William Balls

16 Feb 1849 - 16 Oct 1939

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William Balls

16 Feb 1849 - 16 Oct 1939
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Grave site information of William Balls (16 Feb 1849 - 16 Oct 1939) at Hyde Park Cemetery in Hyde Park, Cache, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

William Balls

Born:
Died:

Hyde Park Cemetery

2-84 S 400 E
Hyde Park, Cache, Utah
United States

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His Wife
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judyh

July 19, 2014
Transcriber

Linda54

May 6, 2012
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doclouie

May 5, 2012

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John Balls

Contributor: Linda54 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

John Balls, son of William Coats and Betsy Balls of Chediston, England, was born October 13, 1825, at Chediston, Suffolk County, England. He was a medium sized man, light brown hair and blue eyes. He was a very quiet reserved man. He was never known to wear a white shirt with a stiff collar, but always carried a colorful handkerchief. John married Sarah Baxter, a daughter of John Baxter and Sarah Butcher. Sarah was born December 6, 1826, at Chediston, Suffolk, England. Twelve children were born to them, my father William Balls being the oldest. Grandfather and Grandmother Balls had ten children born to them in England. They joined the Church in 1851, were baptized and confirmed members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Robert Winters. A Mormon Elder by the name of Nelson visited the home many times. The President of the Branch was R. B. Hayes. My father William Balls has told me how he remembered of going on Sunday to Rumborah Common to attend meeting which was held at Brother George Hancey’s home. The two younger children were pulled in a little wagon, and my father walked behind holding to the back of the wagon for a distance of five or six miles when he was eight years old. Grandfather John Balls was a hard working man and received low wages in England. It was hard to make ends meet. He could only get a limited education owing to the adverse conditions of the poorer class of people. In this locality, the land was very wet and damp, so Grandfather worked for other people digging trenches to drain the land. He received 60 shillings a year. After joining the Church of Jesus Christ, preparations were made for immigration to Utah. Before leaving, a short visit was made to Grandmother Baxter’s home. She had prepared rhubarb sandwiches to last them until they reached Liverpool. During the early part of June 1868, under the direction of William B. Preston and in company with some six-hundred Latter-day Saints, the family left Liverpool aboard their sailing vessel. They were six weeks crossing the Atlantic. They encountered a terrific storm and wind. Because of the extreme roughness of the ocean, the children were tied in their bunks for safety. The adults were required to bail water to keep the ship from sinking. Their ship was blown back in one single night a distance which required three days to recover by sail. The voyage ended by landing in New York about July 28th. From there they traveled by rail to a small town called Benton. The railroad to Omaha had been extended to terminate there. From this point they made preparations to travel on in the pioneer way by ox team. This was the last ox team company of Saints that crossed the plains. Their company was presided over or directed by Captain Simpson M. Molen, who was a member of the Bishopric in the newly established village of Hyde Park, Utah. Hyde Park was the intended destination of John Balls and his family. John Bloomfield, who had also settled Hyde Park, had been called to meet the John Balls family to bring them from the Missouri River to Utah. This meant a distance of 2000 of travel over a almost barren desert. This was not only costly but dangerous. The Indians were not altogether friendly toward the white men. Service rendered by John Bloomfield and other amounts of money donated to make immigration possible for his family were paid in full after being here seven years by careful planning of Grandfather. They left Benton on August 7, 1868 and made their long and tiresome journey. I have heard my father William Balls say he walked most all of the way across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah on September 2, 1868. They came on to Brigham City and remained for a couple of days with the George Reeder family whom they had known in England. They moved on to the north and settled in Hyde Park, Utah. Grandfather John Balls homesteaded eighty acres of land. The first settlers had already spent several winters in Hyde Park and warned Grandfather of the cold which they were not used to. So he immediately secured a building lot on the street now two blocks south of town square, and with pine logs secured from the mountains east of Hyde Park, built a one room house which had a dirt floor and dirt roof. It was 12 by 14 feet. There were no stoves at that time so a fireplace was built in one end of the room and this had to serve for heating as well as cooking and washing. Their fuel was wood dragged from the mountains. This home was an improvement over the dugouts used by some of the first settlers. Grandfather and the older boys worked in the canyon logging for lumber and firewood. Grandmother and the girls worked at what ever they could find to do. They were all weak and undernourished as they faced the cold of the first winter in Zion. The fire was banked at night to save coals for starting the fire next morning. If the fire died out they would have to go to a neighbor to borrow hot coals, matches were so very scarce. Light was furnished by homemade tallow candles and a bake kettle was the main cooking utensil. Grandfather was a good framer and engaged in the raising of livestock. Marriage soon took four of the older children. Two of the twelve children were born after they arrived in Utah. Grandfather and his boys worked together in the canyon getting lumber. He built the first frame saw mill in Hyde Park. He was water master for ten years. He sawed timbers for himself and other people of the town. He and other men would leave home early in the morning and go up into the hills afoot, each one carrying an ax over his shoulder and a dinner bag, and a canteen to fill with water when they came to a spring along the road. One particular morning, Grandfather left home alone and on foot. When about four miles from home as he came to the fork of the road, he met a brown bear with two cubs. The bear had come down to the spring for a drink of water. There was a stream of water running across the road. As soon as the bear saw Grandfather she made a rush for him. Not knowing what to do he threw his lunch bag at her thinking that might satisfy her. But no, the bear continued after him. He raised his ax and was going to strike the bear, but the bear knocked him down with a slap of her paw and began biting him severely. In the meantime, the cubs had run up the hillside behind some shrubbery. The bear left him and went to her cubs, but in a few minutes she returned and bit him more severely again and again. By this time Grandfather was only partly conscious of his surroundings, but he had presence of mind enough to hold his arm over his face and lie holding his breath as if he were dead. The bear turned him over and bit him some more, then left to check on her cubs momentarily. She returned a third time and smelled around him without molesting him any more. Grandfather lay very quietly for some time. He attempted to walk but found he was too wounded and in so much pain that he crawled on his hands and knees thirty or forty rods down the canyon and met Ruben Perkes and Harry Griffith with a pair of mules and a wagon. They cut brush, piled it on the wagon and laid some hay on it, then with a blanket they made a bed for Grandpa to ride home on. After arriving home, it was necessary for someone to ride horseback to Logan for Dr. Ormsby. They took care of him for about a year before he was well enough to take up his farm work again. I remember well Father and Grandfather working together getting logs from the hills to build houses. Grandfather had a white horse and Father a white mare. They put together and made a team to do their farming with. At harvest time, Grandfather cut the grain with a cradle and Father would follow and tie it in bundles. Then change off cutting. In those days all the grain was cut and stacked before starting the threshing machine. Sometimes they couldn’t get through threshing until late in November when snow came and covered the stacks of grain. Grandfather was a very religious man and would walk to Logan, a distance of five miles to attend Stake Conference. He held the office of High Priest. In the spring of 1874 his wife Sarah was afflicted with brain fever and became dangerously ill. She was a wonderful homemaker, a devoted wife and mother and shared with him the hardships of life. On the 23rd of April she passed away leaving a family of eight children at home, the youngest of whom was about seven months old. Emma, the wife of Elijah Seamons, having no children, took the baby Charles Herbert to rear. His sister Sarah, having a baby near the same age, helped to nurse baby Charles. The two older girls, Eliza and Ellen took over the duties of housekeeping. Their father added two more rooms on the west end of the adobe cabin. It was built of adobe and wood. Wood floors now covered both rooms, making them more comfortable. During the year of 1879, Grandfather married Mary Ann Hawkes in Salt Lake City, Utah. She had several children of her own. Grandfather Balls was stricken with phenomena and died on October 30, 1902, and was buried in the Hyde Park Cemetery. He had 12 half brothers and sisters. Their names were Hammond. The names of his children were William, Mary, John R., Sarah, Hannah, Ellen, James, Eliza, Daniel, Herber, Jabur, and Charles Herbert Balls. By John Alma Balls, grandson

William Balls 1849-1939

Contributor: Linda54 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

William Balls was born on 16 February 1849 at Linstead, Suffolk, England. His parents were John Balls and Sarah Baxter Balls. He was the oldest of twelve children.. Two of the children were born after they arrived in Utah. His parents and family had been introduced to the Church Of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in 1851. Elder Robert Winters baptized and confirmed John and Sarah Balls members of the church. William remembered the Elders coming to their home in England many times. An Elder Nelson was one who came often. He also remembered the Branch President was R.B.Hayes, and going on Sunday to Rumbry Commons to attend meetings which were held at Brother George Hancey's home. The two younger children were pulled in a wagon and William walked behind holding to the back of the wagon for a distance of five or six miles, when he was eight years old. His family was considered to be very poor. His Father worked for very low wages digging trenches to help drain the land and make it more suitable for farming. At ten years of age, William hired out to a wealthy farmer to work for lodging and wages. He received 60 shillings per year. They looked forward to the time when they could go to America and have the opportunity for a better life. William was eighteen years old when his family had a chance to immigrate. They sailed from Liverpool England, on the 14th of July 1868, on the steam ship "Colorado," with 600 members of the Church on board. The ships Captain was William Preston. They arrived in New York on the 28 July, 1868. They traveled by railroad to the Missouri River to a small station called Benton which was the end of the steam rail line. John Balls family were part of the last ox train to cross the plains and were under the direction of S .M .Molen. John Bloomfield a resident of Hyde Park Utah, was a member of this company and had been asked to go back to Benton, with a family to get Fathers family, and help them back to Hyde Park. The family left Benton on the 7th of August 1868 and arrived in Salt Lake City on the 2nd of September 1868. "My father John and I walked every step of the way across the plains, a distance of over one thousand miles. He carried his rifle and ammunition with and shot what fresh game he could for food. From Salt Lake they traveled to Brigham City and remained with the John Reeder Family whom they had known in England. After a rest they resumed their journey by ox team and arrived in Hyde Park on September 6, 1868. The journey had taken four days travel time from Brigham City. A few days after coming to Hyde Park, I went out west with a small group of men to Promitory Flat to work, grading the road bed for the Union Pacific Railroad Co. We completed this job and returned home about Christmas time. The rock meeting house that was being built at that time was completed except for the seats. The people attending church had to carry their own chairs. As I came home one of the Bishopric, Brother Molen asked me to pay ten dollars to buy seats for the meeting house which I willingly did. John Balls family homesteaded 80 acres of land and the family set about building a pine log one room house to shelter us from the approaching winter. Dirt floors, a dirt roof, and a fireplace to heat and cook on were the only amenities that first winter. Dad (John) and his sons went to the canyon to log out lumber for building the house and for firewood. Live coals were shared by neighbors as matches were so scarce. There were no stores bo buy metal stoves or other furniture. William's brothers and sisters included, Mary, John Jr., Sarah, Hannah, Ellen, James, Eliza, Danial, Heber, Jabus, and Charles Herbert. William worked with his family on the farm for a few years and prepared himself for marriage. He married Mary Ellen Metcalf on 21 November 1872, in the old endowment house in Salt Lake City. The marriage was performed by Danial H. Wells. They made the trip by ox team and wagon from Hyde Park to Salt Lake and back. William and Mary Elen had sixteen children, ten boys and six girls. They are in order of birth, William Nathanial, Sarah Elizabeth, Mary Maretta, George David, Ida May, Florence, John Alma, Wilford, Parley, Mabel, Charles Heber, Clarence, Maggie, Twins, LaVaughn and LaVere, and Lyman. In the early 1870's, the grasshoppers ate everything growing in the Cache Valley. William went with a threshing crew over into North Ogden. They thrashed all the grain there then went to Ogden valley. They were gone about six weeks. After returning home with the machinery, William took his ox team and went back for his pay which was 26 bushel of frozen wheat. He took it to Smithfield and traded it for flour at the mill. During his life time, William was always ready and willing to do what he could for the benefit of the family, the church, and the community in which he lived. He took part in public works such as canal building, rock hauling and irrigation management. He was ordained a High Priest by Brother E.W. Smith on 12 October 1901. He performed temple work and gave of his means to support family research. He was called as a home missionary and served in Cache Valley. He also had the privilege of sending two sons George and Parley on missions. A third son John Alma served a six month mission with his wife, Ethel in their later married years. His devoted wife Mary Ellen, was a wonderful homemaker and Mother. She died on March 18, 1912. She is buried in the Hyde Park Cemetery. On May 22, 1925, some fourteen years after the death of his wife Mary Ellen, William married Lizzie Chryst in the Logan Temple. The ceremony was performed by Pesident Joseph R. Shepherd. She was a faithful wife. At the age of 84, William was able to be up and around although not enjoying the best of health. His testimony was, "I know that God lives and I still have this testimony." He died on 16 October 1939 and is buried in the Hyde Park Cemetery.

Written by Emma Balls Purser about her grandfather William Balls

Contributor: Linda54 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

I can remember Grandpa Balls walking up the street to our house. He always used a fork or shovel handle for a cane. He always called me "Emer". Grandpa Balls had a car, the name of it was a "Mitchell". It had two seats on the back of the front seat that you could pull down so kids could sit on it and face the back seat of the car. After Mary Ellen(grandma) died he married Lizzy Chryst from Salt Lake and I used to clean house for her. She was old and he was in bed. She was a nurse in her younger years.

John Balls

Contributor: judyh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

John Balls, son of William Coats and Betsy Balls of Chediston, England, was born October 13, 1825, at Chediston, Suffolk County, England. He was a medium sized man, light brown hair and blue eyes. He was a very quiet reserved man. He was never known to wear a white shirt with a stiff collar, but always carried a colorful handkerchief. John married Sarah Baxter, a daughter of John Baxter and Sarah Butcher. Sarah was born December 6, 1826, at Chediston, Suffolk, England. Twelve children were born to them, my father William Balls being the oldest. Grandfather and Grandmother Balls had ten children born to them in England. They joined the Church in 1851, were baptized and confirmed members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Robert Winters. A Mormon Elder by the name of Nelson visited the home many times. The President of the Branch was R. B. Hayes. My father William Balls has told me how he remembered of going on Sunday to Rumborah Common to attend meeting which was held at Brother George Hancey’s home. The two younger children were pulled in a little wagon, and my father walked behind holding to the back of the wagon for a distance of five or six miles when he was eight years old. Grandfather John Balls was a hard working man and received low wages in England. It was hard to make ends meet. He could only get a limited education owing to the adverse conditions of the poorer class of people. In this locality, the land was very wet and damp, so Grandfather worked for other people digging trenches to drain the land. He received 60 shillings a year. After joining the Church of Jesus Christ, preparations were made for immigration to Utah. Before leaving, a short visit was made to Grandmother Baxter’s home. She had prepared rhubarb sandwiches to last them until they reached Liverpool. During the early part of June 1868, under the direction of William B. Preston and in company with some six-hundred Latter-day Saints, the family left Liverpool aboard their sailing vessel. They were six weeks crossing the Atlantic. They encountered a terrific storm and wind. Because of the extreme roughness of the ocean, the children were tied in their bunks for safety. The adults were required to bail water to keep the ship from sinking. Their ship was blown back in one single night a distance which required three days to recover by sail. The voyage ended by landing in New York about July 28th. From there they traveled by rail to a small town called Benton. The railroad to Omaha had been extended to terminate there. From this point they made preparations to travel on in the pioneer way by ox team. This was the last ox team company of Saints that crossed the plains. Their company was presided over or directed by Captain Simpson M. Molen, who was a member of the Bishopric in the newly established village of Hyde Park, Utah. Hyde Park was the intended destination of John Balls and his family. John Bloomfield, who had also settled Hyde Park, had been called to meet the John Balls family to bring them from the Missouri River to Utah. This meant a distance of 2000 of travel over a almost barren desert. This was not only costly but dangerous. The Indians were not altogether friendly toward the white men. Service rendered by John Bloomfield and other amounts of money donated to make immigration possible for his family were paid in full after being here seven years by careful planning of Grandfather. They left Benton on August 7, 1868 and made their long and tiresome journey. I have heard my father William Balls say he walked most all of the way across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah on September 2, 1868. They came on to Brigham City and remained for a couple of days with the George Reeder family whom they had known in England. They moved on to the north and settled in Hyde Park, Utah. Grandfather John Balls homesteaded eighty acres of land. The first settlers had already spent several winters in Hyde Park and warned Grandfather of the cold which they were not used to. So he immediately secured a building lot on the street now two blocks south of town square, and with pine logs secured from the mountains east of Hyde Park, built a one room house which had a dirt floor and dirt roof. It was 12 by 14 feet. There were no stoves at that time so a fireplace was built in one end of the room and this had to serve for heating as well as cooking and washing. Their fuel was wood dragged from the mountains. This home was an improvement over the dugouts used by some of the first settlers. Grandfather and the older boys worked in the canyon logging for lumber and firewood. Grandmother and the girls worked at what ever they could find to do. They were all weak and undernourished as they faced the cold of the first winter in Zion. The fire was banked at night to save coals for starting the fire next morning. If the fire died out they would have to go to a neighbor to borrow hot coals, matches were so very scarce. Light was furnished by homemade tallow candles and a bake kettle was the main cooking utensil. Grandfather was a good framer and engaged in the raising of livestock. Marriage soon took four of the older children. Two of the twelve children were born after they arrived in Utah. Grandfather and his boys worked together in the canyon getting lumber. He built the first frame saw mill in Hyde Park. He was water master for ten years. He sawed timbers for himself and other people of the town. He and other men would leave home early in the morning and go up into the hills afoot, each one carrying an ax over his shoulder and a dinner bag, and a canteen to fill with water when they came to a spring along the road. One particular morning, Grandfather left home alone and on foot. When about four miles from home as he came to the fork of the road, he met a brown bear with two cubs. The bear had come down to the spring for a drink of water. There was a stream of water running across the road. As soon as the bear saw Grandfather she made a rush for him. Not knowing what to do he threw his lunch bag at her thinking that might satisfy her. But no, the bear continued after him. He raised his ax and was going to strike the bear, but the bear knocked him down with a slap of her paw and began biting him severely. In the meantime, the cubs had run up the hillside behind some shrubbery. The bear left him and went to her cubs, but in a few minutes she returned and bit him more severely again and again. By this time Grandfather was only partly conscious of his surroundings, but he had presence of mind enough to hold his arm over his face and lie holding his breath as if he were dead. The bear turned him over and bit him some more, then left to check on her cubs momentarily. She returned a third time and smelled around him without molesting him any more. Grandfather lay very quietly for some time. He attempted to walk but found he was too wounded and in so much pain that he crawled on his hands and knees thirty or forty rods down the canyon and met Ruben Perkes and Harry Griffith with a pair of mules and a wagon. They cut brush, piled it on the wagon and laid some hay on it, then with a blanket they made a bed for Grandpa to ride home on. After arriving home, it was necessary for someone to ride horseback to Logan for Dr. Ormsby. They took care of him for about a year before he was well enough to take up his farm work again. I remember well Father and Grandfather working together getting logs from the hills to build houses. Grandfather had a white horse and Father a white mare. They put together and made a team to do their farming with. At harvest time, Grandfather cut the grain with a cradle and Father would follow and tie it in bundles. Then change off cutting. In those days all the grain was cut and stacked before starting the threshing machine. Sometimes they couldn’t get through threshing until late in November when snow came and covered the stacks of grain. Grandfather was a very religious man and would walk to Logan, a distance of five miles to attend Stake Conference. He held the office of High Priest. In the spring of 1874 his wife Sarah was afflicted with brain fever and became dangerously ill. She was a wonderful homemaker, a devoted wife and mother and shared with him the hardships of life. On the 23rd of April she passed away leaving a family of eight children at home, the youngest of whom was about seven months old. Emma, the wife of Elijah Seamons, having no children, took the baby Charles Herbert to rear. His sister Sarah, having a baby near the same age, helped to nurse baby Charles. The two older girls, Eliza and Ellen took over the duties of housekeeping. Their father added two more rooms on the west end of the adobe cabin. It was built of adobe and wood. Wood floors now covered both rooms, making them more comfortable. During the year of 1879, Grandfather married Mary Ann Hawkes in Salt Lake City, Utah. She had several children of her own. Grandfather Balls was stricken with phenomena and died on October 30, 1902, and was buried in the Hyde Park Cemetery. He had 12 half brothers and sisters. Their names were Hammond. The names of his children were William, Mary, John R., Sarah, Hannah, Ellen, James, Eliza, Daniel, Herber, Jabur, and Charles Herbert Balls. By John Alma Balls, grandson

William Balls 1849-1939

Contributor: judyh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

William Balls was born on 16 February 1849 at Linstead, Suffolk, England. His parents were John Balls and Sarah Baxter Balls. He was the oldest of twelve children.. Two of the children were born after they arrived in Utah. His parents and family had been introduced to the Church Of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in 1851. Elder Robert Winters baptized and confirmed John and Sarah Balls members of the church. William remembered the Elders coming to their home in England many times. An Elder Nelson was one who came often. He also remembered the Branch President was R.B.Hayes, and going on Sunday to Rumbry Commons to attend meetings which were held at Brother George Hancey's home. The two younger children were pulled in a wagon and William walked behind holding to the back of the wagon for a distance of five or six miles, when he was eight years old. His family was considered to be very poor. His Father worked for very low wages digging trenches to help drain the land and make it more suitable for farming. At ten years of age, William hired out to a wealthy farmer to work for lodging and wages. He received 60 shillings per year. They looked forward to the time when they could go to America and have the opportunity for a better life. William was eighteen years old when his family had a chance to immigrate. They sailed from Liverpool England, on the 14th of July 1868, on the steam ship "Colorado," with 600 members of the Church on board. The ships Captain was William Preston. They arrived in New York on the 28 July, 1868. They traveled by railroad to the Missouri River to a small station called Benton which was the end of the steam rail line. John Balls family were part of the last ox train to cross the plains and were under the direction of S .M .Molen. John Bloomfield a resident of Hyde Park Utah, was a member of this company and had been asked to go back to Benton, with a family to get Fathers family, and help them back to Hyde Park. The family left Benton on the 7th of August 1868 and arrived in Salt Lake City on the 2nd of September 1868. "My father John and I walked every step of the way across the plains, a distance of over one thousand miles. He carried his rifle and ammunition with and shot what fresh game he could for food. From Salt Lake they traveled to Brigham City and remained with the John Reeder Family whom they had known in England. After a rest they resumed their journey by ox team and arrived in Hyde Park on September 6, 1868. The journey had taken four days travel time from Brigham City. A few days after coming to Hyde Park, I went out west with a small group of men to Promitory Flat to work, grading the road bed for the Union Pacific Railroad Co. We completed this job and returned home about Christmas time. The rock meeting house that was being built at that time was completed except for the seats. The people attending church had to carry their own chairs. As I came home one of the Bishopric, Brother Molen asked me to pay ten dollars to buy seats for the meeting house which I willingly did. John Balls family homesteaded 80 acres of land and the family set about building a pine log one room house to shelter us from the approaching winter. Dirt floors, a dirt roof, and a fireplace to heat and cook on were the only amenities that first winter. Dad (John) and his sons went to the canyon to log out lumber for building the house and for firewood. Live coals were shared by neighbors as matches were so scarce. There were no stores bo buy metal stoves or other furniture. William's brothers and sisters included, Mary, John Jr., Sarah, Hannah, Ellen, James, Eliza, Danial, Heber, Jabus, and Charles Herbert. William worked with his family on the farm for a few years and prepared himself for marriage. He married Mary Ellen Metcalf on 21 November 1872, in the old endowment house in Salt Lake City. The marriage was performed by Danial H. Wells. They made the trip by ox team and wagon from Hyde Park to Salt Lake and back. William and Mary Elen had sixteen children, ten boys and six girls. They are in order of birth, William Nathanial, Sarah Elizabeth, Mary Maretta, George David, Ida May, Florence, John Alma, Wilford, Parley, Mabel, Charles Heber, Clarence, Maggie, Twins, LaVaughn and LaVere, and Lyman. In the early 1870's, the grasshoppers ate everything growing in the Cache Valley. William went with a threshing crew over into North Ogden. They thrashed all the grain there then went to Ogden valley. They were gone about six weeks. After returning home with the machinery, William took his ox team and went back for his pay which was 26 bushel of frozen wheat. He took it to Smithfield and traded it for flour at the mill. During his life time, William was always ready and willing to do what he could for the benefit of the family, the church, and the community in which he lived. He took part in public works such as canal building, rock hauling and irrigation management. He was ordained a High Priest by Brother E.W. Smith on 12 October 1901. He performed temple work and gave of his means to support family research. He was called as a home missionary and served in Cache Valley. He also had the privilege of sending two sons George and Parley on missions. A third son John Alma served a six month mission with his wife, Ethel in their later married years. His devoted wife Mary Ellen, was a wonderful homemaker and Mother. She died on March 18, 1912. She is buried in the Hyde Park Cemetery. On May 22, 1925, some fourteen years after the death of his wife Mary Ellen, William married Lizzie Chryst in the Logan Temple. The ceremony was performed by Pesident Joseph R. Shepherd. She was a faithful wife. At the age of 84, William was able to be up and around although not enjoying the best of health. His testimony was, "I know that God lives and I still have this testimony." He died on 16 October 1939 and is buried in the Hyde Park Cemetery.

Written by Emma Balls Purser about her grandfather William Balls

Contributor: judyh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

I can remember Grandpa Balls walking up the street to our house. He always used a fork or shovel handle for a cane. He always called me "Emer". Grandpa Balls had a car, the name of it was a "Mitchell". It had two seats on the back of the front seat that you could pull down so kids could sit on it and face the back seat of the car. After Mary Ellen(grandma) died he married Lizzy Chryst from Salt Lake and I used to clean house for her. She was old and he was in bed. She was a nurse in her younger years.

Life timeline of William Balls

1849
William Balls was born on 16 Feb 1849
William Balls was 11 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
William Balls was 14 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
William Balls was 31 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
William Balls was 40 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
William Balls was 44 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
William Balls was 57 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
William Balls was 68 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
William Balls was 81 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
William Balls died on 16 Oct 1939 at the age of 90
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for William Balls (16 Feb 1849 - 16 Oct 1939), BillionGraves Record 1028019 Hyde Park, Cache, Utah, United States

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