William Barnes

22 Jun 1853 - 7 Jun 1920

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William Barnes

22 Jun 1853 - 7 Jun 1920
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WILLIAM BARNES and MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG Compiled From: “History of William Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg” Nancy Barnes Thompson and Lila Christensen. “As I Remember My Grandparents William and Margaret Barnes” Pearl Thompson Sessions. “History of Jonathan Clegg and Ellen Walmsley” “H

Life Information

William Barnes

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Died:

Heber City Cemetery

Loren Mair Ln
Heber, Wasatch, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

William - born in Bolton, Lancashire, England
Margaret - born in Blackburn, Lancashire, England, WILLIAM - BOLTON LANCASHIRE ENG.
MARGARET - BLACKBURN LANCASHIRE, ENG.
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dgmurray

November 2, 2012
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jcgivens1

October 13, 2012
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robshaw8

August 30, 2012

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William Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg

Contributor: jcgivens1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

WILLIAM BARNES and MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG Compiled From: “History of William Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg” Nancy Barnes Thompson and Lila Christensen. “As I Remember My Grandparents William and Margaret Barnes” Pearl Thompson Sessions. “History of Jonathan Clegg and Ellen Walmsley” “Handcarts to Zion” LeRoy Reuben Hafen “Journal of Discourses” Volume Four Margaret Ellen Clegg was just a baby when she came across the plains in the Martin Handcart Company. (See story of Jonathan Clegg for details.) Margaret met a man by the name of William Barnes and married him at the age of 17 on December 28, 1872 and on August 3, 1874 their marriage was solemnized in the Salt Lake Endowment House. When he was 12 years old, William Barnes came to Utah with his brother Richard. He found work carrying the mail from Echo to Provo. He had many experiences with the Indians while carrying the mail. There was only a trail in the high mountains through Provo Canyon, and when he would hear the Indians coming, he would hide until they passed. There was a pine tree that looked much like an umbrella and William said he would usually get there for dinner and rest before going on. In the winter he would ride a horse part way and then go on snowshoes for the rest of the journey. One experience he had while he was carrying mail to Provo was when he stopped at one house, and the hat he wore had no crown in it and his hair was frozen stiff. The lady cried when she saw him. The next trip he made, she made a suit for him out of a homespun petticoat she had, and he was very happy over it. It was the first suit he had. After he gave up the mail, he went to Coalville to find work and at this time he was very ill. He started to walk to Coalville; there was mud and snow on the ground and he had only one pair of shoes, which he had to stop frequently to clean off the mud before he could go on. He took to the foothills and it was late when he got to Silvercreek. He made camp. He had no matches or bedding to keep warm so he took off his coat, wrapped it around his wet feet and lay there shivering all night. He arose early so that he could walk while the snow was still crusted. He found, though, that he was on the wrong side of the canyon. There was a large creek to cross, so he climbed a big tree that was bending across the creek, and throwing his bundle across, he crawled over the branches and dropped to the other side. When he arrived in Coalville, he was unable to find work, but he heard there was work in Weber Canyon, so he went there and was soon hired. While he was working there he came in contact with poison ivy and he had to return home because his feet were so swollen. After his recovery, he was able to get work in Coalville. William and his brother, Richard, worked hard and saved enough money to bring their mother, Nancy Boardman Barnes and their brother Brigham from England. Their father had died in England in 1857. After their mother arrived here, they moved to Coalville and then later to Almy, Wyoming. They again saved enough money to send for their sister, Betty and her family. William and Margaret raised a large family. They had 14 children, eight girls and six boys: William Henry, Robert, Nancy Ellen, Sarah Alice, Margaret, Elizabeth, Sylvia, Rose, Lenora, John, Lillian, Richard Thomas, Earl, and Charles Brigham. They were kind and loving parents, doing all they could to provide for their children and make them happy. They were always dressed warm and had something to eat. Grandma Barnes was a very good cook. She made delicious raisin and current bread, and her homemade cheese and pies were fit for a king. She almost always wore a little blue and white checked front apron with designs worked in cross stitch along the hem. Her hair was combed back straight with a little bob at the back of her neck. She had a friendly smile and was good to all. Grandpa had quite a humorous nature. He was a great joker and loved to tease, but he would always win the kids over by giving them a handful of peppermints or lemon drops. Grandpa used to jig every dance he went to. As soon as they saw him come in the door, they would play a jig and how he would jig! They went through some sad trials in their life. They lost a boy, Robert, when he was 19 years old. Robert, Grandpa and a son-in-law, William Thompson, went to the canyon in Lake Creek for a load of wood. They were cutting a tree and it fell against another tree. Robert attempted to dislodge it by pushing his weight against it and it fell on him killing him instantly. Grandma and Grandpa then moved to Center Creek where he bought a farm and lived there the rest of their lives. It was here that they lost their second son, John. He was drowned in a reservoir just across the fence from their home. The boys had been swimming from a raft and were ready to go ashore when John decided to dive off one more time. This time he didn’t come up. He was 14 years old. Grandpa was an admirer of Western picture shows and he would drive to Heber on the coldest of nights just to see a good picture. They would sing on their way to the show and all the way home. They were both good singers and sang very well together. Everywhere they went people asked them to sing. Sometimes at night they would sit and sing their favorite songs. One of them was, “High on the Mountain Top”. Another was, “When You and I Were Young Maggie”. What wonderful people have gone before us and helped to make our lives what they are today. How blessed we are that our ancestors had faith enough to withstand all the trials that they had to endure and the sacrifices they made. May we always cherish their memory and live by the example they set for us. WILLIAM BARNES “Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah 1847-1868” Frank Esshom WILLIAM BARNES: (son of Thomas Barnes and Nancy Boardman of Bolton, Lancashire, England). Born June 22, 1853 at Bolton. Came to Utah Sept 29, 1866. Daniel Thompson company. Married Margaret Ellen Clegg Dec. 28, 1873, at Heber City, Utah (daughter of Jonathan Clegg and Ellen Walmsley of Heber City, pioneers Nov. 30, 1856, Edward Martin “frozen” handcart company). She was born Nov. 21, 1855. Their children: William Henry, m. Eliza Jordon; Robert b. Sept 11, 1875, Killed at the age of 19; Nancy Ellen b. Nov 18, 1877, m. William Thompson; Sarah Alice b. Nov 27, 1879, m. Urich Stribble; Margaret b. 1881, m. Charles Ludlow; Elizabeth b. Oct 20, 1883, m. George Burt; Sylvia b. Feb 22, 1885, m. John Owens; Rosella b. Sept 16, 1887, m. John Phipps; Lenora b. June 14, 1889, m. William H. Park; Jonathan b. Feb 26, 1819, drowned at the age of 14; Lillie b. Nov 22, 1892, m. Frank Phipps; Richard T. b. Aug 8, 1894; Earl b. July 1, 1896; Charles Brigham b. July 1, 1899. Elder, located at Heber City 1866. Coal miner; farmer; quarryman. WILLIAM H. BARNES and MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG History written by Nancy Barnes Thompson and Lila Christensen (Nancy is a daughter and Lila is a granddaughter)

Williams H. Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg

Contributor: jcgivens1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

WILLIAM H. BARNES AND MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG History written by Nancy Barnes Thompson & Lila Christensen William Henry Barnes was born on the 22nd day of June 1853 in Bolton, Lancashire, England. He was the son of Thomas and Nancy Boardman Barnes. His paternal grandparents were Peter Barnes and Betty Harrison Barnes. His maternal grandparents were William Boardman and Mary Pendlebury Boardman. William H. Barnes came to Utah on September 29, 1866. He married Margaret Ellen Clegg; a daughter of Jonathan and Ellen Walmsley Clegg on December 28, 1872 and on August 3, 1874 this marriage was solemnized in the Salt Lake Endowment House. Margaret Ellen Clegg was born November 21, 1855 in Bolton, Lancashire, England. A daughter of Jonathan Clegg she came to Utah with her family in the famous Handcart Company of 1856 under the leadership of Captain Edward Martin. William and Margaret Ellen Barnes had fourteen children, eight girls and six boys, they were as follows: William H., Robert, Nancy Ellen, Sarah Alice, Margaret, Elizabeth, Sylvia, Rose, Lenora, John, Lillian, Richard, Earl and Charles Brigham Barnes. They also raised two grandchildren, Ester Ludlow Seat and Mary Ludlow Duke, making 16 children they raised and cared for. They were kind and loving parents, doing all they could to provide for the children and make them happy. William Henry Barnes was 12 years old when he and a brother Richard came to Utah. He worked for Moses Cluff carrying the mail from Echo to Provo. He had many experiences with the Indians while carrying mail. There was only a trail in the high mountains through Provo Canyon and when he would hear the Indians coming he would hide until they had passed. There was a pine tree that looked much like an umbrella and grandpa said he would usually get there from dinner and rest before going on. In the winter he would ride a horse part way and then go on snowshoes for the rest of the journey. They said he was an honest and dependable man. After he gave up the mail he went to Coalville to find work, and at this time was very ill with quinsy. He started to walk to Coalville, there was mud and snow on the ground and he had only one pair of shoes, which he had to stop frequently and clean off the mud before he could go on. He took to the foothills and got to Silvercreek as it was getting late in the evening so he made camp there. He had no matches or bedding to keep warm so he took off his coat, wrapped it around his wet feet and lay there shivering all night. He arose early so that he could walk while the snow was still crusted. Upon arising he found that he was on the wrong side of the canyon. There was a large creek to cross so he climbed a big tree that was bending across the creek and throwing his bundle across he crawled over the branches and dropped to the other side. When he arrived in Coalville, he was unable to find work but he heard there was work Weber Canyon so he went there and was soon hired. While he was working there he came in contact with poison ivy and had to return to his home because his feet were so swollen. After his recovery he was able to get work in Coalville. He and his brother Richard worked and saved enough money to bring his mother and brother Brigham from England. Their father had died in England in August of 1857. After their mother arrived here they moved to Coalville and then later to Aly, Wyoming, where their mother died and was buried. They worked very hard and saved enough money to send for their sister Betty Tounge and family. Although there were many hardships they never complained. William Barnes raised a large family but they were always dressed warm and had something to eat. They were not blessed with worldly goods but they had what they needed and they were very happy. Sometimes at nights they would sit and sing their favorite songs, one of them was “When You and I were Young Maggie” another was “High on the Mountain Top”. They had wonderful voices and sang well together, everywhere they were people asked them to sing. Grandpa used to jig in his younger days, every dance he went to, as soon as they saw him come in the door they would play a jig, and how he would jig. I remember the last time he clog danced, he could only dance a few minutes and then he had to stop, he surely felt bad. They went through some sad trials during their life. They lost a boy nineteen years old when he, grandpa and a son-in-law William Thompson went to the canyon for a load of wood. A tree, which they were cutting down, fell on him, killing him instantly. (Robert) It happened in Lake Creek about 5 miles west of Heber. *(As I heard this story they were cutting a tree and it fell against another tree, while the two men were getting a chain to pull it over Robert attempted to dislodge it by pushing his weight against it and it fell toward him pinning him beneath it.) Grandpa then moved to Center Creek where he bought a farm and lived there the rest of his life. It was here that they lost their second son, Jonathan. He was drowned in a reservoir just through the fence from their home. It was a terrible thing to go through; they stood on the bank from morning till late at night before they could get him out…. The boys had been swimming from a raft and were ready to go ashore when Jonathan decided to dive off one more time; this time he didn’t come up. He was fourteen years old. He was always very thankful for what people did for them. One experience he had while he was carrying the mail to Provo, he stopped at one house and the hat he wore had no crown in it and his hair was frozen stiff, the lady cried when she saw him. The next trip he made, she had made a suit for him out of a homespun petticoat she had and he was very happy over it. It was the first suit he had. If anyone needed help they were the first ones there to help neighbors and were willing to do everything they could. Grandma was a beautiful crotchetier and made many lovely things. One time when she had no flour she took a door curtain (it had the pattern of a horse on it) and gave it for a milk pan full of flour. She never took anything she couldn’t pay for. How thankful we should be for our pioneer parents and the sacrifices they made for us. To come here to the Rocky Mountains and make such a lovely place in which for us to live. May we always cherish their memory and live by the example they set for us. We as sons and daughters of pioneer parents should see if we can be as good and faithful as they were. Be pleasant and always remember the things they did for you and I, that we may enjoy these beautiful mountains and what they suffered that we might have the best of everything. May we cherish our pioneer parents and our Heavenly Father bless them for what they have done.

William Henry Barnes and Margaret E. Clegg

Contributor: jcgivens1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

History of William Henry Barnes and Margaret E. Clegg William Barnes, son of Thomas Barnes and Nancy Boardman, was born June 22, 1853 at Lancashire, England. He came to Utah September 29, 1866. On December 26, 1875, he married Margaret Ellen Clegg, daughter of Jonathan and Ellen Walmsley, November 21, 1855 in Salisbury, Preston, Lancashire, England. She came with her parents to Utah November 30, 1856. Grandpa came to Utah at the age of 12 years, his brother, Richard came with him. They worked in the coal mines and saved money to send for their mother and brother Brig, to come to Utah. Their father died in England. When their mother and brother got here they lived in Coalville and worked. Their mother died and was buried in Coalville. They worked and sent enough money to bring a sister, Betty Tongue, and family. William was employed by Moses Cluff to carry the mail from Heber to Provo. He walked on snow shoes in the winter and other times by horse back. He had to be careful and watch for Indians. If he saw anything or heard a noise he would hide. There was a pine tree below Hoovers that Grandpa said he would try to get there by noon to eat his lunch under it, then finish the trip to Provo. In those days the road was steep and narrow, not like the good roads we have now. William would stop at some friends in Provo. He said one day when he stopped his clothes were frozen to him. The next trip he said his friend had taken one of her homespun petticoats and made him a suit. It was the first suit he had ever owned and he said he was so proud to have it. Grandpa and Grandma raised a large family, fourteen children. They also raised two grandchildren after the death of their mother, Esther Ludlow and Mary Ludlow Duke. Mary was only 9 months old when her grandmother took her to raise. Although they never had the comforts of life they never complained. They always had enough to eat and to wear. One day Grandpa took one of his sons, Robert Barnes, who was 19 years old, and my father, William Thompson, to the canyon up Lake Creek for a load of wood. The tree they were cutting fell on Robert, killing him instantly. Grandpa then moved to Center Creek to live. It was here that a son, Johnnie, was drowned in a reservoir which joined their farm, he was just 14 years old. It was a terrible thing to stand on the bank from early morning until late at night until they found his body. Grandpa and Grandma were good singers. At night they would sit on their porch and sing their favorite songs. One song was “When You and I Were Young, Maggie”, another was “High On the Mountain Top,” there were many others. Friends and neighbors would gather to their home in the evenings to hear them sing. Grandpa could do the clog dance, and would dance often in the dances. They attended just about every funeral held in Wasatch County. If anyone needed help they were among the first to be there. Grandpa did his Ward Teaching carrying a lantern, and never missed his visits. He never was able to get up and preach in public, but he said he knew the gospel was true, and Joseph Smith was a Prophet of God. Their family have all passed away now except two, Mrs. Rose Phipps, and Earl Barnes. Grandpa died June 22, 1921. Grandma died December 27, 1925. In 1927 there were 89 grandchildren and 31 great-grandchildren. This poem was written in tribute to them by Mary L. Duke Parents, dear, life’s race is ended, Every prize you sough is won. Your dear name will live forever With your daughters and your sons. You’ve always been so kind and patient, Imparting cheer to all you see, And with your departed loved ones What rejoicing there will be. Parents, dear, we all will miss you, Now that your life’s work is done, But we’ll bow our heads and whisper Let Thy will, Oh Lord, be done. We’ll say farewell, but not goodbye, For we know we’ll meet again. You have gone to your reward in Heaven We’re glad you are free from grief and pain. By Lila Christensen, granddaughter, March 20, 1967

William Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg

Contributor: jcgivens1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

WILLIAM BARNES and MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG Compiled From: “History of William Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg” Nancy Barnes Thompson and Lila Christensen. “As I Remember My Grandparents William and Margaret Barnes” Pearl Thompson Sessions. “History of Jonathan Clegg and Ellen Walmsley” “Handcarts to Zion” LeRoy Reuben Hafen “Journal of Discourses” Volume Four Margaret Ellen Clegg was just a baby when she came across the plains in the Martin Handcart Company. (See story of Jonathan Clegg for details.) Margaret met a man by the name of William Barnes and married him at the age of 17 on December 28, 1872 and on August 3, 1874 their marriage was solemnized in the Salt Lake Endowment House. When he was 12 years old, William Barnes came to Utah with his brother Richard. He found work carrying the mail from Echo to Provo. He had many experiences with the Indians while carrying the mail. There was only a trail in the high mountains through Provo Canyon, and when he would hear the Indians coming, he would hide until they passed. There was a pine tree that looked much like an umbrella and William said he would usually get there for dinner and rest before going on. In the winter he would ride a horse part way and then go on snowshoes for the rest of the journey. One experience he had while he was carrying mail to Provo was when he stopped at one house, and the hat he wore had no crown in it and his hair was frozen stiff. The lady cried when she saw him. The next trip he made, she made a suit for him out of a homespun petticoat she had, and he was very happy over it. It was the first suit he had. After he gave up the mail, he went to Coalville to find work and at this time he was very ill. He started to walk to Coalville; there was mud and snow on the ground and he had only one pair of shoes, which he had to stop frequently to clean off the mud before he could go on. He took to the foothills and it was late when he got to Silvercreek. He made camp. He had no matches or bedding to keep warm so he took off his coat, wrapped it around his wet feet and lay there shivering all night. He arose early so that he could walk while the snow was still crusted. He found, though, that he was on the wrong side of the canyon. There was a large creek to cross, so he climbed a big tree that was bending across the creek, and throwing his bundle across, he crawled over the branches and dropped to the other side. When he arrived in Coalville, he was unable to find work, but he heard there was work in Weber Canyon, so he went there and was soon hired. While he was working there he came in contact with poison ivy and he had to return home because his feet were so swollen. After his recovery, he was able to get work in Coalville. William and his brother, Richard, worked hard and saved enough money to bring their mother, Nancy Boardman Barnes and their brother Brigham from England. Their father had died in England in 1857. After their mother arrived here, they moved to Coalville and then later to Almy, Wyoming. They again saved enough money to send for their sister, Betty and her family. William and Margaret raised a large family. They had 14 children, eight girls and six boys: William Henry, Robert, Nancy Ellen, Sarah Alice, Margaret, Elizabeth, Sylvia, Rose, Lenora, John, Lillian, Richard Thomas, Earl, and Charles Brigham. They were kind and loving parents, doing all they could to provide for their children and make them happy. They were always dressed warm and had something to eat. Grandma Barnes was a very good cook. She made delicious raisin and current bread, and her homemade cheese and pies were fit for a king. She almost always wore a little blue and white checked front apron with designs worked in cross stitch along the hem. Her hair was combed back straight with a little bob at the back of her neck. She had a friendly smile and was good to all. Grandpa had quite a humorous nature. He was a great joker and loved to tease, but he would always win the kids over by giving them a handful of peppermints or lemon drops. Grandpa used to jig every dance he went to. As soon as they saw him come in the door, they would play a jig and how he would jig! They went through some sad trials in their life. They lost a boy, Robert, when he was 19 years old. Robert, Grandpa and a son-in-law, William Thompson, went to the canyon in Lake Creek for a load of wood. They were cutting a tree and it fell against another tree. Robert attempted to dislodge it by pushing his weight against it and it fell on him killing him instantly. Grandma and Grandpa then moved to Center Creek where he bought a farm and lived there the rest of their lives. It was here that they lost their second son, John. He was drowned in a reservoir just across the fence from their home. The boys had been swimming from a raft and were ready to go ashore when John decided to dive off one more time. This time he didn’t come up. He was 14 years old. Grandpa was an admirer of Western picture shows and he would drive to Heber on the coldest of nights just to see a good picture. They would sing on their way to the show and all the way home. They were both good singers and sang very well together. Everywhere they went people asked them to sing. Sometimes at night they would sit and sing their favorite songs. One of them was, “High on the Mountain Top”. Another was, “When You and I Were Young Maggie”. What wonderful people have gone before us and helped to make our lives what they are today. How blessed we are that our ancestors had faith enough to withstand all the trials that they had to endure and the sacrifices they made. May we always cherish their memory and live by the example they set for us. WILLIAM BARNES “Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah 1847-1868” Frank Esshom WILLIAM BARNES: (son of Thomas Barnes and Nancy Boardman of Bolton, Lancashire, England). Born June 22, 1853 at Bolton. Came to Utah Sept 29, 1866. Daniel Thompson company. Married Margaret Ellen Clegg Dec. 28, 1873, at Heber City, Utah (daughter of Jonathan Clegg and Ellen Walmsley of Heber City, pioneers Nov. 30, 1856, Edward Martin “frozen” handcart company). She was born Nov. 21, 1855. Their children: William Henry, m. Eliza Jordon; Robert b. Sept 11, 1875, Killed at the age of 19; Nancy Ellen b. Nov 18, 1877, m. William Thompson; Sarah Alice b. Nov 27, 1879, m. Urich Stribble; Margaret b. 1881, m. Charles Ludlow; Elizabeth b. Oct 20, 1883, m. George Burt; Sylvia b. Feb 22, 1885, m. John Owens; Rosella b. Sept 16, 1887, m. John Phipps; Lenora b. June 14, 1889, m. William H. Park; Jonathan b. Feb 26, 1819, drowned at the age of 14; Lillie b. Nov 22, 1892, m. Frank Phipps; Richard T. b. Aug 8, 1894; Earl b. July 1, 1896; Charles Brigham b. July 1, 1899. Elder, located at Heber City 1866. Coal miner; farmer; quarryman. WILLIAM H. BARNES and MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG History written by Nancy Barnes Thompson and Lila Christensen (Nancy is a daughter and Lila is a granddaughter)

William Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg

Contributor: dgmurray Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

WILLIAM BARNES and MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG Compiled From: “History of William Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg” Nancy Barnes Thompson and Lila Christensen. “As I Remember My Grandparents William and Margaret Barnes” Pearl Thompson Sessions. “History of Jonathan Clegg and Ellen Walmsley” “Handcarts to Zion” LeRoy Reuben Hafen “Journal of Discourses” Volume Four Margaret Ellen Clegg was just a baby when she came across the plains in the Martin Handcart Company. (See story of Jonathan Clegg for details.) Margaret met a man by the name of William Barnes and married him at the age of 17 on December 28, 1872 and on August 3, 1874 their marriage was solemnized in the Salt Lake Endowment House. When he was 12 years old, William Barnes came to Utah with his brother Richard. He found work carrying the mail from Echo to Provo. He had many experiences with the Indians while carrying the mail. There was only a trail in the high mountains through Provo Canyon, and when he would hear the Indians coming, he would hide until they passed. There was a pine tree that looked much like an umbrella and William said he would usually get there for dinner and rest before going on. In the winter he would ride a horse part way and then go on snowshoes for the rest of the journey. One experience he had while he was carrying mail to Provo was when he stopped at one house, and the hat he wore had no crown in it and his hair was frozen stiff. The lady cried when she saw him. The next trip he made, she made a suit for him out of a homespun petticoat she had, and he was very happy over it. It was the first suit he had. After he gave up the mail, he went to Coalville to find work and at this time he was very ill. He started to walk to Coalville; there was mud and snow on the ground and he had only one pair of shoes, which he had to stop frequently to clean off the mud before he could go on. He took to the foothills and it was late when he got to Silvercreek. He made camp. He had no matches or bedding to keep warm so he took off his coat, wrapped it around his wet feet and lay there shivering all night. He arose early so that he could walk while the snow was still crusted. He found, though, that he was on the wrong side of the canyon. There was a large creek to cross, so he climbed a big tree that was bending across the creek, and throwing his bundle across, he crawled over the branches and dropped to the other side. When he arrived in Coalville, he was unable to find work, but he heard there was work in Weber Canyon, so he went there and was soon hired. While he was working there he came in contact with poison ivy and he had to return home because his feet were so swollen. After his recovery, he was able to get work in Coalville. William and his brother, Richard, worked hard and saved enough money to bring their mother, Nancy Boardman Barnes and their brother Brigham from England. Their father had died in England in 1857. After their mother arrived here, they moved to Coalville and then later to Almy, Wyoming. They again saved enough money to send for their sister, Betty and her family. William and Margaret raised a large family. They had 14 children, eight girls and six boys: William Henry, Robert, Nancy Ellen, Sarah Alice, Margaret, Elizabeth, Sylvia, Rose, Lenora, John, Lillian, Richard Thomas, Earl, and Charles Brigham. They were kind and loving parents, doing all they could to provide for their children and make them happy. They were always dressed warm and had something to eat. Grandma Barnes was a very good cook. She made delicious raisin and current bread, and her homemade cheese and pies were fit for a king. She almost always wore a little blue and white checked front apron with designs worked in cross stitch along the hem. Her hair was combed back straight with a little bob at the back of her neck. She had a friendly smile and was good to all. Grandpa had quite a humorous nature. He was a great joker and loved to tease, but he would always win the kids over by giving them a handful of peppermints or lemon drops. Grandpa used to jig every dance he went to. As soon as they saw him come in the door, they would play a jig and how he would jig! They went through some sad trials in their life. They lost a boy, Robert, when he was 19 years old. Robert, Grandpa and a son-in-law, William Thompson, went to the canyon in Lake Creek for a load of wood. They were cutting a tree and it fell against another tree. Robert attempted to dislodge it by pushing his weight against it and it fell on him killing him instantly. Grandma and Grandpa then moved to Center Creek where he bought a farm and lived there the rest of their lives. It was here that they lost their second son, John. He was drowned in a reservoir just across the fence from their home. The boys had been swimming from a raft and were ready to go ashore when John decided to dive off one more time. This time he didn’t come up. He was 14 years old. Grandpa was an admirer of Western picture shows and he would drive to Heber on the coldest of nights just to see a good picture. They would sing on their way to the show and all the way home. They were both good singers and sang very well together. Everywhere they went people asked them to sing. Sometimes at night they would sit and sing their favorite songs. One of them was, “High on the Mountain Top”. Another was, “When You and I Were Young Maggie”. What wonderful people have gone before us and helped to make our lives what they are today. How blessed we are that our ancestors had faith enough to withstand all the trials that they had to endure and the sacrifices they made. May we always cherish their memory and live by the example they set for us. WILLIAM BARNES “Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah 1847-1868” Frank Esshom WILLIAM BARNES: (son of Thomas Barnes and Nancy Boardman of Bolton, Lancashire, England). Born June 22, 1853 at Bolton. Came to Utah Sept 29, 1866. Daniel Thompson company. Married Margaret Ellen Clegg Dec. 28, 1873, at Heber City, Utah (daughter of Jonathan Clegg and Ellen Walmsley of Heber City, pioneers Nov. 30, 1856, Edward Martin “frozen” handcart company). She was born Nov. 21, 1855. Their children: William Henry, m. Eliza Jordon; Robert b. Sept 11, 1875, Killed at the age of 19; Nancy Ellen b. Nov 18, 1877, m. William Thompson; Sarah Alice b. Nov 27, 1879, m. Urich Stribble; Margaret b. 1881, m. Charles Ludlow; Elizabeth b. Oct 20, 1883, m. George Burt; Sylvia b. Feb 22, 1885, m. John Owens; Rosella b. Sept 16, 1887, m. John Phipps; Lenora b. June 14, 1889, m. William H. Park; Jonathan b. Feb 26, 1819, drowned at the age of 14; Lillie b. Nov 22, 1892, m. Frank Phipps; Richard T. b. Aug 8, 1894; Earl b. July 1, 1896; Charles Brigham b. July 1, 1899. Elder, located at Heber City 1866. Coal miner; farmer; quarryman. WILLIAM H. BARNES and MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG History written by Nancy Barnes Thompson and Lila Christensen (Nancy is a daughter and Lila is a granddaughter)

Williams H. Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg

Contributor: dgmurray Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

WILLIAM H. BARNES AND MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG History written by Nancy Barnes Thompson & Lila Christensen William Henry Barnes was born on the 22nd day of June 1853 in Bolton, Lancashire, England. He was the son of Thomas and Nancy Boardman Barnes. His paternal grandparents were Peter Barnes and Betty Harrison Barnes. His maternal grandparents were William Boardman and Mary Pendlebury Boardman. William H. Barnes came to Utah on September 29, 1866. He married Margaret Ellen Clegg; a daughter of Jonathan and Ellen Walmsley Clegg on December 28, 1872 and on August 3, 1874 this marriage was solemnized in the Salt Lake Endowment House. Margaret Ellen Clegg was born November 21, 1855 in Bolton, Lancashire, England. A daughter of Jonathan Clegg she came to Utah with her family in the famous Handcart Company of 1856 under the leadership of Captain Edward Martin. William and Margaret Ellen Barnes had fourteen children, eight girls and six boys, they were as follows: William H., Robert, Nancy Ellen, Sarah Alice, Margaret, Elizabeth, Sylvia, Rose, Lenora, John, Lillian, Richard, Earl and Charles Brigham Barnes. They also raised two grandchildren, Ester Ludlow Seat and Mary Ludlow Duke, making 16 children they raised and cared for. They were kind and loving parents, doing all they could to provide for the children and make them happy. William Henry Barnes was 12 years old when he and a brother Richard came to Utah. He worked for Moses Cluff carrying the mail from Echo to Provo. He had many experiences with the Indians while carrying mail. There was only a trail in the high mountains through Provo Canyon and when he would hear the Indians coming he would hide until they had passed. There was a pine tree that looked much like an umbrella and grandpa said he would usually get there from dinner and rest before going on. In the winter he would ride a horse part way and then go on snowshoes for the rest of the journey. They said he was an honest and dependable man. After he gave up the mail he went to Coalville to find work, and at this time was very ill with quinsy. He started to walk to Coalville, there was mud and snow on the ground and he had only one pair of shoes, which he had to stop frequently and clean off the mud before he could go on. He took to the foothills and got to Silvercreek as it was getting late in the evening so he made camp there. He had no matches or bedding to keep warm so he took off his coat, wrapped it around his wet feet and lay there shivering all night. He arose early so that he could walk while the snow was still crusted. Upon arising he found that he was on the wrong side of the canyon. There was a large creek to cross so he climbed a big tree that was bending across the creek and throwing his bundle across he crawled over the branches and dropped to the other side. When he arrived in Coalville, he was unable to find work but he heard there was work Weber Canyon so he went there and was soon hired. While he was working there he came in contact with poison ivy and had to return to his home because his feet were so swollen. After his recovery he was able to get work in Coalville. He and his brother Richard worked and saved enough money to bring his mother and brother Brigham from England. Their father had died in England in August of 1857. After their mother arrived here they moved to Coalville and then later to Aly, Wyoming, where their mother died and was buried. They worked very hard and saved enough money to send for their sister Betty Tounge and family. Although there were many hardships they never complained. William Barnes raised a large family but they were always dressed warm and had something to eat. They were not blessed with worldly goods but they had what they needed and they were very happy. Sometimes at nights they would sit and sing their favorite songs, one of them was “When You and I were Young Maggie” another was “High on the Mountain Top”. They had wonderful voices and sang well together, everywhere they were people asked them to sing. Grandpa used to jig in his younger days, every dance he went to, as soon as they saw him come in the door they would play a jig, and how he would jig. I remember the last time he clog danced, he could only dance a few minutes and then he had to stop, he surely felt bad. They went through some sad trials during their life. They lost a boy nineteen years old when he, grandpa and a son-in-law William Thompson went to the canyon for a load of wood. A tree, which they were cutting down, fell on him, killing him instantly. (Robert) It happened in Lake Creek about 5 miles west of Heber. *(As I heard this story they were cutting a tree and it fell against another tree, while the two men were getting a chain to pull it over Robert attempted to dislodge it by pushing his weight against it and it fell toward him pinning him beneath it.) Grandpa then moved to Center Creek where he bought a farm and lived there the rest of his life. It was here that they lost their second son, Jonathan. He was drowned in a reservoir just through the fence from their home. It was a terrible thing to go through; they stood on the bank from morning till late at night before they could get him out…. The boys had been swimming from a raft and were ready to go ashore when Jonathan decided to dive off one more time; this time he didn’t come up. He was fourteen years old. He was always very thankful for what people did for them. One experience he had while he was carrying the mail to Provo, he stopped at one house and the hat he wore had no crown in it and his hair was frozen stiff, the lady cried when she saw him. The next trip he made, she had made a suit for him out of a homespun petticoat she had and he was very happy over it. It was the first suit he had. If anyone needed help they were the first ones there to help neighbors and were willing to do everything they could. Grandma was a beautiful crotchetier and made many lovely things. One time when she had no flour she took a door curtain (it had the pattern of a horse on it) and gave it for a milk pan full of flour. She never took anything she couldn’t pay for. How thankful we should be for our pioneer parents and the sacrifices they made for us. To come here to the Rocky Mountains and make such a lovely place in which for us to live. May we always cherish their memory and live by the example they set for us. We as sons and daughters of pioneer parents should see if we can be as good and faithful as they were. Be pleasant and always remember the things they did for you and I, that we may enjoy these beautiful mountains and what they suffered that we might have the best of everything. May we cherish our pioneer parents and our Heavenly Father bless them for what they have done.

William Henry Barnes and Margaret E. Clegg

Contributor: dgmurray Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

History of William Henry Barnes and Margaret E. Clegg William Barnes, son of Thomas Barnes and Nancy Boardman, was born June 22, 1853 at Lancashire, England. He came to Utah September 29, 1866. On December 26, 1875, he married Margaret Ellen Clegg, daughter of Jonathan and Ellen Walmsley, November 21, 1855 in Salisbury, Preston, Lancashire, England. She came with her parents to Utah November 30, 1856. Grandpa came to Utah at the age of 12 years, his brother, Richard came with him. They worked in the coal mines and saved money to send for their mother and brother Brig, to come to Utah. Their father died in England. When their mother and brother got here they lived in Coalville and worked. Their mother died and was buried in Coalville. They worked and sent enough money to bring a sister, Betty Tongue, and family. William was employed by Moses Cluff to carry the mail from Heber to Provo. He walked on snow shoes in the winter and other times by horse back. He had to be careful and watch for Indians. If he saw anything or heard a noise he would hide. There was a pine tree below Hoovers that Grandpa said he would try to get there by noon to eat his lunch under it, then finish the trip to Provo. In those days the road was steep and narrow, not like the good roads we have now. William would stop at some friends in Provo. He said one day when he stopped his clothes were frozen to him. The next trip he said his friend had taken one of her homespun petticoats and made him a suit. It was the first suit he had ever owned and he said he was so proud to have it. Grandpa and Grandma raised a large family, fourteen children. They also raised two grandchildren after the death of their mother, Esther Ludlow and Mary Ludlow Duke. Mary was only 9 months old when her grandmother took her to raise. Although they never had the comforts of life they never complained. They always had enough to eat and to wear. One day Grandpa took one of his sons, Robert Barnes, who was 19 years old, and my father, William Thompson, to the canyon up Lake Creek for a load of wood. The tree they were cutting fell on Robert, killing him instantly. Grandpa then moved to Center Creek to live. It was here that a son, Johnnie, was drowned in a reservoir which joined their farm, he was just 14 years old. It was a terrible thing to stand on the bank from early morning until late at night until they found his body. Grandpa and Grandma were good singers. At night they would sit on their porch and sing their favorite songs. One song was “When You and I Were Young, Maggie”, another was “High On the Mountain Top,” there were many others. Friends and neighbors would gather to their home in the evenings to hear them sing. Grandpa could do the clog dance, and would dance often in the dances. They attended just about every funeral held in Wasatch County. If anyone needed help they were among the first to be there. Grandpa did his Ward Teaching carrying a lantern, and never missed his visits. He never was able to get up and preach in public, but he said he knew the gospel was true, and Joseph Smith was a Prophet of God. Their family have all passed away now except two, Mrs. Rose Phipps, and Earl Barnes. Grandpa died June 22, 1921. Grandma died December 27, 1925. In 1927 there were 89 grandchildren and 31 great-grandchildren. This poem was written in tribute to them by Mary L. Duke Parents, dear, life’s race is ended, Every prize you sough is won. Your dear name will live forever With your daughters and your sons. You’ve always been so kind and patient, Imparting cheer to all you see, And with your departed loved ones What rejoicing there will be. Parents, dear, we all will miss you, Now that your life’s work is done, But we’ll bow our heads and whisper Let Thy will, Oh Lord, be done. We’ll say farewell, but not goodbye, For we know we’ll meet again. You have gone to your reward in Heaven We’re glad you are free from grief and pain. By Lila Christensen, granddaughter, March 20, 1967

William Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg

Contributor: dgmurray Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

WILLIAM BARNES and MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG Compiled From: “History of William Barnes and Margaret Ellen Clegg” Nancy Barnes Thompson and Lila Christensen. “As I Remember My Grandparents William and Margaret Barnes” Pearl Thompson Sessions. “History of Jonathan Clegg and Ellen Walmsley” “Handcarts to Zion” LeRoy Reuben Hafen “Journal of Discourses” Volume Four Margaret Ellen Clegg was just a baby when she came across the plains in the Martin Handcart Company. (See story of Jonathan Clegg for details.) Margaret met a man by the name of William Barnes and married him at the age of 17 on December 28, 1872 and on August 3, 1874 their marriage was solemnized in the Salt Lake Endowment House. When he was 12 years old, William Barnes came to Utah with his brother Richard. He found work carrying the mail from Echo to Provo. He had many experiences with the Indians while carrying the mail. There was only a trail in the high mountains through Provo Canyon, and when he would hear the Indians coming, he would hide until they passed. There was a pine tree that looked much like an umbrella and William said he would usually get there for dinner and rest before going on. In the winter he would ride a horse part way and then go on snowshoes for the rest of the journey. One experience he had while he was carrying mail to Provo was when he stopped at one house, and the hat he wore had no crown in it and his hair was frozen stiff. The lady cried when she saw him. The next trip he made, she made a suit for him out of a homespun petticoat she had, and he was very happy over it. It was the first suit he had. After he gave up the mail, he went to Coalville to find work and at this time he was very ill. He started to walk to Coalville; there was mud and snow on the ground and he had only one pair of shoes, which he had to stop frequently to clean off the mud before he could go on. He took to the foothills and it was late when he got to Silvercreek. He made camp. He had no matches or bedding to keep warm so he took off his coat, wrapped it around his wet feet and lay there shivering all night. He arose early so that he could walk while the snow was still crusted. He found, though, that he was on the wrong side of the canyon. There was a large creek to cross, so he climbed a big tree that was bending across the creek, and throwing his bundle across, he crawled over the branches and dropped to the other side. When he arrived in Coalville, he was unable to find work, but he heard there was work in Weber Canyon, so he went there and was soon hired. While he was working there he came in contact with poison ivy and he had to return home because his feet were so swollen. After his recovery, he was able to get work in Coalville. William and his brother, Richard, worked hard and saved enough money to bring their mother, Nancy Boardman Barnes and their brother Brigham from England. Their father had died in England in 1857. After their mother arrived here, they moved to Coalville and then later to Almy, Wyoming. They again saved enough money to send for their sister, Betty and her family. William and Margaret raised a large family. They had 14 children, eight girls and six boys: William Henry, Robert, Nancy Ellen, Sarah Alice, Margaret, Elizabeth, Sylvia, Rose, Lenora, John, Lillian, Richard Thomas, Earl, and Charles Brigham. They were kind and loving parents, doing all they could to provide for their children and make them happy. They were always dressed warm and had something to eat. Grandma Barnes was a very good cook. She made delicious raisin and current bread, and her homemade cheese and pies were fit for a king. She almost always wore a little blue and white checked front apron with designs worked in cross stitch along the hem. Her hair was combed back straight with a little bob at the back of her neck. She had a friendly smile and was good to all. Grandpa had quite a humorous nature. He was a great joker and loved to tease, but he would always win the kids over by giving them a handful of peppermints or lemon drops. Grandpa used to jig every dance he went to. As soon as they saw him come in the door, they would play a jig and how he would jig! They went through some sad trials in their life. They lost a boy, Robert, when he was 19 years old. Robert, Grandpa and a son-in-law, William Thompson, went to the canyon in Lake Creek for a load of wood. They were cutting a tree and it fell against another tree. Robert attempted to dislodge it by pushing his weight against it and it fell on him killing him instantly. Grandma and Grandpa then moved to Center Creek where he bought a farm and lived there the rest of their lives. It was here that they lost their second son, John. He was drowned in a reservoir just across the fence from their home. The boys had been swimming from a raft and were ready to go ashore when John decided to dive off one more time. This time he didn’t come up. He was 14 years old. Grandpa was an admirer of Western picture shows and he would drive to Heber on the coldest of nights just to see a good picture. They would sing on their way to the show and all the way home. They were both good singers and sang very well together. Everywhere they went people asked them to sing. Sometimes at night they would sit and sing their favorite songs. One of them was, “High on the Mountain Top”. Another was, “When You and I Were Young Maggie”. What wonderful people have gone before us and helped to make our lives what they are today. How blessed we are that our ancestors had faith enough to withstand all the trials that they had to endure and the sacrifices they made. May we always cherish their memory and live by the example they set for us. WILLIAM BARNES “Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah 1847-1868” Frank Esshom WILLIAM BARNES: (son of Thomas Barnes and Nancy Boardman of Bolton, Lancashire, England). Born June 22, 1853 at Bolton. Came to Utah Sept 29, 1866. Daniel Thompson company. Married Margaret Ellen Clegg Dec. 28, 1873, at Heber City, Utah (daughter of Jonathan Clegg and Ellen Walmsley of Heber City, pioneers Nov. 30, 1856, Edward Martin “frozen” handcart company). She was born Nov. 21, 1855. Their children: William Henry, m. Eliza Jordon; Robert b. Sept 11, 1875, Killed at the age of 19; Nancy Ellen b. Nov 18, 1877, m. William Thompson; Sarah Alice b. Nov 27, 1879, m. Urich Stribble; Margaret b. 1881, m. Charles Ludlow; Elizabeth b. Oct 20, 1883, m. George Burt; Sylvia b. Feb 22, 1885, m. John Owens; Rosella b. Sept 16, 1887, m. John Phipps; Lenora b. June 14, 1889, m. William H. Park; Jonathan b. Feb 26, 1819, drowned at the age of 14; Lillie b. Nov 22, 1892, m. Frank Phipps; Richard T. b. Aug 8, 1894; Earl b. July 1, 1896; Charles Brigham b. July 1, 1899. Elder, located at Heber City 1866. Coal miner; farmer; quarryman. WILLIAM H. BARNES and MARGARET ELLEN CLEGG History written by Nancy Barnes Thompson and Lila Christensen (Nancy is a daughter and Lila is a granddaughter)

Life timeline of William Barnes

1853
William Barnes was born on 22 Jun 1853
William Barnes was 7 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
William Barnes was 27 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
William Barnes was 28 years old when The world's first international telephone call is made between St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, and Calais, Maine, United States. A telephone call is a connection over a telephone network between the called party and the calling party.
William Barnes was 43 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
William Barnes was 51 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
William Barnes was 64 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
William Barnes died on 7 Jun 1920 at the age of 67
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for William Barnes (22 Jun 1853 - 7 Jun 1920), BillionGraves Record 2352472 Heber, Wasatch, Utah, United States

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