William Loveridge

1 May 1854 - 9 May 1931

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William Loveridge

1 May 1854 - 9 May 1931
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HISTORY OF WILLIAM AND MARTHA LOVERIDGE BY SYLVAN BUHLER IN 1980 [Editing/Correction by Lee Farnsworth - July 2011. Sources for the corrections made can be found in familysearch.org by starting at William Loveridge, PID K2MW-FWJ. Credits: This history was compiled and written in 1980 by Sylvan B Buh

Life Information

William Loveridge

Born:
Died:

American Fork Cemetery

601-699 Alpine Hwy
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States
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Chynna67

July 24, 2011
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sls1966

September 1, 2011
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N Harpst

April 7, 2020
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pavik

April 9, 2020
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PapaMoose

July 23, 2011

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Obituary of William Loveridge - Obtained from Horace Clark - "Oldest Resident of Highland Dies"

Contributor: sls1966 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

...William Loveridge, sturdy pioneer of our community, who has just turned 77 years of age, was born in Ponty Pool, Monmouthshire, Wales, May 1, 1864. His father was names Charles, and his mother, Sarah Ann Hall, and he was one of a famiy of 13 children. Eleven of them were boys and two were girls. His parents and all of his brothers and sisters have preceded him in death. The place of Brother Loveridge's birth was a coal mining district and his parents were engaged in the shoemaking occupation. William, very early in his life, was needed at home to care for his brothers and sisters while hi parents were at work, and when only 9 year of age took his place as a worker in the coal mines. This necessity offered him scant opportunity for school training so that he was only permitted to attend a school two days in his life. In spite of the handicaps which this placed him under, his natural perceptions, his keen memory and his contact with life developed his capacities so as to enable him to take an honored and active place in his community and church. At one time while leading a barrow drawing a small car of coal to the mouth of the mine, a cave-in of coal buried him to his head, badly crushing his body and limbs. Tho he recovered and returned to his work soon, with the aid of a crutch and cane, he has been somewhat crippled for life. Brother Loveridge's parents and the family were converts to the church when he was but a boy. Their home was made the headquarters for the missionaries and their work, and after his marriage to Martha Scott, October 17, 1875, their home was thrown open to the Elders and they assisted them in their work. Eleven children have blessed the union of this good couple. Five of them were born in their native land and six after emigrating to Utah for the Gospel's sake. They ae Elizabeth A., Mary Jane, Edward, now of McGill, Nevada; Reuben N., Martha, Hazel S. Buhler of Highland, Rachel S. Price of Islen, Nevada, and Cressie A. Greenland of Highland. There survive him, also, besides the seven children, 28 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. His wife passed away July 17, 1929. The second daughter, Mary Jane, died before they left England and was buried in Burnt Wood Church yard. Brother and Sister Loveridge gathered the remaining four with them, and tho terribly reluctant to leave their other child, Sister Loveridge and the children came over to America in June, 1886, and Brother Loveridge followed the next November. Both their mothers were already in America. The family made their home in Alpine after arriving in Utah. They stayed there sometimes over a year than settled in Highland to engage in farming. After about two years more Brother Loveridge built the residence that has been their home ever since, about 41 years. Brother Loveridge as been faithful in all his church activities, regular in attending his meetings and in meeting every and all obligation made of him. He was councilor to the president in the Highland Branch when it was a branch of the American Fork Third Ward, was assistant in the Sunday School Superintendency in the branch and when it was organized as a ward; and has served faithfully as a ward teacher. He was ordained an Elder in England. With his wife, he received his endowments and was sealed in the Salt Lake Temple November 17, 1897, and was ordained a High Priest, February 2, 1907. Last Saturday, May 9, (1932) brought his career to a close and with his going we have lost a good father, a good neighbor and a faithful Latter-Day Saint. ...Luding (Ludwig) M. Larson, vocal duet "Whispering Hope", rendered by Morley Steele and Ora Chipman, accompanied by Ann Chipman. A biographical sketch, paying high tribute to the splendid character of M. Loveridge, was read by counselor Ray L. Alston. Mr. George F. White of Highland, and Wm S. Greenwood of Ogden, were the next speakers, both conveyed many consoling remarks and spoke of their pleasant associations with Mr. Loveridge. A violin solo, "Perfect Day", was rendered by Irene Johnston, accompanied on the piano by Lois Greenwood. Stephen L. Chipman and President Clifford E. Young were the next speakers. They spoke of the splendid character of Mr. Loverige and his good wife who preceded him in death almost two years ago. The closing number was a vocal duet, "I'm A Pilgrim" by Rula Dorton and Lelold Peterson, accompanied by Lulu Anderson of Lehi, after which R. E. Booth of the American Fork Second Ward offered the benediction. Interment wa in the American Fork City Cemetery where James H. Clarke dedicated the grave.

Obituary of William Loveridge - Obtained from Horace Clark - "Oldest Resident of Highland Dies"

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

...William Loveridge, sturdy pioneer of our community, who has just turned 77 years of age, was born in Ponty Pool, Monmouthshire, Wales, May 1, 1864. His father was names Charles, and his mother, Sarah Ann Hall, and he was one of a famiy of 13 children. Eleven of them were boys and two were girls. His parents and all of his brothers and sisters have preceded him in death. The place of Brother Loveridge's birth was a coal mining district and his parents were engaged in the shoemaking occupation. William, very early in his life, was needed at home to care for his brothers and sisters while hi parents were at work, and when only 9 year of age took his place as a worker in the coal mines. This necessity offered him scant opportunity for school training so that he was only permitted to attend a school two days in his life. In spite of the handicaps which this placed him under, his natural perceptions, his keen memory and his contact with life developed his capacities so as to enable him to take an honored and active place in his community and church. At one time while leading a barrow drawing a small car of coal to the mouth of the mine, a cave-in of coal buried him to his head, badly crushing his body and limbs. Tho he recovered and returned to his work soon, with the aid of a crutch and cane, he has been somewhat crippled for life. Brother Loveridge's parents and the family were converts to the church when he was but a boy. Their home was made the headquarters for the missionaries and their work, and after his marriage to Martha Scott, October 17, 1875, their home was thrown open to the Elders and they assisted them in their work. Eleven children have blessed the union of this good couple. Five of them were born in their native land and six after emigrating to Utah for the Gospel's sake. They ae Elizabeth A., Mary Jane, Edward, now of McGill, Nevada; Reuben N., Martha, Hazel S. Buhler of Highland, Rachel S. Price of Islen, Nevada, and Cressie A. Greenland of Highland. There survive him, also, besides the seven children, 28 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. His wife passed away July 17, 1929. The second daughter, Mary Jane, died before they left England and was buried in Burnt Wood Church yard. Brother and Sister Loveridge gathered the remaining four with them, and tho terribly reluctant to leave their other child, Sister Loveridge and the children came over to America in June, 1886, and Brother Loveridge followed the next November. Both their mothers were already in America. The family made their home in Alpine after arriving in Utah. They stayed there sometimes over a year than settled in Highland to engage in farming. After about two years more Brother Loveridge built the residence that has been their home ever since, about 41 years. Brother Loveridge as been faithful in all his church activities, regular in attending his meetings and in meeting every and all obligation made of him. He was councilor to the president in the Highland Branch when it was a branch of the American Fork Third Ward, was assistant in the Sunday School Superintendency in the branch and when it was organized as a ward; and has served faithfully as a ward teacher. He was ordained an Elder in England. With his wife, he received his endowments and was sealed in the Salt Lake Temple November 17, 1897, and was ordained a High Priest, February 2, 1907. Last Saturday, May 9, (1932) brought his career to a close and with his going we have lost a good father, a good neighbor and a faithful Latter-Day Saint. ...Luding (Ludwig) M. Larson, vocal duet "Whispering Hope", rendered by Morley Steele and Ora Chipman, accompanied by Ann Chipman. A biographical sketch, paying high tribute to the splendid character of M. Loveridge, was read by counselor Ray L. Alston. Mr. George F. White of Highland, and Wm S. Greenwood of Ogden, were the next speakers, both conveyed many consoling remarks and spoke of their pleasant associations with Mr. Loveridge. A violin solo, "Perfect Day", was rendered by Irene Johnston, accompanied on the piano by Lois Greenwood. Stephen L. Chipman and President Clifford E. Young were the next speakers. They spoke of the splendid character of Mr. Loverige and his good wife who preceded him in death almost two years ago. The closing number was a vocal duet, "I'm A Pilgrim" by Rula Dorton and Lelold Peterson, accompanied by Lulu Anderson of Lehi, after which R. E. Booth of the American Fork Second Ward offered the benediction. Interment wa in the American Fork City Cemetery where James H. Clarke dedicated the grave.

Short History of William and Martha Loveridge

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

HISTORY OF WILLIAM AND MARTHA LOVERIDGE BY SYLVAN BUHLER IN 1980 [Editing/Correction by Lee Farnsworth - July 2011. Sources for the corrections made can be found in familysearch.org by starting at William Loveridge, PID K2MW-FWJ. Credits: This history was compiled and written in 1980 by Sylvan B Buhler, a grandson of William and Martha Loveridge. Information for this history was obtained from the following sources: 1. Aunt Chrissie Greenland, the only surviving child at the time of this writing. 2. A short history written by Ruby Lee Buhler from information she obtained from Aunt Chrissie. 3. The life story of my mother, Hazel Buhler. 4. The life story of my sister, Lillie Buhler Day. 5. A one-page history compiled by my sister, Ruby Buhler Day, several years ago. 6. Genealogy sheets prepared by Ruby Buhler Day. The pages at the end of this history written by the grandchildren entitled "What I Remember about Grandfather and Grandmother Loveridge," and also the obituary page, were not used as resource material. They were obtained afterwards and serve to corroborate and added to the history. [These are not included as part of this revision. Do not have them. lwf.] I give credit to Ruby Lee Buhler for inspiring me to write this history with the short history that she wrote. William and Martha Loveridge History William Loveridge was born May 1, 1854, in Pontypool, Monmouth (Wales) (now in Gwent County), England, a son of Charles Warre and Sarah Ann Prothero (Hall) Loveridge. He was one of 13 children and by necessity grew up helping with the raising of a large family. His father was a shoemaker, and Aunt Cressie tells how her father didn't have a chance for much of an education because he stayed home from school to help make a living for the family while his parents worked in the shoe shop. He never learned to read but could write some, and he was a real whiz with math and figures. Chrissie tells how no one could out-figure him. [Corrections by Editor: (1) His father was Charles Loveridge, the son of William Loveridge and Rachel Cridge and NOT Charles Warre Loveridge, the son of another William Loveridge and Mary Warre (find Charles Warre in FamilySearch at PID LCQ6-ZVJ). A review of Charles Warre Loveridge in FamilySearch shows that he married Susan Mary Ann Langdon in 1837 in Chard and then moved nearby and ultimately to London where he was a banker. Charles Loveridge appears with no middle name in the 1851 and 1861 Trevethin, Monmouthshire census records and also throughout the LDS branch registers for both Pontypool and Abersychan. Further evidence for Charles Loveridge (not Warre) is in the Pontypool LDS Branch Register (Film 104166) on p. 29 as having as parents William and Rachel Loveridge. In the same record it indicates that Charles and Sarah Loveridge were baptized 8 May 1853 by Uriah Rickards, the branch president, and that Charles was born in Somerset and Sarah was born in Monmouth and was now age 31. It shows the parents of Sarah as William and Sarah Prothero. The parents of both Charles and Sarah are repeated also on p. 34 as indicated. Clearly he is not and never was Charles Warre Loveridge, in spite of all the family records with that name in them. [(2) William was actually born in Trevethin, Monmouthshire on this date. This is where Charles Loveridge was living when in the 1851 census it indicates that he was head of household and that Sarah Ann Hall was living in the household as a “servant” and had two living sons: Reasoner and Ledru Hall – later each took the name of Loveridge, as did their families after marriage.] When he was a boy of about 10 or 12, he fell from a roof and broke both arms. This caused him to lose his sense of smell, although Aunt Cressie says he could still taste. Cressie says the only thing he ever smelled after that was when he got sprayed with a skunk. She tells about how they buried his clothes to get rid of the smell. Sometime later they dug them up and laundered them for use. I, Sylvan, also remember my mother telling of this incident – except she said that he didn't even smell the skunk. Martha Cresswell Scott Loveridge was born October 17, 1858, in Cannock, Burtwood, Stafford, England, a daughter of Samuel Faulkner (but sealed to George Scott)** and Mary Ann Cresswell. (**Martha Cresswell's real father was Samuel Faulkner, but her mother found out he was already married and had a family -- after having two children by this marriage – Edward and Martha. She, therefore, left him and had these first two children sealed to her second husband, George Scott.) [Corrections: (1) The correct name of the town is “Burntwood” in Staffordshire, but there is no record in the Burntwood parish records –searched several times – of Martha Cresswell being baptized as a baby nor any record of any Cresswell person. They do not show up in the 1851 census either. She may have been born there and gave this information to her family orally. (2) There is no record of any marriage to Samuel Faulkner, and the births are not recorded in the parish records. The first evidence is the 1861 Burntwood census which shows the family as George Scott, Mary Ann Scott and one child name Martha Cresswell – not Scott nor Faulkner. The brother Edward was born after Martha and must have died prior to the marriage in March 1861 and the census of 1861. The marriage of Mary Ann Cresswell (age 27, spinster) and George Scott (age 38, bachelor) is recorded in Ogley Hay, Stafforshire parish by banns on 11 March 1861.] Martha went to school to the third or fourth grade and, therefore, could read and write quite nicely. Cressie tells that she was a very good speller. She was a child of very strict parents but was still full of fun and some mischief and liked to trick her brothers-in-law. She worked in homes to help her parents make a living and always prided herself in doing a good job. Martha and Willard Loveridge were married on her 17th birthday October 17, 1875, in the Burtwood church in England. Cressie tells how she was born on a Sunday, married on a Sunday, her first girl was born on a Sunday, and although she didn't die on a Sunday, was buried on a Sunday as she had requested. [Correction: Marriage on this date was in Trevethin, Monmouthshire and not Burntwood, which the Cresswells and Scotts had left sometime between1861 and 1868. The marriage is shown in the Abersychan LDS Branch records, with their habitation as Trevethin. (Film 104166, item 3).] After their marriage, William continued to work in the coal mines in England. Their home was open to and they assisted the LDS missionaries as William's parents had done. One day while working in the mine driving a team of mules, he got too close to the wall and his head caught between two large pieces of coal. He hollered for the mules to stop, which they miraculously and immediately did, or his head would have been pulled right off. Cressie tells that he carried dark marks behind his ear from this experience for the rest of his life. It seems that William had several accidents while working in the mines for he also broke his leg while working there. Chrissie tells the story of how they set the leg without any anesthetic, and that it hurt so much that he said he could have bit a nail in half if he had one. He had to lie flat on his back for nearly a year for his leg to heal. He then went back to work with a stick or a cane in one hand and a crutch in the other. He then had the misfortune of falling down the elevator shaft of the mine and had to go back to bed for some time again. Tribulation was not only with William but Martha as well. While William was down in bed, she was having a real problem with her knee. Chrissie tells (and I remember my mother, Hazel, telling the same story) of how their mother had to walk three miles each way every day to the doctor, and how he would burn the knee out by pouring a caustic over it. She would walk 1-1/2 miles carrying her baby, Elizabeth, and then would leave the baby for her mother to tend and would then walk the remaining 1-1/2 miles to the doctor. She would then walk home, stopping at a big rock about half the way home to rest and sometimes to stop crying because of the pain before picking up her baby at her mother's house and then proceed on home. The doctor didn't come to the house because he said that the walking was the only thing that would save her leg. This was a very painful experience for her. Chrissie tells that after it healed you could put your hand in the large cavity of her left knee. The year is now 1883 and the Loveridges have just had a new baby born to them on April 10th and named him George. He was their fourth child. On July 11th of this year (just three months after the birth of their new baby) their next to the oldest child, Mary Jane, died of the black measles. She was five years old. Another child was born to the Loveridges on February 13, 1886, and was named William Thomas. Both William and Martha had been baptized some years earlier before their marriage – William in 1864 and Martha in 1868. In fact, Martha had been confirmed by her future father-in-law (William's father), Charles Loveridge. They had a desire to come to America and to Zion and decided to do so. Because there wasn't enough money, and for perhaps other reasons not known, William stayed in England for the time being. Martha and their four children (Elizabeth Ann, Edward, George, and William Thomas) boarded a ship and came to America and to Highland in Utah County, Utah. The story is told by Chrissie and Hazel of how George's hat blew off and was lost in the ocean while coming across on the ship. This was sometime between 1886 and 1888 for Will was born in England in 1886 and Gladys was born in Highland in 1888. (In William's obituary it states that the family came in June of 1886 and William in November of the same year.) [Added to above: As for emigration, the Abersychan LDS Branch Register indicates that Martha Loveridge emigrated on 21 May 1886 and that Charles emigrated on 2 October 1886. Other pertinent information from the Abersychan LDS branch: George Scott, Mary Ann Scott, and Martha Scott, all of the place known as “Coom” (not a listed place in the maps) were baptized on 14 November 1868 by T. Willet and they were confirmed on 15 November 1868, with Martha confirmed by Charles Loveridge. This record erroneously indicates that all three of them were born in Trevethin. The record also shows that both William and Martha were re-baptized (common practice in this branch) and confirmed on 28 February 1875 by William’s half-brother (and branch president) Reasoner and confirmed by William’s father Charles. Then they were re-baptized and confirmed again by Reasoner and a D. Rood on 11 June 1877. Reasoner and Charles and most others also were baptized several times over the years.] Upon arriving in Utah, Martha and her four children went to Alpine and lived with her parents (George Scott and Mary Ann Cresswell) who had already come to America from England. Some time later, William was able to also come over from England. Chrissie tells that he worked his way over on the ship in order to get here. The family then moved into a small log cabin located north and west from the present four-way stop in Highland where the Alpine Stake Center now is. It is not known whether or not William built this cabin. William went to work for the Smoot Lumber Company in Provo where he earned the money to buy his land in Highland and build their permanent home. Because of the travel distance to work, William stayed over in Provo for the whole week and sometimes longer. There must have been a great deal of love and togetherness between William and Martha because Chrissie tells the story (and again I remember my mother, Hazel, telling the same story) of how Martha missed William and wanted to see him so much that she took the four small children and walked the 20 miles to Provo to see him. She carried her baby (Will) all the way and also George who was then about five years old, part of the way. The older two children, Elizabeth and Edward, walked. They stayed at Aunt Sarah's (where William was) overnight and then walked back home the next day. William, with Edward helping, finished building their house which they moved into. William quit working at the Smoot Lumber Company and began farming. This new house was located one-fourth of a mile south of the present four-way stop in Highland where Uncle John and Aunt Chrissie used to have their store. The foundation of the house is still there at the time of this writing as well as a chicken coop at the rear along with other artifacts. (A picture of these is included at the back of this history.)[Again, none of these pictures and other “extra” are in this revised version but can be found on the Memories page in FamilyTree at familysearch.org .] It is now 1897. The Loveridges have now had nine children. Their oldest, Elizabeth, is now married and Mary Jane had died in England, leaving seven children at home. Hazel was at this time their youngest child – being about 14 months old, having been born November 15, 1895. Another hardship came to William and Martha this year. On January 5th, their next to the youngest child, Martha (being three years old) died of the black measles. It surely would have been a hard, sobering, and touching experience to be called upon to have to bury a child at such a young tender age when children are so close to their parents. On February 5, 1898, 13 months after the death of Martha, Rachel was born. Then on November 26, 1900, their last of 11 children, Chrissie, was born. On February 9, 1906, the Loveridges were again called upon to bury another of their children – this time a 14 year old young man, Reuben. Reuben was loved by all—including his pet dog and cat. My mother, Hazel, was very close to Reuben and told us kids how when Reuben was sick that his pet dog and cat would not leave the room where he lay ill until he would pet and reassure them. After Reuben died, these two pets would not eat and mourned the loss of Reuben for a long time. Chrissie tells that Reuben had gotten his feet wet and had become sick, and that he died of a kidney infection. But life must go on, and it did. William continued farming and also worked for others – sometimes for not much of a wage. Chrissie tells that he husked corn in Alpine and that one time all he received for a day's wages was a beef head. One time Gladys nearly got her foot cut off when she went to Grandma Scott’s on an errand. She decided to pick some pretty flowers in the alfalfa patch where her grandpa was mowing the alfalfa. He didn't see her; she got her foot in the mower and nearly cut it off. The doctor (who some sources say had been drinking at the time) somehow miraculously sewed the foot back on nearly perfect. Aunt Gladys still had the shoe she was wearing at the time of the accident (which had been bronzed) as we kids were growing up. I remember she always kept it on top of her china closet at her home in Lehi. As I remember the shoe, it was cut about 2/3 of the way through--or maybe even more. Gladys always limped a little but could walk very well, as I remember. Grandmother (Martha) also used to do work outside of and in the home to help make a living for the family. Chrissie tells how her mother used to walk to Alpine with her children in her arms and carry fruit on her head with the aid of some padding – the fruit she had dried for different people on a share basis. Chrissie also tells how her mother used to do washing for others to help make a living; how she carried the water in the house and heated it on the coal stove, then do the wash, empty the water, and all. Chrissie tells that they would walk everywhere they went until later on when they got a horse and buggy. They never did own an automobile, and the one in the picture accompanying this [original] history was probably Edward's after he was married and had come up to visit from Nevada, according to Aunt Chrissie. The Loveridges also always went to church together as a family. William was superintendent of the Sunday School for many years. Chrissie states that her parents both had wonderful memories and that her mother did a lot of readings at social occasions. They were also very good singers and on occasion would sing together the song "The Spirit of God Like A Fire is Burning" for their testimonies in fast and testimony meeting. At one time President Heber J. Grant visited their little church for the setting apart of Bishop Harry Jerling. He told them that Highland would someday become a stake and a city. Stake President, Clifford E. Young, who married President Grant's daughter was also there. It was about 1908 that Martha's mother, Grandmother Scott Weston, came to live with the Loveridges after having had a stroke. Grandpa Scott had died and she had remarried a Mr. Weston. The only information that was able to be obtained about Grandfather Weston is from Hazel's life story where she tells that he came to Utah with a handcart company and then later went back and assisted several handcart companies across the plains. Hazel also tells in her life story how one day she went to Grandfather and Grandmother Weston’s and found Grandpa Weston lying on the ground moaning, having fallen off the hay stack and broken his neck. It is presumed that this is probably when he died. Two additional rooms were built onto the north end of the house by William with Edward helping at this time to accommodate Grandmother Scott Weston moving in and living with them. She lived with them for about five years until her death on September 6, 1913, after having had three strokes. In this year of 1908 when Grandmother Scott Weston came to live with the Loveridges, the youngest boy in the family, William, (everyone called him Will) got married on February 12. This left only the three youngest girls (Hazel now 13, Rachel 10, and Chrissie 8) at home with no boys to help William with the farm work. Hazel loved to work in the fields, and especially with her father, and became his right-hand helper. I remember my mother, Hazel, always saying how she would rather work in the fields with her dad than stay in the house. Of course Martha didn't like to be alone and needed help too, so the other girls helped their mother in the house. Hazel, however, did have quite a siege of sickness ;with the "Saint Vidas Dance." Chrissie says she had it about three years. This held Hazel back in school so she was older when she graduated from the eighth grade. (This can be noticed by the school picture included in the picture section.) I remember my mother, Hazel, telling about how she had the "Saint Vidas Dance,"and I always wondered what kind of an illness it was. I did some research on it and found that its modern name is "Cholera.” Its symptoms are involuntary and uncontrollable nervous twitching of the muscles; it is caused by the streptococcus germ usually showing up as a complication of the scarlet fever, scarlatina, rheumatic fever, or infantile paralysis. Perhaps this explains why my mother had a bad (rheumatic) heart and died of heart failure at a rather early age of not quite 68. The Loveridge family was always very close and the three girls now left at home were no exception. Cressie still remembers how they used to play together and told of one time she, Hazel, and Rachel went to the creek to see a rainbow only to find that it had moved when they got there. They laughed and had a lot of fun together. Chrissie tells how they used to make ice cream from fresh snow by mixing a little milk, sugar, vanilla, and lemon into it and stirring it up. They also used to make orangeade from peelings of oranges by putting them in a little water with sugar and letting them set awhile. Not only were the children close, but the whole family. My mother, Hazel, used to tell how her parents would play ball or kick the can with the children out in front of the house at dinner time before going back out into the fields to work. Hazel tells in her life story how the family would go each week to American Fork to see a continued show [movie] with Mary Pickford . . . and tells how they would ride in the wagon under quilts and count the stars as they went. Chrissie remembers when her mother, or sometimes other members of the family, would read to the rest of the family while they sat around the kitchen shelling corn or beans, or sometimes just sitting and listening. At Christmas time Cressie remembers that they hardly ever had a tree, but when they did it had candles on it rather than electric lights. She tells that her father would climb up into the loft and hand the toys down through a hole in the ceiling and how the children thought Santa had left them there. They always hung their stockings up on Christmas Eve and always had a lot of fun at Christmas time. Chrissie remembers that her mother was a pretty woman, and one day down in the butcher shop someone told her how pretty her mother was. Chrissie says her mother was always feeding people who came to her home, and also taking food to the sick and needy. She remembers that there were always a lot of people at their home. The Loveridge family children continued to grow up and soon the three youngest girls still left at home were grown and getting married. Hazel was married in 1916, Rachel in 1917 and Chrissie in 1921. William and Martha were now alone, except for Chrissie and her husband, John, who continued to live with the folks after their marriage. The year is now 1929, and Martha's health is beginning to fail her. I now quote from my sister, Lillie's, life story: "Elmer was born June 11, and although Grandmother had been ill, she came to take care of the baby and mother while I did the housework and washings and ironings. I was almost 13 years old at the time. There were times when I saw Grandma clutch her stomach as if in great pain. One time I asked her what was the matter, only to have her scold me, telling me to get to work. But I knew she was very ill, and I was sick at heart and kept wondering about her. Before Mother was able to get up out of bed, Aunt Cressie, who lived with grandmother, came to care for Mother one day saying that Grandma was too ill to come. Dad stopped in to see her one day soon after Mother was able to be up, and seeing her in so much pain, gently lifted her from her bed and carried her out to the car. He stated later how tiny and thin, and light as a child she seemed. She was taken to the Lehi hospital. The doctors operated on her and found cancer and gave her no hope. She died July 17." As before stated, this was in 1929. She would have been 71 in three months. Chrissie says that William always called Martha "Ma," and that Martha always called William "Pa." The children also used these names for their parents, and in fact Cressie tells how hard it was and how hard she persevered to break the habit and call her parents "Father" and "Mother" later in life because some people thought "Pa" and "Ma" a little disrespectful . I, however, am sure there was no disrespect meant – the titles were connotations of closeness and endearment. William and Martha were always very close, as was also their family. It is told that when Martha was so ill and near death, William told her "don't worry, Ma, I'll be with you soon." On May 9, 1931 – 22 months after Martha's death – William also passed away at the age of 77. There seems to be some discrepancy as to the cause of death, but in my sister Lillie's life story she states that as "Grandpa Loveridge" was returning home from town in his hay wagon, having no lights, was hit by a car and was injured, which injuries led to his death shortly afterwards. Aunt Chrissie did not want me to tell this because she felt it too sacred, but will do so hoping she will not judge me too harshly. She tells that as her father, William, lay ill in the back bedroom just before passing away, that she saw her mother, Martha, in the room – and that William also saw her -- and looking towards her said, "Ma." It seems that everyone I have talked to that remembers "Grandpa and Grandma Loveridge," remembers going there for Thanksgiving, a family get together, or to have dinner. Everyone also always remembers the beautiful lilac bushes, the not very common lawn around the house, the beautiful flowers, and the well kept yard. Grandmother Loveridge seems to be remembered by all for her energetic spirit, always doing for others, a kind and considerate person, yet one of principle who would put things in their proper perspective when needed. Grandfather Loveridge is remembered as a small man in stature, but a giant in his testimony of the gospel, kindness, thoughtful ness, and self-control, never losing his temper. They were both pioneers and hard workers. They had a love and togetherness – with each other and with their children – for which all should seek and strive. In mortality they are gone, but in eternity they live. Someday I know I will meet them in that eternal world. I will feel of their love and thank them for the heritage they provided for me.

He always voted for the contrary

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Every time a new calling was presented for sustaining, or similar things needing approval for a vote, William Loveridge would always vote against because he felt sorry no one ever vote for the other side.

Short History of William and Martha Loveridge

Contributor: sls1966 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

HISTORY OF WILLIAM AND MARTHA LOVERIDGE BY SYLVAN BUHLER IN 1980 [Editing/Correction by Lee Farnsworth - July 2011. Sources for the corrections made can be found in familysearch.org by starting at William Loveridge, PID K2MW-FWJ. Credits: This history was compiled and written in 1980 by Sylvan B Buhler, a grandson of William and Martha Loveridge. Information for this history was obtained from the following sources: 1. Aunt Chrissie Greenland, the only surviving child at the time of this writing. 2. A short history written by Ruby Lee Buhler from information she obtained from Aunt Chrissie. 3. The life story of my mother, Hazel Buhler. 4. The life story of my sister, Lillie Buhler Day. 5. A one-page history compiled by my sister, Ruby Buhler Day, several years ago. 6. Genealogy sheets prepared by Ruby Buhler Day. The pages at the end of this history written by the grandchildren entitled "What I Remember about Grandfather and Grandmother Loveridge," and also the obituary page, were not used as resource material. They were obtained afterwards and serve to corroborate and added to the history. [These are not included as part of this revision. Do not have them. lwf.] I give credit to Ruby Lee Buhler for inspiring me to write this history with the short history that she wrote. William and Martha Loveridge History William Loveridge was born May 1, 1854, in Pontypool, Monmouth (Wales) (now in Gwent County), England, a son of Charles Warre and Sarah Ann Prothero (Hall) Loveridge. He was one of 13 children and by necessity grew up helping with the raising of a large family. His father was a shoemaker, and Aunt Cressie tells how her father didn't have a chance for much of an education because he stayed home from school to help make a living for the family while his parents worked in the shoe shop. He never learned to read but could write some, and he was a real whiz with math and figures. Chrissie tells how no one could out-figure him. [Corrections by Editor: (1) His father was Charles Loveridge, the son of William Loveridge and Rachel Cridge and NOT Charles Warre Loveridge, the son of another William Loveridge and Mary Warre (find Charles Warre in FamilySearch at PID LCQ6-ZVJ). A review of Charles Warre Loveridge in FamilySearch shows that he married Susan Mary Ann Langdon in 1837 in Chard and then moved nearby and ultimately to London where he was a banker. Charles Loveridge appears with no middle name in the 1851 and 1861 Trevethin, Monmouthshire census records and also throughout the LDS branch registers for both Pontypool and Abersychan. Further evidence for Charles Loveridge (not Warre) is in the Pontypool LDS Branch Register (Film 104166) on p. 29 as having as parents William and Rachel Loveridge. In the same record it indicates that Charles and Sarah Loveridge were baptized 8 May 1853 by Uriah Rickards, the branch president, and that Charles was born in Somerset and Sarah was born in Monmouth and was now age 31. It shows the parents of Sarah as William and Sarah Prothero. The parents of both Charles and Sarah are repeated also on p. 34 as indicated. Clearly he is not and never was Charles Warre Loveridge, in spite of all the family records with that name in them. [(2) William was actually born in Trevethin, Monmouthshire on this date. This is where Charles Loveridge was living when in the 1851 census it indicates that he was head of household and that Sarah Ann Hall was living in the household as a “servant” and had two living sons: Reasoner and Ledru Hall – later each took the name of Loveridge, as did their families after marriage.] When he was a boy of about 10 or 12, he fell from a roof and broke both arms. This caused him to lose his sense of smell, although Aunt Cressie says he could still taste. Cressie says the only thing he ever smelled after that was when he got sprayed with a skunk. She tells about how they buried his clothes to get rid of the smell. Sometime later they dug them up and laundered them for use. I, Sylvan, also remember my mother telling of this incident – except she said that he didn't even smell the skunk. Martha Cresswell Scott Loveridge was born October 17, 1858, in Cannock, Burtwood, Stafford, England, a daughter of Samuel Faulkner (but sealed to George Scott)** and Mary Ann Cresswell. (**Martha Cresswell's real father was Samuel Faulkner, but her mother found out he was already married and had a family -- after having two children by this marriage – Edward and Martha. She, therefore, left him and had these first two children sealed to her second husband, George Scott.) [Corrections: (1) The correct name of the town is “Burntwood” in Staffordshire, but there is no record in the Burntwood parish records –searched several times – of Martha Cresswell being baptized as a baby nor any record of any Cresswell person. They do not show up in the 1851 census either. She may have been born there and gave this information to her family orally. (2) There is no record of any marriage to Samuel Faulkner, and the births are not recorded in the parish records. The first evidence is the 1861 Burntwood census which shows the family as George Scott, Mary Ann Scott and one child name Martha Cresswell – not Scott nor Faulkner. The brother Edward was born after Martha and must have died prior to the marriage in March 1861 and the census of 1861. The marriage of Mary Ann Cresswell (age 27, spinster) and George Scott (age 38, bachelor) is recorded in Ogley Hay, Stafforshire parish by banns on 11 March 1861.] Martha went to school to the third or fourth grade and, therefore, could read and write quite nicely. Cressie tells that she was a very good speller. She was a child of very strict parents but was still full of fun and some mischief and liked to trick her brothers-in-law. She worked in homes to help her parents make a living and always prided herself in doing a good job. Martha and Willard Loveridge were married on her 17th birthday October 17, 1875, in the Burtwood church in England. Cressie tells how she was born on a Sunday, married on a Sunday, her first girl was born on a Sunday, and although she didn't die on a Sunday, was buried on a Sunday as she had requested. [Correction: Marriage on this date was in Trevethin, Monmouthshire and not Burntwood, which the Cresswells and Scotts had left sometime between1861 and 1868. The marriage is shown in the Abersychan LDS Branch records, with their habitation as Trevethin. (Film 104166, item 3).] After their marriage, William continued to work in the coal mines in England. Their home was open to and they assisted the LDS missionaries as William's parents had done. One day while working in the mine driving a team of mules, he got too close to the wall and his head caught between two large pieces of coal. He hollered for the mules to stop, which they miraculously and immediately did, or his head would have been pulled right off. Cressie tells that he carried dark marks behind his ear from this experience for the rest of his life. It seems that William had several accidents while working in the mines for he also broke his leg while working there. Chrissie tells the story of how they set the leg without any anesthetic, and that it hurt so much that he said he could have bit a nail in half if he had one. He had to lie flat on his back for nearly a year for his leg to heal. He then went back to work with a stick or a cane in one hand and a crutch in the other. He then had the misfortune of falling down the elevator shaft of the mine and had to go back to bed for some time again. Tribulation was not only with William but Martha as well. While William was down in bed, she was having a real problem with her knee. Chrissie tells (and I remember my mother, Hazel, telling the same story) of how their mother had to walk three miles each way every day to the doctor, and how he would burn the knee out by pouring a caustic over it. She would walk 1-1/2 miles carrying her baby, Elizabeth, and then would leave the baby for her mother to tend and would then walk the remaining 1-1/2 miles to the doctor. She would then walk home, stopping at a big rock about half the way home to rest and sometimes to stop crying because of the pain before picking up her baby at her mother's house and then proceed on home. The doctor didn't come to the house because he said that the walking was the only thing that would save her leg. This was a very painful experience for her. Chrissie tells that after it healed you could put your hand in the large cavity of her left knee. The year is now 1883 and the Loveridges have just had a new baby born to them on April 10th and named him George. He was their fourth child. On July 11th of this year (just three months after the birth of their new baby) their next to the oldest child, Mary Jane, died of the black measles. She was five years old. Another child was born to the Loveridges on February 13, 1886, and was named William Thomas. Both William and Martha had been baptized some years earlier before their marriage – William in 1864 and Martha in 1868. In fact, Martha had been confirmed by her future father-in-law (William's father), Charles Loveridge. They had a desire to come to America and to Zion and decided to do so. Because there wasn't enough money, and for perhaps other reasons not known, William stayed in England for the time being. Martha and their four children (Elizabeth Ann, Edward, George, and William Thomas) boarded a ship and came to America and to Highland in Utah County, Utah. The story is told by Chrissie and Hazel of how George's hat blew off and was lost in the ocean while coming across on the ship. This was sometime between 1886 and 1888 for Will was born in England in 1886 and Gladys was born in Highland in 1888. (In William's obituary it states that the family came in June of 1886 and William in November of the same year.) [Added to above: As for emigration, the Abersychan LDS Branch Register indicates that Martha Loveridge emigrated on 21 May 1886 and that Charles emigrated on 2 October 1886. Other pertinent information from the Abersychan LDS branch: George Scott, Mary Ann Scott, and Martha Scott, all of the place known as “Coom” (not a listed place in the maps) were baptized on 14 November 1868 by T. Willet and they were confirmed on 15 November 1868, with Martha confirmed by Charles Loveridge. This record erroneously indicates that all three of them were born in Trevethin. The record also shows that both William and Martha were re-baptized (common practice in this branch) and confirmed on 28 February 1875 by William’s half-brother (and branch president) Reasoner and confirmed by William’s father Charles. Then they were re-baptized and confirmed again by Reasoner and a D. Rood on 11 June 1877. Reasoner and Charles and most others also were baptized several times over the years.] Upon arriving in Utah, Martha and her four children went to Alpine and lived with her parents (George Scott and Mary Ann Cresswell) who had already come to America from England. Some time later, William was able to also come over from England. Chrissie tells that he worked his way over on the ship in order to get here. The family then moved into a small log cabin located north and west from the present four-way stop in Highland where the Alpine Stake Center now is. It is not known whether or not William built this cabin. William went to work for the Smoot Lumber Company in Provo where he earned the money to buy his land in Highland and build their permanent home. Because of the travel distance to work, William stayed over in Provo for the whole week and sometimes longer. There must have been a great deal of love and togetherness between William and Martha because Chrissie tells the story (and again I remember my mother, Hazel, telling the same story) of how Martha missed William and wanted to see him so much that she took the four small children and walked the 20 miles to Provo to see him. She carried her baby (Will) all the way and also George who was then about five years old, part of the way. The older two children, Elizabeth and Edward, walked. They stayed at Aunt Sarah's (where William was) overnight and then walked back home the next day. William, with Edward helping, finished building their house which they moved into. William quit working at the Smoot Lumber Company and began farming. This new house was located one-fourth of a mile south of the present four-way stop in Highland where Uncle John and Aunt Chrissie used to have their store. The foundation of the house is still there at the time of this writing as well as a chicken coop at the rear along with other artifacts. (A picture of these is included at the back of this history.)[Again, none of these pictures and other “extra” are in this revised version but can be found on the Memories page in FamilyTree at familysearch.org .] It is now 1897. The Loveridges have now had nine children. Their oldest, Elizabeth, is now married and Mary Jane had died in England, leaving seven children at home. Hazel was at this time their youngest child – being about 14 months old, having been born November 15, 1895. Another hardship came to William and Martha this year. On January 5th, their next to the youngest child, Martha (being three years old) died of the black measles. It surely would have been a hard, sobering, and touching experience to be called upon to have to bury a child at such a young tender age when children are so close to their parents. On February 5, 1898, 13 months after the death of Martha, Rachel was born. Then on November 26, 1900, their last of 11 children, Chrissie, was born. On February 9, 1906, the Loveridges were again called upon to bury another of their children – this time a 14 year old young man, Reuben. Reuben was loved by all—including his pet dog and cat. My mother, Hazel, was very close to Reuben and told us kids how when Reuben was sick that his pet dog and cat would not leave the room where he lay ill until he would pet and reassure them. After Reuben died, these two pets would not eat and mourned the loss of Reuben for a long time. Chrissie tells that Reuben had gotten his feet wet and had become sick, and that he died of a kidney infection. But life must go on, and it did. William continued farming and also worked for others – sometimes for not much of a wage. Chrissie tells that he husked corn in Alpine and that one time all he received for a day's wages was a beef head. One time Gladys nearly got her foot cut off when she went to Grandma Scott’s on an errand. She decided to pick some pretty flowers in the alfalfa patch where her grandpa was mowing the alfalfa. He didn't see her; she got her foot in the mower and nearly cut it off. The doctor (who some sources say had been drinking at the time) somehow miraculously sewed the foot back on nearly perfect. Aunt Gladys still had the shoe she was wearing at the time of the accident (which had been bronzed) as we kids were growing up. I remember she always kept it on top of her china closet at her home in Lehi. As I remember the shoe, it was cut about 2/3 of the way through--or maybe even more. Gladys always limped a little but could walk very well, as I remember. Grandmother (Martha) also used to do work outside of and in the home to help make a living for the family. Chrissie tells how her mother used to walk to Alpine with her children in her arms and carry fruit on her head with the aid of some padding – the fruit she had dried for different people on a share basis. Chrissie also tells how her mother used to do washing for others to help make a living; how she carried the water in the house and heated it on the coal stove, then do the wash, empty the water, and all. Chrissie tells that they would walk everywhere they went until later on when they got a horse and buggy. They never did own an automobile, and the one in the picture accompanying this [original] history was probably Edward's after he was married and had come up to visit from Nevada, according to Aunt Chrissie. The Loveridges also always went to church together as a family. William was superintendent of the Sunday School for many years. Chrissie states that her parents both had wonderful memories and that her mother did a lot of readings at social occasions. They were also very good singers and on occasion would sing together the song "The Spirit of God Like A Fire is Burning" for their testimonies in fast and testimony meeting. At one time President Heber J. Grant visited their little church for the setting apart of Bishop Harry Jerling. He told them that Highland would someday become a stake and a city. Stake President, Clifford E. Young, who married President Grant's daughter was also there. It was about 1908 that Martha's mother, Grandmother Scott Weston, came to live with the Loveridges after having had a stroke. Grandpa Scott had died and she had remarried a Mr. Weston. The only information that was able to be obtained about Grandfather Weston is from Hazel's life story where she tells that he came to Utah with a handcart company and then later went back and assisted several handcart companies across the plains. Hazel also tells in her life story how one day she went to Grandfather and Grandmother Weston’s and found Grandpa Weston lying on the ground moaning, having fallen off the hay stack and broken his neck. It is presumed that this is probably when he died. Two additional rooms were built onto the north end of the house by William with Edward helping at this time to accommodate Grandmother Scott Weston moving in and living with them. She lived with them for about five years until her death on September 6, 1913, after having had three strokes. In this year of 1908 when Grandmother Scott Weston came to live with the Loveridges, the youngest boy in the family, William, (everyone called him Will) got married on February 12. This left only the three youngest girls (Hazel now 13, Rachel 10, and Chrissie 8) at home with no boys to help William with the farm work. Hazel loved to work in the fields, and especially with her father, and became his right-hand helper. I remember my mother, Hazel, always saying how she would rather work in the fields with her dad than stay in the house. Of course Martha didn't like to be alone and needed help too, so the other girls helped their mother in the house. Hazel, however, did have quite a siege of sickness ;with the "Saint Vidas Dance." Chrissie says she had it about three years. This held Hazel back in school so she was older when she graduated from the eighth grade. (This can be noticed by the school picture included in the picture section.) I remember my mother, Hazel, telling about how she had the "Saint Vidas Dance,"and I always wondered what kind of an illness it was. I did some research on it and found that its modern name is "Cholera.” Its symptoms are involuntary and uncontrollable nervous twitching of the muscles; it is caused by the streptococcus germ usually showing up as a complication of the scarlet fever, scarlatina, rheumatic fever, or infantile paralysis. Perhaps this explains why my mother had a bad (rheumatic) heart and died of heart failure at a rather early age of not quite 68. The Loveridge family was always very close and the three girls now left at home were no exception. Cressie still remembers how they used to play together and told of one time she, Hazel, and Rachel went to the creek to see a rainbow only to find that it had moved when they got there. They laughed and had a lot of fun together. Chrissie tells how they used to make ice cream from fresh snow by mixing a little milk, sugar, vanilla, and lemon into it and stirring it up. They also used to make orangeade from peelings of oranges by putting them in a little water with sugar and letting them set awhile. Not only were the children close, but the whole family. My mother, Hazel, used to tell how her parents would play ball or kick the can with the children out in front of the house at dinner time before going back out into the fields to work. Hazel tells in her life story how the family would go each week to American Fork to see a continued show [movie] with Mary Pickford . . . and tells how they would ride in the wagon under quilts and count the stars as they went. Chrissie remembers when her mother, or sometimes other members of the family, would read to the rest of the family while they sat around the kitchen shelling corn or beans, or sometimes just sitting and listening. At Christmas time Cressie remembers that they hardly ever had a tree, but when they did it had candles on it rather than electric lights. She tells that her father would climb up into the loft and hand the toys down through a hole in the ceiling and how the children thought Santa had left them there. They always hung their stockings up on Christmas Eve and always had a lot of fun at Christmas time. Chrissie remembers that her mother was a pretty woman, and one day down in the butcher shop someone told her how pretty her mother was. Chrissie says her mother was always feeding people who came to her home, and also taking food to the sick and needy. She remembers that there were always a lot of people at their home. The Loveridge family children continued to grow up and soon the three youngest girls still left at home were grown and getting married. Hazel was married in 1916, Rachel in 1917 and Chrissie in 1921. William and Martha were now alone, except for Chrissie and her husband, John, who continued to live with the folks after their marriage. The year is now 1929, and Martha's health is beginning to fail her. I now quote from my sister, Lillie's, life story: "Elmer was born June 11, and although Grandmother had been ill, she came to take care of the baby and mother while I did the housework and washings and ironings. I was almost 13 years old at the time. There were times when I saw Grandma clutch her stomach as if in great pain. One time I asked her what was the matter, only to have her scold me, telling me to get to work. But I knew she was very ill, and I was sick at heart and kept wondering about her. Before Mother was able to get up out of bed, Aunt Cressie, who lived with grandmother, came to care for Mother one day saying that Grandma was too ill to come. Dad stopped in to see her one day soon after Mother was able to be up, and seeing her in so much pain, gently lifted her from her bed and carried her out to the car. He stated later how tiny and thin, and light as a child she seemed. She was taken to the Lehi hospital. The doctors operated on her and found cancer and gave her no hope. She died July 17." As before stated, this was in 1929. She would have been 71 in three months. Chrissie says that William always called Martha "Ma," and that Martha always called William "Pa." The children also used these names for their parents, and in fact Cressie tells how hard it was and how hard she persevered to break the habit and call her parents "Father" and "Mother" later in life because some people thought "Pa" and "Ma" a little disrespectful . I, however, am sure there was no disrespect meant – the titles were connotations of closeness and endearment. William and Martha were always very close, as was also their family. It is told that when Martha was so ill and near death, William told her "don't worry, Ma, I'll be with you soon." On May 9, 1931 – 22 months after Martha's death – William also passed away at the age of 77. There seems to be some discrepancy as to the cause of death, but in my sister Lillie's life story she states that as "Grandpa Loveridge" was returning home from town in his hay wagon, having no lights, was hit by a car and was injured, which injuries led to his death shortly afterwards. Aunt Chrissie did not want me to tell this because she felt it too sacred, but will do so hoping she will not judge me too harshly. She tells that as her father, William, lay ill in the back bedroom just before passing away, that she saw her mother, Martha, in the room – and that William also saw her -- and looking towards her said, "Ma." It seems that everyone I have talked to that remembers "Grandpa and Grandma Loveridge," remembers going there for Thanksgiving, a family get together, or to have dinner. Everyone also always remembers the beautiful lilac bushes, the not very common lawn around the house, the beautiful flowers, and the well kept yard. Grandmother Loveridge seems to be remembered by all for her energetic spirit, always doing for others, a kind and considerate person, yet one of principle who would put things in their proper perspective when needed. Grandfather Loveridge is remembered as a small man in stature, but a giant in his testimony of the gospel, kindness, thoughtful ness, and self-control, never losing his temper. They were both pioneers and hard workers. They had a love and togetherness – with each other and with their children – for which all should seek and strive. In mortality they are gone, but in eternity they live. Someday I know I will meet them in that eternal world. I will feel of their love and thank them for the heritage they provided for me.

He always voted for the contrary

Contributor: sls1966 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Every time a new calling was presented for sustaining, or similar things needing approval for a vote, William Loveridge would always vote against because he felt sorry no one ever vote for the other side.

Life timeline of William Loveridge

1854
William Loveridge was born on 1 May 1854
William Loveridge was 7 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
William Loveridge was 24 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
William Loveridge was 29 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
William Loveridge was 37 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
William Loveridge was 54 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
William Loveridge was 60 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
William Loveridge was 74 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
William Loveridge died on 9 May 1931 at the age of 77
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for William Loveridge (1 May 1854 - 9 May 1931), BillionGraves Record 65965 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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