (Lizzie) spent several winters in Utah where her son, Clarence, was working at the smelters. They would come home for the summers. After all of her children were married, she sold her home in Wilford and bought a little home in St. Anthony. Here she continued to be a faithful member of the Latter-day Saints Church, and was active in the Relief Society. She survived her husband by thirty-nine years. She passed away in the Madison County Hospital on August1, 1959 after a lingering illness. She was eighty-nine years old. Children of William Wallace and Elizabeth Dickson M. Welch Birthday Birthplace Spouse Death Date S. Elizabeth 5/25/1888 Bennington, ID William Birch 12/15/1955 (1) Ethel Briggs (died) (2) Emma Louis Howells (div.) (3) Mary Gladys Brower (div.) (4) Ada C. Phelps Eliza 8/28/1891Paradise, UTLouis Birch Living Jesse D. 1/31/1895Bennington, ID Ethel Birch 2/21/1958 Clarence L.6/16/1901Wilford, IDMyrtle Johnston 8/3/1937 Stanley H.7/4/1904Wilford, IDOrpha S. Johnston Living

William Wallace Welch and Elizabeth Dickson McArthur

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

WILLIAM WALLACE AND ELIZABETH DICKSON McARTHUR WELCH (Taken from the Sketch of their lives by John William Welch, their son, as dictated to his wife, Ada C. Welch) My father, William Wallace Welch was born on February 26, 1867 at Three Mile Creek, Box Elder County, Utah. He was the ninth child of John and Eliza Billington Welch. The family moved to Brigham City in 1874. In 1877, his father was made Bishop of the Fourth Ward of Brigham City. At that meeting, President Brigham Young made his last public address. This was Sunday, August 19, 1877 at a special conference held in Brigham City for the purpose of organizing the Box Elder Stake of Zion. The Welch Family moved to Paradise, Utah when William Wallace was about eighteen years old. It was there that he met Elizabeth Dickson McArthur. She was daughter of John Dickson and Sarah Elizabeth Abbott McArthur and was born in Paradise on March 28, 1870. Elizabeth, being the oldest girl in the family, had to work very hard. Knitting stockings for the family one of her regular jobs. They were usually of black or gray yarn spun by her grandmother Abbott She became a very good seamstress. The McArthur Family was very musical. They had a quartette that consisted of the father who sang bass; Elizabeth soprano, Jacob, tenor and Minerva, alto. They sang for socials and funerals. Elizabeth was the one to sing the solo part. William Wallace Welch and Elizabeth McArthur were married on December 29, 1887. Their marriage was solemnized in the Logan Temple on June 28, 1889. In the winter of 1887-88, they moved to Bennington, Bear Lake Country, Idaho. Will's brother-in-law and sister, Orson and Eliza Tippetts lived there, and they thought it would be a better place to live. They built a two-room log house with a lean-to. They had about five acres of land. Will helped other farmers besides doing the work on his own place. William Welch and John D. McArthur, father of Elizabeth (Lizzie), made a trip to the Upper Snake River Valley to see the country. They decided that they wanted to settle here and returned to Bennington to prepare to make the move. The families moved to Wilford in the summer of 1896, traveling with four horses and two wagons loaded with household and personal belongings. When they arrived in Wilford, they traded one of the teams of horses with the harness and wagon to William C. Pratt for a small acreage with a two-room log house on it. Will removed the dirt roof and put a shingled roof on it. He farmed his land and worked for wages on farms and also did butchering, especially for Tom Birch, the storekeeper in Wilford. Lizzie Welch served for many years on the Sewing Committee of the Relief Society. She was well known for h er skill at sewing, knitting and hat making. She nursed the sick and often helped to “lay out the dead,” and to make burial clothes. William Welch loved music. He played the guitar, mandolin and mouth harp. He was a good singer and would sing for the children by the hour in the evenings while sitting around the fire. He bought one of the first Victrola’s and whenever he made a trip to town, he would buy a new record. His favorites were those by Bill Lowder, a Scotch singer of those days. He was a very timid man. He seldom attended church for fear of being called upon. He was very generous with his poor neighbors a large part of it. If he knew of a family in need, he would send them flour and anything he happened to have that they could use. His son remembered taking a whole butchered pig to a family that was sick with diphtheria. The stock was watered twice a day in the winter time at the canal about a block away. Sometimes the ice would be two feet thick on the canal. A hole would be chopped in the ice and sometimes the water dipped up into tubs for the stock to drink out of. The water for the house was carried from the canal. In the winter time, it was hauled in a fifty-gallon barrel on a toboggan. Sometimes the water in the barrel would freeze almost solid. A tub was kept over the barrel to keep it clean. Later a ditch was made closer to the house. The water from it was used for washing and watering the stock, but the drinking water was still hauled from the canal. Father was not a man to loaf about town. If he had any business to transact, he would attend to it while mother did the shopping she wanted to do and would go right back home. He liked to read whatever he could find. Books were scarce and were highly prized in those days. He liked to sit in front of the fire and read while one of us children combed his hair with a fine-toothed comb. He had shiny black hair. At the turn of the century (New Year's Eve 1900), he told us children that he was going to stay up to see the New Year in. he told us it was something that none of us would probably see again. We older children stayed up with him. He took us outside. The stars were bright and the night was very cold, maybe fifteen degrees below zero. l we stayed outside as long as we could stand the cold, and it was after midnight. l it was an incident that all of us older children have remembered all of our lives. He used to do a lot of fishing and would usually take me with him. I remember one time when he was trying to hook a big fish. He stepped off into a big hole and fell out of sight, losing his fishing pole. When he came up, he saw me sitting there laughing at him. He said, “You would laugh if a fellow were drowning, wouldn't you.” I had not been worried because I knew father was a very good swimmer. Another time we were fishing on the Teton River. I was testing the ice ahead of me with an ax. All at once the ice broke and I fell through. Father yelled, “Save the ax.” it would embarrass him when I would tease him about it later. In about 1918, father drove into St. Anthony after some groceries. On his way back home something frightened the horse. It broke into a run and ran the buggy into a telephone pole. He got home all right but after that he was subject to bad headaches and high blood pressure. I took him to the hospital in Idaho Falls when he died three days later on May 22, 1920. After her husband died, Elizabeth (Lizzie) spent several winters in Utah where her son, Clarence, was working at the smelters. They would come home for the summers. After all of her children were married, she sold her home in Wilford and bought a little home in St. Anthony. Here she continued to be a faithful member of the Latter-day Saints Church, and was active in the Relief Society. She survived her husband by thirty-nine years. She passed away in the Madison County Hospital on August 1, 1959 after a lingering illness. She was eighty-nine years old. Children of William Wallace and Elizabeth Dickson M. Welch Birthday Birthplace Spouse Death Date S. Elizabeth 5/25/1888 Bennington, ID William Birch 12/15/1955 (1) Ethel Briggs (died) (2) Emma Louis Howells (div.) (3) Mary Gladys Brower (div.) (4) Ada C. Phelps Eliza 8/28/1891Paradise, UT Louis Birch Living Jesse D. 1/31/1895Bennington, ID Ethel Birch 2/21/1958 Clarence L.6/16/1901Wilford, ID Myrtle Johnston 8/3/1937 Stanley H.7/4/1904 Wilford, ID Orpha S. Johnston Living

Life timeline of William W. Welch

1867
William W. Welch was born in 1867
William W. Welch was 12 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
William W. Welch was 21 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
William W. Welch was 28 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
William W. Welch was 36 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
William W. Welch was 50 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
William W. Welch died in 1920 at the age of 53
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for William W. Welch (1867 - 1920), BillionGraves Record 227621 Teton-Newdale Cemetery, Madison, Idaho, United States

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