Vern Perry

15 Dec 1892 - 19 Oct 1984

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Vern Perry

15 Dec 1892 - 19 Oct 1984
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Vern Perry was born December 15,1892 to Joseph Francis Perry and Martha Ann Hovey. He was named Stephen LaVern Perry. This name was either too long or too fancy and Vern being a simple man decided to use just plain 'Vern' and for more important things she used 'Stephen Vern'. The family lived in a o
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Life Information

Vern Perry

Born:
Married: 24 Feb 1923
Died:

Rexburg Cemetery

312 Cemetery Rd
Rexburg, Madison, Idaho
United States

Headstone Description

Sealed Nov 27, 1942
Transcriber

finnsh

August 4, 2011
Photographer

Mitchowl

August 4, 2011

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Vern History History by daughter, Nona Perry Miller

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Vern Perry was born December 15,1892 to Joseph Francis Perry and Martha Ann Hovey. He was named Stephen LaVern Perry. This name was either too long or too fancy and Vern being a simple man decided to use just plain "Vern" and for more important things she used "Stephen Vern". The family lived in a one room log home on a homestead east and north of Rigby. The first child, a boy, died shortly after birth and was buried in Millville, Utah. Four more children came to this family: Mary Alice (Mayme), Alonzo Earl, Vern and five years later William Henry was born. Bill was just a few weeks old when Martha became very ill. She was taken to Millville Utah and passed away at the home of her parents. She was buried there beside her first born child. The family came back to Rigby but they lost the farm as it had been mortgaged for medical expenses. This tragedy left a father with four young children, not even a place to live and he needed to work so that the family could survive. Relatives and friends tried to help. The Stowell family (a cousin) kept the children for about 6 months. Another relative, the Hulse family also helped out but they had a large family of their own. One time they lived with a Swedish couple who had no children of their own. Vern said, "They talked Swedish to the horses, cows, pigs, and chickens but to us kids they tried to talk United States." Finally a widow lady, Nellie Weaver Preston was hired to care for the children. She had six children of her own so when Joseph Perry married Nellie Preston it made a family of 10 children. More children came to this union making a total of fifteen children. They got along good and when times were good they were able to stay together but other times Vern boarded out with other families. Though young, he was expected to work for his keep. One time he lived with a family where the school teacher was boarding. The teacher was good to him but made him go to school. Vern would cry and make a fuss but the teacher would drag him along for the two miles in the cold. He had no overshoes so his feet got wet and cold trudging through the snow. One lady made him promise that he wouldn't go into the orchard. The neighbor boy who was supposed to be looking after him wanted some plums and talked him into going into the orchard. He said that he straightened the grass behind himself and thought she would never know. Somehow she found out and told him to cut some willows. She said a little bird had told her and Vern said, "I guess it did. I don't know how else she could have found out." The Perry family continued to move for jobs and Vern was not always with them. From Idaho Falls to Union, Utah to a dairy east of Rexburg and then to Annis on the West side of the little Buttes. Vem was baptized while in the Annis Ward these records were lost and Vern was re-baptized in 1932. One year Vern thinned beets for some one there. A woman would go down the row with a long hoe and space, and a kid would have to crawl along and pull out the doubles. He earned three dollars but was not paid. The day before the 4th of July the people went to town so Vern's parents knew they had some money. The Stowells loaned Vern a horse and he went after his pay and took the money home. The next morning his parents and the girls dressed up and went to town. He didn't get any of the three dollars nor did he get to go to town. Vern says that apparently the seasons used to be shorter here. Some areas had a hard time raising wheat and it would freeze before it was harvested. Every family had a big flour bin in the kitchen, apparently big enough to hold the winters supply. Not sure where the Perry’s were living at the time, but the kids took their wheat to a flour mill in Menan - It was the only mill around. The miller asked where the wheat was raised and knew immediately it had been frozen and would not make good flour. A man, unknown to them, offered to trade his wheat as his wheat was only going to be used for cattle feed. Vern went to school there one term and then they moved to Independence where his dad worked for John Jones. Vern and his step sister had the job of herding the hogs. After the harvest the hogs would be turned into the grain field to eat the wheat that had dropped. They needed watching, as barbed wire fences didn't keep them in. Vern attended the Independence School when ever he could. The school year was short and there was no extra time to study. He went to school until about 4th grade. It may have been about this time that Vern went to some sort of a celebration possibly at the Independence School where they were selling food and drink. He only had a nickel that he would toss up into the air and then catch it. One time he tossed it up and couldn't find where it came down. He had his heart set on getting a lemonade and was so thirsty. There was a well there but someone told him there was dead cat in it. Vern tells of a farm his dad homesteaded down by the river. They would enter a gate on the south side of the Bannock Gym and there would be a total of 9 gates to open and close as the road went through the farms. This farm was mortgaged to buy a team of horses. The team was used to hire out for farm work such as digging beets. Vern was not a part of this deal but somehow he ended up paying for the harnesses. Usually the house is built near a spring or stream but this time they were pretty far away and water had to be carried quite a distance. His dad started a well but didn't finish it saying one of the kids might fall in. It was probably here that one of the Preston boys - a step brother planted some potatoes. No horse was available so they used a couple of the kids to pull the cultivator. His dad had a real good boat. It was probably a fishing boat as Joe Perry was a good fisherman. It had been said that he could catch a fish where there wasn't any fish. The boys took the boat one day and got caught in a whirlpool, probably in the river. They were really scared and never did that again. Vern says that his parents went on a trip and some how this farm was lost. Vern worked around doing what ever he could do. Thinning and hoeing sugar beets was hard and back breaking work. Vern once commented to someone, "The soil in that field is really good. I cut all the rocks in two years ago. He was always hoping to find something better than thinning beets. At one time he worked in a livery stable in Shelley and had to stay in the stable with the horses. This stable was located about where Huntsman grocery store is now. He herded sheep for Frank Spaulding, an early homesteader, and thinks he earned maybe fifty cents a day. At that time they only had barbed wire fences. The sheep would get through the fence out into the fields and bloat and die. Frank went on a trip someplace and saw wire netting. He had some shipped to him and that was the first it was used in this part of the country. Vern tells of helping his father cut rock on the hills East of Thornton. The rock was used for buildings one of which was the Thornton elevator. They used a chisel and drill and blasted to cut the rock. It was very poor pay and they nearly starved to death. Vern said his hands still hurt from the drill. Vern went to work for the McGarry's who had a big farm and a 400 acre cattle ranch at Kilgore. They became his family and he called them Dad Mc Garry and Grandma Mc Garry. They treated him really good and all the generations of the McGarrys had a lot of respect for Vern throughout the years. Someone had to stay at the Kilgore Ranch all winter to feed the stock. They used horses and sleighs. The horses learned to follow in the sleigh tracks and if the didn't, they could easily go into the snow up to their hips. One time Dad Me Carry looked across the meadow and could see three horses. The winter was bad and the snow was really deep. By Jasus, we'll give them a chance and he took off on some skis that Vern had bought. These were Indian ponies probably wandering in search of something to eat. (The Indians came there to fish in the summer.) He only made it back with one horse. One was dead by the time he got there and another one died on the way. He wore the skis and led the horse. The horse kept stepping on the skis. World War I came along and Vern felt it his duty to enlist. On his way to town he met Dad McGarry who turned around and said, '"By Jasus, I'll go with you." Vern wondered if his intention had been to try to talk him out of enlisting. He was assigned to infantry and he often told of the boat ride over and how it made him too sick to die. Horses were used for everything and Vern knew about horses. He said that some of the city guys didn't even know that horses needed a drink of water. He often talked of his war experiences - of little food, of huddling down in trenches and having lice crawl all over his body, of being gassed and of seeing his buddies die. There is more detailed war experiences in the interview from the Rexburg 7th Ward and also the newspaper interview. He told of the excitement of seeing The Statue of Liberty when he returned. He loved his country and was proud to serve. He had a lot of respect for the flag or anything patriotic. The war ended November 11, 1918 Vern returned home in June the next year - to the only home he knew - The McGarrys. No one had bothered his things and it was like he had never been gone. Even the dog remembered him. Shortly after this Vern and another fellow went to Grey's Lake - east of Idaho Falls to homestead. He always called this Tipporary. He had a wagon and a team of horses and stayed over night at Ozone where there was water for the horses. A black man from the area helped do some fencing. The cattlemen and sheepmen had no respect for the homesteader and would tear up the property. The fence wasn't good, was never completed, and didn't keep the cattle and sheep out of the crops. There was no money to keep going and he lost the farm. Vern went back to the McGarrys. Dances seemed to be the main entertainment in those days. It was at a dance that Vern met Pauline Struhs. He borrowed a buggy from the McGarrys and they went to Rexburg where they were married February 24, 1923. They lived on McGarry farm where Vern had rented a small part of the land for his own use. Times were very hard and there were other homes. They lived in the house that later became the Edstrom home. Dean was born in 1924. In 1925 Martha Veronika was born and lived only a few hours. Vern had to borrow some money for a burial plot that cost $35 in the Rexburg cemetery. He felt bad that Pauline's father did not offer to help. Ruby was born in 1926 in the house belonging to Halls across the street from the Edstrom House. Dean recalls living in a house across from the Walz's in Independence. Dean had Brights disease and the doctor prescribed cream of tarter , which was supposed to purify the blood. He had to take so much that they started buying it in bulk at the drugstore. Dean would go to town with Dad on the horse and they would buy a sack of cream of tarter costing 25 cents. Nona was born in 1932 on the "Woods Place". A narrow lane led to the house that couldn't be seen from the road. There the sugar beet crop got bugs and Vern and Dean sacked up wheat and sold it at the Thornton elevator for 8 cents a sack in order to pay for and insecticide spray that somebody had concocted. The big truck with a tank on the back came and sprayed up and down the rows. That night there was a cloud burst and washed it all off. There was hardly any crop at all - just a beet here and there. Vern may have been trying to buy this farm but some how it was suddenly sold to Joe Jensen. It seemed that Joe wanted to take a trip or something and needed to get things settled. Vern and Pauline were given 3 days to move off. Nona was a little baby, it was February and about 40 degrees below. At that time they moved to the little farm where the children grew up and they spent their remaining days. Several people had attempted to buy this farm and it would be mortgaged and lost. The country was deep into the depression. Vern bought the approximately 40 acres from Beneficial Life Insurance Company for about $2500. The agent was very helpful. Vern went to see Bill Mortenson because Bill had money, and Bill agreed to buy a real good Holstein milk cow and calf for about $40. This cow gave 2 buckets of milk each milking. The house was in terrible condition. Windows were out and snow blew in cold, it was drafty, and dirty. To get through the winter, rooms, were closed off sometimes using quilts. Carma was born here in 1933 and Clinton in 1942. All children were born at home and in the earlier years the doctor was likely paid with chickens and produce. One day the long rear room used as a kitchen caught fire from the cook stove. Fortunately there was a crew of men nearby cleaning the canal. There must have been a little water in it and they carried buckets of water and put out the fire. Changes and additions were made over the years and eventually Vern and Pauline had a comfortable home. Sometime in the late 1930's the electrical lines came through. Not everybody could afford the five dollars and the Perry's had to wait. When electricity did come, the kerosene lamps were put away, and one of the first purchases when money allowed was a electric washing machine. Dean worked and earned a little money and paid four dollars for a used radio. It had to have a antenna outside on a post. There was the news, music with all the latest songs , soap operas, and programs that were either funny or told a story like Death Valley days - or the "Whistler" which was a mystery. After World War II a used refrigerator was purchased. Prior to that time, milk, butter, etc. were kept in the root cellar. There was no money for anything you could do without so a telephone didn't come until early 1950's. Prior to that phone calls were rare. One of the neighbors would come with a message that we were wanted on the phone. It took two stoves to heat the house, a heater in the living room when needed and a cook stove which was kept going winter and summer. Every night Vern would bring in the kindling for the next mornings fire. Before bedtime he would split the kindling into narrow sticks and had a way of shaving some of them so that they would curl. He would start the fire first thing the next morning so the house would be warm. The first crops on this farm weren't too good. A four horse team was often needed for farm work but that first year in order to buy seed it was necessary to sell a young horse that had just been broken for farm work and would have been the very best horse to plant the first crop. The Larson brothers - Pete, Henry, Nephi, Rudolph, and Alma came to check out the horse. They must have had some kind of unofficial corporation with Rudolph as the treasurer. The horse was sold. He never had four horses again and after that he borrowed a horse when necessary. Most of the time he got by with three horses and used a 3 horse evener to make up for the 4th horse. The first grain crop was about 3/4 weeds. It was so bad that it was cut with a mowing machine and then brought in and stacked in the yard. The stack looked like a big bunch of tumble weeds. Reinhart Walz who had the local threshing machine came and run it through extra slow trying to salvage as much as possible. One summer Vera was trying to upgrade the tiny granary which was part of a shed. He wanted to make a bin with a cement floor. He and Dean went Mickelson Lumber and Mr. Mickelson was sitting out front smoking a pipe. They needed two or three 2x4's and a couple of sacks of cement all of which cost about $7.50, but it was necessary to charge that small amount until after harvest. In the summer there was never much money. Eggs and cream that were taken to town bought a few groceries. Vern worked hard to improve this little farm. He fought the weeds and scraped off the high spots and filled in the low spots, kept it irrigated and the crops got better. The kids were paid a few pennies for each bucket of rocks they would pick up out of the soil. But a small farm with a mortgage and some extra work on the side when available was not a lot to keep a family going. Many folks around had inherited their land from their parents who had homesteaded it. Everyone pitched in and did what they could. Pauline worked in the fields when she was needed. The kids did field work at home and worked for the neighbors when it was available. Vern always milked 3 to 5 cows. If we weren't getting much milk, it would be run through the separator morning and night and the cream would be saved and taken to the creamery in town. Much of the time, especially in later years, the milk was sold. The milk truck would come through very early in the mornings and pick up the cans. This meant working fast to get the milk out to the road in time. Vern always kept his clock a few minutes fast and that alarm would go off about 4:30 A.M. Except for just a very few years the milking and chores were done with a kerosene lantern that hung on a nail in the barn and later a big light was installed that lit up the yard. Eventually Dean put electricity in the barn. Nice long green grass grew abundantly in the gutters along the road. It was the kids chore to herd the cows along the road for a few hours each day in the summer. The cows would graze and eat non-stop. This helped conserve the little bit of grass that grew in the pasture in the trees up in the field. In the spring there would be baby calves, pigs and chickens. Sometimes on a frosty morning the chickens and maybe a little pig or two would be wrapped up in old sweaters or blankets, put in a bucket, brought into the house and put in a warm spot behind the stove. There were always several cats around. They helped keep the mice away so they served a good purpose. But sometimes a new batch of kittens was not needed. Vern would put them in a gunny sack and drown them when they were brand new before their eyes were open. Surely an unpleasant task, but the most humane way at that time to control the cat population. Vern had a yellow and brown shaggy dog named Olie. It followed him wherever he went. One day he was mowing hay. Unfortunately the dog was right there by his side and got in the way of the mower blades. The dogs legs were cut off. Vern felt really bad and had to go get a neighbor who owned a gun to come shoot the dog. It was Friday the 13th -really an unlucky day. Vern worked for other farmers doing whatever needed to be done. He worked for Earl Hall, sometimes for extended periods of time. They treated him really good and always invited him at noon time for a hot meal. Mrs. Hall was called "Aunt Maude". He would ride the little mare "Babe," to work everyday. He never owned a saddle. This horse was good for anything. Not only could she be ridden but would do her share , when hitched up for farm work. Sometimes he would come home after dark. Pauline would often have the milking done but there were still other chores to do. Just before World War II a dollar a day was the going wage for farm work. Clinton was born. May 12, 1942. The kids were excited to have a new baby around the house. Dean was about to be drafted to go off to war. A special effort was made to have the family sealed in the Salt Lake Temple. That would seem like a short trip to us today, but this was an older car and the speed limit was 35 miles per hour. The kids were bundled up in blankets in the back seat. They were traveling that Thanksgiving Day and dinner was a sandwich eaten in the car. There was no money for hamburger stops. The family was sealed on November 27, 1942. This trip lasted about four days. World War II brought many changes. Boys at age 18 had to register for the draft and went off to war in Europe and Japan. When the boys left or returned the benches would be moved out of the little one room church making a dance floor. Sometimes the benches would be outside in the snow. Some of the locals would play some music and there would be a community social. It was always a sad time when the boys went off to war it and some did not return. Some of the folks left the area to work in the defense plants. Everyone was needed and now some women were working. It was the patriotic thing to do. It seemed that everything was rationed - tires, gasoline, meat, sugar, canned goods, and shoes. Many things were not available to buy at all. Even the foil off the chewing gum wrappers was saved. Sugar affected the Perrys the most as home canned fruit and jelly were a big part of their diet. Jelly was replaced with dark Karo syrup which was bought in half-gallon and gallon buckets. Dean was drafted and went to Germany. One day that dreaded telegram came. He was still alive but had been taken prisoner by the enemy. He was released after about 2 months. He had not been given much to eat and was suffering from malnutrition. The war ended while he was on furlough at home and his duty was pretty much over. Many of the boys never returned. The war helped end the depression and the family gradually got ahead. At harvest time Vern would get together with some of the other farmers and they would "trade work". This was for the man power and also for the machinery. One crop would be done and they would move on to the next farm. This was done a lot to dig potatoes and sugar beets. Sometimes there was a big rush to get these crops out of the ground before the ground froze and winter set in. At thrashing time everybody helped everybody. It took a lot of men, teams, and wagons to haul in the bundles of grain and man the machines. A big noontime meal was served and sometimes a supper. It was always a puzzle as to how long the jobs would take and when the threshers would come and just who would be cooking dinner that day. Vern ate at one home where they put a bowl of fresh whole peaches on the table. He couldn't believe they wouldn't even peel the peaches. In the winter sorting potatoes was the usual employment. Vern would hurry to get his cows milked, chores done, and have a little breakfast. He would take off jogging up the path through the fields and trees. The spud cellar was at Thornton about a mile away. He had to cross the Texas Slough, probably on a plank and had a path he followed even through deep snow. It seemed that walking was easier than getting his car out and getting it started. His lunch was simple - sandwiches: 1/2 fried egg, 1/2 jelly and one of some kind of meat. There would be a little jar of home canned fruit, usually a piece of cake, and something in the thermos to drink. He never complained or got tired of this. The potato sorting season brought a weekly check for several weeks each winter. Vern would sometimes cash his check at the grocery store and come home with a big box of red delicious apples. They would be wrapped in purple tissue and he liked to peel and eat one before he went to bed at night, always sharing with everyone else. Vern's health was basically good over the years. He worked hard and hardly complained except some rheumatism especially in his left leg. One time in the 30's Vern was in bed for several days. This was a big worry with a family of little kids and not being able to work. Somehow he got over that spell. Sometimes he took big red pills. The pills i came in a little box instead of a bottle. Dr. Rigby had a shot that was supposed to help. The first time he put a band around Vern's arm and had Vern hold it with the instructions, "When I say let go -you let go." Well Vern hesitated and said, "You mean now"7" Apparently the hesitation caused terrible pain and Vern told of how he really danced around, latter on he bought some Mineral powder from a salesman and he took this for a long time and felt that this mixture helped. Vern wrote, "In 1957, I was in the Boise Veteran's Hospital for a check up, mostly for nervousness , and several X-rays were taken. I was told the findings if any would have to be requested by my doctor At this time I am having some trouble with pains in my left breast." It seems that none of the family were aware of his chest pains. Vern had taken the bus to Boise. This was the first of 2 or 3 trips in an attempt to get a Veteran's pension, which was granted. When they found out that he had been gassed in the army there was no question. With this little pension and a little Social Security check, Vern and Pauline got along pretty good. Even though it wasn't much, they had never had a regular income before. In 1969, Vern and Pauline were on their way to Steve and Regina's (a granddaughter) wedding in Idaho Falls. After getting the cows milked and the chores done, there wasn't much time to get there and they were rushed. Vern missed a stop sign and they were broadsided by a truck. Both were taken to the hospital with injuries. Vern had about 32 broken bones including a broken arm, pelvis, ribs, and a punctured lung. He was not in good condition and it was about four days before they even set his arm Keith gave him a priesthood blessing to get well and enjoy life. His hospital stay was about two months. Pauline's injuries were not as severe and her hospital stay was shorter but it was a long recovery for both, with many trips back to the doctor and for therapy. He was 76 years old and somehow was convinced that it was time to give up farm work and milking. At that time the farm land was leased out and the cows were sold. Vern always liked to keep busy and always found something to do. One day he was on this little Ford tractor mowing a steep bank. The tractor tipped him off and then it went around in circles continuing to run over him. He finally got out of the way. The doctor taped up his ribs and he kept going. On June 5 1976, the Teton Dam Reservoir was almost full. Then leaks were found and before noon the dam had crumbled. Residents were alerted and rushed to college hill. The water was several feet deep and several miles wide in places. It demolished, severely damaged, washed away or drowned everything in its path. Vern was sure that he and Pauline were safe and wouldn't leave. Fortunately the water moved west and they were safe. Dean and Ruth's, and Stephen's Rexburg homes were badly damaged. Vern didn't ever drive very far. He got his first car in 1929 or 1930. He always had older cars that weren't reliable. Just to go to town meant getting the car out early, checking the water and tires, and maybe pumping air into them. Fixing flats was a do it yourself project and for this reason tire patching and a pump were always carried in the car. In the winter when it was cold, the car might get a hot water treatment to get it started. It was not unusual to buy a dollars worth of gas or to take some sacks of grain to the elevator to sell. They hardly ever had a vacation as we know it. In the earlier years it was impossible to leave without someone to take over the morning and night milking and chores. There were a couple of trips to California to see the girls and Dean who was married would come do the chores. They also went to Montana to see Carma. They always enjoyed getting away for a few hours - just a nice ride or maybe a trip to the mountains for huckleberries. Finding and picking huckleberries was back breaking and we would wonder how they could have enjoyed that. But it also meant a picnic and socializing with others. Vern knew a lot about the early days and early settlers. He always had stories to tell. He remembered the river bridge at Lorenzo going out several times. One time it went down with a herd of cattle on it. They had broken backs and other injuries and probably some of them drowned. When attempts were made to work on the river it seemed that word would reach up above where the water is controlled and about three o'clock they would let more water loose and wash all of their work away. It was finally decided that the railroad knew what they were doing as their bridge held good. So the bridge was built below the railroad bridge. He told about Dad McGarry being the lead person to build the canal that ran by the house and through the farms. He only used a couple of tools - a tongue scraper, and a slip scraper. He described some of the machinery in the 7th Ward History Book. One time he and Nels Hansen were up on a mountain and they worked and worked to pry loose a great big rock so that it would roll down. The rock finally took off and they looked down and there was a man driving by in a wagon. Boy, were they scared. They didn't dare go to see what happened however they never did hear anything. He remembered the days before over shoes. Feet were wrapped in gunny sacks or just got wet. When overshoes were first invented they had rubber on the bottom only and canvas or something similar on top. Knee pants were really something. They had no garters to hold the socks up and used string if you could find some. Vern and Pauline had some good years as they grew older. One of the neighbors commented that they would go some place almost every day. They enjoyed this simple pleasure. Several times a week they would find some reason to go to town. They enjoyed going to the grocery store and picking out the best looking cake to buy. Pauline's health started to fail and she had a pace maker put in for her heart. Then in 1980 she broke her hip and her heart got worse. Vern was very attentive. Ruby and Ruth took turns staying to help out. Pauline died July 8, 1980. Ruby and Ruth continued to stay with Vern for the next 4 1/2 years. He did not adjust well when he was away from home. At home he could putter around and keep busy. Ruth was usually there on Sundays and she attended church with Vern faithfully every Sunday. On October 16, 1984, Vern rode to Montana with Keith and Ruby to visit Carma and Bill. Bill had cancer at this time. They had a nice dinner and then Vern complained of chest pains. He was taken to the Phillipsburg Hospital. It was determined that he was having a heart attack. Early on October 17, he had a stroke paralyzing his right side completely. He died on October 19, 1984. He was almost 92 years old. He had always said that he wanted to die with his boots on. He didn't quite make it but he persevered to the very end. He outlived most of his friends and neighbors, and was one of the very few World War I veterans left. He lived from horse drawn wagon days to electronics and computer age. He lived through two World Wars, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. There were seventeen U.S. presidents and ten presidents of the L.D.S. Church during his life time. Vern had no enemies. Everyone was his friend. He was always willing to talk and visit and maybe share a story. In earlier years when he went to town he left his keys in the car - in case someone wanted to move it. The house and out buildings weren't locked because the neighbors might want to borrow something. Vern liked plain simple food. He always said that bread is the staff of life and ate lots of bread and milk. He liked lettuce leaves and tomato slices with about a 1/4 inch of sugar on them. He ate lots of eggs and greasy food but stayed healthy until the end. He never complained and was happy and thankful for what he had. He could always find humor even in a bad situation. Vern and Pauline Perry taught their children by example - to love the Lord, to love their neighbor, to be honest and to work hard. A Legacy we can all be proud of.

Stephen LaVern " Vern" Perry

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

-Written by Nona Perry Miller, a daughter Vern Perry was born December 15, 1892 to Joseph Francis Perry and Martha Ann Hovey. He was named Stephen LaVern Perry. This name was either too long or too fancy and Vern being a simple man decided to use just plain "Vern" and for more important things she used "Stephen Vern". The family lived in a one room log home on a homestead east and north of Rigby. The first child, a boy, died shortly after birth and was buried in Millville, Utah. Four more children came to this family: Mary Alice (Mayme), Alonzo Earl, Vern and five years later William Henry was born. Bill was just a few weeks old when Martha became very ill. She was taken to Millville Utah and passed away at the home of her parents. She was buried there beside her first born child. The family came back to Rigby but they lost the farm as it had been mortgaged for medical expenses. This tragedy left a father with four young children, not even a place to live and he needed to work so that the family could survive. Relatives and friends tried to help. The Stowell family (a cousin) kept the children for about 6 months. Another relative, the Hulse family also helped out but they had a large family of their own. One time they lived with a Swedish couple who had no children of their own. Vern said, "They talked Swedish to the horses, cows, pigs, and chickens but to us kids they tried to talk United States." Finally a widow lady, Nellie Weaver Preston was hired to care for the children. She had six children of her own so when Joseph Perry married Nellie Preston it made a family of 10 children. More children came to this union making a total of fifteen children. They got along good and when times were good they were able to stay together but other times Vern boarded out with other families. Though young, he was expected to work for his keep. One time he lived with a family where the school teacher was boarding. The teacher was good to him but made him go to school. Vern would cry and make a fuss but the teacher would drag him along for the two miles in the cold. He had no overshoes so his feet got wet and cold trudging through the snow. One lady made him promise that he wouldn't go into the orchard. The neighbor boy who was supposed to be looking after him wanted some plums and talked him into going into the orchard. He said that he straightened the grass behind himself and thought she would never know. Somehow she found out and told him to cut some willows. She said a little bird had told her and Vern said, "I guess it did. I don't know how else she could have found out." The Perry family continued to move for jobs and Vern was not always with them, from Idaho Falls to Union, Utah, to a dairy east of Rexburg and then to Annis on the west side of the little Buttes. Vern was baptized while in the Annis Ward. These records were lost and Vern was re-baptized in 1932. One year Vern thinned beets for some one there. A woman would go down the row with a long hoe and space, and a kid would have to crawl along and pull out the doubles. He earned three dollars but was not paid. The day before the 4th of July the people went to town so Vern's parents knew they had some money. The Stowells loaned Vern a horse and he went after his pay and took the money home. The next morning his parents and the girls dressed up and went to town. He didn't get any of the three dollars nor did he get to go to town. Vern says that apparently the seasons used to be shorter here. Some areas had a hard time raising wheat and it would freeze before it was harvested. Every family had a big flour bin in the kitchen, apparently big enough to hold the winters supply. Not sure where the Perry’s were living at the time, but the kids took their wheat to a flour mill in Menan - It was the only mill around. The miller asked where the wheat was raised and knew immediately it had been frozen and would not make good flour. A man, unknown to them, offered to trade his wheat as his wheat was only going to be used for cattle feed. Vern went to school there one term and then they moved to Independence where his dad worked for John Jones. Vern and his step sister had the job of herding the hogs. After the harvest the hogs would be turned into the grain field to eat the wheat that had dropped. They needed watching, as barbed wire fences didn't keep them in. Vern attended the Independence School when ever he could. The school year was short and there was no extra time to study. He went to school until about 4th grade. It may have been about this time that Vern went to some sort of a celebration possibly at the Independence School where they were selling food and drink. He only had a nickel that he would toss up into the air and then catch it. One time he tossed it up and couldn't find where it came down. He had his heart set on getting lemonade and was so thirsty. There was a well there but someone told him there was dead cat in it. Vern tells of a farm his dad homesteaded down by the river. They would enter a gate on the south side of the Bannock Gym and there would be a total of 9 gates to open and close as the road went through the farms. This farm was mortgaged to buy a team of horses. The team was used to hire out for farm work such as digging beets. Vern was not a part of this deal but somehow he ended up paying for the harnesses. Usually the house is built near a spring or stream but this time they were pretty far away and water had to be carried quite a distance. His dad started a well but didn't finish it saying one of the kids might fall in. It was probably here that one of the Preston boys - a step brother planted some potatoes. No horse was available so they used a couple of the kids to pull the cultivator. His dad had a real good boat. It was probably a fishing boat as Joe Perry was a good fisherman. It had been said that he could catch a fish where there wasn't any fish. The boys took the boat one day and got caught in a whirlpool, probably in the river. They were really scared and never did that again. Vern says that his parents went on a trip and some how this farm was lost. Vern worked around doing what ever he could do. Thinning and hoeing sugar beets was hard and back breaking work. Vern once commented to someone, "The soil in that field is really good. I cut all the rocks in two years ago. He was always hoping to find something better than thinning beets. At one time he worked in a livery stable in Shelley and had to stay in the stable with the horses. This stable was located about where Huntsman grocery store is now. He herded sheep for Frank Spaulding, an early homesteader, and thinks he earned maybe fifty cents a day. At that time they only had barbed wire fences. The sheep would get through the fence out into the fields and bloat and die. Frank went on a trip someplace and saw wire netting. He had some shipped to him and that was the first it was used in this part of the country. Vern tells of helping his father cut rock on the hills East of Thornton. The rock was used for buildings one of which was the Thornton elevator. They used a chisel and drill and blasted to cut the rock. It was very poor pay and they nearly starved to death. Vern said his hands still hurt from the drill. Vern went to work for the McGarry's who had a big farm and a 400 acre cattle ranch at Kilgore. They became his family and he called them Dad McGarry and Grandma McGarry. They treated him really good and all the generations of the McGarrys had a lot of respect for Vern throughout the years. Someone had to stay at the Kilgore Ranch all winter to feed the stock. They used horses and sleighs. The horses learned to follow in the sleigh tracks and if the didn't, they could easily go into the snow up to their hips. One time Dad Me Carry looked across the meadow and could see three horses. The winter was bad and the snow was really deep. By Jasus, we'll give them a chance and he took off on some skis that Vern had bought. These were Indian ponies probably wandering in search of something to eat. (The Indians came there to fish in the summer.) He only made it back with one horse. One was dead by the time he got there and another one died on the way. He wore the skis and led the horse. The horse kept stepping on the skis. World War I came along and Vern felt it his duty to enlist. On his way to town he met Dad McGarry who turned around and said, '"By Jasus, I'll go with you." Vern wondered if his intention had been to try to talk him out of enlisting. He was assigned to infantry and he often told of the boat ride over and how it made him too sick to die. Horses were used for everything and Vern knew about horses. He said that some of the city guys didn't even know that horses needed a drink of water. He often talked of his war experiences - of little food, of huddling down in trenches and having lice crawl all over his body, of being gassed and of seeing his buddies die. There are more detailed war experiences in the interview from the Rexburg 7th Ward and also the newspaper interview. He told of the excitement of seeing The Statue of Liberty when he returned. He loved his country and was proud to serve. He had a lot of respect for the flag or anything patriotic. The war ended November 11, 1918 Vern returned home in June the next year - to the only home he knew - The McGarrys. No one had bothered his things and it was like he had never been gone. Even the dog remembered him. Shortly after this Vern and another fellow went to Grey's Lake - east of Idaho Falls to homestead. He always called this Tipporary. He had a wagon and a team of horses and stayed over night at Ozone where there was water for the horses. A black man from the area helped do some fencing. The cattlemen and sheep men had no respect for the homesteader and would tear up the property. The fence wasn't good, was never completed, and didn't keep the cattle and sheep out of the crops. There was no money to keep going and he lost the farm. Vern went back to the McGarrys. Dances seemed to be the main entertainment in those days. It was at a dance that Vern met Pauline Struhs. He borrowed a buggy from the McGarrys and they went to Rexburg where they were married February 24, 1923. They lived on McGarry farm where Vern had rented a small part of the land for his own use. Times were very hard and there were other homes. They lived in the house that later became the Edstrom home. Dean was born in 1924. In 1925, Martha Veronika was born and lived only a few hours. Vern had to borrow some money for a burial plot that cost $35 in the Rexburg cemetery. He felt bad that Pauline's father did not offer to help. Ruby was born in 1926 in the house belonging to Halls across the street from the Edstrom House. Dean recalls living in a house across from the Walz's in Independence. Dean had Bright’s disease and the doctor prescribed cream of tartar, which was supposed to purify the blood. He had to take so much that they started buying it in bulk at the drugstore. Dean would go to town with Dad on the horse and they would buy a sack of cream of tarter costing 25 cents. Nona was born in 1932 on the "Woods Place". A narrow lane led to the house that couldn't be seen from the road. There the sugar beet crop got bugs and Vern and Dean sacked up wheat and sold it at the Thornton elevator for 8 cents a sack in order to pay for and insecticide spray that somebody had concocted. The big truck with a tank on the back came and sprayed up and down the rows. That night there was a cloud burst and washed it all off. There was hardly any crop at all - just a beet here and there. Vern may have been trying to buy this farm but some how it was suddenly sold to Joe Jensen. It seemed that Joe wanted to take a trip or something and needed to get things settled. Vern and Pauline were given 3 days to move off. Nona was a little baby, it was February and about 40 degrees below. At that time they moved to the little farm where the children grew up and they spent their remaining days. Several people had attempted to buy this farm and it would be mortgaged and lost. The country was deep into the depression. Vern bought the approximately 40 acres from Beneficial Life Insurance Company for about $2500. The agent was very helpful. Vern went to see Bill Mortenson because Bill had money, and Bill agreed to buy a real good Holstein milk cow and calf for about $40. This cow gave 2 buckets of milk each milking. The house was in terrible condition. Windows were out and snow blew in cold, it was drafty, and dirty. To get through the winter, rooms were closed off sometimes using quilts. Carma was born here in 1933 and Clinton in 1942. All children were born at home and in the earlier years the doctor was likely paid with chickens and produce. One day the long rear room used as a kitchen caught fire from the cook stove. Fortunately there was a crew of men nearby cleaning the canal. There must have been a little water in it and they carried buckets of water and put out the fire. Changes and additions were made over the years and eventually Vern and Pauline had a comfortable home. Sometime in the late 1930's the electrical lines came through. Not everybody could afford the five dollars and the Perry's had to wait. When electricity did come, the kerosene lamps were put away, and one of the first purchases when money allowed was a electric washing machine. Dean worked and earned a little money and paid four dollars for a used radio. It had to have an antenna outside on a post. There was the news, music with all the latest songs, soap operas, and programs that were either funny or told a story like Death Valley days - or the "Whistler" which was a mystery. After World War II a used refrigerator was purchased. Prior to that time, milk, butter, etc. were kept in the root cellar. There was no money for anything you could do without, so a telephone didn't come until early 1950's. Prior to that phone, calls were rare. One of the neighbors would come with a message that we were wanted on the phone. It took two stoves to heat the house, a heater in the living room when needed and a cook stove which was kept going winter and summer. Every night Vern would bring in the kindling for the next mornings fire. Before bedtime he would split the kindling into narrow sticks and had a way of shaving some of them so that they would curl. He would start the fire first thing the next morning so the house would be warm. The first crops on this farm weren't too good. A four horse team was often needed for farm work but that first year in order to buy seed it was necessary to sell a young horse that had just been broken for farm work and would have been the very best horse to plant the first crop. The Larson brothers - Pete, Henry, Nephi, Rudolph, and Alma came to check out the horse. They must have had some kind of unofficial corporation with Rudolph as the treasurer. The horse was sold. He never had four horses again and after that he borrowed a horse when necessary. Most of the time he got by with three horses and used a 3 horse evener to make up for the 4th horse. The first grain crop was about 3/4 weeds. It was so bad that it was cut with a mowing machine and then brought in and stacked in the yard. The stack looked like a big bunch of tumble weeds. Reinhart Walz who had the local threshing machine came and run it through extra slow trying to salvage as much as possible. One summer Vera was trying to upgrade the tiny granary which was part of a shed. He wanted to make a bin with a cement floor. He and Dean went Mickelson Lumber and Mr. Mickelson was sitting out front smoking a pipe. They needed two or three 2x4's and a couple of sacks of cement all of which cost about $7.50, but it was necessary to charge that small amount until after harvest. In the summer there was never much money. Eggs and cream that were taken to town bought a few groceries. Vern worked hard to improve this little farm. He fought the weeds and scraped off the high spots and filled in the low spots, kept it irrigated and the crops got better. The kids were paid a few pennies for each bucket of rocks they would pick up out of the soil. But a small farm with a mortgage and some extra work on the side when available was not a lot to keep a family going. Many folks around had inherited their land from their parents who had homesteaded it. Everyone pitched in and did what they could. Pauline worked in the fields when she was needed. The kids did field work at home and worked for the neighbors when it was available. Vern always milked 3 to 5 cows. If we weren't getting much milk, it would be run through the separator morning and night and the cream would be saved and taken to the creamery in town. Much of the time, especially in later years, the milk was sold. The milk truck would come through very early in the mornings and pick up the cans. This meant working fast to get the milk out to the road in time. Vern always kept his clock a few minutes fast and that alarm would go off about 4:30 A.M. Except for just a very few years the milking and chores were done with a kerosene lantern that hung on a nail in the barn and later a big light was installed that lit up the yard. Eventually Dean put electricity in the barn. Nice long green grass grew abundantly in the gutters along the road. It was the kids chore to herd the cows along the road for a few hours each day in the summer. The cows would graze and eat non-stop. This helped conserve the little bit of grass that grew in the pasture in the trees up in the field. In the spring there would be baby calves, pigs and chickens. Sometimes on a frosty morning the chickens and maybe a little pig or two would be wrapped up in old sweaters or blankets, put in a bucket, brought into the house and put in a warm spot behind the stove. There were always several cats around. They helped keep the mice away so they served a good purpose. But sometimes a new batch of kittens was not needed. Vern would put them in a gunny sack and drown them when they were brand new before their eyes were open. Surely an unpleasant task, but the most humane way at that time to control the cat population. Vern had a yellow and brown shaggy dog named Olie. It followed him wherever he went. One day he was mowing hay. Unfortunately the dog was right there by his side and got in the way of the mower blades. The dogs legs were cut off. Vern felt really bad and had to go get a neighbor who owned a gun to come shoot the dog. It was Friday the 13th -really an unlucky day. Vern worked for other farmers doing whatever needed to be done. He worked for Earl Hall, sometimes for extended periods of time. They treated him really good and always invited him at noon time for a hot meal. Mrs. Hall was called "Aunt Maude". He would ride the little mare "Babe," to work everyday. He never owned a saddle. This horse was good for anything. Not only could she be ridden but would do her share , when hitched up for farm work. Sometimes he would come home after dark. Pauline would often have the milking done but there were still other chores to do. Just before World War II a dollar a day was the going wage for farm work. Clinton was born. May 12, 1942. The kids were excited to have a new baby around the house. Dean was about to be drafted to go off to war. A special effort was made to have the family sealed in the Salt Lake Temple. That would seem like a short trip to us today, but this was an older car and the speed limit was 35 miles per hour. The kids were bundled up in blankets in the back seat. They were traveling that Thanksgiving Day and dinner was a sandwich eaten in the car. There was no money for hamburger stops. The family was sealed on November 27, 1942. This trip lasted about four days. World War II brought many changes. Boys at age 18 had to register for the draft and went off to war in Europe and Japan. When the boys left or returned the benches would be moved out of the little one room church making a dance floor. Sometimes the benches would be outside in the snow. Some of the locals would play some music and there would be a community social. It was always a sad time when the boys went off to war it and some did not return. Some of the folks left the area to work in the defense plants. Everyone was needed and now some women were working. It was the patriotic thing to do. It seemed that everything was rationed - tires, gasoline, meat, sugar, canned goods, and shoes. Many things were not available to buy at all. Even the foil off the chewing gum wrappers was saved. Sugar affected the Perrys the most as home canned fruit and jelly were a big part of their diet. Jelly was replaced with dark Karo syrup which was bought in half-gallon and gallon buckets. Dean was drafted and went to Germany. One day that dreaded telegram came. He was still alive but had been taken prisoner by the enemy. He was released after about 2 months. He had not been given much to eat and was suffering from malnutrition. The war ended while he was on furlough at home and his duty was pretty much over. Many of the boys never returned. The war helped end the depression and the family gradually got ahead. At harvest time Vern would get together with some of the other farmers and they would "trade work". This was for the man power and also for the machinery. One crop would be done and they would move on to the next farm. This was done a lot to dig potatoes and sugar beets. Sometimes there was a big rush to get these crops out of the ground before the ground froze and winter set in. At thrashing time everybody helped everybody. It took a lot of men, teams, and wagons to haul in the bundles of grain and man the machines. A big noontime meal was served and sometimes a supper. It was always a puzzle as to how long the jobs would take and when the threshers would come and just who would be cooking dinner that day. Vern ate at one home where they put a bowl of fresh whole peaches on the table. He couldn't believe they wouldn't even peel the peaches. In the winter sorting potatoes was the usual employment. Vern would hurry to get his cows milked, chores done, and have a little breakfast. He would take off jogging up the path through the fields and trees. The spud cellar was at Thornton about a mile away. He had to cross the Texas Slough, probably on a plank and had a path he followed even through deep snow. It seemed that walking was easier than getting his car out and getting it started. His lunch was simple - sandwiches: 1/2 fried egg, 1/2 jelly and one of some kind of meat. There would be a little jar of home canned fruit, usually a piece of cake, and something in the thermos to drink. He never complained or got tired of this. The potato sorting season brought a weekly check for several weeks each winter. Vern would sometimes cash his check at the grocery store and come home with a big box of red delicious apples. They would be wrapped in purple tissue and he liked to peel and eat one before he went to bed at night, always sharing with everyone else. Vern's health was basically good over the years. He worked hard and hardly complained except some rheumatism especially in his left leg. One time in the 30's Vern was in bed for several days. This was a big worry with a family of little kids and not being able to work. Somehow he got over that spell. Sometimes he took big red pills. The pills i came in a little box instead of a bottle. Dr. Rigby had a shot that was supposed to help. The first time he put a band around Vern's arm and had Vern hold it with the instructions, "When I say let go -you let go." Well Vern hesitated and said, "You mean now ?" Apparently the hesitation caused terrible pain and Vern told of how he really danced around, latter on he bought some Mineral powder from a salesman and he took this for a long time and felt that this mixture helped. Vern wrote, "In 1957, I was in the Boise Veteran's Hospital for a checkup, mostly for nervousness, and several X-rays were taken. I was told the findings if any would have to be requested by my doctor At this time I am having some trouble with pains in my left breast." It seems that none of the family were aware of his chest pains. Vern had taken the bus to Boise. This was the first of 2 or 3 trips in an attempt to get a Veteran's pension, which was granted. When they found out that he had been gassed in the army there was no question. With this little pension and a little Social Security check, Vern and Pauline got along pretty good. Even though it wasn't much, they had never had a regular income before. In 1969, Vern and Pauline were on their way to Steve and Regina's wedding in Idaho Falls. After getting the cows milked and the chores done, there wasn't much time to get there and they were rushed. Vern missed a stop sign and they were broadsided by a truck. Both were taken to the hospital with injuries. Vern had about 32 broken bones including a broken arm, pelvis, ribs, and a punctured lung. He was not in good condition and it was about four days before they even set his arm Keith gave him a priesthood blessing to get well and enjoy life. His hospital stay was about two months. Pauline's injuries were not as severe and her hospital stay was shorter but it was a long recovery for both, with many trips back to the doctor and for therapy. He was 76 years old and somehow was convinced that it was time to give up farm work and milking. At that time the farm land was leased out and the cows were sold. Vern always liked to keep busy and always found something to do. One day he was on this little Ford tractor mowing a steep bank. The tractor tipped him off and then it went around in circles continuing to run over him. He finally got out of the way. The doctor taped up his ribs and he kept going. On June 5 1976, the Teton Dam Reservoir was almost full. Then leaks were found and before noon the dam had crumbled. Residents were alerted and rushed to college hill. The water was several feet deep and several miles wide in places. It demolished, severely damaged, washed away or drowned everything in its path. Vern was sure that he and Pauline were safe and wouldn't leave. Fortunately the water moved west and they were safe. Dean and Ruth's, and Stephen's Rexburg homes were badly damaged. Vern didn't ever drive very far. He got his first car in 1929 or 1930. He always had older cars that weren't reliable. Just to go to town meant getting the car out early, checking the water and tires, and maybe pumping air into them. Fixing flats was a do it yourself project and for this reason tire patching and a pump were always carried in the car. In the winter when it was cold, the car might get a hot water treatment to get it started. It was not unusual to buy a dollars worth of gas or to take some sacks of grain to the elevator to sell. They hardly ever had a vacation as we know it. In the earlier years it was impossible to leave without someone to take over the morning and night milking and chores. There were a couple of trips to California to see the girls and Dean who was married would come do the chores. They also went to Montana to see Carma. They always enjoyed getting away for a few hours - just a nice ride or maybe a trip to the mountains for huckleberries. Finding and picking huckleberries was back breaking and we would wonder how they could have enjoyed that. But it also meant a picnic and socializing with others. Vern knew a lot about the early days and early settlers. He always had stories to tell. He remembered the river bridge at Lorenzo going out several times. One time it went down with a herd of cattle on it. They had broken backs and other injuries and probably some of them drowned. When attempts were made to work on the river it seemed that word would reach up above where the water is controlled and about three o'clock they would let more water loose and wash all of their work away. It was finally decided that the railroad knew what they were doing as their bridge held good. So the bridge was built below the railroad bridge. He told about Dad McGarry being the lead person to build the canal that ran by the house and through the farms. He only used a couple of tools - a tongue scraper, and a slip scraper. He described some of the machinery in the 7th Ward History Book. One time he and Nels Hansen were up on a mountain and they worked and worked to pry loose a great big rock so that it would roll down. The rock finally took off and they looked down and there was a man driving by in a wagon. Boy, were they scared. They didn't dare go to see what happened however they never did hear anything. He remembered the days before over shoes. Feet were wrapped in gunny sacks or just got wet. When overshoes were first invented they had rubber on the bottom only and canvas or something similar on top. Knee pants were really something. They had no garters to hold the socks up and used string if you could find some. Vern and Pauline had some good years as they grew older. One of the neighbors commented that they would go someplace almost every day. They enjoyed this simple pleasure. Several times a week they would find some reason to go to town. They enjoyed going to the grocery store and picking out the best looking cake to buy. Pauline's health started to fail and she had a pace maker put in for her heart. Then in 1980 she broke her hip and her heart got worse. Vern was very attentive. Ruby and Ruth took turns staying to help out. Pauline died July 8, 1980. Ruby and Ruth continued to stay with Vern for the next 4 1/2 years. He did not adjust well when he was away from home. At home he could putter around and keep busy. Ruth was usually there on Sundays and she attended church with Vern faithfully every Sunday. On October 16, 1984, Vern rode to Montana with Keith and Ruby to visit Carma and Bill. Bill had cancer at this time. They had a nice dinner and then Vern complained of chest pains. He was taken to the Phillipsburg Hospital. It was determined that he was having a heart attack. Early on October 17, he had a stroke paralyzing his right side completely. He died on October 19, 1984. He was almost 92 years old. He had always said that he wanted to die with his boots on. He didn't quite make it but he persevered to the very end. He outlived most of his friends and neighbors, and was one of the very few World War I veterans left. He lived from horse drawn wagon days to electronics and computer age. He lived through two World Wars, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. There were seventeen U.S. presidents and ten presidents of the L.D.S. Church during his life time. Vern had no enemies. Everyone was his friend. He was always willing to talk and visit and maybe share a story. In earlier years when he went to town he left his keys in the car - in case someone wanted to move it. The house and out buildings weren't locked because the neighbors might want to borrow something. Vern liked plain simple food. He always said that bread is the staff of life and ate lots of bread and milk. He liked lettuce leaves and tomato slices with about a 1/4 inch of sugar on them. He ate lots of eggs and greasy food but stayed healthy until the end. He never complained and was happy and thankful for what he had. He could always find humor even in a bad situation. Vern and Pauline Perry taught their children by example - to love the Lord, to love their neighbor, to be honest and to work hard. A legacy we can all be proud of.

Life timeline of Vern Perry

1892
Vern Perry was born on 15 Dec 1892
Vern Perry was 13 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Vern Perry was 24 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Vern Perry was 37 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Vern Perry was 38 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Vern Perry was 49 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany invades the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa. Nazi Germany is the common English name for Germany between 1933 and 1945, when Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Party (NSDAP) controlled the country through a dictatorship. Under Hitler's rule, Germany was transformed into a totalitarian state that controlled nearly all aspects of life via the Gleichschaltung legal process. The official name of the state was Deutsches Reich until 1943 and Großdeutsches Reich from 1943 to 1945. Nazi Germany is also known as the Third Reich, from German Drittes Reich, meaning "Third Realm" or "Third Empire", the first two being the Holy Roman Empire and the German Empire. The Nazi regime ended after the Allied Powers defeated Germany in May 1945, ending World War II in Europe.
Vern Perry was 60 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
Vern Perry was 71 years old when The Beatles make their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, performing before a "record-busting" audience of 73 million viewers across the USA. The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. With members John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, they became widely regarded as the foremost and most influential music band in history. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later experimented with several musical styles, ranging from pop ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock, often incorporating classical elements and unconventional recording techniques in innovative ways. In 1963, their enormous popularity first emerged as "Beatlemania"; as the group's music grew in sophistication, led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the band were integral to pop music's evolution into an art form and to the development of the counterculture of the 1960s.
Vern Perry was 80 years old when Vietnam War: The last United States combat soldiers leave South Vietnam. The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and the government of South Vietnam. The North Vietnamese army was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; the South Vietnamese army was supported by the United States, South Korea, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war is considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some US perspectives. The majority of Americans believe the war was unjustified. The war would last roughly 19 years and would also form the Laotian Civil War as well as the Cambodian Civil War, which also saw all three countries become communist states in 1975.
Vern Perry died on 19 Oct 1984 at the age of 91
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Vern Perry (15 Dec 1892 - 19 Oct 1984), BillionGraves Record 81401 Rexburg, Madison, Idaho, United States

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