Victor Rex Jackson

7 May 1912 - 24 Jan 2010

Register

Victor Rex Jackson

7 May 1912 - 24 Jan 2010
edit Edit Record
photo Add Images
group_add Add Family
description Add a memory

Grave site information of Victor Rex Jackson (7 May 1912 - 24 Jan 2010) at Evergreen Cemetery in Springville, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
Register to get full access to the grave site record of Victor Rex Jackson
Terms and Conditions

We want you to know exactly how our service works and why we need your registration in order to allow full access to our records.

terms and conditions

Contact Permissions

We’d like to send you special offers and deals exclusive to BillionGraves users to help your family history research. All emails ​include an unsubscribe link. You ​may opt-out at any time.

close
close
Thanks for registering with BillionGraves.com!
In order to gain full access to this record, please verify your email by opening the welcome email that we just sent to you.
close
Sign up the easy way

Use your facebook account to register with BillionGraves. It will be one less password to remember. You can always add an email and password later.

Loading

Life Information

Victor Rex Jackson

Born:
Married: 19 Nov 1947
Died:

Evergreen Cemetery

1876-1998 North 2000 West
Springville, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

PKristineHurd

May 28, 2011
Photographer

Catirrel

May 25, 2011

Nearby Graves

Nearby GravesTM

Some family members have different last names, but they’re still buried relatively close to one another. View grave sites based on name, distance from the original site, and find those missing relatives.

Upgrade to BG+

Find more about Victor Rex...

We found more records about Victor Rex Jackson.

Family

Relationships on the headstone

add

Relationships added by users

add

Grave Site of Victor Rex

edit

Victor Rex Jackson is buried in the Evergreen Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

An Army Engineer’s Recollection of the Longest Day, June 6, 1944

Contributor: PKristineHurd Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

VICTOR REX JACKSON, Private First Class An Army Engineer’s Recollection of the Longest Day, June 6, 1944 I didn’t get much sleep the night of June 5, 1944. We had been on the LCT (Landing Craft Tank) for 24 hours already but the invasion had been delayed because of bad weather. The hard steel decks and the rough seas made sleeping difficult at best. We were one platoon of the 531st Engineers Shore Regiment and our LCT was carrying one big TD-18 caterpillar tractor to help with the massive effort of building a drivable surface across the soft sandy beach for the hundreds of trucks and vehicles that would be hauling supplies onto the beach. Finally the long night was over and we were on our way in. We were assigned to land on Utah beach. The first wave had landed at 0600. Now it was our turn. It was 0630 when the TD-18 caterpillar pulled the sled carrying our construction supplies off the ramp at the front of the LCT. Then I stepped of the ramp with my rifle in hand and my pack on my back. I immediately sank into the water up to my armpits, so I held my rifle above my head. We were still about 400 feet from the shore. But instead of the water getting shallower it started getting deeper. By now the water was up to my chin and my life jacket was partially floating me. My toes were just barely touching the sand so I could barely keep moving forward. Another soldier nearby who was short like me couldn’t swim and he started to panic. Anthony Gish grabbed him and started towing him to shore but they both swallowed a lot of salt water before they made it ashore. I don’t remember any small arms fire but we were getting shelled by mortar fire about every 10 minutes. The good thing about mortar shells is that you can hear them coming with a whistle like sound so you can hit the ground and avoid the shrapnel from the explosion. The bad thing about them is if they land close enough to you, you’re dead anyway. Our first task when we got ashore was to lay out the summerfelt matting across the sand to provide a firm surface for the trucks and vehicles coming in behind us. The matting was made from wire mesh in approximately 6 inch grid pattern with burlap on the bottom. It was manufactured in rolls that were 10 feet wide and 100 feet long. The rolls were stacked on the sled that the TD-18 Cat had pulled ashore. Each roll weighed about 500 pounds so four or five men would grab each end of the roll and start rolling it across the sand to the higher ground. It took about 2 rolls to span the distance from the hard wet sand and hard ground at the top of the beach. The next step after the matting was unrolled was to stake it down with iron stakes. While we were rolling out the matting, the infantry troops were landing on the beach and moving past us inland. One of their officers asked some of our squad to pull three bodies out of the surf. Two of us grabbed each body but when I reached for one poor soldier’s arm it pulled completely out of the socket because his shoulder had been shattered so badly from his wounds. As we continued rolling the matting and securing it with stakes, two soldiers from another company came up to our Command Post looking for their unit. Sergeant Snyder told them to get going to their unit and then walked away. Just then a mortar shell landed and killed one of them instantly. The other man looked like he was in bad shape when I passed by – his back had been cut to ribbons from the shrapnel of the mortar shell. The medics worked on him and gave him blood plasma but he died within an hour. When we finished laying the matting we were assigned to help unload the ships that were now beached on the wet sand. The tide had receded several feet from the time we had landed and because the beach was so shallow, the ships that had been floating a couple of hundred yards offshore when we landed were now sitting on wet sand. We climbed on board and manually loaded boxes into cargo nets that were then swung over the side and into trucks to haul up to the supply dump on the beach. We worked all day and into the night unloading the supplies to literally “feed an army.” I don’t remember specifically saying my prayers that night but I know I said them. I will always be eternally grateful for my Heavenly Father’s protecting care over me that day and throughout the war. The soldiers that I saw die there paid the ultimate sacrifice that we must never forget. I have been back to Utah beach twice since then – once in 1994 and again in 2004 for the 50th and 60th anniversary of that historic event. It looks a lot different now but yet it’s still the same shallow beach. I rolled up my pants and walked in the water – I hope to walk that beach one more time before I die. I guess I don’t have much time left since I’m 94 now. I saw one fellow soldier there that I had never met before but I embraced him and cried with him because we both knew men who gave their all on that beach. I met former CBS newsman Edwin Newman there at the Utah Beach Museum. He asked me about my experience and listened so intently to my story that you would have thought I had won the Congressional Medal of Honor. But I was just one of thousands who did their duty to their country in the name of freedom. I met another French man who shook my hand and thanked me for my service. He was just a boy five years old when the Army liberated his small village. I met the actor Tom Hanks at the American Cemetery at Colleville. He thanked me for my service. I shook hands with Colin Powell and Condoleeza Rice and they thanked me. But the one that really melted my heart was a little French girl who spoke no English. She saw me as we were walking across a parking lot to our rental car. She couldn’t have been more than 8 years old. She was with her parents and I could see her parents talking to her as they looked at my WWII veteran cap. Suddenly she ran from her parents toward me and threw her arms around my legs and gave me the biggest hug that I will remember forever. That was a symbol to me that generations to come will always remember the sacrifices of the “Greatest Generation.” Edited by Harold Jackson

VICTOR REX JACKSON (1912-2010) LIFE HISTORY

Contributor: PKristineHurd Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

VICTOR REX JACKSON (1912-2010) LIFE HISTORY I am the oldest living child of Victor Orin and Ada E. Rex Jackson. I was born 7 May 1912 on the ranch of my Grandfather David Jackson. This ranch was three miles north of Randolph, Utah. I had four brothers and seven sisters, nine of whom are still living. My father was a rancher and business man with a special love for horses and adventure. Through the years, as he worked to provide for his growing family, he undertook a number of business ventures. He was a rancher, a car salesman and other things. As a result, his wife and young family were moved from place to place frequently. By the time I was twelve years old we had lived on a ranch near Randolph, Utah; on a ranch near Woodruff, Utah; in the town of Evanston, Wyoming; in the town of Randolph, Utah; in Ogden, Utah; Driggs, Idaho; and finally in Belfry, Montana where we lived during the remainder of my growing up years. Our family by this time consisted of four boys--Victor Rex, Clarence David, William Trueman, and Ned Roy, and three girls--Freda, Mary Elizabeth, and Alice. My father was in the farming business in Belfry, and needless to say, I had to learn early in life to work and to help care for my younger brothers and sisters. I developed a deep love for my family. My parents, mainly my mother, realized the importance of teaching her family the gospel and in instilling in them the desire to become educated, both in the gospel and in getting along in the world, and in capitalizing on advantages. I graduated from Belfry High School in 1932. By that time there were four more children in the family--Phyllis, Carrol, Hope Ada, and Richard Rex. My youngest sister, Norma Jean, was born about a year after I graduated. For a year or so after graduating from high school, I continued to help with the farming at home. During summers they took cows to Cooke City and sold milk. I got a job working on the highway construction and with a mining company at Cooke City. In 1939 my mother and our Branch President, Thomas Irvine, encouraged and helped me plan and prepare for a mission. I was called to the Central States Mission and entered the Mission Home in Salt Lake City on 5 February 1940. I was released 28 February 1942. I labored first in Belleville, Illinois; then in St Louis, Missouri; Kirksville, Columbus and Moberly, Missouri; and in Coffeeville and Topeka, Kansas. My companions were Elders H. Leslie Reese, Don Gardner, Alma Rigby, Parly Swanson, Johnson, Jacob VanLeeween, Ross, Keith Clark and Lem Lovell. On my return from my mission I rode as far as Salt Lake City with Elders Don Steadman and John H. Evanson. They went by way of Oklahoma, New Mexico, Texas and Arizona. My folks met me in Salt Lake City and I traveled the rest of the way to Montana with them. Seven weeks after returning from my mission, on my thirtieth birthday, I was inducted into the army at Missoula, Montana. I was sent to Fort Leonardwood, Missouri for basic training, and after eight weeks there I was sent to Camp Edwards, Massachusetts. We sailed from New York on 6 August 1942. Eighteen days later we arrived in the British Isles. I spent a month in Ireland and a month in Scotland. We then boarded a ship with a large convoy and sailed for North Africa. We made the invasion into Algeria about twenty-five miles west of Iran. I was with the first Amphibious Brigade 531 Engineers Shore Regiment Co. D. We later made the invasion into Sicily and then into Italy. Half of our reconnaissance party were wounded or killed going into Italy. In November 1943 we went back to England and made the invasion into Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. I waded ashore just thirty minutes after the first men at 6:30 A.M. We had three other campaigns after that and I came home with seven battle stars and not a scratch. My guardian angel was right along side me a lot of times. We were in the heart of Germany when the war ended on my birthday May 7, 1945. I arrived home September 2. I had many depressing and horrifying experiences during this time. One of the hardest and most disheartening was word of the death of my youngest brother, Richard, and of my sister Phyllis. I also had some experiences that strengthened my faith and testimony of the gospel of our Savior, Jesus Christ. The year after I returned from the service I helped my folks on the farm in Belfry, and helped Bill build a service station near Cooke City. Then I went to Salt Lake City and worked as a carpenter. During this time in Salt Lake, I dated several LDS girls, including Naomi Wagstaff, the sister of one of the lady missionaries, Marguerete Wagstaff, whom I had known in Columbia, Missouri while on my mission. In the summer of 1947 I returned home to Montana to go into the block manufacturing business. Later that summer I proposed to my future bride, Naomi Wagstaff, who was a nurse working at the Summit County Hospital in Coalville, Utah. She was originally from Kamas where her father had a dairy farm. We were married in the Salt Lake Temple on 19 November 1947. After Christmas, which we spent with relatives in Utah and Montana, we went to Arizona and spent the next three months there where I worked as a carpenter in the construction business in the Mesa area. We returned to Montana in March and rented a small house in Bridger where I had my block manufacturing business set up. That summer I bought an acre of ground one-half mile south of Bridger. There I constructed a building for my block business, and also a small house for our family. We had two little boys when we moved into this home: Victor Leland, born 22 September 1948, and Harold Gene, born 2 September 1949. The business did well for several years, but because of the nature of the business and weather conditions I had to discontinue block making in the winter and hire out in construction wherever I could get work. True to the teachings and example of my parents, I continued to remain active and involved in church and in civic affairs in the community of Bridger, and was zealous in encouraging and helping our children to do well in their school, community, and church activities. Naomi and I have five sons and one daughter, the two previously mentioned, and James Wallace, born 12 May 1952, Andrew Glen, born 29 November 1954, Morgan Wagstaff, born 12 March 1958, and Bonnie Joan, born 18 May 1961. All of our children graduated from Bridger High School and attended seminary and served missions. In 1980 when Bonnie graduated and left home to attend BYU in Provo, Naomi and I left our home in Bridger, where we had lived for thirty years, and moved to Utah. By this time the three oldest were married, none living in Montana, and the three youngest were attending BYU. For the first two years in Utah, we lived in Bountiful with sister June Green, caring for her.Sister Green was a cripple and in her seventies and couldn't care for herself. She lived in a basement apartment in the home of her daughter and son-in-law, Ardith and Heber Kapp. About Christmas time in 1981, we moved to Ogden to manage some apartments which our son Harold and I bought. These were sold about six months later and Naomi and I moved back to Bridger, Montana. We were there about three months when we leased the place and moved to Provo, Utah. In 1984, after we had sold our home in Bridger, we bought a home in Springville. Naomi cared for another elderly lady, Naoma Earl, who was legally blind. While I have officially retired from construction and carpenter work, I still do some odd jobs as a carpenter and in taking care of our home in Springville and property in Montana. Our children have scattered since getting their college degrees. Two live in Arizona: Bonnie and her husband David Gardner in Mesa, and Morgan and his wife Jeanne in Chandler. Andrew and his wife Linda live in Tullahoma, Tennessee. Jim and his wife Laurie live in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Harold and his wife Verla live in Fairfield, California. Leland and his wife Marlene, after living in California and Arizona for twenty years, now live almost next door in Spanish Fork, Utah. I have served in a number of church callings over the years. I was MIA Secretary at sixteen, taught classes in MIA and Sunday School and Priesthood meetings. I served as a counselor in the Branch Presidency in Belfry, and later as Branch President. I served as Sunday School President and on the Billings Stake High council for seven and a half years. I served as an Ordinance Worker in the Provo Temple, and am presently a stake missionary. I enjoy life and enjoy traveling. I have been privileged to travel these last 20 years, courtesy of two sons who work for different airlines. I enjoy living near Provo where I can go to and root for BYU at sports events, but most of all I love my family and being with them. Also, "I want you to know that I know that Jesus Christ lives. He died upon the cross for each and every one of us. I know that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God and was the instrument in God's hands in restoring the true gospel of Jesus Christ back to the earth. And I know that all of the presidents of the church have been prophets, and that we have a living prophet to guide and direct us today, President Gordon B. Hinckley."

An Army Engineer’s Recollection of the Longest Day, June 6, 1944

Contributor: Jan MWH Created: 1 year ago Updated: 8 months ago

VICTOR REX JACKSON, Private First Class An Army Engineer’s Recollection of the Longest Day, June 6, 1944 I didn’t get much sleep the night of June 5, 1944. We had been on the LCT (Landing Craft Tank) for 24 hours already but the invasion had been delayed because of bad weather. The hard steel decks and the rough seas made sleeping difficult at best. We were one platoon of the 531st Engineers Shore Regiment and our LCT was carrying one big TD-18 caterpillar tractor to help with the massive effort of building a drivable surface across the soft sandy beach for the hundreds of trucks and vehicles that would be hauling supplies onto the beach. Finally the long night was over and we were on our way in. We were assigned to land on Utah beach. The first wave had landed at 0600. Now it was our turn. It was 0630 when the TD-18 caterpillar pulled the sled carrying our construction supplies off the ramp at the front of the LCT. Then I stepped of the ramp with my rifle in hand and my pack on my back. I immediately sank into the water up to my armpits, so I held my rifle above my head. We were still about 400 feet from the shore. But instead of the water getting shallower it started getting deeper. By now the water was up to my chin and my life jacket was partially floating me. My toes were just barely touching the sand so I could barely keep moving forward. Another soldier nearby who was short like me couldn’t swim and he started to panic. Anthony Gish grabbed him and started towing him to shore but they both swallowed a lot of salt water before they made it ashore. I don’t remember any small arms fire but we were getting shelled by mortar fire about every 10 minutes. The good thing about mortar shells is that you can hear them coming with a whistle like sound so you can hit the ground and avoid the shrapnel from the explosion. The bad thing about them is if they land close enough to you, you’re dead anyway. Our first task when we got ashore was to lay out the summerfelt matting across the sand to provide a firm surface for the trucks and vehicles coming in behind us. The matting was made from wire mesh in approximately 6 inch grid pattern with burlap on the bottom. It was manufactured in rolls that were 10 feet wide and 100 feet long. The rolls were stacked on the sled that the TD-18 Cat had pulled ashore. Each roll weighed about 500 pounds so four or five men would grab each end of the roll and start rolling it across the sand to the higher ground. It took about 2 rolls to span the distance from the hard wet sand and hard ground at the top of the beach. The next step after the matting was unrolled was to stake it down with iron stakes. While we were rolling out the matting, the infantry troops were landing on the beach and moving past us inland. One of their officers asked some of our squad to pull three bodies out of the surf. Two of us grabbed each body but when I reached for one poor soldier’s arm it pulled completely out of the socket because his shoulder had been shattered so badly from his wounds. As we continued rolling the matting and securing it with stakes, two soldiers from another company came up to our Command Post looking for their unit. Sergeant Snyder told them to get going to their unit and then walked away. Just then a mortar shell landed and killed one of them instantly. The other man looked like he was in bad shape when I passed by – his back had been cut to ribbons from the shrapnel of the mortar shell. The medics worked on him and gave him blood plasma but he died within an hour. When we finished laying the matting we were assigned to help unload the ships that were now beached on the wet sand. The tide had receded several feet from the time we had landed and because the beach was so shallow, the ships that had been floating a couple of hundred yards offshore when we landed were now sitting on wet sand. We climbed on board and manually loaded boxes into cargo nets that were then swung over the side and into trucks to haul up to the supply dump on the beach. We worked all day and into the night unloading the supplies to literally “feed an army.” I don’t remember specifically saying my prayers that night but I know I said them. I will always be eternally grateful for my Heavenly Father’s protecting care over me that day and throughout the war. The soldiers that I saw die there paid the ultimate sacrifice that we must never forget. I have been back to Utah beach twice since then – once in 1994 and again in 2004 for the 50th and 60th anniversary of that historic event. It looks a lot different now but yet it’s still the same shallow beach. I rolled up my pants and walked in the water – I hope to walk that beach one more time before I die. I guess I don’t have much time left since I’m 94 now. I saw one fellow soldier there that I had never met before but I embraced him and cried with him because we both knew men who gave their all on that beach. I met former CBS newsman Edwin Newman there at the Utah Beach Museum. He asked me about my experience and listened so intently to my story that you would have thought I had won the Congressional Medal of Honor. But I was just one of thousands who did their duty to their country in the name of freedom. I met another French man who shook my hand and thanked me for my service. He was just a boy five years old when the Army liberated his small village. I met the actor Tom Hanks at the American Cemetery at Colleville. He thanked me for my service. I shook hands with Colin Powell and Condoleeza Rice and they thanked me. But the one that really melted my heart was a little French girl who spoke no English. She saw me as we were walking across a parking lot to our rental car. She couldn’t have been more than 8 years old. She was with her parents and I could see her parents talking to her as they looked at my WWII veteran cap. Suddenly she ran from her parents toward me and threw her arms around my legs and gave me the biggest hug that I will remember forever. That was a symbol to me that generations to come will always remember the sacrifices of the “Greatest Generation.” Edited by Harold Jackson

VICTOR REX JACKSON (1912-2010) LIFE HISTORY

Contributor: Jan MWH Created: 1 year ago Updated: 8 months ago

VICTOR REX JACKSON (1912-2010) LIFE HISTORY I am the oldest living child of Victor Orin and Ada E. Rex Jackson. I was born 7 May 1912 on the ranch of my Grandfather David Jackson. This ranch was three miles north of Randolph, Utah. I had four brothers and seven sisters, nine of whom are still living. My father was a rancher and business man with a special love for horses and adventure. Through the years, as he worked to provide for his growing family, he undertook a number of business ventures. He was a rancher, a car salesman and other things. As a result, his wife and young family were moved from place to place frequently. By the time I was twelve years old we had lived on a ranch near Randolph, Utah; on a ranch near Woodruff, Utah; in the town of Evanston, Wyoming; in the town of Randolph, Utah; in Ogden, Utah; Driggs, Idaho; and finally in Belfry, Montana where we lived during the remainder of my growing up years. Our family by this time consisted of four boys--Victor Rex, Clarence David, William Trueman, and Ned Roy, and three girls--Freda, Mary Elizabeth, and Alice. My father was in the farming business in Belfry, and needless to say, I had to learn early in life to work and to help care for my younger brothers and sisters. I developed a deep love for my family. My parents, mainly my mother, realized the importance of teaching her family the gospel and in instilling in them the desire to become educated, both in the gospel and in getting along in the world, and in capitalizing on advantages. I graduated from Belfry High School in 1932. By that time there were four more children in the family--Phyllis, Carrol, Hope Ada, and Richard Rex. My youngest sister, Norma Jean, was born about a year after I graduated. For a year or so after graduating from high school, I continued to help with the farming at home. During summers they took cows to Cooke City and sold milk. I got a job working on the highway construction and with a mining company at Cooke City. In 1939 my mother and our Branch President, Thomas Irvine, encouraged and helped me plan and prepare for a mission. I was called to the Central States Mission and entered the Mission Home in Salt Lake City on 5 February 1940. I was released 28 February 1942. I labored first in Belleville, Illinois; then in St Louis, Missouri; Kirksville, Columbus and Moberly, Missouri; and in Coffeeville and Topeka, Kansas. My companions were Elders H. Leslie Reese, Don Gardner, Alma Rigby, Parly Swanson, Johnson, Jacob VanLeeween, Ross, Keith Clark and Lem Lovell. On my return from my mission I rode as far as Salt Lake City with Elders Don Steadman and John H. Evanson. They went by way of Oklahoma, New Mexico, Texas and Arizona. My folks met me in Salt Lake City and I traveled the rest of the way to Montana with them. Seven weeks after returning from my mission, on my thirtieth birthday, I was inducted into the army at Missoula, Montana. I was sent to Fort Leonardwood, Missouri for basic training, and after eight weeks there I was sent to Camp Edwards, Massachusetts. We sailed from New York on 6 August 1942. Eighteen days later we arrived in the British Isles. I spent a month in Ireland and a month in Scotland. We then boarded a ship with a large convoy and sailed for North Africa. We made the invasion into Algeria about twenty-five miles west of Iran. I was with the first Amphibious Brigade 531 Engineers Shore Regiment Co. D. We later made the invasion into Sicily and then into Italy. Half of our reconnaissance party were wounded or killed going into Italy. In November 1943 we went back to England and made the invasion into Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. I waded ashore just thirty minutes after the first men at 6:30 A.M. We had three other campaigns after that and I came home with seven battle stars and not a scratch. My guardian angel was right along side me a lot of times. We were in the heart of Germany when the war ended on my birthday May 7, 1945. I arrived home September 2. I had many depressing and horrifying experiences during this time. One of the hardest and most disheartening was word of the death of my youngest brother, Richard, and of my sister Phyllis. I also had some experiences that strengthened my faith and testimony of the gospel of our Savior, Jesus Christ. The year after I returned from the service I helped my folks on the farm in Belfry, and helped Bill build a service station near Cooke City. Then I went to Salt Lake City and worked as a carpenter. During this time in Salt Lake, I dated several LDS girls, including Naomi Wagstaff, the sister of one of the lady missionaries, Marguerete Wagstaff, whom I had known in Columbia, Missouri while on my mission. In the summer of 1947 I returned home to Montana to go into the block manufacturing business. Later that summer I proposed to my future bride, Naomi Wagstaff, who was a nurse working at the Summit County Hospital in Coalville, Utah. She was originally from Kamas where her father had a dairy farm. We were married in the Salt Lake Temple on 19 November 1947. After Christmas, which we spent with relatives in Utah and Montana, we went to Arizona and spent the next three months there where I worked as a carpenter in the construction business in the Mesa area. We returned to Montana in March and rented a small house in Bridger where I had my block manufacturing business set up. That summer I bought an acre of ground one-half mile south of Bridger. There I constructed a building for my block business, and also a small house for our family. We had two little boys when we moved into this home: Victor Leland, born 22 September 1948, and Harold Gene, born 2 September 1949. The business did well for several years, but because of the nature of the business and weather conditions I had to discontinue block making in the winter and hire out in construction wherever I could get work. True to the teachings and example of my parents, I continued to remain active and involved in church and in civic affairs in the community of Bridger, and was zealous in encouraging and helping our children to do well in their school, community, and church activities. Naomi and I have five sons and one daughter, the two previously mentioned, and James Wallace, born 12 May 1952, Andrew Glen, born 29 November 1954, Morgan Wagstaff, born 12 March 1958, and Bonnie Joan, born 18 May 1961. All of our children graduated from Bridger High School and attended seminary and served missions. In 1980 when Bonnie graduated and left home to attend BYU in Provo, Naomi and I left our home in Bridger, where we had lived for thirty years, and moved to Utah. By this time the three oldest were married, none living in Montana, and the three youngest were attending BYU. For the first two years in Utah, we lived in Bountiful with sister June Green, caring for her.Sister Green was a cripple and in her seventies and couldn't care for herself. She lived in a basement apartment in the home of her daughter and son-in-law, Ardith and Heber Kapp. About Christmas time in 1981, we moved to Ogden to manage some apartments which our son Harold and I bought. These were sold about six months later and Naomi and I moved back to Bridger, Montana. We were there about three months when we leased the place and moved to Provo, Utah. In 1984, after we had sold our home in Bridger, we bought a home in Springville. Naomi cared for another elderly lady, Naoma Earl, who was legally blind. While I have officially retired from construction and carpenter work, I still do some odd jobs as a carpenter and in taking care of our home in Springville and property in Montana. Our children have scattered since getting their college degrees. Two live in Arizona: Bonnie and her husband David Gardner in Mesa, and Morgan and his wife Jeanne in Chandler. Andrew and his wife Linda live in Tullahoma, Tennessee. Jim and his wife Laurie live in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Harold and his wife Verla live in Fairfield, California. Leland and his wife Marlene, after living in California and Arizona for twenty years, now live almost next door in Spanish Fork, Utah. I have served in a number of church callings over the years. I was MIA Secretary at sixteen, taught classes in MIA and Sunday School and Priesthood meetings. I served as a counselor in the Branch Presidency in Belfry, and later as Branch President. I served as Sunday School President and on the Billings Stake High council for seven and a half years. I served as an Ordinance Worker in the Provo Temple, and am presently a stake missionary. I enjoy life and enjoy traveling. I have been privileged to travel these last 20 years, courtesy of two sons who work for different airlines. I enjoy living near Provo where I can go to and root for BYU at sports events, but most of all I love my family and being with them. Also, "I want you to know that I know that Jesus Christ lives. He died upon the cross for each and every one of us. I know that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God and was the instrument in God's hands in restoring the true gospel of Jesus Christ back to the earth. And I know that all of the presidents of the church have been prophets, and that we have a living prophet to guide and direct us today, President Gordon B. Hinckley."

Life timeline of Victor Rex Jackson

1912
Victor Rex Jackson was born on 7 May 1912
Victor Rex Jackson was 16 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
1928
See More
Victor Rex Jackson was 27 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
1939
See More
Victor Rex Jackson was 28 years old when The Holocaust: The first prisoners arrive at a new concentration camp at Auschwitz. The Holocaust, also referred to as the Shoah, was a genocide during World War II in which Nazi Germany, aided by its collaborators, systematically murdered some six million European Jews, around two-thirds of the Jewish population of Europe, between 1941 and 1945. Jews were targeted for extermination as part of a larger event involving the persecution and murder of other groups, including in particular the Roma and "incurably sick", as well as ethnic Poles and other Slavs, Soviet citizens, Soviet prisoners of war, political opponents, gay men and Jehovah's Witnesses, resulting in up to 17 million deaths overall.
1940
See More
Victor Rex Jackson was 45 years old when Space Race: Launch of Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth. The Space Race refers to the 20th-century competition between two Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union (USSR) and the United States (US), for dominance in spaceflight capability. It had its origins in the missile-based nuclear arms race between the two nations that occurred following World War II, aided by captured German missile technology and personnel from the Aggregat program. The technological superiority required for such dominance was seen as necessary for national security, and symbolic of ideological superiority. The Space Race spawned pioneering efforts to launch artificial satellites, uncrewed space probes of the Moon, Venus, and Mars, and human spaceflight in low Earth orbit and to the Moon.
1957
See More
Victor Rex Jackson was 52 years old when The Beatles make their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, performing before a "record-busting" audience of 73 million viewers across the USA. The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. With members John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, they became widely regarded as the foremost and most influential music band in history. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later experimented with several musical styles, ranging from pop ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock, often incorporating classical elements and unconventional recording techniques in innovative ways. In 1963, their enormous popularity first emerged as "Beatlemania"; as the group's music grew in sophistication, led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the band were integral to pop music's evolution into an art form and to the development of the counterculture of the 1960s.
1964
See More
Victor Rex Jackson was 67 years old when Jim Jones led more than 900 members of the Peoples Temple to mass murder/suicide in Jonestown, Guyana, hours after some of its members assassinated U.S. Congressman Leo Ryan (pictured). James Warren Jones was an American religious cult leader who initiated and was responsible for a mass suicide and mass murder in Jonestown, Guyana. He considered Jesus Christ as being in compliance with an overarching belief in socialism as the correct social order. Jones was ordained as a Disciples of Christ pastor, and he achieved notoriety as the founder and leader of the Peoples Temple cult.
1978
See More
Victor Rex Jackson was 71 years old when Michael Jackson's Thriller, the best-selling album of all time, was released. Michael Joseph Jackson was an American singer, songwriter, and dancer. Dubbed the "King of Pop", he was one of the most popular entertainers in the world, and was the best-selling music artist during the year of his death. Jackson's contributions to music, dance, and fashion along with his publicized personal life made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades.
1982
See More
Victor Rex Jackson was 79 years old when The World Wide Web is opened to the public. The World Wide Web (WWW), also called the Web, is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and accessible via the Internet. English scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989. He wrote the first web browser in 1990 while employed at CERN in Switzerland. The browser was released outside CERN in 1991, first to other research institutions starting in January 1991 and to the general public on the Internet in August 1991.
1991
See More
Victor Rex Jackson was 91 years old when Invasion of Iraq: In the early hours of the morning, the United States and three other countries (the UK, Australia and Poland) begin military operations in Iraq. The 2003 invasion of Iraq was the first stage of the Iraq War. The invasion phase began on 20 March 2003 and lasted just over one month, including 21 days of major combat operations, in which a combined force of troops from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Poland invaded Iraq. This early stage of the war formally ended on 1 May 2003 when U.S. President George W. Bush declared the "end of major combat operations", after which the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) was established as the first of several successive transitional governments leading up to the first Iraqi parliamentary election in January 2005. U.S. military forces later remained in Iraq until the withdrawal in 2011.
2003
See More
Victor Rex Jackson died on 24 Jan 2010 at the age of 97
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Victor Rex Jackson (7 May 1912 - 24 Jan 2010), BillionGraves Record 2238 Springville, Utah, Utah, United States

Loading