William I Taylor

9 Dec 1883 - 24 Nov 1938

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William I Taylor

9 Dec 1883 - 24 Nov 1938
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William Weldon Taylor lived a rich, pure life; one particularly rich for others in that it was one of service. For the greater number of his 54 years, his every act bore evidence of a keen adjustment to his fellow men. So often in his home, in his church affiliations or in his business, he would for

Life Information

William I Taylor

Born:
Died:

Browns Chapel Cemetery

1901-1977 Township Highway 131B
Clarksburg, Ross, Ohio
United States

Headstone Description

S SGT US ARMY WORLD WAR II COX US NAVY WORLD WAR II
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dfarmer55

June 6, 2011
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pettyd

April 17, 2020
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Data Doctor

September 3, 2012
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Mary Espinoza

July 24, 2019
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NatureGirl716

April 20, 2020
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Melanie

April 20, 2020
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Data Doctor

August 23, 2012

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William Weldon Taylor

Contributor: Mary Espinoza Created: 11 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

William Weldon Taylor lived a rich, pure life; one particularly rich for others in that it was one of service. For the greater number of his 54 years, his every act bore evidence of a keen adjustment to his fellow men. So often in his home, in his church affiliations or in his business, he would forego pleasures of his own, and so many times actually reduce his financial earning power through giving aid to someone in need. His life truly was one of giving. Selfishness never found a home in the soul of Will Taylor. Consideration of others characterized this great man whom everyone loved so well. It has been said that people who criticized Bishop Taylor did not know him. And one can say that there were few who did not know him. He was born December 9, 1883, in the Second Ward of Provo, the eldest son of William Joseph and Abby Jane Scott Taylor. The thoughtful guidance of his good parents played an outstanding role in shaping the character of Will Taylor. Those enviable qualities of this wonderful man; those personality traits that constituted his individuality, originated in part from the heritage of his good parents and the environment which they created in their home. Both of them were instrumental in developing his lasting fine qualities. Shortly before his brother, Scott A. Taylor, passed away April 20, 1962, he made these comments about Will: “I remember his as a little boy with big freckles and curly hair. When he was very young he had typhoid fever which nearly cost him his life. He had a mind of his own and when a decision was made nothing could change it. Ed Hinckley said he was an outstanding student at BYU.” As a boy his playmates knew him for his fairness in play; they remembered him for his love of his mother and father, for his kindness to his brothers and sisters and for his respect and thoughtfulness for the aged. At an early age he began the growth of sharing with others; of living unselfishly for the sake of others. These admiral qualities continued to grow to such heights that they characterized his rich, full life. He lived with his family in their simple dwelling in Provo for 15 years. At that time, they moved to Vineyard on the Shadrack Holdaway ranch. This ranch was later known to us as the Harry Gammon farm. The family remained there for about five years. They then moved to Lake View where Will lived for the remainder of his life. The place was purchased from J.J. Dillitush. It had belonged before that to George Scott, Sr. According to Scott A., Will was largely responsible for the family’s leaving Provo and moving to Vineyard in 1904, and was in favor of buying the George C. Scott property which later became Cherry Hill Dairy Farm. June 26, 1907, was a memorable day in the life of Will Taylor. At that time he married a lovely young girl, Nora Johnson, whose character so complemented his as to make her an ideal mate for him. They were known to be sweethearts always. June 30, 1908, their first child, a son named Weldon Johnson, was born. Approximately three years later their home was blessed with a lovely little daughter, Virginia. When he was called on a mission in 1912, Will’s home was in a turmoil. Little Virginia was very ill; it looked as if they might lose her, but his ever-kindled faith in his religion caused him to accept the call even against the wishes of his own mother. Through his faith, things at home were made normal. In speaking of Will’s mission at his funeral, Dean Johnson said, “It was my privilege to visit the same Australian mission in which Uncle Will served, and to visit with some of the old people who were once associated with him. I can remember how they would bring out their albums and show the pictures of the various elders, and they would pause and exclaim at Uncle Will’s picture, ‘What a fine man he was!’ It was in the homes of these people that I learned to appreciate the life of a real missionary.” While in Australia, Will was honored as very few missionaries are, in that he was appointed by President Hyde to serve as mission president. This calling, which he filled for almost a year, was an unusual challenge, but the richness of his life up to that time enabled him to fill it admirably. Though young in years, he was experienced in life’s affairs. He was known always to be true and fair in his decisions. He was always intensely interested in dairying. After moving to Cherry Hill Farm he was actively engaged in that activity. His first business entry was in about 1908 when he operated the Lake View Dairy jointly with George Scott. It was Will’s idea, a few years later, to organize the dairy known as “Cherry Hill” which he operated in conjunction with his father and brothers. Later it was dissolved as a family unit and Will continued to own and operate this business until his death in 1938, which made a total of 30 years he spent dairying. The operation of the dairy was carried on at the Lake View farm until 1925 when he purchased the site and constructed the new bu9ilding just off center street Fourth West in Provo, where his dairy products were prepared for and disbursed for distribution. In 1915, just after his return from the Australian mission and at the young age of 31, he was chosen Bishop of the Lake View Ward. In this office he was tolerant, sympathetic, kind-hearted to all and was careful to weigh and consider his decisions. He served in this calling for 13 years, which speaks adequately of his ability. For a man so young to command the respect and admiration of his elders is certainly an accomplishment of merit. On June 27, 1915, a second son, Paul Hector, named for one of his father’s missionary companions, Hector Haight, came to bless the home of Will and Nora. Though he was always very busy, Will was never too involved to devote time to others. He was first to visit the sick. Someone has said he was called to administer to the sick more than any other one man in the ward at that time. He loved to do it because he thought he might be helping. That was his unselfish goal. The scripture “He who is greatest among you is servant of all,” has been aptly used in connection with his life of It has been said by at least one person that Will was too honest and too considerate of others to be a business man. He practiced his religion in his daily dealings. When his milk customers were unable to pay for their milk he rarely cut them off. His heart was too big; their problems were too well understood. When a friend became ill, without an order he would see to it that buttermilk was left by the delivery boy. Or to some family in need he would send milk daily with orders to the delivery man not to collect. The story is told of one who had done ill against him in business and who became distressed, then came to Will who gave him assistance and furnished him with the necessities of life. These deeds characterized the life of this man. He truly lived his religion. One of the more important activities of Will’s life was participation in the Taylor quartet. The original group was composed of Will, Scott and Joseph Taylor and August Johnson. They sang at graveside services during the flu epidemic. If an actual count were made of the many times Will sang with the quartet and with the choir, or the many times he spoke in religious circles, or the many times he prayed to God in behalf of his people, the figure would be an astounding one. Many people have been comforted and made to feel better by having heard him speak or sing. He was a member of the quartet for 30 years. As a member of the old Provo Tabernacle Choir, Will frequently conducted the group in the absence of Adolph Boshard, choir leader. Will was also choir leader in the ward and a good one. He had an active organization with weekly practices. According to Clara they sang at sacrament meetings and had concerts, parties and outings. On of the very most important phases of his life was his family. Due to his many responsibilities in church and business, Will was unable to spend as much time as he would have loved to spend with his family, but he was very proud of and concerned for the welfare of each one as he or she came along with individual personalities and accomplishments. His wonderful companion, Nora, filled in the gap with the children. Probably the greatest burden that Will bore was Nora’s illness, though like all other of his problems he took it “chin up”. Victor Bird said at his funeral, “I have never found him outwardly disturbed by the problems that confronted him. He exercised a calmness that few men can under strain, yet I know how concerned he was about his responsibilities.” Nora had been ill for some time, had undergone surgery and underwent more surgery when Paul was leaving for the Australian mission in January of 1935, yet she and Will, true to their faith, were both anxious that he go. Words are not adequate to express what they must have felt at that time. Neither can words express the grief and loneliness that Will experienced when later that same year, November 16, 1935, the devoted companion who had meant so much to him for so long was called away. It has been felt by those nearest to him that he never actually found himself after Nora’s passing. Will’s life was a very crowded one. He utilized every moment. His accomplishments were many. He served as a member of the High Council of the Sharon Stake and at the time of his death was energetically engaged in religious, social and business connections. The experience of his youth had taught him to hold to that which is good and the fact that he was doing those things just previous to his passing is indicative of his not having deviated from his goal. Note: In publishing this history we express sincere appreciation and thanks to Morris Clinger, Dean Johnson, Chris Jeppeson, Jim Nuttall, Victor Bird, Scott A. and Clara Taylor and August Johnson for some of the thoughts and ideas expressed. Alene K. Taylor

Funeral Service for William Weldon Taylor

Contributor: Mary Espinoza Created: 11 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

FUNERAL SERVICES for William Weldon TAYLOR November 27, 1939 Lake View Ward Chapel Choir sang—“Though Deepening Trails Throng Your Way” Invocation by Spencer Madsen: Our Father in Heaven, it is with humility in our hearts that we present ourselves before you today in this capacity, and pay our respects to one of your servants whom thou has permitted to come and dwell with us. We thank thee, our Father in Heaven, for the life of our friend. We are thankful for the example he has set, and we ask thee, our Father in Heaven, to be with us during these services; that things of comfort and consolation may be said; that the music may be pleasing unto thee. We ask that thee bless all of those who are to take part on this program today, that the things, which they do, will be uplifting. Again we thank thee for the life of this, our brother, who has been such a friend to us. We thank thee for the service he has rendered, and we are thankful every day of our life for characters of this kink that we may look up to do the work that is assigned to them. Our Father in Heaven, we ask thee to be with us, to help us to get the most out of this, so that we may make our life better by the information which we shall have upon the life of our brother who has left, and we do it in the name of thy son, Jesus Christ, Amen. “The Sweetest Story Ever Told”, sung by Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Clark, accompanied by Mrs. Edith Powell. Life sketch of Mr. Taylor given by Morris Clinger: William W. Taylor lived a rich, pure life; a life particularly rich for others in that his life was a life of service. For the greater number of the fifty-four years he was with us, his very acts bore evidence of a keen adjustment to his fellow men. So often in his home, in his church affiliations or in his business, he would fore-go pleasures of his own, and so many times actually reduce his financial earning power, through giving aid to someone in need. His life truly was one of giving. Selfishness never found a home in the soul of Will Taylor. Consideration of others characterized this great man whom everyone loved so well. It has been said that “People who criticized Bishop Taylor did not know him.” And one can say there were few who did not know Uncle Will. He was born December 9, 1883, in the second ward of Provo. The thoughtful guidance of his good parents played an outstanding role in shaping the character of Uncle Will. Those enviable qualities of the wonderful man; those personality traits that constituted the individuality of Uncle Will, originated in part from the heritage of his good parents and the environment which they caused to exist. These were instrumental in developing the lasting fine qualities of this man. As a boy, his playmates knew him for his fairness in play; they remembered him for his love of his mother and father, for his kindness to his brothers and sister. At this early age he began the growth of sharing with others; of living unselfishly for the sake of others. These admirable qualities continued to grow to insurmountable heights; to the point of characterizing the rich, full life of Uncle Will. He lived with his family in their simple dwelling in Provo for fifteen years, when at that time, he moved to Vineyard on the Shaddrach Holdaway ranch. This ranch is known to us now as the Harry Gammon farm. The family remained here for about five years. They then moved to Lake View where he has lived since. The place was purchased from J. J. Dillitush; it had belonged before that to George Scott Senior. June 26, 1907 was a happy and memorable day in the life of Uncle Will. At this time he married a lovely, young girl whose character so blended with Uncle Will’s as to make her an ideal mate for him. As we remember him for his kindness, his goodness, his bigness; so we remember Aunt Nora for her kindness, truly her goodness. Nora Johnson was indeed the ideal wife for Uncle Will. Surely we regret their having hone, their having left us; but what other husband and wife could have lived so shortly yet have prepared their children so adequately to carry on as we know they will carry on. The blood of Aunt Nora and Uncle Will has richly shown itself in these fine young men and women; in these boys who are now left alone. Alone in that they cannot associate physically with their parents; yet not alone because those admirable qualities of their parents are so clearly seen in them. Virginia and Margaret so like their dear mother and father, Weldon, Paul, Richard, Phillip, all enviable chaps, and Robert, the sweetest little fellow I have ever know, all bearing evidence of their rich heritage and environment. Because we associates of this family can still enjoy the character of Uncle Will and Aunt Nora through their children, I say again, June 26, 1907 was a memorable day. Uncle Will was always intensely interesting in dairying. Since moving to the present Cherry Hill Dairy farm, he has been actively engaged in that activity. His first business entry was in about 1908 when he operated jointly with George Scott, the Lake View Dairy. A few years later Will Taylor organized the dairy that we know it to be today, “Cherry Hill Dairy.” Therefore, one can say that he has been efficiently operating the dairy business for 30 years. The operation of the dairy was carried on at the Lake View farm until 1925 when Uncle Will purchased the site and constructed the new building which has since adequately housed the machinery for the distribution of his dairy products. The operation of this business undoubtedly would have dissolved under another’s supervision. It was a down-hill job. But Uncle Will was a “sticker”. He apparently was a firm believer of the adage, “A quitter never wins; a winner never quite.” His formidable initiative was instrumental in causing the business to grow it its present status; now far-reaching into Utah, Wasatch, Juab, Sanpete and Millard counties. Any man interested in dairying has cause to admire what this man has done. He was ready always to accept a new challenge. He was always one to look on the bright side of things. If there was just a ray of hope, he so enthusiastically strove with that dim blow as a stimulus, the goal was invariably achieved. He was called on a mission in 1912, and then after returning home, just at the young age of thirty-one, he was chosen Bishop of the Lake View ward. He served justly for thirteen years. This speaks adequately of his ability; to know that a man so young could command the respect and admiration of his elders. The records now on file enumerate his many accomplishments. The amusement hall was constructed while he served as bishop. Having so recently completed this beautiful chapel, we are in a position to appreciate what Bishop Taylor did during the construction of that building. As Bishop Johnson worked untiringly for months and months, so did Bishop Taylor. Though he was always very busy, he was never too busy but what he had time for others. He was first to visit the sick. He has been called to administer to the sick probably more than any other one man in the ward. He loved to do it because he thought he might be helping. That was his unselfish goal. When his milk customers were unable to pay for their milk, he rarely cut them off. His heart was too big; their problems were too well understood by Uncle Will. When a friend became ill, without an order, he would see to it that buttermilk was left by the delivery boy. Or to some family in need, he would send milk daily with orders to the deliveryman not to collect. These were deeds that characterized the life of this man. He truly lived his religion. Young and old remember him, too, for his sound advice. He has been a father to many. Many sought him for aid and he was always ready to give. If one had an actual count of the many, many times he has sung with the quartet, with the choir, the many times he has spoken in religious circles, the many times he has prayed to God in behalf of his people; that figure would be an astounding one. We will miss seeing him before us as a leader. So many people have been made to feel better for having heard him speak or sing. I sympathize deeply with the other three members of that ever-wanted, that ever-popular quartet that is now dissolved after thirty years of happy association. Uncle Will, too, was an ideal conversationalist. His outstanding attribute in this was that he was a good listener. He would always let you have your say; moreover, he would give prominence to what you said. One always felt his place in the world after chatting with Uncle Will. He was appreciative of others’ talents; he saw good in you. I was always happy to know that Uncle Will and Aunt Nora were in the audience when I read of was in a play. I am honored now in paying tribute to him in this way. Patience was a developed habit of his. He never acted hastily; his consideration of others predominated his every move. He always makes it a point to thank those who helped him. Those who were so close to him during his short illness realized this most perhaps. Though he was, in part, unconscious when the elders last administered to him, he signaled his appreciation to them through eye and arm movement. One was always glad to do something for this appreciative man. And so the life of Uncle Will was a very crowded one. He utilized every moment. His accomplishments have been many. At the time of his death, he was energetically engaged in religious, in social, and in business connections. The experience of his youth taught him to hold to that which was good and the fact that he was doing those things so well just previous to his passing, is indicative of his not having deviated from his goal. He was a wonderful man; we are better for having known him. By request of the family, Aunt Clara has written a few lines, which I would like to read in climaxing the above brief sketch; TO UNCLE WILL His work is done—his tired head Is resting from earthly cares, He has gone to meet his loving mate He has climbed his flight of stairs. And though this parting seems unjust I think we all agree, that he accomplished More in his short life, than some do in an eternity. You would never hear him boast or Brag of anything he had, but of his Children “And just so” he was truly very proud. Violin solo—by Maxine Taylor of American Fork entitled “Perfect Day.” Accompanied by Barbara Taylor. First speaker, Dean Johnson: My dears brothers and sisters, friends, I feel very humble in occupying this position. I also feel a great deal of remorse, you might say, for the loss of this good man, but then, as my mind gets a little glimpse of the fine qualities and the great attributes, strong character that this man possessed, I don’t feel quite so bad. When I hear this pretty music, that has just been rendered, and see these beautiful flowers, I visualize also the great number of his many friends that he has, and I feel like saying, “Bless God for such men.” And also in thinking of the tragedy of the death of Uncle Will, I also feel a spirit of joy and happiness at the thought of what a happy reunion and what a happy meeting there will be when Uncle Will and Aunt Nora can be together again. I can never think of Aunt Nora without thinking of Uncle Will, and I can never think of Uncle Will without thinking of Aunt Nora, so what I may say of one may be true of the other, and I might also say that before I venture off into any particular line of thought, that what I say here today may be sentiments of not only myself, but of the family and some who are not of the family, and particularly Uncle August, who is bishop of the ward, and also the life-long companion of Uncle Will. When I think of these sweethearts—Aunt Nora and Uncle Will—as I believe they always were, I will relate to you some little experiences. It fell to my lot to do quite a lot of work for them when I was younger, and I used to appreciate the fine meals that Aunt Nora would prepare for us while we were in the fields working in the hay, and during those conversations that we had at the table, I learned a great deal of the characters of the two of them. They used to tell us, or Aunt Nora in particular—Uncle Will was always away on business of some sort—of their early courthood day, and how thrilled Aunt Nora was at every little thing that happened, but the particular ting I wish to mention is, I could see her eyes sparkle, and smile come to her face as she should tell about receiving the letters from Uncle Will from Australia. She had one son and a little tiny baby, and undoubtedly her interest was over there with him, and his interest with her, but she seemed so thrilled every time she would tell about these experiences, and of course, they portrayed to me a great message of love and devotion. While upon this subject, I wish to mention the fact of the fine missionary work that Uncle Will did while he was away. It was my privilege to visit the same mission a few years ago, and visit some of the old people who were once associated with him. I can remember just as plain as I can see you here, how they would bring out their albums and show the various pictures of the various elders, and they would pause and exclaim at Uncle Will’s picture, “What a fine man he was.” It was in the homes of these people that I learned to appreciate the life of a real missionary. He fulfilled the office of mission president for about nine months while the acting president came home. The people there seemed to admire him as they do here. He was very strict in obeying and fulfilling the mission rules to the very letter, and of course at the end, the people thought he was a little too much that way, but I remember them bringing up circumstances and saying, “How true he was and how fair he was in his decisions,” so I think he was well-blessed that way and performed a wonderful work. He was always considerate of others. That statement has been made by Morris, yet his consideration of other people was so far from the usual ability, that most of us have to consider that he could draw you a comparison though his thoughts were of other persons before himself and his wisdom was far beyond the average individual. It seems to me that whatever dealing I have had with him, and from experiences that have been told me by other people, they thought his wisdom was far superior. They would go to him for help and for his judgment on different occasions. It seemed as though he had a general conception of everything. People claim that the person who is educated has the power to appreciate and the power to visualize things to a greater extent than most of us, but to me, a person who has a great knowledge, is a person that knows quite a little bit, or more than the average about everything. We have a great many people who are termed as intelligent because they know almost all there is to know about one particular thing, but as far as knowing very much about any other line of study, you might say they do not know very much. To my way of thinking, that person is not an intelligent person. Uncle Will was a man who knew something about everything. He had a general conception of great wisdom. Then, he has been acting as the bishop of the Lake view Ward for thirteen years. This is proof enough that his life was a life of service. It has been stated in the Scriptures, and I think it is justly so, that “He who is greatest among you is servant of all.” I think his life work was of service to more different people than anyone who has ever lived in the community. As he was sustained bishop of the Lake View Ward, I don’t remember what year it was, but August Johnson, who is now bishop, was his first counselor, with Will Goodrich acting as his second counselor, and then P.W. Madsen was sustained as the second counselor, and then Jim Nuttall was sustained as his second counselor and it wasn’t long till he was called away and Spencer Madsen was called as his second assistant. During the time that these people served as the second counselor, Uncle August and Uncle Will remained for the full thirteen years, and so during this time, Uncle August learned to love Uncle Will. During the talks I have had with him, he said that he appreciated Uncle Will even more so than some of his brothers and sisters. I believe he had a more thorough understanding of his nature than some of the brothers and sisters and the family. He told me of their service together, and one particular time in 1918 when the flu epidemic was so terrible throughout the community. He told of going on cold winter nights to the homes of the sick and, as most of you know of the conditions at this time, more lives were lost during this flu epidemic than in the World War, so his was a life of service at this time. They were called to go to various homes, and they were never fearful of catching this disease. They would put their little white masks over their faces and go in and help the sick. And it was during experiences of this kind that many of you, I think most of you, have had experience with administering to the sick even in your own family. You will know that is the time that you find out the fine characteristics of the individual, and it was during these services, where it meant either life of death, that the true characters of these individuals came out, and that was when they learned to appreciate the value of the soul. I would go on and enumerate the large number of experiences, you might say, of this man, which would take a long while. I think there are very few here who have not been influenced some way by this man. He labored hard during his term as bishop. They built the amusement hall, and I remember those pretty numbers that the Taylor quartet used to sing. I guess they performed and sang more in different gatherings than any quartet we have had in the community. I remember talking to Uncle August about it, and he said how proud he always felt to stand up to the side of Uncle Will and sing songs that old people loved to hear.. When we had the dedication of the chapel, he said. “how glad he would be if they could just keep that quartet going on forever.” So, his life is nothing to feel badly about. It is something to feel joyful about, and I can’t help but think how joyful we should be, especially then I went through the home prior to these funeral services, saw the family even having smiles on their faces. I don’t believe they can help but appreciate greatly the value those kind of people, that mother and father was to them, and also the Taylor family on Uncle Will’s side. They have been leaders, they have been adventurers, you might say. In every line that they have chosen to follow, not only Uncle Will, but all his brother and sisters. It seems to be these kind of top-notch people that are leaders. They took initiative to go forward and do more for higher and greater things. Some of them have chosen different vocations, but each of them, they seemed to be leaders within that line, and some of the best. I might say a few words in connection with the children. They represent the very finest people that have ever lived in this community. They have fulfilled offices in this ward and they have carried out their work successfully. They seem to achieve those things that they desire to do, and of course, I believe as has been stated, it is the divine inheritance that has been given them. It seems as though Christ has called, he has educated, he has experienced people in so many different lines to carry on so many different kinds of work, and it is a work for all persons to do. Many of us have a great deal of reverence and respect for this family. I might say also, in connection with the sickness of Uncle Will, how kind the people have been to assist and call on him. I do know if there has ever been a day, although I have not been in direct contact with the family, that there has been even three or four or five ask me how Uncle Will is getting on. And how good the people were to help the family—Sister Clinger and all the immediate members. There are many others who have helped and that deserves a great deal of credit for their fine attention. Now, as to venture on the gospel discourse, I don’t believe it is necessary. I feel that the Taylor family and all their relatives and friends, most of them, know a lot about the gospel, and it wouldn’t do me much good to preach gospel to them. However, it is a happy thought to hold in your mind that we are going to meet again, and death is not the end. We can’t destroy this life, we live on forever, and we will sometime in the distant future have that happy reunion together again. We shall continue on working. This individual, whose body lays before us will rise again and on the morrow he shall take up his labors just as he left off here, and he shall achieve much, and the people will look upon him and say, “He is indeed a man of God.” How great will be our happiness with him, and some day, some place, somewhere, we can associate with him and enjoy all the happiness God has promised to us, and may He bless us in this end, I pray in the name of Jesus Christ, Amen. Quartet—by the Allen Brothers, “Jesus My Savior.” Second speaker, Christian Jepperson: Brothers and sisters, it is written, “It is better to attend a place of mourning than a place of feasting.” I suppose the reason for that is because our minds are directed in another channel at a funeral that will be for the up building of our inert selves. Notwithstanding that saying, I don’t believe there is anyone of us but what realizes what a terrible hole bereavement leaves in the heart of a family and how hard it is, and I think you have to use all your will power and all your faith to adjust yourself to a condition which we are facing today. It will be adjusted. It takes time, but after years, things may look a little different. That chair—that vacant chair—and that face will always be remembered. Maybe in years to come, not with the keen sorrow of today, but with a pleasant remembrance. Just a day or two less than two months ago, I was in a garage in Provo, and someone walked up and touched me on the shoulder, and said, “Hello, Chris.” Of course, I turned around, but I knew who it was before I turned around. It was Will to say a few commonplace remarks. Will walked over to his car and drove out. Two or three days after that I learned that he was very sick. I went down and talked to him, and he said he felt that he was going to come out of it all right. All we could do was to bow our heads. It was the hand of fate, and say to God, “Thy will be done.” Sometimes I wonder—lots of other people in our surroundings wonder—just why those that are so useful, those that have done so much and have so much, so many plans projected, things they want to put over, have go to be called hence, but it comes and we have got to do it. We have got to take that which comes to us and bow our heads and say as I said before. It was my fortune—good fortune—to labor with Brother Will while he was bishop. In all of the years he was bishop, superintendent of the Sunday School, probably I will say we learned much more of each other than we would ordinarily do. He learned of my weak points and of my strong ones. I learned his, but I also learned this—that Brother Will was very much more keen toward that great thing, that great principle we call tolerance, than I was, and for all those things that we do, I remember him with the fondest memories. Other things that I wish to remember Brother Will for was that he loved his wife very dearly, and I was so happy when they asked me to make a few remarks in the passing. She was a wonderful woman. You know what makes anyone really great is to be of service. A woman who was a peacemaker. He loved her so dearly, and she was a wonderful woman. You know there are other things I will always probably remember, and that is Brother Will as a neighbor. Just two steel rails dividing our homes. We all loved the man. We all love a person that never lays down on the job. Sometimes, I don’t know whether Brother Will was so enthusiastic about certain things, but I knew he never layed down on the job—never. We all love characters of that kind. There are a lot of them in the world, but there are still too few. Too few. We talk about our empire builders. We talk about them, and the present day, and I have talked of men who picked rails, but if we will think back to civilization, some of the greatest empires that were ever on the face of the earth centuries before railroads were even dreamed of, and I just like to think, brothers and sisters, I like to think of how our pioneer parents—pushed frontiers, civilization against a wilderness, pushed back forests, pushed back their frontiers and developed comfort. Oh, for that kind of people and their descendants. And among those people that pushed the frontier from wilderness, probably of the most of them very little could be said, but among them, there were those who qualified to handle the greatest responsibilities in our nation; I want to say this, while I am on my feet, right now. I know Brother Will was one of those that would take any position and carry the office to the credit of his constituents and to himself. As he was a student, he was a hard worker. Just one word to your children. It is quite a burden that has fallen on the shoulders of this family, and especially the older ones, but I know this, the younger ones will take the advice of the older children, and know the older children’s counsel will never fail. One other thing the family holds, is the greatest heritage that never could be given to any human being. In their beings flow the best blood that ever peopled the face of the earth, and I am not just talking to be talking. I know the family on both sides. I know of their qualities, and I know these children are going to live up to the capabilities and the possibilities of that wonderful heritage. I pray God to be with them and all of us is my prayer in the name of Jesus, Amen. Third speaker, Victor J. Bird: One of the really great characters of our community has passed on. It was in 1924 that I first became acquainted with Bother Taylor and during the intervening years. I have had the pleasure of associating with him in bother business and religious capacities. He was one who practiced his religion in his daily dealings with his fellowmen. I have never found him outwardly disturbed by the problems that confronted him, but he exercised a calmness that few men can under strain, yet I know how concerned he was about his responsibilities. I knew of his problems as he talked to me often regarding his affairs. He worked unceasingly for the establishment of his business and to maintain his farm and home, always displaying honesty and integrity in his business dealings. These days it is not an easy matter to conduct business with competition as it is and under the conditions that exist, but he plodded early and late and thereby pushed forward in the march to success. He was so appreciative of every act done for him to help him in his business, regardless of how small the favor. His family tells me of how he appreciated every little courtesy extended to him by any of them. You know this appreciation is one of the finer arts and not everyone is given to know the value of it. But on the other hand, too many there are who are so unappreciative of what ever is done for them. He was endowed with a sweet voice and one felt good to converse with him. He make all men feel that they were his brothers. He was kind and mellow—and by that I mean he was made sweet and gentle by maturity. He loved nature and particularly, the beauties of his own surroundings in this beautiful valley with its lake and mountains. Since being asked to speak here today I have conversed with several persons, so I could bring to you their reactions of Brother Taylor’s life while he served in various positions: First, as a bishop of this ward, he was tolerant, sympathetic, kind hearted to all and careful in his decisions that he weighed and considered before making. As a neighbor, he was considerate and free with the goods at his disposal. As an employer, he was of times so considerate of others that he worked a hardship on himself. The incident is told of one who had done evil against him in business and who became distressed, then came to Brother Taylor who gave him assistance and furnished him with the necessities of life. He had the personal welfare of his employees at heart and counseled with them in an effort to better their lives. As a father, he was successful, for here we see this fine family of sons and daughters, all fine characters who will carry on the high ideals and virtues of their father and mother. His faith reminds me of the words of the late Robert J. Burdette which I quote: I watch the sunset as I look over the rim of the blue Pacific, and there is no mystery beyond the horizon line, because I know what there is over there. I have been there. I have journeyed in those lands. Over there where the sun is just sinking in Japan. That star is rising over China. In that direction lie the Philippines. I know all that. Well, there is another land that I look toward as I watch the sunset. I have never seen it. I have never seen anyone who has been there, but it has a more abiding reality than any of these lands which I do know. This land beyond the sunset—this land of immortality, this fair and blessed country of the soul—why, this heaven of ours is the one thing in the world, which I know with absolute, unshaken, unchangeable certainty. This I know with a knowledge that is never shadowed by a passing cloud of doubt. I may not always be certain about this world; my geographical locations may sometimes become confused, but the other world—that I know. And as the afternoon sun sinks lower, faith shines more clearly and hope, lifting her voice in a high key, sings the songs of fruition. My work is about ended, I think, the best of it I have done poorly; any of it I might have done better, but I have done it. And in a fairer land, with finer material and a better working light, I will do better work. Brother Taylor was an extremely hard worker, rising early and continuing well into the night. I am sure that during the past few years, he has really overworked and what made it harder was the fact that he never actually found himself after the passing of his good wife in 1935. Victor Hugo said: “When I go down to the grave I can say, like many other, ‘I have finished my day’s work.’ But I cannot say, ‘I have finished my life.’ My day’s work will begin again the next morning. The tomb is not a blind alley; it is a thoroughfare. It closes on the twilight, and opens on the dawn.” And so my own faith is so firmly established that I have every confidence and assurance that I shall again enjoy the association and companionship of this good man, for he was a good man and I shall miss him. I am honored in paying this tribute to him today. May our Father in Heaven be kind to you sons and daughters—brothers and sisters, and may His spirit comfort you in the hour you most need it, is my prayer for you, and I ask it humbly in the name of Jesus Christ—Amen. Quartet—by Carl Elsey and company, “Welcome, Wanderer, Welcome,” Fourth speaker, James Nuttall: I am honored, my brothers and sisters, to say a few words at the funeral services of as great a man as Brother Will Taylor. I could have sat today and honored him silently for all he has done for me, from all I have expounded from him during the period of time I associated with him in religious work. To me, Bishop Taylor and your present bishop are outstanding characters because of the inspiration I received from them during the time I associated with them in the bishopric of this ward. Sometime ago on this stand I mentioned the fact that I would go home from bishop’s meeting marveling at them, and let me say to you people that there never was a bishop who was more sincere, who was more desirous of doing good and of doing service than the bishop you have lost. Regularly were bishop meetings held. Regularly were they opened by prayer, and it seemed as though this man could almost talk with God, and when he thought through the problems of this ward, he thought them through for the sole purpose of rendering the most good to those concerned. During that period of time I absorbed good inspiration from that association, and I think I made but little contribution, and I felt that way at the time because of the greatness of the men with whom I associated. If you people want to really appreciate these men, wander as I have wandered, and labor under noble characters. I think no one can place a grudge against Bishop Taylor. At all times he has had the thoughts of other people at heart, and whenever he has taken responsibility, he has rendered that responsibility to the best of his ability, for his has truly been a life of service to the world. And could we see him today in the raiment of glory, and I am simple enough to believe sincerely, my brothers and sisters, that there is such a raiment, we would see him with those whom he has served and those whom he has loved, rendering perhaps a greater service than he ever rendered here. Edwin Markham at one time said, “There is a destiny which makes us, but none go this way alone. What ere we send the light of others, comes back into our own.” If those words are true, and I believe they are, Bishop Will Taylor today is enjoying the mansion that I think very few people can enjoy, because of his desire to serve and to help and to lend aid, his intentions were always to do good and to be good, and he has been that. I think perhaps he sacrificed himself in service, but he enjoyed doing it. He was happy in it, and I know he will be blessed because of it, but, brothers and sisters, that temporal service now is over, but his good will last beyond this period of time. As we think of him when we think beyond his life and realize what he has done and what he has meant to us, the fruits of his labor will live while all those who ever knew him live because of the honor we have for him. His mission is not filled upon earth. Nor will it be while his memory endures. Though the shades of mortality have dropped, the windows of heaven have opened to receive his soul. He has gone the way of the world to enjoy his blessings, and I am sure those of us here would wish for his well being there, and out of his memory in the thoughts of this meeting, we shall deem much and be made better in this final sacrifice. Brother Jepperson said, “It is better to enter the house of mourning than a house of feasting." Someone put that thought in poetry and said, “I walked a mile with pleasure, She chatted all the away, but left me none the wiser for all she had to say. I walked a mile with sorrow, she had no a word to say, but left me all the wiser, for what she didn’t say.” This is beautifully expressed, and I think, with Brother Jepperson, that perhaps out of these services we do gain more than at any other religious service, because of the thinking and reasoning and evaluating which we do as we silently think through the life and experiences of our friend which we have had with them. Where we do appreciate that word of appreciation, where we do show that we sympathize and out of the day we may get that blessing at least. It was said by Paul the Apostle in paying a tribute to King David after David died having served his generation. He couldn’t think of any greater compliment or tribute to the great King David than to say that he had served his generation. If I were called upon to summarize that has been said here today, I would gather from it that William W. Taylor had served faithfully his generation. That would be the greatest tribute we could pay to him. I thought of the fine things he had done, and I looked down before me and I saw this splendid family of Brother Taylor and Sister Taylor. What is more beautiful than a beautiful family of intelligent, clean, God-fearing children, and we have it in this family as you all know. It is one of the fortunate things coming out of an unfortunate thing to have such capable young men and women as we have in this family. Brother Weldon and Virginia; it seems that while providence has taken the father and mother away, it has left someone to partially fill the gap in this home. These two can carry on and provide the kind of kindness and training and inspiration for these younger brothers and this sister. This family has courage. I am not going to talk long, out of consideration for those who have stood throughout this service, but I want to mention this. This family’s courage to me has been one of the most inspiring and beautiful things that have entered into my life. I recall about this time three years ago when we paid our last tributes to Sister Nora Taylor. I recall the time when they sent Paul to a mission in Australia. Sister Taylor was ill at the time, and yet when the opportunity came—the call came for that boy to answer—to carry the glad message of the gospel to those in Australia--she willingly consented that he go, and the father too, knowing of her condition far more, probably than she did, and knowing that probably that boy would never be able to return to see her, sent him out with a smile on their lips and a “God bless you.” You know the sequel. You know that the mother passed on before the boy’s return, but to that entire family, I can say that it shows courage, and a faith that I am sure our Heavenly Father will reward when rewards are given for faithful service on this earth, and it has been faithful, and I am sure it will be to all of these communities an example of splendid faith in God and in His service. I may close what I have said by repeating again the words I used in the beginning, “And William W. Taylor died, having served faithfully and floriously, unselfishly his generation.” God bless his family. Help them to keep the great heritage he has left. As long as they keep the memory and love of this father and mother with them, the father and mother will not be dead, and to them they will always be reminded of this splendid life. I pray God will help us to understand. These deaths have come with a great rapidity here. It should be a constant reminder to us that we have not a lease on life, that the time is short and that we have indeed a very important mission here to serve, and should remind us that we should be going about the business of this life. God help us to realize it, I pray in Jesus’ name, amen. Remarks be Irwin G. Bunnell: Brothers and sisters, I believe we have talked long enough today. However, being a member of the bishopric, I would just like to say a few words of appreciation of Uncle Will’s acquaintanceship while I have been in the bishopric. We asked him to work first on the Finance Committee. When we remodeled our chapel, he accepted that call and worked very diligently. Many nights we met with the Finance Committee and he went over the problems which confronted us. At all times, Uncle Will had an answer to every problem. It seemed as though he understood what the ward needed, what the people needed. He understood the people’s conditions and he knew just exactly what was confronting all of us. We deeply appreciate his work in the Finance Committee, and also in the genealogical work of the ward. He has served very well. He has done his part. If anyone ever accepted a task, which they were set out to do, Uncle Will was always the first one to come and shake hands and congratulate this person, and also give a word of encouragement to continue on with this good work. I owe Uncle Will a great deal personally because I feel that he has been responsible for myself being called upon a mission. I remember very well when he came and asked me if I would go. The look he had upon his face and the words he spoke, I don’t see how anyone could have turned him down. I think much good has been said—in fact, I don’t see how speakers today could have made things more plain to you –of the conditions and of the loveliness of this family. We appreciate having them with us, and having had them in service for so many years. May God bless them. May He help them in all their righteous endeavors in the future, I humbly pray in the name of Jesus, Amen. I wish to take this opportunity to thank all those who have furnished the beautiful floral offerings and who have in any way rendered service in these services. Choir sang—“Oh My Father.” Benediction given by P.W. Madsen: Our Father which art in Heaven, we present ourselves before thee at the close of these services with thankfulness in our hearts for the beautiful music that we have listened to, and for the words of comfort, the counsel and advice that has been given unto us. But above all, do we wish to thank thee, Father, for the privilege we have had of associating with one of your noble servants whom thou has called home, one whose counsel and advice we so much appreciated, one whose love we will always remember. In a few moments we shall leave this building and we shall journey to the cemetery, and there we shall deposit in the open grave, all that remains of the mortal of this beloved brother. We humbly pray, Father, that thou will go with us in our journey, that no harm shall befall us, that no accident shall come to us on the highway, and return us to our homes in safety, and thy spirit will guide and direct us at all times so that when our time comes, it can be said of us, we have lived our life faithfully to the end. And we pray thee, to bless this family in as much as they are deprived of father and mother, and in the hours of trial and darkness, thy spirit shall guide them and the spirit of their father shall help them in the journey of life and help us as their neighbors and friends that when they come to us, we may put our arms around them and help them to keep their feet on the straight and narrow path. Dismiss us now with thy blessings that we may ever live worthy lives out of inspiration, we ask in the name of Jesus, Amen.

William Weldon Taylor

Contributor: k_lassman Created: 3 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

William Weldon Taylor lived a rich, pure life; one particularly rich for others in that it was one of service. For the greater number of his 54 years, his every act bore evidence of a keen adjustment to his fellow men. So often in his home, in his church affiliations or in his business, he would forego pleasures of his own, and so many times actually reduce his financial earning power through giving aid to someone in need. His life truly was one of giving. Selfishness never found a home in the soul of Will Taylor. Consideration of others characterized this great man whom everyone loved so well. It has been said that people who criticized Bishop Taylor did not know him. And one can say that there were few who did not know him. He was born December 9, 1883, in the Second Ward of Provo, the eldest son of William Joseph and Abby Jane Scott Taylor. The thoughtful guidance of his good parents played an outstanding role in shaping the character of Will Taylor. Those enviable qualities of this wonderful man; those personality traits that constituted his individuality, originated in part from the heritage of his good parents and the environment which they created in their home. Both of them were instrumental in developing his lasting fine qualities. Shortly before his brother, Scott A. Taylor, passed away April 20, 1962, he made these comments about Will: “I remember his as a little boy with big freckles and curly hair. When he was very young he had typhoid fever which nearly cost him his life. He had a mind of his own and when a decision was made nothing could change it. Ed Hinckley said he was an outstanding student at BYU.” As a boy his playmates knew him for his fairness in play; they remembered him for his love of his mother and father, for his kindness to his brothers and sisters and for his respect and thoughtfulness for the aged. At an early age he began the growth of sharing with others; of living unselfishly for the sake of others. These admiral qualities continued to grow to such heights that they characterized his rich, full life. He lived with his family in their simple dwelling in Provo for 15 years. At that time, they moved to Vineyard on the Shadrack Holdaway ranch. This ranch was later known to us as the Harry Gammon farm. The family remained there for about five years. They then moved to Lake View where Will lived for the remainder of his life. The place was purchased from J.J. Dillitush. It had belonged before that to George Scott, Sr. According to Scott A., Will was largely responsible for the family’s leaving Provo and moving to Vineyard in 1904, and was in favor of buying the George C. Scott property which later became Cherry Hill Dairy Farm. June 26, 1907, was a memorable day in the life of Will Taylor. At that time he married a lovely young girl, Nora Johnson, whose character so complemented his as to make her an ideal mate for him. They were known to be sweethearts always. June 30, 1908, their first child, a son named Weldon Johnson, was born. Approximately three years later their home was blessed with a lovely little daughter, Virginia. When he was called on a mission in 1912, Will’s home was in a turmoil. Little Virginia was very ill; it looked as if they might lose her, but his ever-kindled faith in his religion caused him to accept the call even against the wishes of his own mother. Through his faith, things at home were made normal. In speaking of Will’s mission at his funeral, Dean Johnson said, “It was my privilege to visit the same Australian mission in which Uncle Will served, and to visit with some of the old people who were once associated with him. I can remember how they would bring out their albums and show the pictures of the various elders, and they would pause and exclaim at Uncle Will’s picture, ‘What a fine man he was!’ It was in the homes of these people that I learned to appreciate the life of a real missionary.” While in Australia, Will was honored as very few missionaries are, in that he was appointed by President Hyde to serve as mission president. This calling, which he filled for almost a year, was an unusual challenge, but the richness of his life up to that time enabled him to fill it admirably. Though young in years, he was experienced in life’s affairs. He was known always to be true and fair in his decisions. He was always intensely interested in dairying. After moving to Cherry Hill Farm he was actively engaged in that activity. His first business entry was in about 1908 when he operated the Lake View Dairy jointly with George Scott. It was Will’s idea, a few years later, to organize the dairy known as “Cherry Hill” which he operated in conjunction with his father and brothers. Later it was dissolved as a family unit and Will continued to own and operate this business until his death in 1938, which made a total of 30 years he spent dairying. The operation of the dairy was carried on at the Lake View farm until 1925 when he purchased the site and constructed the new bu9ilding just off center street Fourth West in Provo, where his dairy products were prepared for and disbursed for distribution. In 1915, just after his return from the Australian mission and at the young age of 31, he was chosen Bishop of the Lake View Ward. In this office he was tolerant, sympathetic, kind-hearted to all and was careful to weigh and consider his decisions. He served in this calling for 13 years, which speaks adequately of his ability. For a man so young to command the respect and admiration of his elders is certainly an accomplishment of merit. On June 27, 1915, a second son, Paul Hector, named for one of his father’s missionary companions, Hector Haight, came to bless the home of Will and Nora. Though he was always very busy, Will was never too involved to devote time to others. He was first to visit the sick. Someone has said he was called to administer to the sick more than any other one man in the ward at that time. He loved to do it because he thought he might be helping. That was his unselfish goal. The scripture “He who is greatest among you is servant of all,” has been aptly used in connection with his life of It has been said by at least one person that Will was too honest and too considerate of others to be a business man. He practiced his religion in his daily dealings. When his milk customers were unable to pay for their milk he rarely cut them off. His heart was too big; their problems were too well understood. When a friend became ill, without an order he would see to it that buttermilk was left by the delivery boy. Or to some family in need he would send milk daily with orders to the delivery man not to collect. The story is told of one who had done ill against him in business and who became distressed, then came to Will who gave him assistance and furnished him with the necessities of life. These deeds characterized the life of this man. He truly lived his religion. One of the more important activities of Will’s life was participation in the Taylor quartet. The original group was composed of Will, Scott and Joseph Taylor and August Johnson. They sang at graveside services during the flu epidemic. If an actual count were made of the many times Will sang with the quartet and with the choir, or the many times he spoke in religious circles, or the many times he prayed to God in behalf of his people, the figure would be an astounding one. Many people have been comforted and made to feel better by having heard him speak or sing. He was a member of the quartet for 30 years. As a member of the old Provo Tabernacle Choir, Will frequently conducted the group in the absence of Adolph Boshard, choir leader. Will was also choir leader in the ward and a good one. He had an active organization with weekly practices. According to Clara they sang at sacrament meetings and had concerts, parties and outings. On of the very most important phases of his life was his family. Due to his many responsibilities in church and business, Will was unable to spend as much time as he would have loved to spend with his family, but he was very proud of and concerned for the welfare of each one as he or she came along with individual personalities and accomplishments. His wonderful companion, Nora, filled in the gap with the children. Probably the greatest burden that Will bore was Nora’s illness, though like all other of his problems he took it “chin up”. Victor Bird said at his funeral, “I have never found him outwardly disturbed by the problems that confronted him. He exercised a calmness that few men can under strain, yet I know how concerned he was about his responsibilities.” Nora had been ill for some time, had undergone surgery and underwent more surgery when Paul was leaving for the Australian mission in January of 1935, yet she and Will, true to their faith, were both anxious that he go. Words are not adequate to express what they must have felt at that time. Neither can words express the grief and loneliness that Will experienced when later that same year, November 16, 1935, the devoted companion who had meant so much to him for so long was called away. It has been felt by those nearest to him that he never actually found himself after Nora’s passing. Will’s life was a very crowded one. He utilized every moment. His accomplishments were many. He served as a member of the High Council of the Sharon Stake and at the time of his death was energetically engaged in religious, social and business connections. The experience of his youth had taught him to hold to that which is good and the fact that he was doing those things just previous to his passing is indicative of his not having deviated from his goal. Note: In publishing this history we express sincere appreciation and thanks to Morris Clinger, Dean Johnson, Chris Jeppeson, Jim Nuttall, Victor Bird, Scott A. and Clara Taylor and August Johnson for some of the thoughts and ideas expressed. Alene K. Taylor

Funeral Service for William Weldon Taylor

Contributor: k_lassman Created: 3 months ago Updated: 3 months ago

FUNERAL SERVICES for William Weldon TAYLOR November 27, 1939 Lake View Ward Chapel Choir sang—“Though Deepening Trails Throng Your Way” Invocation by Spencer Madsen: Our Father in Heaven, it is with humility in our hearts that we present ourselves before you today in this capacity, and pay our respects to one of your servants whom thou has permitted to come and dwell with us. We thank thee, our Father in Heaven, for the life of our friend. We are thankful for the example he has set, and we ask thee, our Father in Heaven, to be with us during these services; that things of comfort and consolation may be said; that the music may be pleasing unto thee. We ask that thee bless all of those who are to take part on this program today, that the things, which they do, will be uplifting. Again we thank thee for the life of this, our brother, who has been such a friend to us. We thank thee for the service he has rendered, and we are thankful every day of our life for characters of this kink that we may look up to do the work that is assigned to them. Our Father in Heaven, we ask thee to be with us, to help us to get the most out of this, so that we may make our life better by the information which we shall have upon the life of our brother who has left, and we do it in the name of thy son, Jesus Christ, Amen. “The Sweetest Story Ever Told”, sung by Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Clark, accompanied by Mrs. Edith Powell. Life sketch of Mr. Taylor given by Morris Clinger: William W. Taylor lived a rich, pure life; a life particularly rich for others in that his life was a life of service. For the greater number of the fifty-four years he was with us, his very acts bore evidence of a keen adjustment to his fellow men. So often in his home, in his church affiliations or in his business, he would fore-go pleasures of his own, and so many times actually reduce his financial earning power, through giving aid to someone in need. His life truly was one of giving. Selfishness never found a home in the soul of Will Taylor. Consideration of others characterized this great man whom everyone loved so well. It has been said that “People who criticized Bishop Taylor did not know him.” And one can say there were few who did not know Uncle Will. He was born December 9, 1883, in the second ward of Provo. The thoughtful guidance of his good parents played an outstanding role in shaping the character of Uncle Will. Those enviable qualities of the wonderful man; those personality traits that constituted the individuality of Uncle Will, originated in part from the heritage of his good parents and the environment which they caused to exist. These were instrumental in developing the lasting fine qualities of this man. As a boy, his playmates knew him for his fairness in play; they remembered him for his love of his mother and father, for his kindness to his brothers and sister. At this early age he began the growth of sharing with others; of living unselfishly for the sake of others. These admirable qualities continued to grow to insurmountable heights; to the point of characterizing the rich, full life of Uncle Will. He lived with his family in their simple dwelling in Provo for fifteen years, when at that time, he moved to Vineyard on the Shaddrach Holdaway ranch. This ranch is known to us now as the Harry Gammon farm. The family remained here for about five years. They then moved to Lake View where he has lived since. The place was purchased from J. J. Dillitush; it had belonged before that to George Scott Senior. June 26, 1907 was a happy and memorable day in the life of Uncle Will. At this time he married a lovely, young girl whose character so blended with Uncle Will’s as to make her an ideal mate for him. As we remember him for his kindness, his goodness, his bigness; so we remember Aunt Nora for her kindness, truly her goodness. Nora Johnson was indeed the ideal wife for Uncle Will. Surely we regret their having hone, their having left us; but what other husband and wife could have lived so shortly yet have prepared their children so adequately to carry on as we know they will carry on. The blood of Aunt Nora and Uncle Will has richly shown itself in these fine young men and women; in these boys who are now left alone. Alone in that they cannot associate physically with their parents; yet not alone because those admirable qualities of their parents are so clearly seen in them. Virginia and Margaret so like their dear mother and father, Weldon, Paul, Richard, Phillip, all enviable chaps, and Robert, the sweetest little fellow I have ever know, all bearing evidence of their rich heritage and environment. Because we associates of this family can still enjoy the character of Uncle Will and Aunt Nora through their children, I say again, June 26, 1907 was a memorable day. Uncle Will was always intensely interesting in dairying. Since moving to the present Cherry Hill Dairy farm, he has been actively engaged in that activity. His first business entry was in about 1908 when he operated jointly with George Scott, the Lake View Dairy. A few years later Will Taylor organized the dairy that we know it to be today, “Cherry Hill Dairy.” Therefore, one can say that he has been efficiently operating the dairy business for 30 years. The operation of the dairy was carried on at the Lake View farm until 1925 when Uncle Will purchased the site and constructed the new building which has since adequately housed the machinery for the distribution of his dairy products. The operation of this business undoubtedly would have dissolved under another’s supervision. It was a down-hill job. But Uncle Will was a “sticker”. He apparently was a firm believer of the adage, “A quitter never wins; a winner never quite.” His formidable initiative was instrumental in causing the business to grow it its present status; now far-reaching into Utah, Wasatch, Juab, Sanpete and Millard counties. Any man interested in dairying has cause to admire what this man has done. He was ready always to accept a new challenge. He was always one to look on the bright side of things. If there was just a ray of hope, he so enthusiastically strove with that dim blow as a stimulus, the goal was invariably achieved. He was called on a mission in 1912, and then after returning home, just at the young age of thirty-one, he was chosen Bishop of the Lake View ward. He served justly for thirteen years. This speaks adequately of his ability; to know that a man so young could command the respect and admiration of his elders. The records now on file enumerate his many accomplishments. The amusement hall was constructed while he served as bishop. Having so recently completed this beautiful chapel, we are in a position to appreciate what Bishop Taylor did during the construction of that building. As Bishop Johnson worked untiringly for months and months, so did Bishop Taylor. Though he was always very busy, he was never too busy but what he had time for others. He was first to visit the sick. He has been called to administer to the sick probably more than any other one man in the ward. He loved to do it because he thought he might be helping. That was his unselfish goal. When his milk customers were unable to pay for their milk, he rarely cut them off. His heart was too big; their problems were too well understood by Uncle Will. When a friend became ill, without an order, he would see to it that buttermilk was left by the delivery boy. Or to some family in need, he would send milk daily with orders to the deliveryman not to collect. These were deeds that characterized the life of this man. He truly lived his religion. Young and old remember him, too, for his sound advice. He has been a father to many. Many sought him for aid and he was always ready to give. If one had an actual count of the many, many times he has sung with the quartet, with the choir, the many times he has spoken in religious circles, the many times he has prayed to God in behalf of his people; that figure would be an astounding one. We will miss seeing him before us as a leader. So many people have been made to feel better for having heard him speak or sing. I sympathize deeply with the other three members of that ever-wanted, that ever-popular quartet that is now dissolved after thirty years of happy association. Uncle Will, too, was an ideal conversationalist. His outstanding attribute in this was that he was a good listener. He would always let you have your say; moreover, he would give prominence to what you said. One always felt his place in the world after chatting with Uncle Will. He was appreciative of others’ talents; he saw good in you. I was always happy to know that Uncle Will and Aunt Nora were in the audience when I read of was in a play. I am honored now in paying tribute to him in this way. Patience was a developed habit of his. He never acted hastily; his consideration of others predominated his every move. He always makes it a point to thank those who helped him. Those who were so close to him during his short illness realized this most perhaps. Though he was, in part, unconscious when the elders last administered to him, he signaled his appreciation to them through eye and arm movement. One was always glad to do something for this appreciative man. And so the life of Uncle Will was a very crowded one. He utilized every moment. His accomplishments have been many. At the time of his death, he was energetically engaged in religious, in social, and in business connections. The experience of his youth taught him to hold to that which was good and the fact that he was doing those things so well just previous to his passing, is indicative of his not having deviated from his goal. He was a wonderful man; we are better for having known him. By request of the family, Aunt Clara has written a few lines, which I would like to read in climaxing the above brief sketch; TO UNCLE WILL His work is done—his tired head Is resting from earthly cares, He has gone to meet his loving mate He has climbed his flight of stairs. And though this parting seems unjust I think we all agree, that he accomplished More in his short life, than some do in an eternity. You would never hear him boast or Brag of anything he had, but of his Children “And just so” he was truly very proud. Violin solo—by Maxine Taylor of American Fork entitled “Perfect Day.” Accompanied by Barbara Taylor. First speaker, Dean Johnson: My dears brothers and sisters, friends, I feel very humble in occupying this position. I also feel a great deal of remorse, you might say, for the loss of this good man, but then, as my mind gets a little glimpse of the fine qualities and the great attributes, strong character that this man possessed, I don’t feel quite so bad. When I hear this pretty music, that has just been rendered, and see these beautiful flowers, I visualize also the great number of his many friends that he has, and I feel like saying, “Bless God for such men.” And also in thinking of the tragedy of the death of Uncle Will, I also feel a spirit of joy and happiness at the thought of what a happy reunion and what a happy meeting there will be when Uncle Will and Aunt Nora can be together again. I can never think of Aunt Nora without thinking of Uncle Will, and I can never think of Uncle Will without thinking of Aunt Nora, so what I may say of one may be true of the other, and I might also say that before I venture off into any particular line of thought, that what I say here today may be sentiments of not only myself, but of the family and some who are not of the family, and particularly Uncle August, who is bishop of the ward, and also the life-long companion of Uncle Will. When I think of these sweethearts—Aunt Nora and Uncle Will—as I believe they always were, I will relate to you some little experiences. It fell to my lot to do quite a lot of work for them when I was younger, and I used to appreciate the fine meals that Aunt Nora would prepare for us while we were in the fields working in the hay, and during those conversations that we had at the table, I learned a great deal of the characters of the two of them. They used to tell us, or Aunt Nora in particular—Uncle Will was always away on business of some sort—of their early courthood day, and how thrilled Aunt Nora was at every little thing that happened, but the particular ting I wish to mention is, I could see her eyes sparkle, and smile come to her face as she should tell about receiving the letters from Uncle Will from Australia. She had one son and a little tiny baby, and undoubtedly her interest was over there with him, and his interest with her, but she seemed so thrilled every time she would tell about these experiences, and of course, they portrayed to me a great message of love and devotion. While upon this subject, I wish to mention the fact of the fine missionary work that Uncle Will did while he was away. It was my privilege to visit the same mission a few years ago, and visit some of the old people who were once associated with him. I can remember just as plain as I can see you here, how they would bring out their albums and show the various pictures of the various elders, and they would pause and exclaim at Uncle Will’s picture, “What a fine man he was.” It was in the homes of these people that I learned to appreciate the life of a real missionary. He fulfilled the office of mission president for about nine months while the acting president came home. The people there seemed to admire him as they do here. He was very strict in obeying and fulfilling the mission rules to the very letter, and of course at the end, the people thought he was a little too much that way, but I remember them bringing up circumstances and saying, “How true he was and how fair he was in his decisions,” so I think he was well-blessed that way and performed a wonderful work. He was always considerate of others. That statement has been made by Morris, yet his consideration of other people was so far from the usual ability, that most of us have to consider that he could draw you a comparison though his thoughts were of other persons before himself and his wisdom was far beyond the average individual. It seems to me that whatever dealing I have had with him, and from experiences that have been told me by other people, they thought his wisdom was far superior. They would go to him for help and for his judgment on different occasions. It seemed as though he had a general conception of everything. People claim that the person who is educated has the power to appreciate and the power to visualize things to a greater extent than most of us, but to me, a person who has a great knowledge, is a person that knows quite a little bit, or more than the average about everything. We have a great many people who are termed as intelligent because they know almost all there is to know about one particular thing, but as far as knowing very much about any other line of study, you might say they do not know very much. To my way of thinking, that person is not an intelligent person. Uncle Will was a man who knew something about everything. He had a general conception of great wisdom. Then, he has been acting as the bishop of the Lake view Ward for thirteen years. This is proof enough that his life was a life of service. It has been stated in the Scriptures, and I think it is justly so, that “He who is greatest among you is servant of all.” I think his life work was of service to more different people than anyone who has ever lived in the community. As he was sustained bishop of the Lake View Ward, I don’t remember what year it was, but August Johnson, who is now bishop, was his first counselor, with Will Goodrich acting as his second counselor, and then P.W. Madsen was sustained as the second counselor, and then Jim Nuttall was sustained as his second counselor and it wasn’t long till he was called away and Spencer Madsen was called as his second assistant. During the time that these people served as the second counselor, Uncle August and Uncle Will remained for the full thirteen years, and so during this time, Uncle August learned to love Uncle Will. During the talks I have had with him, he said that he appreciated Uncle Will even more so than some of his brothers and sisters. I believe he had a more thorough understanding of his nature than some of the brothers and sisters and the family. He told me of their service together, and one particular time in 1918 when the flu epidemic was so terrible throughout the community. He told of going on cold winter nights to the homes of the sick and, as most of you know of the conditions at this time, more lives were lost during this flu epidemic than in the World War, so his was a life of service at this time. They were called to go to various homes, and they were never fearful of catching this disease. They would put their little white masks over their faces and go in and help the sick. And it was during experiences of this kind that many of you, I think most of you, have had experience with administering to the sick even in your own family. You will know that is the time that you find out the fine characteristics of the individual, and it was during these services, where it meant either life of death, that the true characters of these individuals came out, and that was when they learned to appreciate the value of the soul. I would go on and enumerate the large number of experiences, you might say, of this man, which would take a long while. I think there are very few here who have not been influenced some way by this man. He labored hard during his term as bishop. They built the amusement hall, and I remember those pretty numbers that the Taylor quartet used to sing. I guess they performed and sang more in different gatherings than any quartet we have had in the community. I remember talking to Uncle August about it, and he said how proud he always felt to stand up to the side of Uncle Will and sing songs that old people loved to hear.. When we had the dedication of the chapel, he said. “how glad he would be if they could just keep that quartet going on forever.” So, his life is nothing to feel badly about. It is something to feel joyful about, and I can’t help but think how joyful we should be, especially then I went through the home prior to these funeral services, saw the family even having smiles on their faces. I don’t believe they can help but appreciate greatly the value those kind of people, that mother and father was to them, and also the Taylor family on Uncle Will’s side. They have been leaders, they have been adventurers, you might say. In every line that they have chosen to follow, not only Uncle Will, but all his brother and sisters. It seems to be these kind of top-notch people that are leaders. They took initiative to go forward and do more for higher and greater things. Some of them have chosen different vocations, but each of them, they seemed to be leaders within that line, and some of the best. I might say a few words in connection with the children. They represent the very finest people that have ever lived in this community. They have fulfilled offices in this ward and they have carried out their work successfully. They seem to achieve those things that they desire to do, and of course, I believe as has been stated, it is the divine inheritance that has been given them. It seems as though Christ has called, he has educated, he has experienced people in so many different lines to carry on so many different kinds of work, and it is a work for all persons to do. Many of us have a great deal of reverence and respect for this family. I might say also, in connection with the sickness of Uncle Will, how kind the people have been to assist and call on him. I do know if there has ever been a day, although I have not been in direct contact with the family, that there has been even three or four or five ask me how Uncle Will is getting on. And how good the people were to help the family—Sister Clinger and all the immediate members. There are many others who have helped and that deserves a great deal of credit for their fine attention. Now, as to venture on the gospel discourse, I don’t believe it is necessary. I feel that the Taylor family and all their relatives and friends, most of them, know a lot about the gospel, and it wouldn’t do me much good to preach gospel to them. However, it is a happy thought to hold in your mind that we are going to meet again, and death is not the end. We can’t destroy this life, we live on forever, and we will sometime in the distant future have that happy reunion together again. We shall continue on working. This individual, whose body lays before us will rise again and on the morrow he shall take up his labors just as he left off here, and he shall achieve much, and the people will look upon him and say, “He is indeed a man of God.” How great will be our happiness with him, and some day, some place, somewhere, we can associate with him and enjoy all the happiness God has promised to us, and may He bless us in this end, I pray in the name of Jesus Christ, Amen. Quartet—by the Allen Brothers, “Jesus My Savior.” Second speaker, Christian Jepperson: Brothers and sisters, it is written, “It is better to attend a place of mourning than a place of feasting.” I suppose the reason for that is because our minds are directed in another channel at a funeral that will be for the up building of our inert selves. Notwithstanding that saying, I don’t believe there is anyone of us but what realizes what a terrible hole bereavement leaves in the heart of a family and how hard it is, and I think you have to use all your will power and all your faith to adjust yourself to a condition which we are facing today. It will be adjusted. It takes time, but after years, things may look a little different. That chair—that vacant chair—and that face will always be remembered. Maybe in years to come, not with the keen sorrow of today, but with a pleasant remembrance. Just a day or two less than two months ago, I was in a garage in Provo, and someone walked up and touched me on the shoulder, and said, “Hello, Chris.” Of course, I turned around, but I knew who it was before I turned around. It was Will to say a few commonplace remarks. Will walked over to his car and drove out. Two or three days after that I learned that he was very sick. I went down and talked to him, and he said he felt that he was going to come out of it all right. All we could do was to bow our heads. It was the hand of fate, and say to God, “Thy will be done.” Sometimes I wonder—lots of other people in our surroundings wonder—just why those that are so useful, those that have done so much and have so much, so many plans projected, things they want to put over, have go to be called hence, but it comes and we have got to do it. We have got to take that which comes to us and bow our heads and say as I said before. It was my fortune—good fortune—to labor with Brother Will while he was bishop. In all of the years he was bishop, superintendent of the Sunday School, probably I will say we learned much more of each other than we would ordinarily do. He learned of my weak points and of my strong ones. I learned his, but I also learned this—that Brother Will was very much more keen toward that great thing, that great principle we call tolerance, than I was, and for all those things that we do, I remember him with the fondest memories. Other things that I wish to remember Brother Will for was that he loved his wife very dearly, and I was so happy when they asked me to make a few remarks in the passing. She was a wonderful woman. You know what makes anyone really great is to be of service. A woman who was a peacemaker. He loved her so dearly, and she was a wonderful woman. You know there are other things I will always probably remember, and that is Brother Will as a neighbor. Just two steel rails dividing our homes. We all loved the man. We all love a person that never lays down on the job. Sometimes, I don’t know whether Brother Will was so enthusiastic about certain things, but I knew he never layed down on the job—never. We all love characters of that kind. There are a lot of them in the world, but there are still too few. Too few. We talk about our empire builders. We talk about them, and the present day, and I have talked of men who picked rails, but if we will think back to civilization, some of the greatest empires that were ever on the face of the earth centuries before railroads were even dreamed of, and I just like to think, brothers and sisters, I like to think of how our pioneer parents—pushed frontiers, civilization against a wilderness, pushed back forests, pushed back their frontiers and developed comfort. Oh, for that kind of people and their descendants. And among those people that pushed the frontier from wilderness, probably of the most of them very little could be said, but among them, there were those who qualified to handle the greatest responsibilities in our nation; I want to say this, while I am on my feet, right now. I know Brother Will was one of those that would take any position and carry the office to the credit of his constituents and to himself. As he was a student, he was a hard worker. Just one word to your children. It is quite a burden that has fallen on the shoulders of this family, and especially the older ones, but I know this, the younger ones will take the advice of the older children, and know the older children’s counsel will never fail. One other thing the family holds, is the greatest heritage that never could be given to any human being. In their beings flow the best blood that ever peopled the face of the earth, and I am not just talking to be talking. I know the family on both sides. I know of their qualities, and I know these children are going to live up to the capabilities and the possibilities of that wonderful heritage. I pray God to be with them and all of us is my prayer in the name of Jesus, Amen. Third speaker, Victor J. Bird: One of the really great characters of our community has passed on. It was in 1924 that I first became acquainted with Bother Taylor and during the intervening years. I have had the pleasure of associating with him in bother business and religious capacities. He was one who practiced his religion in his daily dealings with his fellowmen. I have never found him outwardly disturbed by the problems that confronted him, but he exercised a calmness that few men can under strain, yet I know how concerned he was about his responsibilities. I knew of his problems as he talked to me often regarding his affairs. He worked unceasingly for the establishment of his business and to maintain his farm and home, always displaying honesty and integrity in his business dealings. These days it is not an easy matter to conduct business with competition as it is and under the conditions that exist, but he plodded early and late and thereby pushed forward in the march to success. He was so appreciative of every act done for him to help him in his business, regardless of how small the favor. His family tells me of how he appreciated every little courtesy extended to him by any of them. You know this appreciation is one of the finer arts and not everyone is given to know the value of it. But on the other hand, too many there are who are so unappreciative of what ever is done for them. He was endowed with a sweet voice and one felt good to converse with him. He make all men feel that they were his brothers. He was kind and mellow—and by that I mean he was made sweet and gentle by maturity. He loved nature and particularly, the beauties of his own surroundings in this beautiful valley with its lake and mountains. Since being asked to speak here today I have conversed with several persons, so I could bring to you their reactions of Brother Taylor’s life while he served in various positions: First, as a bishop of this ward, he was tolerant, sympathetic, kind hearted to all and careful in his decisions that he weighed and considered before making. As a neighbor, he was considerate and free with the goods at his disposal. As an employer, he was of times so considerate of others that he worked a hardship on himself. The incident is told of one who had done evil against him in business and who became distressed, then came to Brother Taylor who gave him assistance and furnished him with the necessities of life. He had the personal welfare of his employees at heart and counseled with them in an effort to better their lives. As a father, he was successful, for here we see this fine family of sons and daughters, all fine characters who will carry on the high ideals and virtues of their father and mother. His faith reminds me of the words of the late Robert J. Burdette which I quote: I watch the sunset as I look over the rim of the blue Pacific, and there is no mystery beyond the horizon line, because I know what there is over there. I have been there. I have journeyed in those lands. Over there where the sun is just sinking in Japan. That star is rising over China. In that direction lie the Philippines. I know all that. Well, there is another land that I look toward as I watch the sunset. I have never seen it. I have never seen anyone who has been there, but it has a more abiding reality than any of these lands which I do know. This land beyond the sunset—this land of immortality, this fair and blessed country of the soul—why, this heaven of ours is the one thing in the world, which I know with absolute, unshaken, unchangeable certainty. This I know with a knowledge that is never shadowed by a passing cloud of doubt. I may not always be certain about this world; my geographical locations may sometimes become confused, but the other world—that I know. And as the afternoon sun sinks lower, faith shines more clearly and hope, lifting her voice in a high key, sings the songs of fruition. My work is about ended, I think, the best of it I have done poorly; any of it I might have done better, but I have done it. And in a fairer land, with finer material and a better working light, I will do better work. Brother Taylor was an extremely hard worker, rising early and continuing well into the night. I am sure that during the past few years, he has really overworked and what made it harder was the fact that he never actually found himself after the passing of his good wife in 1935. Victor Hugo said: “When I go down to the grave I can say, like many other, ‘I have finished my day’s work.’ But I cannot say, ‘I have finished my life.’ My day’s work will begin again the next morning. The tomb is not a blind alley; it is a thoroughfare. It closes on the twilight, and opens on the dawn.” And so my own faith is so firmly established that I have every confidence and assurance that I shall again enjoy the association and companionship of this good man, for he was a good man and I shall miss him. I am honored in paying this tribute to him today. May our Father in Heaven be kind to you sons and daughters—brothers and sisters, and may His spirit comfort you in the hour you most need it, is my prayer for you, and I ask it humbly in the name of Jesus Christ—Amen. Quartet—by Carl Elsey and company, “Welcome, Wanderer, Welcome,” Fourth speaker, James Nuttall: I am honored, my brothers and sisters, to say a few words at the funeral services of as great a man as Brother Will Taylor. I could have sat today and honored him silently for all he has done for me, from all I have expounded from him during the period of time I associated with him in religious work. To me, Bishop Taylor and your present bishop are outstanding characters because of the inspiration I received from them during the time I associated with them in the bishopric of this ward. Sometime ago on this stand I mentioned the fact that I would go home from bishop’s meeting marveling at them, and let me say to you people that there never was a bishop who was more sincere, who was more desirous of doing good and of doing service than the bishop you have lost. Regularly were bishop meetings held. Regularly were they opened by prayer, and it seemed as though this man could almost talk with God, and when he thought through the problems of this ward, he thought them through for the sole purpose of rendering the most good to those concerned. During that period of time I absorbed good inspiration from that association, and I think I made but little contribution, and I felt that way at the time because of the greatness of the men with whom I associated. If you people want to really appreciate these men, wander as I have wandered, and labor under noble characters. I think no one can place a grudge against Bishop Taylor. At all times he has had the thoughts of other people at heart, and whenever he has taken responsibility, he has rendered that responsibility to the best of his ability, for his has truly been a life of service to the world. And could we see him today in the raiment of glory, and I am simple enough to believe sincerely, my brothers and sisters, that there is such a raiment, we would see him with those whom he has served and those whom he has loved, rendering perhaps a greater service than he ever rendered here. Edwin Markham at one time said, “There is a destiny which makes us, but none go this way alone. What ere we send the light of others, comes back into our own.” If those words are true, and I believe they are, Bishop Will Taylor today is enjoying the mansion that I think very few people can enjoy, because of his desire to serve and to help and to lend aid, his intentions were always to do good and to be good, and he has been that. I think perhaps he sacrificed himself in service, but he enjoyed doing it. He was happy in it, and I know he will be blessed because of it, but, brothers and sisters, that temporal service now is over, but his good will last beyond this period of time. As we think of him when we think beyond his life and realize what he has done and what he has meant to us, the fruits of his labor will live while all those who ever knew him live because of the honor we have for him. His mission is not filled upon earth. Nor will it be while his memory endures. Though the shades of mortality have dropped, the windows of heaven have opened to receive his soul. He has gone the way of the world to enjoy his blessings, and I am sure those of us here would wish for his well being there, and out of his memory in the thoughts of this meeting, we shall deem much and be made better in this final sacrifice. Brother Jepperson said, “It is better to enter the house of mourning than a house of feasting." Someone put that thought in poetry and said, “I walked a mile with pleasure, She chatted all the away, but left me none the wiser for all she had to say. I walked a mile with sorrow, she had no a word to say, but left me all the wiser, for what she didn’t say.” This is beautifully expressed, and I think, with Brother Jepperson, that perhaps out of these services we do gain more than at any other religious service, because of the thinking and reasoning and evaluating which we do as we silently think through the life and experiences of our friend which we have had with them. Where we do appreciate that word of appreciation, where we do show that we sympathize and out of the day we may get that blessing at least. It was said by Paul the Apostle in paying a tribute to King David after David died having served his generation. He couldn’t think of any greater compliment or tribute to the great King David than to say that he had served his generation. If I were called upon to summarize that has been said here today, I would gather from it that William W. Taylor had served faithfully his generation. That would be the greatest tribute we could pay to him. I thought of the fine things he had done, and I looked down before me and I saw this splendid family of Brother Taylor and Sister Taylor. What is more beautiful than a beautiful family of intelligent, clean, God-fearing children, and we have it in this family as you all know. It is one of the fortunate things coming out of an unfortunate thing to have such capable young men and women as we have in this family. Brother Weldon and Virginia; it seems that while providence has taken the father and mother away, it has left someone to partially fill the gap in this home. These two can carry on and provide the kind of kindness and training and inspiration for these younger brothers and this sister. This family has courage. I am not going to talk long, out of consideration for those who have stood throughout this service, but I want to mention this. This family’s courage to me has been one of the most inspiring and beautiful things that have entered into my life. I recall about this time three years ago when we paid our last tributes to Sister Nora Taylor. I recall the time when they sent Paul to a mission in Australia. Sister Taylor was ill at the time, and yet when the opportunity came—the call came for that boy to answer—to carry the glad message of the gospel to those in Australia--she willingly consented that he go, and the father too, knowing of her condition far more, probably than she did, and knowing that probably that boy would never be able to return to see her, sent him out with a smile on their lips and a “God bless you.” You know the sequel. You know that the mother passed on before the boy’s return, but to that entire family, I can say that it shows courage, and a faith that I am sure our Heavenly Father will reward when rewards are given for faithful service on this earth, and it has been faithful, and I am sure it will be to all of these communities an example of splendid faith in God and in His service. I may close what I have said by repeating again the words I used in the beginning, “And William W. Taylor died, having served faithfully and floriously, unselfishly his generation.” God bless his family. Help them to keep the great heritage he has left. As long as they keep the memory and love of this father and mother with them, the father and mother will not be dead, and to them they will always be reminded of this splendid life. I pray God will help us to understand. These deaths have come with a great rapidity here. It should be a constant reminder to us that we have not a lease on life, that the time is short and that we have indeed a very important mission here to serve, and should remind us that we should be going about the business of this life. God help us to realize it, I pray in Jesus’ name, amen. Remarks be Irwin G. Bunnell: Brothers and sisters, I believe we have talked long enough today. However, being a member of the bishopric, I would just like to say a few words of appreciation of Uncle Will’s acquaintanceship while I have been in the bishopric. We asked him to work first on the Finance Committee. When we remodeled our chapel, he accepted that call and worked very diligently. Many nights we met with the Finance Committee and he went over the problems which confronted us. At all times, Uncle Will had an answer to every problem. It seemed as though he understood what the ward needed, what the people needed. He understood the people’s conditions and he knew just exactly what was confronting all of us. We deeply appreciate his work in the Finance Committee, and also in the genealogical work of the ward. He has served very well. He has done his part. If anyone ever accepted a task, which they were set out to do, Uncle Will was always the first one to come and shake hands and congratulate this person, and also give a word of encouragement to continue on with this good work. I owe Uncle Will a great deal personally because I feel that he has been responsible for myself being called upon a mission. I remember very well when he came and asked me if I would go. The look he had upon his face and the words he spoke, I don’t see how anyone could have turned him down. I think much good has been said—in fact, I don’t see how speakers today could have made things more plain to you –of the conditions and of the loveliness of this family. We appreciate having them with us, and having had them in service for so many years. May God bless them. May He help them in all their righteous endeavors in the future, I humbly pray in the name of Jesus, Amen. I wish to take this opportunity to thank all those who have furnished the beautiful floral offerings and who have in any way rendered service in these services. Choir sang—“Oh My Father.” Benediction given by P.W. Madsen: Our Father which art in Heaven, we present ourselves before thee at the close of these services with thankfulness in our hearts for the beautiful music that we have listened to, and for the words of comfort, the counsel and advice that has been given unto us. But above all, do we wish to thank thee, Father, for the privilege we have had of associating with one of your noble servants whom thou has called home, one whose counsel and advice we so much appreciated, one whose love we will always remember. In a few moments we shall leave this building and we shall journey to the cemetery, and there we shall deposit in the open grave, all that remains of the mortal of this beloved brother. We humbly pray, Father, that thou will go with us in our journey, that no harm shall befall us, that no accident shall come to us on the highway, and return us to our homes in safety, and thy spirit will guide and direct us at all times so that when our time comes, it can be said of us, we have lived our life faithfully to the end. And we pray thee, to bless this family in as much as they are deprived of father and mother, and in the hours of trial and darkness, thy spirit shall guide them and the spirit of their father shall help them in the journey of life and help us as their neighbors and friends that when they come to us, we may put our arms around them and help them to keep their feet on the straight and narrow path. Dismiss us now with thy blessings that we may ever live worthy lives out of inspiration, we ask in the name of Jesus, Amen.

Life timeline of William I Taylor

William I Taylor was born on 9 Dec 1883
William I Taylor was 15 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
William I Taylor was 20 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
William I Taylor was 31 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
William I Taylor was 44 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
William I Taylor died on 24 Nov 1938 at the age of 54
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for William I Taylor (9 Dec 1883 - 24 Nov 1938), BillionGraves Record 10922 Clarksburg, Ross, Ohio, United States

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