Wellington Wood

29 Dec 1873 - 26 Feb 1944

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Wellington Wood

29 Dec 1873 - 26 Feb 1944
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Wellington Wood (Pioneer) Came to Utah in 1850 Written by Lillian C. Harris Grand Daughter of Camp Windsor of Daughters of Utah Pioneers of Utah County Orem, Utah Wellington Wood was the only child of Daniel and Sarah Sweet Wood. His father was a twin, born 27 June 1788 in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. He
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Life Information

Wellington Wood

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Died:

Spanish Fork City Cemetery

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Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah
United States
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SouthPawPhilly

July 17, 2011
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July 17, 2011

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Wellington Wood Jr.

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

Wellington Wood (Pioneer) Came to Utah in 1850 Written by Lillian C. Harris Grand Daughter of Camp Windsor of Daughters of Utah Pioneers of Utah County Orem, Utah Wellington Wood was the only child of Daniel and Sarah Sweet Wood. His father was a twin, born 27 June 1788 in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. He did farming there, and after his first marriage, moved first to Niagra County, New York, then later to Royal Oak, Oakland County, Michigan. In 1834, his first wife died, and he married the widow of Zenos Warren. She was Sarah Sweet Warren. In Royal Oak Michigan, Wellington Wood, was born to Daniel and Sarah Sweet Wood. He was named after Daniel Wood’s first wife, Abbie Wellington, because he was born on her birthday August 17, in 1841. When Wellington Wood was very young, he gathered hazel nuts where they grew wild. He drove cows to and from the pasture and did what he could to help his father. He could remember in his later years a few of these boyhood days in Michigan, although they moved away from there before he was very old. Wellington’s parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and endured many hardships for the sake of their religion. In the early days, when flour was scarce, they shared it with others just as long as they had any. Wellington Wood, and his parents came to Utah in 1850. They settled in Springville, and about three years later, moved to Spanish Fork. The father was getting old, and when Wellington was fourteen years old, he assumed the responsibility of earning a living for the family. Like some of his ancestors, he became a farmer and stock raiser. Wellington Wood drove a team and wagon back and forth across the plains, to assist others who were crossing and who needed help in making the long journey to Utah. He also took part in protecting the lives and the property of the Latter Day Saints during the Black-Hawk War when the Indians were so bad. Wellington’s mother died 4 July 1863, and was buried in Springville. His father married a Mrs. Whitemore, who was a great help to him when his eyes failed him in his later years. Wellington, built a new four room house for his father and his step-mother, but she told him that she would never live long enough to move into it. She told Wellington, to find a wife to live in it with him. Her words proved true, for she died when the house was nearly finished. Wellington Wood married Susannah Warner 10 July 1871 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake. She was the daughter of William and Mary Reynolds Warner. They had nine children, but only five of them lived to have families. Wellington, was among the first beet raisers who cultivated them with a push hoe and who used a four inch hoe for blocking the beets before thinning them. He was a hard worker who stayed at work from dawn until late in the evening. He had one of the old time horse power threshing machines and many men came to him to try and find work. He helped them by allowing them to go along with the threshing machine to the farms, then most of the farmers were willing to hire them to help with the threshing. Wellington, did this work for widows who were in need, without charging them for it. He also looked ahead for his family. Before winter came each year, he had a supply of meat, flour, beans, potatoes and vegetables; so that he wouldn’t need to worry about his family going hungry. Wellington Wood married Mary Elizabeth Warner, a sister of his first wife, on Feb. 4, 1873. They had five children four of them living to raise families. Altogether Wellington had three sons and six daughters that lived to maturity. Five of them died when very young. Those who lived to maturity were Wellington, Morris, Amos, Sophronia, Nora, Mary, Violet, Geneva, and Abbie. The three sons all filled L. D. S. missions, and all the children were very fine people. Their father and mother taught them to be honest and truthful, never to speak about others unless they had something good to say, to help those in need, never to get in the habit of borrowing, and to always keep a promise when it was made, or else make it right in some way. Many of these teachings have been handed down to his grandchildren and great grand children. There are some fine people among them. Wellington Wood was among the few who lived the second great commandment, “Love they neighbor as thyself.” He went about doing good; and few people knew about these deeds besides those whom he was helping, for he was rather quiet and didn’t brag about anything he did. There was a widow who had to work hard, and who had to carry her water for a half mile every time that she needed some. Wellington, drove an artesian well for her, so she could have some water close by. In December 1905, Wellington, was at the Spanish Fork Foundry. When he was coming down a flight of stairs, he stepped on a rock which threw him off balance and he fell. One of his knee caps was displaced, and as he tried to stand up, he broke the other one. From this time on, he was a cripple and had to stay in a wheel chair. He felt badly about being a care for his wife, and was more determined than ever to work as much as he could; so he carried wood and coal into the house by using his chair in the best way. He kept a supply of water handy, from the old fashioned well, and he made trips to town almost every day. This cheered him up, because he had many friends every where. They visited him at his home very often, too. He was good to the Indians and feed them, and became their friend. Indians used to come to town just to go and see him. He loved to hear good music; he played the violin and loved to hear others play violin solos. He gave his violin to his son, Morris, who played it at dances all over Utah County. Wellington Wood, became ill with pneumonia, with a high fever. He was so ambitious that he kept wanting to get up and get the coal and wood. When he died, on the 24th of March 1920, he had his foot outside of the bed covers - he and wanted to get up to do his work. At his funeral services, a tribute was paid to him by a friend and neighbor, Enoch Ludlow. He told how Wellington Wood, lived his religion every day of his life, instead of just preaching about it. He said that he and Wellington, were working on an irrigation ditch, one time and he mentioned the fact that they were short of flour, and that he didn’t know how they were going to get along until they harvested wheat again. The next morning, very early, Wellington Wood sacked up some wheat, and told Enoch Ludlow to take it to the mill and get some flour for his family. We’ve hear many other instances about the goodness of our grandfather, Wellington Wood.. From the Spanish Fork Press March 25, 1920 WELLINGTON WOOD DIES VERY SUDDENLY Wellington Wood died at his home in Second ward yesterday afternoon of acute pneumonia, after an illness of only a few days. He was born August 17th , 1841 in Royal Oak, Oakland County, Michigan. He was the son of Daniel and Sarah Wood, and is the father of fourteen children and 49 grandchildren. Surviving him are his wife, Mary Elizabeth Wood, and the following sons and daughters: Wellington Wood Jr., J. Morris Wood, Amos Wood, Mrs. Mayland Carter, Mrs. Charles Stewart Jr., and Mrs. William Huff of Spanish Fork; Mrs. E. B. Nelson of Vale, Oregon, and Mrs. Waylond Wightman of Payson. When the deceased was but a small boy his father and mother joined the church and moved westward. They settled first in Springville and aided in the construction of a fort for protection against hostile Indians. A few years later they moved to Spanish Fork and Mr. Wood has since made this his home. He stood guard on several occasions at the old fort, and was a member of the party who found the body of Mr. Edmunds who was killed by the Indians in the battle of Diamond Fork. Wellington Wood was not a man who took an active part in the social activities, but it can truly be said of him that he was a kind and loving father, who gave splendid counsel to his children. He goes to his rest with the splendid reputation that through his life he has endeavored to live according to the Golden Rule of the Master, "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Funeral services will be held at the Second ward meetinghouse Saturday at 2 p.m. The Spanish Fork Press Document Number: 153 Institution: Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University Call Number: Microfilm Sp24 Classification: ORIGINAL: Newspaper Location: USA, Utah, Utah, Spanish Fork Date Range: BTWN 1900 and 2003 Microfilm Reel #7 Life of Wellington Wood Sr. By Nora W. Carter Wellington Wood was from a pioneer family. His grandparents, John and Sarah Thurston Wood came from Massachusetts to Jaffrey, New Hampshire as pioneers. All the streams and ponds contained fish. Wild animals roamed among the trees. Wild fruits were found, such as blackberry, raspberry, checkerberry, blueberry and huckleberry. Land had to be cleared of forests; rye was raised at first; afterwards, clover or herdgrass, and later corn. When the ground was in a better condition; barley, wheat, oats and potatoes were raised, and finally flax for the manufacturing of cloth. Cattle were raised and were driven 62 miles to Boston, the nearest market. The farmers hauled pork, poultry, butter and cheese to Boston and brought back salt, sugar and other necessities. Daniel Wood, the father of Wellington Wood, was born in Jaffrey, New Hampshire, 27 June 1788. He was a twin and was a tiny infant, but grew to be a large man. He lived in Jaffrey until after his marriage. He married a neighbor, Abby Wellington, daughter of Enoch Wellington and Sarah Richardson. They were married in 1813 and had seven children, two boys and five girls. The moved to New York State, living in Niagara County, where all, except the last tow children were born. The last two were born in Royal Oak, Michigan, where the family moved about 1824. Abby Wellington, Wood died 8 December 1834, and Daniel was left without a companion. He was a farmer and stock raiser and was also a soldier in the War of 1812, for which he received a pension for his service in that war. The mother of Wellington Wood was Sarah Sweet, daughter of Amos and Dorcas Sweet. She was born 13 January 1799 in Hoosick, Rensselaer, New York. Her parents were pioneers of New York. She grew to womanhood in New York State. She was a small woman with dark hair and dark brown eyes. She met Zenos C. Warren, a pioneer of New Jersey, and later became his wife. They had five children, four boys and the last a girl. The family of Zenos C. And Sarah Sweet Warren moved to Oakland County Michigan, where he died 4 March 1836. They had both lost their companions and a friendship was formed which resulted in thier marriage, 2 April 1837, in Oakland County, Michigan. Daniel and Sara Sweet Warren Wood had only one child, Wellington Wood, born 17 August 1841, Royal Oak, Oakland County, Michigan. He probably received his name from his fathers first wife, Abby Wellington as she was also born in August. After their pioneer life in Michigan, Daniel and Sarah Wood joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints, and endured the hardships, which followed the Saints on their journey from place to place until they crossed the plains and found a home of peace and rest in the Rocky Mountains. Wellington Wood could well remember his childhood days. He gathered hazelnuts where they grew wild. He also drove the cows to and from the places where they grazed and did what he could to help his parents. He had to endure many hardships and was only nine years old when he crossed the plains. The children of Abby Wellington Wood remained in Michigan; but the time had come for Daniel and Sarah Wood and their son Wellington, also four children of her first marriage-Charles Wesley Warren, William James Warren, Amos Sweet Warren and Mary D. Warren to join the companies crossing the plains. They crossed the plains in the Aaron Johnson Company. Aaron Johnson was captain of the company of 150 wagons crossing the plains. They left Kanesville, Iowa, on June 12, 1850 and arrived in Salt Lake, September 12th. When they arrived in Salt Lake, Aaron Johnson was met by William Miller, his son-in-law, who told him of Hobble Creek which he had seen. Not being satisfied to lead the company there without first seeing it, Aaron Johnson rode fifty more miles down to what is now Springville. He was delighted with the prospects the new site offered, and returned and asked permission of Brigham Young to settle there. Eight families of the weary travelers then moved on ‘till they came to the place chosen by their leader for their future home. They reached Springville, 18 September 1850. The long journey was ended. The next day, they sharpened scythes and cut tons of wild hay form the meadow around them. Axes were sharpened and wagons repaired to prepare to go to the hills for logs to build their homes. The mothers and children began picking wild berries. Bushels of ground cherries, choke cherries and service berries were dried. By December of the same year logs had been cut and the “Old Fort” was built in a square with six cabins on each side and only one gateway. The roofs were covered with clay. Aaron Johnson was bishop and director in civil affairs for 20 years. Wellington Wood was baptized in Springville, 30 Mary 1851. His parents were re-baptized the same date. All the family settled in Springville, but all, except Amos Sweet Warren and Mary D. Warren moved to Spanish Fork, Later. Wellington Wood’s father was getting old and when he was fourteen years of age, he ahd to assume the responsibility of earning a living for the family. Like some of his ancestors, he also became a farmer and stock raiser. At first, they lived southeast of Spanish Fork in what is known as the “bottoms”, later at Spanish Fork in and adobe house. After coming to Utah, Wellington Wood drove a team across the plains to assist others in making the journey to Utah. When the Indians were hostile, he took part in protecting the property and families of the Saints during the Black Hawk War. Wellington’s mother died 4 July 1863 and was buried in Springville. Daniel Wood later married a Mrs. Whittemore, who also preceded him in death. Wellington’s father, Daniel Wood lived to be ninety years old, and died 12 October 1878. He was blind the last six years or more of his life. While his father’s last wife was living, Wellington built a four room frame house for her, but she told him she would never live to move in it. Her words proved true, for she died when the house was nearly finished. Wellington Wood married Susannah Warner, 10 July, 1871, in the Endowment House. She was the daughter of William and Mary Reynolds Warner. Nine children were born to them, five living to have families. The 4th of February 1874, he married in the Endowment House, Mary Elizabeth Warner, a sister of Susannah. By this marriage, he became the father of five children, four living to have families. His ten living children were Wellington, Morris, Amos, Sophronia, Nora, Mary Violet, Geneva and Abbie. His three sons filled missions for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints. Wellington Wood was among the few who lived the second great commandment, “Love thye neighbor as they self.” He went about doing good for few, besides the ones he helped, knew anything about it. At the funeral of Wellington Wood a tribute was paid him by a friend and neighbor, Enock Ludlow. In substance he said, “Wellington Wood was a man who did not preach religion, but lived it in his every day life.” He told of the hardships he endured in coming form England and trying to get a start in a new country, with a large family to keep. He said, on year while with others, cleaning an irrigation ditch, he got to telling Wellington Wood what a hard time he was having and happened to say he did not know how he was going to keep his family in flour until harvest time. Wellington Wood said nothing, but next morning at five o’clock he sacked up some wheat and called to Enoch to come and go to the mill and get some flour and he could lpay the wheat back in the fall. This was only one of the many acts of kindness, he did for his neighbors. Another neighbor, a widow, was trying to support herself and family. She worked hard, and besides the work, she had to carry the water to use in cooking and cleaning, half a mile, as that was the nearest well. Wellington told her if she would buy the piping, he would see that she had a well. She did get the piping and he drove an artesian well for her, paying the ones who helped him out of his own pocket. Wellington Wood had one of the old time horse power threshing machines and many came to him for work. He did the best he could for them by letting them follow the machine, and asking the farmers to give them work. He took no toll from widows who were in need. An aged Negro and wife who lived in Spanish Fork used to come to him for meat and potatoes. When he had more potatoes than he needed; he would tell those how needed aid to come and help themselves. He was always kind to the Indians and never turned them away without feeding them. He was among the first beet raisers; when farmers used push-hoes to cultivate them, and a four-inch hoe to cut out the beets for thinning. Wellington Wood raised hay and decided to try dairy cows. He bought some good cows and a separator. He also had a large butter worker made to mix the butter, ready for pressing into pounds for the market. At one time, he made most of the butter sold at the Oran Lewis Store. Where the butter was sold, he requested that it be kept away from onions and vegetables that might cause the butter to be tainted. He was quite satisfied with his dairy and was successful in selling butter instead of taking the milk to the creamery. Wellington Wood worked from early morn until late in the evening. Each fall found him with his winters wood and flour, potatoes, beans, meat and vegetables. He believed in looking out for a rainy day. In December 1905, Wellington wood was at the Spanish Fork Foundry. While descending the stairs, he tripped on a pebble which cause him to fall, displacing his knee-caps, and from this time on he was a cripple and had to go in a wheel chair. Although a cripple, he carried wood, coal and water on his chair; chopped wood, made trips to town built fires, and did many other things to pass the time away and keep himself cheerful. He taught his children to be honest and truthful, never speak of others unless you have something good to say, help those in need, never get in the habit of borrowing and never make a promise unless you think you can keep it. If for any reason you cannot keep a promise send word to the one expecting you and make an explanation. An honest is never outlawed. He loved good music, especially violin solos. He was honest, truthful, kind, and generous, and was well known and respected in the community where he lived. He died of pneumonia, 24 March 1920, after a very short illness. He is buried in the Spanish Fork City Cemetery.

Wellington Wood Jr.

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

History of Wellington Wood Jr. Wellington Wood Jr., the oldest boy of a large family, was born 29 Dec. 1873, to Wellington Wood Sr. and Susannah Warner. Wellington, was taught the Gospel from infancy, prayer being the foundation of the home of his good family. Honesty, tolerance unselfishness, along with love and compassion for his fellow men were emphasized. Wellington, spent his childhood days much the same as other boys. He was taught that early to bed and early to rise was essential, if one was to be a successful farmer, and he put this into practice every morning, as he helped his farther on the farm. Wellington, spent his childhood in Leland, but as school time came, the children would go up town and stay with Uncle Jim Warner’s, family during the week and return home for the weekend. Wellington studied hard and gained a good common education for those days. Grandpa Wood encouraged his boys to stay at home to work and told them if they would do so, he would give each of them 10 acres of ground and a team of horses. The land was situated in Leland, at the time, but later it was traded for land in the river bottoms. As a young man, Wellington, courted Elizabeth Lavina Ferris, who lived with step parents Alphus Bingham and wife. Wellington courted Elizabeth for over two years, and then one night when they were alone, he asked her to marry him, but she avoided giving an answer at that time. Wellington, went home feeling very unhappy and as he kneeled by his bed to pray that night, he asked God to touch her heart, that she would accept his proposal, as he loved her very much. A few nights later he went back to see her, Elizabeth, met him at the door and told him that she loved him and would marry him. Elizabeth Lavina Ferris and Wellington Wood Jr. spoke vows in a very humble and impressive ceremony performed 23 November 1898 in the Salt Lake Temple. Later they had a wedding dinner and Wellington, furnished the turkeys, a barrel of pickles and 100 lbs. of sugar. Aunt Nora Carter made their wedding cake. Shortly after their marriage. Wellington, and his bride moved into a two room house out in the river bottoms. Wellington, spent long hours working hard to buy more land so he could provide for he and his wife. In 1905 Grandfather Wood met with an accident resulting in his having to spend the rest of his life in a wheelchair. Wellington, did all the farming for both he and Grandfather on a crop share basis. In addition to the land, they had a herd of range cattle and milked 10 to 14 head of cows. They had a milk house where they run the milk through a separator and made butter from the cream. They sold the butter at Orem Lewis Store, and there were always many orders for their butter. Wellington, always lived closed to God, and because of this he seemed to be inspired to sense danger among other things. Alonzo Warren, told that one time they were hauling hay and they were returning to the barn with a load, and Uncle Morris, who was a young fellow at the time, happened to be lying on the back part of the load. As they approached a ditch half full of water, Wellington, told Morris, to move to the front but he didn’t do so. As they were part way across the bridge, the load slid, Uncle Morris, went into the ditch with part of the load of hay on top of him. Wellington, pushed his foot down in the hay and felt Uncle Morris, he quickly pulled him out, or he would have drowned. This very keen sense of danger prevented several accidents from happening through out his life. Wellington and Elizabeth were blessed with five children: Merril, Mary, Willis, Syrenus, and La Verne. These five devoted children were taught the Gospel and the same virtues that their parents were taught. In April, 1906, the Bishop called Wellington, to go on a mission for the church at the time his family of five children were sick with whooping cough and chicken pox and because of this he did not like to leave mother to care for them alone, but she told him “If the Bishop wants you to go, do as he advises, you.” Wellington told the Bishop of their situation and the bishop said, “Brother Wood, you have your call and I believe you had better go and I promise you that your family will be taken care of.” At that time the missionaries had to travel with out purse or script and when he left he had $600.00 in the bank, his mission cost $600.00. So he returned out of debt. He had many wonderful experiences and also many trials and tribulations. Most everywhere he went in his diary he tells of him hiking 25 miles and holding street meeting at night. He had many wonderful companions, one of them being LeRoy Koyle Sr. of Spanish Fork. Everywhere they went the people called Roy, his little boy. After he left for his mission his family moved to Benjamin, and stayed with the Alf Bingham family for the summer. When fall came, they moved to Spanish Fork, and remained with old Aunt Ann Wilson until he came home in 1908. The family got along fine during this time, always having plenty to eat and wear and having very little sickness. After returning home Wellington was called to fill a home mission in Payson, and his companion was Uncle John Warner. After going on these two missions, he always had a soft spot in his heart for missionaries and always contributed to missionary funds. In 1928 he was in the 19th quorum of Seventies, composed of 11 members from the 1st and 2nd wards. Wellington and Elizabeth were blessed with four more children: Anne, Vernal, and twins Ferris and Ferrin. Wellington was always busy doing many things. He was ditch rider for the High Line Cane 1 Co. and Water Master for the South East Irrigation Co. for many years. He believed in giving each one his fair share of water. He had a blacksmith shop somewhere he repaired his farm machinery and the farmers from all around would come with broken plows, harrows, and wagons. Wellington would always lend a helping hand. Wellington also had the art of shoeing horses. At the time he bought a circle saw and sawed the lumber for his barns and sheds and did sawing for the neighbors. He also bought a threshing machine and besides threshing his own, he would thresh for others. He believed in sharing what he had with his fellow man. Many times he gave flour, potatoes, vegetables, and meat to many who were in need. He trusted everyone who he had doings with and whenever he had the occasion to sell something, frequently the person buying could not provide cash right at the time. But, because of his trust for mankind he did not require the signing of an agreement. He always took the man’s word. He was always thoughtful toward his family. On Mother’s day he and Mother would get each daughter and daughter-in-law a potted plant and even after mother died, he still got plants for all. Everyone who ever came by at meal time were warmly invited to eat with us. It was always a joy to him to have company. Wellington, was a cheerful humorous man always trying to make life happy for them around him. He was honest in his dealings and believed a man should be as good as his word. At his funeral service, Albert Gwenson was the main speaker. He told of the wonderful life Wellington Wood, had lived and said that there was a poem that could express his life better than he could. The house by the side of the road. The House By the Side of the Road by Sam Walter Ross There are hermit souls that live withdrawn in the place of their self content; There are souls like stars that dwell, apart in a fellowless firmament; There are pioneer souls that blaze their paths where highways never ran; But let me live by the side of the road, and be a friend to man. Let me live in the house by the side of the road, where the race of man go by; The men who are good and the men who are bad, as good and as bad as I. I would not sit in the scorners’s seat or hurl at cynics ban; Let me live in the house by the side of the road and be a friend to man. I see from my house by the side of the road, by the side of the highway of life. The men who press with order and hope, the men who are faint with the strife. But I turn not away from their smiles nor their tears, both part of an infinite plan. Let me live in the house by the side of the road and be a friend to man. I know there are brook gladdened meadows ahead and mountains of wear some height; But the road passes on through the long afternoon, and stretches away to the night. But still I rejoice, when the strangers rejoice, and weep with the strangers that moon, Nor live in my house by the side of the road like a man who dwells alone. Let me live in my house by the side of the road where the race of man go by. They are good, they are bad, they are weak, they are strong, they are wise, they are foolish–so am I. Then why should I sit in the scorners’s seat or hurl the cynics ban. Let me live in my house by the side of the road and be a friend to man. Story of Wellington Wood Jr. By Jean Warren Wellington Wood Jr. was born 29 Dec 1873 to Wellington Wood Sr. and Susannah Warner. He was a good boy and a hard worker. He was the oldest boy of a large family. He was taught to pray and to be unselfish. He was also taught to help those around who were in need. He farmed with grandfather before his marriage, and when his father met with an accident and had to spend the rest of his life in awheel chair he did all the farming on a corp share. They also had a herd of range cattle and milked form 10 to 14 milk cows. Grandfather said if Wellington would stay with him he would give him a team of horses and 10 acres of ground. The ground was in Leland and was later traded for land in the river bottoms. Wellington had a good common education for those days. He was a good honest young man and on the 23 Nov 1898 he married Elizabeth Lavinia Ferris in the Salt Lake Temple. Merrill Wellington was the first child born to them the 3 Sept 1899. Then Mary born 10 Nov 1900 Willis born 13 June 1902 Syrenus born 19 Mar 1904 LaVern born 23 Nov 1905. She was the baby when her father was called on a mission to Colorado, for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He left in May 1906. His family of 5 children were all sick at the time, with chicken pox and whooping cough. He hated to leave them and went to the Bishop. The Bishop said, “Brother Wood you have your call and I believe you better go.” At that time the missionaries had to travel without purse or script. Roy Koyle was one of his missionary companions. Everyone called him his little boy. They had many interesting experiences. His family lived in the Spanish Fork River Bottoms, but when he went on his missions, they moved to Benjamin for the Summer Living with the Alph Bingham family. Then in Spanish Fork until he came home in Nov 1908. When He left he had $600.00 in the bank. His mission cost $600.00 so he returned out of debt. He also filled a home in Payson. His companion was Uncle John Warner. He was a ditch rider for the Highland Canal company and Water Master for the Spanish Fork South East Irrigation Company for years. He believed in giving every man his fair share of water. He also ran a threshing machine going out thrashing for others. In 1928 he was in the 19th Quorum of Seventies. There were 11 men in the First and Second Wards. He always donated to the missionary fund. Wellington Wood and his wife Elizabeth were blessed with four more children. Ann born 13 Jan 1910 Vernal born 10 Nov 1911 Then last but not least twin boys Ferrin and Ferris born 25 Aug 1916 Every Mother’s Day he and grandma would get their daughters and daughters in laws a potted plant and even after grandma died he still got plants for all. Wellington Wood was a good honest man and was loved by his children, grandchildren, neighbors, and friends. He died 26 Feb 1944.

A History of Wellington Wood, Jr.

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 9 months ago Updated: 9 months ago

Wellington Wood Jr. was born 29 December, 1873, in Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah. He was the first boy born to his parents Wellington and Susannah Warner Wood. Wellington’s parents were both members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and it was in this church where Wellington was blessed on 5 March, 1874. A month before this event his father had entered the order of polygamy by marrying Mary Elizabeth Warner, the sister of Susannah, his wife. Wellington’s family lived in Leland. His childhood was similar to other children of the area. He was expected to rise early, work hard, and obey gospel principles. His father was a farmer and cattle rancher. He expected his children to learn and enjoy this hard work. When it was time for Wellington to go to school in town, he took up residence with his Uncle Jim. All week he would study hard and live with Uncle Jim. On weekends he wouldreturn home. Wellington studied hard and received a good common education. When Wellington was nine years old, he was baptized in Spanish Fork Creek. Wellington’s father loved his family and encouraged them to stay close by, as they grew up. If they wanted work there was a great deal at home, so as they grew up he promised them ten acres of ground and a team of horses, if they would stay home. As a young man, Wellington courted Elizabeth Lavina Ferris. She was living with the Alpheus Bingham family. They courted for more than two years. One night when they were alone, he asked her to marry him, she avoided giving an answer at the time because he had not told her he loved her. Wellington, went home feeling very unhappy and when he knelt to pray that night, he asked God to touch her heart so that she would accept his proposal, because he loved her very much. A few nights later, he went to see her. She met him at the door and told him that she loved him and would marry him. They were married in the Salt Lake City Temple, 23 November, 1898. Later they had a wedding dinner. Wellington furnished the turkeys, a barrel of pickles and 100 lbs. of sugar and Aunt Nora made their wedding cake. Shortly after their marriage, Wellington and his bride moved into a two-room house out in the river bottoms. Wellington spent long hours working hard to buy more land so he could provide for his family. Wellington and Elizabeth were quickly blessed with five children: Merrill Wellington, Mary Susannah, Willis, Syrenus, and LaVerne. These five devoted children were taught the Gospel and the same virtues that their parents had been taught. The family lived so far out that the children had to go long distances to get to school. They would go in a wagon, on horse back, or by foot to get there. Wellington taught his children to ride horses as soon as they could sit up. In 1905 his father met with an accident resulting in his having to spend the rest of his life in a wheelchair. Wellington did all the farming for both households on a crop share basis. In addition to the land, they had a herd of range cattle and milked 10 to 14 head of cows. They had a milk house where they ran the milk through a separator and made butter from the cream. They sold the butter at Orem Lewis Store and there were always many orders for their butter. Wellington always lived closed to God and because of this he seemed to be inspired to sense danger among other things. Alonzo Warren told that one time they were hauling hay and as they were returning to the barn with a load, Uncle Morris, who was a young fellow at the time, happened to be lying on the back part of the load. As they approached a ditch half full of water, Wellington told Morris to move to the front but he didn’t do so. As they were part way across the bridge, the load slid, Uncle Morris went into the ditch with part of the load of hay on top of him. Wellington pushed his foot down in the hay and felt Uncle Morris, he quickly pulled him out, or he would have drowned. This very keen sense of danger prevented several accidents from happening throughout his life. In April 1906, the Bishop called Wellington to go on a mission for the church, at the time his family of five children was sick with whooping cough and chicken pox and because of this he did not like to leave Elizabeth to care for them alone, but she told him “If the Bishop wants you to go, do as he advises, you.” Wellington told the Bishop of their situation and the bishop said, “Brother Wood, you have your call and I believe you had better go and I promise you that your family will be taken care of.” At that time the missionaries had to travel without purse or script and when he left he had $600.00 in the bank, his mission cost $600.00. So he returned out of debt. (There is a journal that Wellington kept, Cathie Owens has a copy of it.) He had many wonderful experiences and also many trials and tribulations. In his diary, he tells of hiking 25 miles and holding street meetings at night. One story he told was, that one night when he and his companion had finished their work for the day, they stopped at what they thought was a member’s home for supper and a place to stay, but the member had left the church. He told them if they would hike over the mountain they would find someone to help them. They walked all night in snow drifts up to their hips, before arriving at the house. He had many wonderful companions, one of them being LeRoy Koyle Sr. of Spanish Fork, everywhere they went, the people called Roy his little boy. After he left for his mission his family moved to Benjamin and stayed with the Alf Bingham family for the summer. When fall came, they moved to Spanish Fork and remained with old Aunt Ann Wilson until he came home in 1908. The family got along fine during this time, always having plenty to eat and wear and having very little sickness. Wellington wrote home when he could. The following is a letter from him to his sister and family. Aspen July 17, 1907 Mr. and Mrs. Maylon Carter Dear Brother and Sister I now try and answer your kind and welcome letter I received some time ago. The folks told me you had come back from Castle Gates and were well. I am thankful to hear of your all being well for that is a great comfort to me for as long as we are well and trying to do what is right we have nothing to worry about. I am well and enjoying my work. You see that I have been moved since you wrote to me before and I have a nice place to spend the summer for I am up in the mountains to a mining camp. It seems as though I have been favored in that respect if they only leave me here for about another month and I think they will. We have quite nice people to work among as good as we could get that are not of the church but they are not very anxious for our religion but they are not afraid to read our booke or talk to us and they most all treat us nice. If I could always have them as nice to work among I would not care for whare it is hard to get to talk to them that is where it is the most tiresome. I guess you had a nice time on the fourth or at least I hope you did. We spent our time at the room there wasn’t much going on here they pretended to celebrate but that was about all it amounted to. The Day goes had the most of the celebration here. Their town paper was giving the people a raking over for letting them out do American citizens. I think you must have hot weather down there now it was a little warm here for about a week but we had some nice showers and has been nice since. It hasn’t been long since I see a little frost on the lettuce in the morning but not enough to hurt any thing. I am pleased to hear of Mr. Huff’s coal mine turning out all right for he needs something for he is getting to old to do much work and has a family to keep. Did you see John Huff while you was up there? How is he getting along. I guess he is quite a man by now. Wellington Wood Jr. pg 4 Did you get out to see Mrs. Morrison when you were out that way they told me you was intending to go. I think she would be pleased to see you I know she was me when I went outthere that time to shear sheep. It was night when I passed through there on my way out here and I was asleep and did not know when I passed through. I would like to go through there in the day when I go back again if I can. It seems as though Mrs. Morrison has always had a hard time but she has tried to be faithful under it all and if she can continue she will sure be blessed and have her reward laid up in Heaven that she can enjoy when she completes her labor here. If Uncle Jim would get her and do as she wanted him to he would be a good deal better off and much happier for when any one tryes to do what is right it always brings joy.You must write when you can I like to hear from you if I am careless in getting them answered and must ask you to excuse me for not writing sooner. Have you went back to take care of Charl’s children since you went back? Who took care of them when you was away? I always feel sorry for the poor little fellows when ever I think of them for they always say a boys best friend is his mother. [Wellington’s sister died leaving her sons motherless.] I will close asking our Heavenly Father to pour out his choicest blessings upon you all. Your Brother Wellington Wood Jr. Kiss the babies for me I will bet Ora is cute running around and talking. After returning home Wellington was called to fill a home mission in Payson and his companion was Uncle John Warner. After going on these two missions, he always had a soft spot in his heart for missionaries and always contributed to missionary funds. In 1928 he was in the 19 quorum of Seventies, th composed of 11 members from the 1st and 2nd wards. Wellington and Elizabeth were blessed with four more children: Anna Ireta, Vernal, and twins, Ferris and Ferrin following his mission. Wellington greatly enjoyed these children. He would take them all up on his lap and sing songs to them at night when the chores were done. Wellington enjoyed music. He loved to sing and taught all his children many songs which he knew by memory. He also enjoyed listening to music being played and his children knew how to play many instruments. His children often felt his love the best when they were singing with him. Wellington was always busy doing many things. He was a ditch rider for the High Line Canal Co. and Water Master for the South East Irrigation Co. for many years. He believed in giving each one his fair share of water. He had a blacksmith shop somewhere he repaired his farm machinery and the farmers from all around would come with broken plows, harrows, and wagons. Wellington would always lend a helping hand. Wellington also knew the art of shoeing horses. Wellington’s normal attire was a pair of overalls and a work shirt. He was a big man with dark brown hair and blue eyes. Wellington Wood Jr. pg 5 He bought a circle saw and sawed the lumber for his barns and sheds. He also did sawing for the neighbors. He also bought a threshing machine and besides threshing his own, he would thresh for others. On the days he threshed, the men would all work together on the thresher and the women would produce a feast. The feast would be served on planks of wood laid over sawhorses. There was always food left over from these feasts so much was made. He believed in sharing what he had with his fellow man. Many times he gave flour, potatoes, vegetables, and meat to many who were in need. He trusted everyone with whom he had dealings with and whenever he had the occasion to sell something, frequently the person buying could not provide cash right at the time, but because of his trust for mankind he did not require the signing of an agreement. He always took the man’s word. He was always thoughtful toward his family. On Mother’s Day, he and Elizabeth would get each daughter and daughter-inlaw a potted plant and even after Elizabeth died, he still got plants for all. Everyone who came by at meal time was warmly invited to eat with them. It was always a joy to him to have company. Wellington was a cheerful humorous man always trying to make life happy for those around him. He was honest in his dealings and believed a man should be as good as his word. In 1915, while Wellington and Elizabeth were away, Mary Susannah decided she was going to ride a half-tamed horse. The horse threw her and she broke her arm. It was a bad compound fracture, and became infected. A few days later she died of the effects of the fall. Wellington and his wife were very sad. That same year the family moved their home across the Spanish Fork river. The spring in 1916 was very wet and the bluff, below which their house had stood and where their saw mill still stood, moved. It covered the saw mill over, so that you cannot tell it was ever there. Their house would have been covered it they had not moved it. The family did dig out the saw but nothing more. Wellington and Elizabeth were both very religious. They taught their children the gospel and made sure they always went to church with them. In 1940, Wellington’s wife passed away, this caused a great change in his life to occur. Wellington loved fresh light soda biscuits and until the death of his wife he had them for breakfast every morning with coffee. After her death Wellington began to eat cold cereal, he found that Cherrios were quite good. Wellington died after a long illness, 26 February, 1944, in the Payson Hospital. He was buried in the Spanish Fork Cemetery. At his funeral service, Albert Gwenson was the main speaker. He told of the wonderful life Wellington Wood had lived and said that there was a poem that could express his life better than he could. Wellington Wood Jr. pg 6 The House By the Side of the Road by Sam Walter Ross There are hermit souls that live withdrawn in the place of their self content; There are souls like stars that dwell, apart in a fellow less firmament; There are pioneer souls that blaze their paths where highways never ran; But let me live by the side of the road, and be a friend to man. Let me live in the house by the side of the road, where the race of man go by; The men who are good and the men who are bad, as good and as bad as I. I would not sit in the scorners’s seat or hurl at cynics ban; Let me live in the house by the side of the road and be a friend to man. I see from my house by the side of the road, by the side of the highway of life. The men who press with order and hope, the men who are faint with the strife. But I turn not away from their smiles nor their tears, both part of an infinite plan. Let me live in the house by the side of the road and be a friend to man. I know there are brook gladdened meadows ahead and mountains of wear some height; But the road passes on through the long afternoon, and stretches away to the night. But still I rejoice, when the strangers rejoice, and weep with the strangers that moon, Nor live in my house by the side of the road like a man who dwells alone. Let me live in my house by the side of the road where the race of man go by. They are good, they are bad, they are weak, they are strong, they are wise, they are foolish–so am I. Then why should I sit in the scorners’s seat or hurl the cynics ban. Let me live in my house by the side of the road and be a friend to man. Carter, Nora Wood. History of Mary Elizabeth Warner Wood. Carter, Nora Wood. Life of Wellington Wood Sr. Harris, Lillian C. Wellington Wood (Pioneer): Came to Utah in 1850. Hill, Marie. Let us Know Each Other Better. “Mary Elizabeth Warner Wood” in Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude. 3437-3438. Nybo, Anna Ireta and Lois Sabin Lasonby. A Bouquet to the Living. Nybo, Anna Ireta. Anna Ireta Wood Nybo: Personal History. Nybo, Anna Ireta. Elizabeth Lavina Ferris. Nybo, Anna Ireta. Wellington Wood Jr. Wood, Syrenus. Personal History of Syrenus Wood.

Life timeline of Wellington Wood

1873
Wellington Wood was born on 29 Dec 1873
Wellington Wood was 14 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
1888
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Wellington Wood was 21 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
1894
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Wellington Wood was 30 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
1903
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Wellington Wood was 41 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
1914
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Wellington Wood was 54 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
1928
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Wellington Wood was 57 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
1930
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Wellington Wood died on 26 Feb 1944 at the age of 70
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Wellington Wood (29 Dec 1873 - 26 Feb 1944), BillionGraves Record 54724 Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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