Thomas Lightfoot

10 Mar 1866 - 19 Apr 1950

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Thomas Lightfoot

10 Mar 1866 - 19 Apr 1950
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.....her life story, told on tape on her 80th birthday, November 14, 1973, and supplemented with reminiscences during the month of March, 1979, age 85. “I was born November 14, 1893. My father is Thomas Lightfoot, and my mother is Mary Jane Forrester Lightfoot. I had a sister Agnes, then myself, t
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Life Information

Thomas Lightfoot

Born:
Died:

Ogden City Cemetery

1875 Monroe Blvd.
Ogden, Weber, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Mother / Father
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bonnie2463

July 13, 2013
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AmandaJasper

July 6, 2013

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Personal History of Elizabeth Lightfoot Gibson

Contributor: bonnie2463 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

.....her life story, told on tape on her 80th birthday, November 14, 1973, and supplemented with reminiscences during the month of March, 1979, age 85. “I was born November 14, 1893. My father is Thomas Lightfoot, and my mother is Mary Jane Forrester Lightfoot. I had a sister Agnes, then myself, then brother Joseph (Joe), Christopher (Chris), Louisa (Louie), Orson, Robert (Bob), and Lenora, all born in Carlisle, England, and brother James Forrester (Jim) was born in Kaysville, Utah. (Note: 6 other children died in infancy or early childhood in England.) When I was born our home was in Carlisle, Cumberland (Cumbria) England. Carlisle is about 10 miles from the Scottish border, and was a pretty town when we lived there, bigger than Salt Lake City. We were living in what we called a “terrace”; the homes were built close together and you could hear your neighbors through the walls! At this time Father was on the police force working for the railroad. When I was about three years old, or a little more I guess, Agnes was going to go to the Cooperative Store at the corner of the block. And I followed. And she went into the Cooperative Store, and I kept on going! And I went all the way from what they call “Botchigate”, the main street, right through the main part of the city (there were four gates into the city because they had walls all around, built many years ago to keep the Pits and Scots out of the city) to the other side of the city over the River Eden bridge to a place called Stannix. And it started to rain, and there I was down in the valley (by the river) and there was a home close by, and I was crying and crying, and this lady came out, and I don’t know how she got in touch with the police force, (there was no telephone at the time), but anyway she took me over to her home and the police came and they said to me “What’s your name?” And I’d just shake my head. (I was so little and scared.) So he asked me again what my name was (he repeated every name he could think of), and he said “Is it Mary?”and I shook my head, no. And he said, “Is it Sa1ly?” “No.” And he asked quite a number of names and I kept shaking my head. So he took me back home, that is to the police station, and the folks naturally came there. Father was on the police force at the time, the railroad police, and the police man said “You little brat, you, don’t you know your name?” (And he always called me that, too, every time he saw me!) So when the folks came there to get me, every time I’d see him, it didn’t matter where I’d be until I was quite a good sized girl, he’d say “You little brat you!” And then my health wasn’t too good when I got, oh, about 4 years old, and they used to send me on the bus every day. We’d ride from one side of the city to the other on the bus, the streetcar, and it only cost a penny, and I world ride up on the top of the bus and I’d go right to the castle - that was where Mary Queen of Scots had been put in the dungeon there. She wasn’t beheaded there, but she was imprisoned there. And there was a cathedral right across from the castle, and I would go into the cathedral and oh, just roam around you know. And I wasn’t very old, and I enjoyed these rides every day. And that was to get away, for my health, to get fresh air I guess. And in the summertime they’d send me out to the country, about 6 or 7 miles, to a big farm home. My father and mother had both worked there, and that’s where Father met my mother, at this farm. And he never could sing, but Father and Mother had a little quarrel and he wrote on the barn door “Go and leave me -“ (just a song he knew) - (I’m just trying to think now what it was -) “Go and leave me if you wish it, never let me cross your mind, but if you think I’m so unworthy, go and leave me, never mind.” And I’ve often thought about it. And before they married he had bought all the furniture for their home where they rented. But this lady at the farm was very good to us. She used to have prize cattle, enormous cattle, and she had blue ribbons all over the place. And they had a milk house all built of stone, and a big slab where they made butter. She made butter and took it to the market. And that’s how come I’d go out with her, you see, in what they called a “Gigby”. It was a two-wheeled cart, pulled with a horse -you’ve seen the pictures where they just had one seat and a place in the back where they could put their produce. And I’d go out there and she had a beautiful garden in the back of her place, and it had - she used to grow all kinds of flowers, and Lavender -have you ever smelled lavender? - well, she grew a lot of lavender, and she used to gather that and put it in sacks, you see, and she’d sell that. They would have a regular public market and they would have butter and cheese and poultry, you know, of all kinds. And they used to make their own sausage and things like that. At this farmhouse, it was a well-kept farm, even the yard was paved with cobblestones and the hired men used to have to sweep that every day. And they had pigs, and big boilers that they cooked the pig feed in, and it was really interesting for me, because I used to just love to go there. And then I can tell you about how the folks were converted.... These two men came to my mother’s home. See, being a terrace, all the houses joined together, and they had called at several places but people wouldn’t have anything to do with them when they found, you know, that they were Mormon missionaries. And they stopped at my mother’s door, and they told their story. They said they hadn’t had money come from home, and where they’d stayed the woman told them to leave because they didn’t have the money to pay the rent, and so they didn’t have anywhere to stay. So Mother invited them into the house, and she told them that they could have her front, what we called the parlor. And we had one bedroom upstairs that they used, and they used the parlor. And she told them that they could stay there until got their money. And they were in the front room parlor and they began to sing. My mother's younger sister was living with us at the time (Aunt Hannah), and she was a dressmaker. And Mother and her just stood there and listened to these fellows sing. And their names were Daniel Muir from Bountiful, Utah, and Ephriam Briggs from Woods Cross, Utah. And they began to sing "Oh My Father", and Mother and Aunt Hannah stood and listened to them. When Father came home that evening, Mother told him what she had done- that these two young men from America had come there and were Mormon missionaries. And so he said "But you don't know anything about them other than...", and she said "No." So he went in and talked with them, and I guess it must have satisfied him because he let them stay. And they talked to Father and Mother and Aunt Hannah, and they preached the Gospel to them, and in two days Father and Mother were converted. And they were baptized a very short time afterwards, and Aunt Hannah joined the Church with them, and my sister Agnes. (Baptized 9 August 1898) A little later on an Elder Brown came to our home to stay, also. And Mother did their washing and they stayed there. Elder Brown got a "Dear John" letter from his girl and he was really down. He went upstairs to his bedroom to grieve. Aunt Hannah dressed up in father's police clothes and the other elders almost dragged her up the stairs to cheer him up, and he started to laugh and that was the end of his grief: Later on Aunt Hannah came to America. First of all she went to New Castle on Thinnes. That's where the headquarters of the Northern part of England or the conference house for the Elders was. Some new missionaries came there, and it happened that Chris Holland was one, and he met my Aunt Hannah and he fell in love with her. He asked if, and he knew that she was coming to America, and would she correspond with him. And she said "Yes." So they corresponded for two years while he was in the mission field. When he came home to Kaysville, she was living down in Nephi at one of the Elder's homes down there, and they decided to get married. He built her a home in Kaysville and they had one, their oldest girl, Mary her name was. And then when she had her second baby, Aunt Hannah died! That was before Father and Mother came to this country. Chris wrote to Mother and told her about Aunt Hannah's death, and Mother grieved so much about it. She had a dream, and Hannah came to her and told her that she had to quit grieving, that she was happy. She showed Mother the room that she was in and she was taking care of the children there. After that Mother quit grieving. I had a blessing when I was 5 years old at the time my parents were baptized. I had had inflammation of the lungs 9 times. And the Elders gave me this blessing and stated that I would gain my health and strength, and that I would be able to do much good, and I would come here to this country, and if I lived right I would be the means of being influential in many things. Now I don't know just what my trouble was, but when I was - before the Elders came - I had lost my eyesight, I was blind. And they kept me in a dark room for six weeks. And the doctor used to come every day and lay me on the floor and put drops in my eyes. And when I gained my sight, the first thing that I saw was - I got up on the landing, you see most of the homes had upstairs, and I was out on the landing, and my sister Agnes was coming in the front door and she was the oddest looking creature I'd ever seen. And I always remember that--she was so changed from how I remembered her. I was just thinking about the time when I was a little girl when the Elders gave me that blessing, and they told me that if I would keep the Word of Wisdom that I would gain my health, and from then on I kept the Word of Wisdom as far as I could and gained my health and strength and never had a doctor until my children were born. The day that I was baptized (17 November 1901) there was an old lady who was baptized at the same time. We had to go to what they called the Public Baths, and she cried and cried when she got out of the water, and I didn't shed a tear. After that we moved to a place called Botchigate. It was a little country place. It was a beautiful little place. David Penman from West Weber had been on a mission and he came over there to England and he had come to get this young woman, Hannah Foster was her name, and they married there and he stayed in Carlisle, oh for about two years. After those first two missionaries, many missionaries lived in our home, some of them became prominent officials in the Church. David 0. McKay was one missionary who stopped at their home on his way to his mission in Scotland. I was going to school - you see, over there they go to school by the time they are five years old. They had a flood at that time, and when we went down to go to see it, it was all in the schoolyard and we couldn't go to school. And when I got there, I had been wearing glasses and my glasses fell off and broke, and I never wore glasses anymore until I was about, oh, 40 years old, and then more just for show than for seeing. At 85 I can thread a needle, sew, read, etc., without glasses! I did go to school until we left England, when I was 13 years old. (1907) I think the most interesting part about my life was when we left England. We came to Liverpool. My Uncle Richen (my father’s oldest brother) lived in Liverpool. He was on the police force there. Agnes, my oldest sister, was 18 years old at the time, and she was a very nice looking girl and had quite a wonderful personality. And Uncle Richen said “Tom, I don’t like the idea of you taking these girls to Utah, among those Mormons. I know that they are wild men. I know I will never get to see you or hear any more about you!” Father said, “Well, that may be so, but we’re going anyway.” And when we got to the office, they wanted to charge full fare for me and half fare for my brother, Chris. He was only about 4 years old at the time. And that was going to run Fahter and Mother pretty low on money. (At the time they left England, Agnes was 18, Lizzie 13, Louise 10, Joe 7, Chris 6, Lenora 4, Orson 2, and Bob just a baby) President Penrose, who was President of the British Mission at the time, said, “Brother Lightfoot, you go on anyway. We’ll see that you get through the custom house. We’ll see that you have the money.” So when we got on the boat (the SS Arabic) there were quite a number of the Elders coming home and we had a wonderful time on the boat. I was the only one that wasn’t seasick. Mother and them were very sick. Mother said she didn’t care whether they threw her overboard or not, she was so sick; and Agnes was quite sick. My brother Orson had a cast on his foot. We think that he must have had paralysis, but we never knew just for sure, but he had been in the hospital there in Carlisle and they put this cast on. (While there in the hospital the big nurse came in, and he was quite a mischievous child and he wanted to run around, and the nurse said, “Orson, you get up into that crib and stay there. You’re a naughty boy!” And he said, No I’m not, I’m a Mormon Boy!” She was puzzled at this and couldn’t figure out what he meant by that, and remarked about it at the table for the hospital help, and the cook, being a Mormon herself, explained to them what a “Mormon” was.) So when we were on the boat he would just run around, getting around so good, and everyone would make a big fuss over him. But when we came to pass the Custom House they weren’t going to let us come on account of him having the cast. Father had him in his arms, and he had an orange in his hand (we were on the boat for seven days and they would give everyone an orange every day, so, being a big family, we had accumulated quite a few) and he dropped the orange, and Father let him down and he rant to get it, and they said “All right, you’re alright!” So they let us come. And the Elders all had collected money so we would have money enough to come through customs. When we got to Kaysville, Father gave the money back to the Elders and then we had $7 left! Bishop Blood was the one that came to meet us at the time. He later became the Governor of Utah. I’ve often pictured what a sight we must have been! Oh yes, we came to Utah on the train. I’ll have to tell you about a little instance that happened on the train. My Mother was scared of colored people, and she lay awake all night long. She said she couldn’t risk her life with them (the porters!). And Orson, he got into the restroom and locked himself in, and they couldn’t get him out. And they tried and tried every way possible. At last they had to put a wire down underneath, and he was just a little fellow, and tell him to put it on the catch of the door so he could unlock it. And that’s how he got out, but it was quite exciting for a while! We had left England on the 26th of April, 1906 and got into Kaysville on the 7th of May, 1906. We were five days coming from Boston, coming here to Kaysville, and seven days on the boat. Father was working for Frank L. Layton for $40 a month on his farm. Mother went out nursing, and I took care of our home. We lived in the little red schoolhouse! It was just one big room, and we had it curtained off for bedrooms, and we had a little old stove that we did the cooking on. I made the meals (I was 14 years old at the time) for Father and the other children. There were seven of us altogether. Agnes worked at the Thornley’s home and so she wasn’t there, but I cooked for the rest. And I know Father, he was the most patient man that ever lived and he never made a complaint, and I know right well he had sour dough bread many times because the bread would go sour before it got baked! And I’d get down and scrub that great big floor. And you know how kids are, and we made candy and all the neighbor kids would come over and have a good time. And when I did the washing, we hung the washing all around the school yard on the fence. It was quite a picture, but we didn’t have any clothes lines, so we’d just hang them around on the fence! My brother Bob was born in England and was never very well. When we were crossing over on the boat he was so sick they didn’t expect him to live and we thought they would have to bury him at sea. But he revived until we got to Kaysville and I took care of him when Mother was working. Uncle Chris lived about a block from the school house and we used to get milk from his cows. And I said to Uncle Chris, “Let’s try just one cow’s milk and see if that would help Bob,” (instead of a mixture from all the cows), and he did, and after that Bob began to grow and was made well, and it seemed like he changed altogether after that. We lived in the schoolhouse for quite a long while, and then we went onto a farm, jut below the cemetery in Kaysville. They later made it into a reservoir in the valley. It was the Neilson farm. Mother would work out in the fields with Father and I would take care of the home. We had rice pudding. I used to make pretty good rice pudding, and we’d have some every day. I’d make it in a big milk pan and they used to have quite a joke about Lizzie and her rice puddings! There was a creek running down in front of the place, and Jim, the baby brother born in Kaysville, used to go down to the creek and get in the water to swim, and I used to have to change his rompers a dozen times a day! We lived on this farm for about 3 years, and then came to Ogden. In Ogden we lived across from the Racetrack (down by Willey' and Hyer's homes), and Father worked at the Wasatch Canning Factory. John Parker was Superintendent of the canning factory at the time. It seemed that more or less all of us worked at the factory, and then father would be in the warehouse, and the boys would be up at the top and put the cans down the chute, and we girls would do the labeling and worked in the peas and the asparagus and tomatoes. They were very good to us. I later went to work at Shupe Williams Candy Co., and I worked there for about 6 weeks until I ate all the candy I could hold. Pearl Burton, who was living with us at the time, she and I worked there. I went from there to Scowcrofts and worked there for 41/2 years. I did all the sample work. Mother said to me one time "Lizzie, you should write a book about your life. You know, you've had quite a loving life!" I don't know what she would think about all the things I have done since. You see, I went with Harvis Call and I went with Neil Vanderfliece, and then I went with Earl Waite. First of all I went with Neil Vanderfliece and he was killed. A group was going to a watermelon party, and as they crossed the railroad tracks a train hit him and killed him. I had had to go to a Board meeting that night, and they called me and told me what had happened. He was surely always good to me. I went with Harvis Call for about two years, and then I went with Earl. He and I had an understanding, until a former girl friend came and won him back again. Over my years there has been a great change in the means of transportation. My dates used to come and get me in a white top buggy pulled by a horse. One time my sister and I were going to a dance and she was to meet her boyfriend, Ed Penman, there. I hooked up the horse, and I don’t suppose I got the harness on just right or something, cause as I came along the road that horse kept going in and out, in and out, all the way along the ride, until he got me right off the road altogether into the burrs, and I had a wool dress on and my dress got full of burrs. And when we got to the dance, Ed, who had come all the way from West​Weber to go to the dance with my sister, had to help her pull all the burrs out of my dress before I could go to the dance! And I have rode in what they call the race cart, and I have rode in buggies and wagons, and several other different kinds of vehicles. And I have also had the privilege of going in a plane. And when we got over to Hawaii they went from different islands by plane, and I enjoyed it very much. And I rode on the trains, and all over the country by bus. I like to travel by bus. When I get onto the bus I just relax, and let the driver do the driving. And I've enjoyed it very much, the different experiences that I have had. My folks moved to a big two story house down by the river in West Ogden, just across the viaduct, and we used to hold Sunday School there before this ward was organized. It was a Branch. We had a big parlor in this home, and also a big room kept just for the church meetings, with chairs set up and an organ. Before the meeting would start it was my job to make a big cake in a big dripper pan that filled the whole over. And Lenora peeled the potatoes and vegetables and had them in their pans, ready to be pushed to the front of the stove as soon as church was over so it wouldn't take long at all to have the dinner ready. When Lizzie's cake came out of the oven, Mother put a big beef roast in, and towards the end of the meeting the wonderful aroma of delicious roast beef would come into the meeting room.​It never took much coaxing to have the stake board visitors stay to dinner at our house. The potatoes and vegetables cooked while Mother made the gravy and a delicious dinner was ready. Mother was Relief Society President during much of this time and was very busy with this work. And Mother used to take in boarders. They were building the Globe Mills at the time, and these workmen stayed there. They were from Brigham City and Salt Lake and around, and so naturally we'd have lots of dishes, and my sister Louie never liked to do housework, or she never liked to wash dishes, and she'd slip away and go and play the piano and leave me to wash the dishes. And that's how my husband - I don't know whether it was he fell in love with me for that or what, but I was washing dishes and he said to me "I like the way you wash the dishes!" But that was after my mission. During the time I was working at Scowcrofts I was called to the Western States Mission. This was something I very much desired to do, and I was preparing to go and still working when one day Mr. Wright, who was our boss (he wasn't a member of the Church and was Manager of the Overall Dept.), came up to me and he said "Elizabeth, there are two gentlemen here to see you." Two men, Ray McArthur and Harry Bingham, had come to Scowcrofts and asked for me. Harry Bingham was Martha Leishman's brother (and it turned out he had recommended me), and the other gentleman I didn't know, and I couldn't figure out why they had come there. Harry said, "I guess you wonder what I'm here for." He said that they wanted me to go up into Chester, Idaho, to take care of Mr. McArthur's home. He had four children and his wife had just recently passed away. And I said, "I can't-- I have my call to go into the mission field." And they said "Oh, you've got called to the wrong mission!” I said, “I have nothing to do with it, I can’t go,” that I had accepted the call from Salt Lake. So they said they would go to see my Bishop, which they did. It was Frederick Walker, the West Ogden Ward Bishop. And Bishop Walker said he had nothing to do with it, that I had accepted the call from Salt Lake. So they went to President Joseph F. Smith. He said that I should go to Idaho, that it was a mission for me to go and take care of the McArthur home. He would release me now from my Western States call and if it should turn out to be a matrimonial case he would release me for rood, and if not, they would call me again. So I went up there with them, and I stayed there for six months. Mr. McArthur was 1st Counselor in the Bishopric. He had a dairy farm, and cows. His oldest child was 14 and the youngest 7 years old. There was a big garden, and we were very well provided for, and the children were very good to help me. When I came one of the children told me “Daddy said you were pretty, and I don't think you're pretty.” But when I left, he told me “I do think you're pretty!” Mr. McArthur wanted me to marry him and stay there, but I had made up my mind for the mission, and when they contacted me from Salt Lake again, I was ready to go. I would rather go on the mission. So I came home and left for my mission on the 14th of November 1917, on my birthday (24th). And I labored in Denver, Colorado for six weeks and from there went to Omaha, Nebraska, and labored there for almost 18 months, all during the time of the First World War.​I was there at the time the Armistice was signed. I came home in the month of June, 1919. On my way I went to the conference in Denver where they dedicated the chapel there. During this time President Smith had passed away and Pres. Heber J. Grant was the President, and he released me from my mission. I came home, and I met Mr. Gibson - Jim - a month or so after I got home, and we were married the following June 16, 1920. While I was in the mission field, Lenora worked at Wasatch Canning Factory. Jim Gibson worked there on the machinery, and he told Lenora “When your sister comes home, I'm going to get her!” And Lenora said “Oh, she wouldn't even look at you!” When I came home from my mission, I took Lenora's and the boy's lunches to them, and Lenora introduced Jim to me. After I'd left he asked Lenora if she thought her sister would like to go to a show, and she told him yes, she guessed I would. So when she came home she told me Jim Gibson was coming to take me to a show, and he took me to the Orpheum Theatre. On the night I gave my mission report in the ward, Jim went to his brother John's home (he was living in our ward), and said he'd go down to church with him. And he said while I was talking he kept thinking to himself, “I’m going to get her.” There weren't many cars at that time, but Jim had a Ford car, and he'd come up from Brigham to see me. The Christmas after I came home from my mission George James went up into the hills and brought us a big real Christmas tree, the only real one we’d ever had, and we decorated it. Jim came on Christmas, and oh, it was so cold, and brought me a beautiful manicure set with Mother of Pearl handles. Some of the pieces I still have. I had been corresponding with one of the missionaries I’d met in the field - Charles Winters of Otto, Wyoming, and in April Conference time we had agreed to meet on temple square at the Bureau of Information. I waited and waited, and Charles didn't come. Something had come up that he couldn't leave the ranch. But, Jim came down, and I went home with him. A group of us when we were fooling around used to go up on the sand hill and shoot guns across the sand banks, and that's where Jim took me to give me my engagement ring. My ring was a ruby. At that time diamonds weren't so popular, it was more rubies, but nowadays it's all diamonds. We were married in the Salt Lake Temple on June 16, 1920. Mother and a Mrs. Pingree who was a very good family friend went with us to the temple. James Forbes Gibson was born March 20, 1882 in West Weber, Utah, a son of Thomas and Catherine Forbes Hunter Gibson, sixth in a family of 10 children. My husband was a very considerate man, and he was a good provider, and we loved each other very much. We had two children, two boys, and he was so good about taking care of these boys. I never had to get up in the night to take care of them, he did. And it didn't matter what was wrong, if they had the toothache, he would take care of them, and he never allowed me to get up to take care of them. And he was 11 years older than I, but we got along just wonderful. He was very pleasant - he had what I would say a dry humor, but we enjoyed each other very much. Sister Call was an old lady that lived down the street. She used to come up here every once in a while, and she’d say “You know, I love to come and talk to your husband!” And I said “I wondered why you come up here so often!” And we’d laugh about it, but he was, he was good natured. He would always wait for me. He would take me to the show, and we’d go to the vaudeville every Saturday night - have dinner and then go to the vaudeville.​And then after the vaudeville quit, they had the picture shows and he didn't like picture shows, so he would take me up and wait for me until I came cut of the show. The most patient man that I ever met. We made our first home in Logan at the Sugar Factory house.​Jim was working at the sugar factory as foreman over the Kelley presses (where they squeezed the juice cut of the beets). Near our house, which was just south of Logan, there was a little stream of water close by. A boy about 8 or 9 years old was driving a hay rake and he got to close to the edge of the stream and the rake and he fell in. When they were able to get him out, they called Dr. William H. Budge, a young family practitioner, to attend him, and he was so kind and gentle with the boy, I said I was going to have him for my doctor. So he attended me when our son Carl was born in our home on March 20, 1921. His full name was Carlisle Forbes, and he was born on his Dad’s 39th birthday. A young woman who was a nurse stayed with me, and my sister Lenora came up to stay with me when he was born. Ed Poorte came up to see her, and unknown to me, they went to the courthouse in Logan and were married. Lenora was 18 years old. We came back down to Ogden in the Spring, and lived in one room of Lenora and Ed's home for a little while, and then moved to West Ogden onto Cahoon Street. We moved into my present home that same year. We bought the lot and had the home, which we purchased from Fred Walker, moved onto the lot at 2456 F Avenue, Globe Mill Road. My father helped us remodel the home, enclosing the back porch to become the kitchen. In the spring of 1925 we were expecting another baby. Mrs. Cannon, who had been our neighbor in Logan, called me and told me that Dr. Budge was moving his practice to Ogden. So I went to town to the Eccles Bldg., and they were just putting the name in the foyer directory. I went upstairs, and there was Dr. Budge, unpacking his office supplies. So I was his first patient in Ogden, and he delivered Grant at our home on Sunday, May 17, 1925. He weighed 8 lbs. and was a beautiful, healthy baby. As I said before, Jim was very good with the boys. He was also pretty good about celebrating Christmases. Though they had to be practical, it was a festive time, and I decorated the house up. Carl remembers they each got a pair of overalls, a book, and a game each Christmas. They never had a real Christmas tree, just a small artificial one. They always went to Grandma Gibson’s for Thanksgiving dinner and Christmas dinner. Grandma Catherine Hunter Gibson, my mother-in-law, had a “shanty” where she did all her cooking on the big coal cooking range. She made big “sheet cake” type fruit cakes and cut them to give each family a part. She kept a drawer full or sugar cookies, and made a rich cream cake that the grandsons really relished. The old part of the home, in Taylor, Utah, was made of adobe bricks, and it was a warm house with big rooms. They had a ‘folding bed’, high headboard with a mirror on top where Jim and I slept when we came down from Logan to visit. One night when we were visiting she cleaned her cooking range with a new blacking polish while the range was still warm, and it caused an odor so strong, she came into the bedroom and we were asleep and she thought we were dead from the fumes! When she passed away we were willed this bed, but as I had no room for it in our home, we sold it. Catherine was a good singer and enjoyed singing the pioneer songs. Grandpa Gibson, Thomas, had passed away when Jim and I were married, so I never knew him. Jim’s family was Tom, the oldest brother, who never married (his fiancée was killed at Loren Farr Park during one 24th of July fireworks.) George also never married. Joe married Violet Elizabeth (Lizzie) and worked at the sugar factory. A pile of sugar sacks fell on him and he passed away from the effects a month later. John married Elizabeth Sewell whom they called “Little Liz”. All the Gibson boys had gone for Elizabeths. Mary, a sister, died soon after Jim and I were married. She had married a Vaughn. There was also a sister Christina and a sister Elizabeth. One day when Tom went over to the little confectionary store there in West Weber he came home with two pair of long socks for Carl when he was a baby. He and George gave me their old suits and beautiful silk shirts and overcoats and I would remodel and make them down for Carl and Grant, and our boys were always well dressed. The first long pants Carl wore was when he was about 4 years old. We went uptown one day and Carl saw this model in Wright’s window (where J. C. Penny’s is now) - a boy mannequin in long pants), and he came back to me and said “Mama, I don't want any more maiden suits!” And he took my hand and took me to see the model.​I told my mother what Carl had said, and she said, “Oh, I have an old pair of Dad’s pants that would make some nice ones.” They were striped (that he had worn in England with a long tailed coat and a tall silk hat). So I made Carl some long pants - he was thrilled to death - and I took him to town and into the Wright’s store, and Mr. Wright said “Where did you get those nice pants?”, and Carl told him I had made them, and he stood Carl up on the counter and measured him and made him a new belt to go with the trousers. Everyone admired Carl's new pants, and they brought me their husband’s old pants to remodel for their boys. I made lots of boys’ pants, and my boys always looked nice. Not so long ago a man came to our ward to speak and he said “I see a lady here - Sister Gibson - she made my first long pants!” When Grant was in high school I got gabardine material from the Grant store and made his shirts, and the boys at school would say “My, you wear pretty shirts, where do you get them?” and he would tell them “Nye’s!” (An expensive men’s clothing store!) (One day Jim took Carl uptown with instructions to buy him a pair of new bib overalls, which the boys were always dressed in when they were younger so their shirttails would stay tucked in. Carl talked his Dad into buying him a pair of Levis instead. He wanted them so badly. When they returned home with them, Mom insisted that they take them right back and get the bib overalls. To this day - 50 years later - whenever she relates the story she tells how much neater the boys looked in their bib overalls, and when Carl tells the story he still feels sorry that he didn’t get the levis, so it proves that even a family unit is made up of individual personalities. - Beth) ​Grandpa and Grandma Lightfoot moved from the big home on B Avenue to a smaller home on F Avenue, and from there they moved to their tiny home behind Aunt Louie’s house. They didn’t have room for big family gatherings inside the house, but the families did gather there often and visit in the cool of Louie’s fruit orchard at the side of their house. It was our practice every summer to make a ‘vacation’ out of the trip to Provo to get pears for canning. We stopped on the way back in Salt Lake City to eat at a restaurant. While there Jim heard two men talking about the bank closing - the Ogden State Bank where we had our money! He paid for the meal, pulled on his purse strings, and never let them loose again! It happened that just before this Jim had bought a new car on time payments, which was very unusual for him. And he worried about this until he asked me if I didn’t think it would be a good idea to pay off the car, which I agreed on. So only two or three weeks before he had drawn that money from the bank and we didn’t owe on the car. But we hadn’t our winter supply of coal or sugar, which we usually did each Fall. It was a trying time. We lived on beans. Those depression years were really lean. I was able to remodel old coats into new smaller ones for the boys, and old suits into pants for them and tried to keep them looking fresh and neat. I sewed the same way for many people who came from all over town when they heard about my work, and they kept me busy, so I was able to help the family in this way. Jim would work whenever he could, as his work was seasonal and slim during this time too. When the country started to pull out of the depression and things got a little easier, Jim said, “Well, here we are, and we’re out of debt and we’ll start all over anew. And it was with your help.” And that made me feel really good that he so expressed his appreciation for the efforts I had made. It was then he got his job at the Royal Canning Factory. He had worked for the sugar factory in Wilson Lane, then he went to the Wasatch Canning Factory, and last to the Royal Canning Factory, working there until he retired. Jim’s health was very poor when he retired. He never liked to leave home, being content with his home and surroundings, but he did enjoy a trip we took with Louie and her husband Moroni and Agnes. We went up the coast to Portland, Oregon, and he said he would like to go again. But a series of small strokes had weakened him and soon after we returned from Oregon he suffered a massive stroke which took him on July 29, 1954, and he was buried in the West Weber Cemetery on July 31, 1954. I was a widow at age 61. Of course by this time the boys had left home. I'll tell you just a little bit more about them. When Carl was 6 years old he went to the Hopkins School, from there to Central High School, and graduated from the new Ogden High School in 1939. He was always fond of baseball, and he played on the American Legion team and the church teams. After he graduated he went to night school at Weber College, taking Drafting courses. Work was so hard to find, and he finally got on at the railroad; working in the freight handling for O.U.R. & D. Co. He was drafted into the Air Force in 1942. He was trained as a Sheet Metal Aircraft repairman, and spent 26 months in the South Pacific in New Guinea. When he came home in December, 1945, he went back to the railroad. He met Elizabeth Wight and they were married July 31, 1946. They have had a family of 4 daughters and a son, Carla Jean born July 24, 1947, Catherine, born July 4, 1950, Evan Carlisle born Feb. 5, 1952, Gayle, born Feb. 3, 1955, and Kaye, born Jan. 7, 1957. Carl is still working at the railroad, as the Demurrage Clerk for Union Pacific, and they live at 3647 Monroe Blvd. in Ogden. Thomas Grant went to Hopkins School, Central Jr. High, and Ogden High School, graduating in 1943. Grant didn’t care about sports, but he liked business, and worked at J. C. Penny Co. in the afternoons when he was going to high school. He also worked for Herrod Furniture Co. He went to work for the railroad in the Commissary Dept. He married Sylvia Shepherd in 1944. He was a Steward in charge of dining car service, and as railroad cuts were made he transferred to Denver, Colorado for a time. He left the railroad and returned to Ogden, employed by the Elks Lodge. Grant and Sylvia have three children, Cheryl Ann, born April 29, 1945, Alan Grant born Oct. 9, 1951, and Debra, born July 13, 1954. Sylvia passed away in 1977. Grant married Bertha Vaughn Myers in 1978. He is now employed by Wolfe's Sportsman’s Headquarters, and they live in Roy, Utah. ​I had always helped in the support of the family, especially during the depression years, with my sewing, dressmaking and tailoring, and after Jim's death I continued with this work, enabling me to maintain myself in complete independence, and also enjoying the trips which were a good diversion from my steady work at the machine. I have made many, many beautiful wedding dresses - among them Beth’s, Carla Jean’s, Cheryl’s, Cathy’s and three of Beth’s sisters - Charlene, Lorraine, and Janet’s. I’ve had many occasions to meet quite a number of the authorities of the Church, and I’ve enjoyed their company. President Brown, I think a great deal of him. He put his arm around my waist and he said “Peace be with you”, and I'll never forget it. I would like to tell about President David O. McKay and meeting him in our home in Carlisle. He was on his way to Scotland on his mission, and we had several of the Elders boarding at our home at the time. There was David Penman (from West Weber) and several others of the missionaries. And David O. McKay came there and visited and had dinner at our home, and then went on his mission to Scotland. He was a very handsome young man, very personable, and he and the other Elders all had their pictures taken together. He was a very attractive young fellow. After we’d come to this country, I went to his home on Madison Avenue in Ogden. Ida Dean Call, one of the girls I was chumming with at the time, sang in the Tabernacle Choir and knew Jeannette, President McKay’s daughter. While we were there, President McKay came home and greeted Jeannette, and pulled her onto his lap and said, “My little Jean” in his Scottish brogue. President McKay used to talk quite a bit of Scotch and we thought a great deal of him, and many times when he came to Ogden here we would shake his hand as he was sitting on the stand. And one time my father and mother went to a funeral in the Third Ward and he was sitting on the stand, and he happened to spy my father down in the audience, and he said “I'll have to go down, there’s a party down there I want to speak to.” And he came and talked to my father down in the audience. And I met him on the street one day, we were close by the Keeley’s restaurant, and I was talking to a party and I said “Joe, let's step to one side, here comes the President.” And I could just feel him coming along the street, it seemed like, and before he got to where we were. But when he got to where we were, he came over and shook hands with us, and I really admired him very much. President Joseph F. Smith, I knew him quite well. When I went to Salt Lake to stay with some friends of ours, I was about to leave to come home and I was to meet my parents by the tabernacle. And President Smith came out from the temple gate and he touched me on the shoulder and he said “Girlie, what are you doing here all alone?” And I said, well I was waiting for my parents to come and get me. And he said, “Now, you be careful, you know you shouldn't be here all alone.” And I never forgot it. I could always picture him with his long white beard, and I was quite thrilled about it, so I’ve had the privilege of meeting him too. I've had an interesting life. I've done a great many things. I taught Sunday School for 29 years, and I taught Relief Society 30 years, the Theology Lesson, and was one of the counselors in Mutual for quite some time. I served a Regional Mission for two years - 1957-58, with Eleanor Bates as my companion. When I was called to go into the Regional Mission, President Thompson was the President of the stake at the time, and I said to him “I don’t know whether I can do very much good or not!” He said, “Sister Gibson, with a personality like you've got, you can get anywhere!” And we were very successful in our work at that time. We were the means of having eight people baptized into the Church. Eleanor visits me still and we often talk about the good times we had together in the Regional Mission. I have really enjoyed my life. I would sew and be frugal and save, and then each summer after Jim’s passed away I would go on a vacation trip with the bus tours. I've done a great deal of traveling all over the United States and have met a great many people and have made lots and lots of friends I would never have met otherwise, and I really enjoyed it all. I’ve been to Hawaii and to Canada, and to Mexico (3 times), and every state all but Alaska. I hope and pray that I can do a little more before the end. And I'm happy. I've sewed for 40 years, and am still doing it. Today is my birthday - 80 years old, and I've really enjoyed it all! I made a trip to the Bahamas. We went down through the Southern States (by bus) into Florida, and from Miami over to the Bahamas. We went by boat, and stayed right on the boat at night and had all our meals on the boat. While we were there President Kennedy’s wife came there, in a yacht, and she went from there to the plane, but we saw her boat and it was beautiful. We visited some of the homes there. It is quite an attractive place, and then we went over across the channel in a glass-bottomed boat, and we saw all the different kinds of fish that were in the water, and we saw the fish that jump out of the water and back in again, and it was quite an attraction there. I surely enjoyed it. And then we got coral - the divers went down and got the coral and brought it back up. When I was in Hawaii we went by boat over to Captain Cook's island, and we saw the different fish there, all colors, the most beautiful sight that I've ever seen, and I never will forget. It was just like a garden down in the ocean. And all these different fish, they were striped - black and white striped, and there was pink and there was yellow and all different colors of fish. In Hawaii we had a wonderful time! Everywhere we went it seemed that they would give us the orchids and leis. On the Sunday we went to the docks, and there was a large ship that these wealthy people were going around the world on, on a trip. And the Hawaiians don’t dance on Sunday, so they would sing from the dock and the people on the ship would sing, and we would sing from the dock, and we really enjoyed the visit with them. And a lady came up to me and she said “Are you from Utah?”, and I said yes, and she said “I've got something for you.” And she placed the most beautiful gardenia lei on my neck and gave me the kiss, the Hawaiian kiss. And we went to the Hawaiian orchid gardens, and the bus driver, when we were in this store, he looked all over for me, and he said “Where's Mrs. Gibson?”, and they said oh, she's over there, and he came over and he said “I want to place this on your neck.” And he gave me a beautiful lei and kissed me. And the girls said "How do you rate?" “Wherever you go they put a lei on your neck!” And Bertha Hadley was my companion, and when we went back to the room we had a bathtub half full of gardenias and orchids and leis, and we often laughed about the orchids we had! In Hawaii at this place where they had the orchids, they were selling for $5, and when we got to San Francisco they were selling for $0.98! History of Elizabeth Lightfoot Gibson .....her life story, told on tape on her 80th birthday, November 14, 1973, and supplemented with reminiscences during the month of March, 1979, age 85. “I was born November 14, 1893. My father is Thomas Lightfoot, and my mother is Mary Jane Forrester Lightfoot. I had a sister Agnes, then myself, then brother Joseph (Joe), Christopher (Chris), Louisa (Louie), Orson, Robert (Bob), and Lenora, all born in Carlisle, England, and brother James Forrester (Jim) was born in Kaysville, Utah. (Note: 6 other children died in infancy or early childhood in England.) When I was born our home was in Carlisle, Cumberland (Cumbria) England. Carlisle is about 10 miles from the Scottish border, and was a pretty town when we lived there, bigger than Salt Lake City. We were living in what we called a “terrace”; the homes were built close together and you could hear your neighbors through the walls! At this time Father was on the police force working for the railroad. When I was about three years old, or a little more I guess, Agnes was going to go to the Cooperative Store at the corner of the block. And I followed. And she went into the Cooperative Store, and I kept on going! And I went all the way from what they call “Botchigate”, the main street, right through the main part of the city (there were four gates into the city because they had walls all around, built many years ago to keep the Pits and Scots out of the city) to the other side of the city over the River Eden bridge to a place called Stannix. And it started to rain, and there I was down in the valley (by the river) and there was a home close by, and I was crying and crying, and this lady came out, and I don’t know how she got in touch with the police force, (there was no telephone at the time), but anyway she took me over to her home and the police came and they said to me “What’s your name?” And I’d just shake my head. (I was so little and scared.) So he asked me again what my name was (he repeated every name he could think of), and he said “Is it Mary?”and I shook my head, no. And he said, “Is it Sa1ly?” “No.” And he asked quite a number of names and I kept shaking my head. So he took me back home, that is to the police station, and the folks naturally came there. Father was on the police force at the time, the railroad police, and the police man said “You little brat, you, don’t you know your name?” (And he always called me that, too, every time he saw me!) So when the folks came there to get me, every time I’d see him, it didn’t matter where I’d be until I was quite a good sized girl, he’d say “You little brat you!” And then my health wasn’t too good when I got, oh, about 4 years old, and they used to send me on the bus every day. We’d ride from one side of the city to the other on the bus, the streetcar, and it only cost a penny, and I world ride up on the top of the bus and I’d go right to the castle - that was where Mary Queen of Scots had been put in the dungeon there. She wasn’t beheaded there, but she was imprisoned there. And there was a cathedral right across from the castle, and I would go into the cathedral and oh, just roam around you know. And I wasn’t very old, and I enjoyed these rides every day. And that was to get away, for my health, to get fresh air I guess. And in the summertime they’d send me out to the country, about 6 or 7 miles, to a big farm home. My father and mother had both worked there, and that’s where Father met my mother, at this farm. And he never could sing, but Father and Mother had a little quarrel and he wrote on the barn door “Go and leave me -“ (just a song he knew) - (I’m just trying to think now what it was -) “Go and leave me if you wish it, never let me cross your mind, but if you think I’m so unworthy, go and leave me, never mind.” And I’ve often thought about it. And before they married he had bought all the furniture for their home where they rented. But this lady at the farm was very good to us. She used to have prize cattle, enormous cattle, and she had blue ribbons all over the place. And they had a milk house all built of stone, and a big slab where they made butter. She made butter and took it to the market. And that’s how come I’d go out with her, you see, in what they called a “Gigby”. It was a two-wheeled cart, pulled with a horse -you’ve seen the pictures where they just had one seat and a place in the back where they could put their produce. And I’d go out there and she had a beautiful garden in the back of her place, and it had - she used to grow all kinds of flowers, and Lavender -have you ever smelled lavender? - well, she grew a lot of lavender, and she used to gather that and put it in sacks, you see, and she’d sell that. They would have a regular public market and they would have butter and cheese and poultry, you know, of all kinds. And they used to make their own sausage and things like that. At this farmhouse, it was a well-kept farm, even the yard was paved with cobblestones and the hired men used to have to sweep that every day. And they had pigs, and big boilers that they cooked the pig feed in, and it was really interesting for me, because I used to just love to go there. And then I can tell you about how the folks were converted.... These two men came to my mother’s home. See, being a terrace, all the houses joined together, and they had called at several places but people wouldn’t have anything to do with them when they found, you know, that they were Mormon missionaries. And they stopped at my mother’s door, and they told their story. They said they hadn’t had money come from home, and where they’d stayed the woman told them to leave because they didn’t have the money to pay the rent, and so they didn’t have anywhere to stay. So Mother invited them into the house, and she told them that they could have her front, what we called the parlor. And we had one bedroom upstairs that they used, and they used the parlor. And she told them that they could stay there until got their money. And they were in the front room parlor and they began to sing. My mother's younger sister was living with us at the time (Aunt Hannah), and she was a dressmaker. And Mother and her just stood there and listened to these fellows sing. And their names were Daniel Muir from Bountiful, Utah, and Ephriam Briggs from Woods Cross, Utah. And they began to sing "Oh My Father", and Mother and Aunt Hannah stood and listened to them. When Father came home that evening, Mother told him what she had done- that these two young men from America had come there and were Mormon missionaries. And so he said "But you don't know anything about them other than...", and she said "No." So he went in and talked with them, and I guess it must have satisfied him because he let them stay. And they talked to Father and Mother and Aunt Hannah, and they preached the Gospel to them, and in two days Father and Mother were converted. And they were baptized a very short time afterwards, and Aunt Hannah joined the Church with them, and my sister Agnes. (Baptized 9 August 1898) A little later on an Elder Brown came to our home to stay, also. And Mother did their washing and they stayed there. Elder Brown got a "Dear John" letter from his girl and he was really down. He went upstairs to his bedroom to grieve. Aunt Hannah dressed up in father's police clothes and the other elders almost dragged her up the stairs to cheer him up, and he started to laugh and that was the end of his grief: Later on Aunt Hannah came to America. First of all she went to New Castle on Thinnes. That's where the headquarters of the Northern part of England or the conference house for the Elders was. Some new missionaries came there, and it happened that Chris Holland was one, and he met my Aunt Hannah and he fell in love with her. He asked if, and he knew that she was coming to America, and would she correspond with him. And she said "Yes." So they corresponded for two years while he was in the mission field. When he came home to Kaysville, she was living down in Nephi at one of the Elder's homes down there, and they decided to get married. He built her a home in Kaysville and they had one, their oldest girl, Mary her name was. And then when she had her second baby, Aunt Hannah died! That was before Father and Mother came to this country. Chris wrote to Mother and told her about Aunt Hannah's death, and Mother grieved so much about it. She had a dream, and Hannah came to her and told her that she had to quit grieving, that she was happy. She showed Mother the room that she was in and she was taking care of the children there. After that Mother quit grieving. I had a blessing when I was 5 years old at the time my parents were baptized. I had had inflammation of the lungs 9 times. And the Elders gave me this blessing and stated that I would gain my health and strength, and that I would be able to do much good, and I would come here to this country, and if I lived right I would be the means of being influential in many things. Now I don't know just what my trouble was, but when I was - before the Elders came - I had lost my eyesight, I was blind. And they kept me in a dark room for six weeks. And the doctor used to come every day and lay me on the floor and put drops in my eyes. And when I gained my sight, the first thing that I saw was - I got up on the landing, you see most of the homes had upstairs, and I was out on the landing, and my sister Agnes was coming in the front door and she was the oddest looking creature I'd ever seen. And I always remember that--she was so changed from how I remembered her. I was just thinking about the time when I was a little girl when the Elders gave me that blessing, and they told me that if I would keep the Word of Wisdom that I would gain my health, and from then on I kept the Word of Wisdom as far as I could and gained my health and strength and never had a doctor until my children were born. The day that I was baptized (17 November 1901) there was an old lady who was baptized at the same time. We had to go to what they called the Public Baths, and she cried and cried when she got out of the water, and I didn't shed a tear. After that we moved to a place called Botchigate. It was a little country place. It was a beautiful little place. David Penman from West Weber had been on a mission and he came over there to England and he had come to get this young woman, Hannah Foster was her name, and they married there and he stayed in Carlisle, oh for about two years. After those first two missionaries, many missionaries lived in our home, some of them became prominent officials in the Church. David 0. McKay was one missionary who stopped at their home on his way to his mission in Scotland. I was going to school - you see, over there they go to school by the time they are five years old. They had a flood at that time, and when we went down to go to see it, it was all in the schoolyard and we couldn't go to school. And when I got there, I had been wearing glasses and my glasses fell off and broke, and I never wore glasses anymore until I was about, oh, 40 years old, and then more just for show than for seeing. At 85 I can thread a needle, sew, read, etc., without glasses! I did go to school until we left England, when I was 13 years old. (1907) I think the most interesting part about my life was when we left England. We came to Liverpool. My Uncle Richen (my father’s oldest brother) lived in Liverpool. He was on the police force there. Agnes, my oldest sister, was 18 years old at the time, and she was a very nice looking girl and had quite a wonderful personality. And Uncle Richen said “Tom, I don’t like the idea of you taking these girls to Utah, among those Mormons. I know that they are wild men. I know I will never get to see you or hear any more about you!” Father said, “Well, that may be so, but we’re going anyway.” And when we got to the office, they wanted to charge full fare for me and half fare for my brother, Chris. He was only about 4 years old at the time. And that was going to run Fahter and Mother pretty low on money. (At the time they left England, Agnes was 18, Lizzie 13, Louise 10, Joe 7, Chris 6, Lenora 4, Orson 2, and Bob just a baby) President Penrose, who was President of the British Mission at the time, said, “Brother Lightfoot, you go on anyway. We’ll see that you get through the custom house. We’ll see that you have the money.” So when we got on the boat (the SS Arabic) there were quite a number of the Elders coming home and we had a wonderful time on the boat. I was the only one that wasn’t seasick. Mother and them were very sick. Mother said she didn’t care whether they threw her overboard or not, she was so sick; and Agnes was quite sick. My brother Orson had a cast on his foot. We think that he must have had paralysis, but we never knew just for sure, but he had been in the hospital there in Carlisle and they put this cast on. (While there in the hospital the big nurse came in, and he was quite a mischievous child and he wanted to run around, and the nurse said, “Orson, you get up into that crib and stay there. You’re a naughty boy!” And he said, No I’m not, I’m a Mormon Boy!” She was puzzled at this and couldn’t figure out what he meant by that, and remarked about it at the table for the hospital help, and the cook, being a Mormon herself, explained to them what a “Mormon” was.) So when we were on the boat he would just run around, getting around so good, and everyone would make a big fuss over him. But when we came to pass the Custom House they weren’t going to let us come on account of him having the cast. Father had him in his arms, and he had an orange in his hand (we were on the boat for seven days and they would give everyone an orange every day, so, being a big family, we had accumulated quite a few) and he dropped the orange, and Father let him down and he rant to get it, and they said “All right, you’re alright!” So they let us come. And the Elders all had collected money so we would have money enough to come through customs. When we got to Kaysville, Father gave the money back to the Elders and then we had $7 left! Bishop Blood was the one that came to meet us at the time. He later became the Governor of Utah. I’ve often pictured what a sight we must have been! Oh yes, we came to Utah on the train. I’ll have to tell you about a little instance that happened on the train. My Mother was scared of colored people, and she lay awake all night long. She said she couldn’t risk her life with them (the porters!). And Orson, he got into the restroom and locked himself in, and they couldn’t get him out. And they tried and tried every way possible. At last they had to put a wire down underneath, and he was just a little fellow, and tell him to put it on the catch of the door so he could unlock it. And that’s how he got out, but it was quite exciting for a while! We had left England on the 26th of April, 1906 and got into Kaysville on the 7th of May, 1906. We were five days coming from Boston, coming here to Kaysville, and seven days on the boat. Father was working for Frank L. Layton for $40 a month on his farm. Mother went out nursing, and I took care of our home. We lived in the little red schoolhouse! It was just one big room, and we had it curtained off for bedrooms, and we had a little old stove that we did the cooking on. I made the meals (I was 14 years old at the time) for Father and the other children. There were seven of us altogether. Agnes worked at the Thornley’s home and so she wasn’t there, but I cooked for the rest. And I know Father, he was the most patient man that ever lived and he never made a complaint, and I know right well he had sour dough bread many times because the bread would go sour before it got baked! And I’d get down and scrub that great big floor. And you know how kids are, and we made candy and all the neighbor kids would come over and have a good time. And when I did the washing, we hung the washing all around the school yard on the fence. It was quite a picture, but we didn’t have any clothes lines, so we’d just hang them around on the fence! My brother Bob was born in England and was never very well. When we were crossing over on the boat he was so sick they didn’t expect him to live and we thought they would have to bury him at sea. But he revived until we got to Kaysville and I took care of him when Mother was working. Uncle Chris lived about a block from the school house and we used to get milk from his cows. And I said to Uncle Chris, “Let’s try just one cow’s milk and see if that would help Bob,” (instead of a mixture from all the cows), and he did, and after that Bob began to grow and was made well, and it seemed like he changed altogether after that. We lived in the schoolhouse for quite a long while, and then we went onto a farm, jut below the cemetery in Kaysville. They later made it into a reservoir in the valley. It was the Neilson farm. Mother would work out in the fields with Father and I would take care of the home. We had rice pudding. I used to make pretty good rice pudding, and we’d have some every day. I’d make it in a big milk pan and they used to have quite a joke about Lizzie and her rice puddings! There was a creek running down in front of the place, and Jim, the baby brother born in Kaysville, used to go down to the creek and get in the water to swim, and I used to have to change his rompers a dozen times a day! We lived on this farm for about 3 years, and then came to Ogden. In Ogden we lived across from the Racetrack (down by Willey' and Hyer's homes), and Father worked at the Wasatch Canning Factory. John Parker was Superintendent of the canning factory at the time. It seemed that more or less all of us worked at the factory, and then father would be in the warehouse, and the boys would be up at the top and put the cans down the chute, and we girls would do the labeling and worked in the peas and the asparagus and tomatoes. They were very good to us. I later went to work at Shupe Williams Candy Co., and I worked there for about 6 weeks until I ate all the candy I could hold. Pearl Burton, who was living with us at the time, she and I worked there. I went from there to Scowcrofts and worked there for 41/2 years. I did all the sample work. Mother said to me one time "Lizzie, you should write a book about your life. You know, you've had quite a loving life!" I don't know what she would think about all the things I have done since. You see, I went with Harvis Call and I went with Neil Vanderfliece, and then I went with Earl Waite. First of all I went with Neil Vanderfliece and he was killed. A group was going to a watermelon party, and as they crossed the railroad tracks a train hit him and killed him. I had had to go to a Board meeting that night, and they called me and told me what had happened. He was surely always good to me. I went with Harvis Call for about two years, and then I went with Earl. He and I had an understanding, until a former girl friend came and won him back again. Over my years there has been a great change in the means of transportation. My dates used to come and get me in a white top buggy pulled by a horse. One time my sister and I were going to a dance and she was to meet her boyfriend, Ed Penman, there. I hooked up the horse, and I don’t suppose I got the harness on just right or something, cause as I came along the road that horse kept going in and out, in and out, all the way along the ride, until he got me right off the road altogether into the burrs, and I had a wool dress on and my dress got full of burrs. And when we got to the dance, Ed, who had come all the way from West​Weber to go to the dance with my sister, had to help her pull all the burrs out of my dress before I could go to the dance! And I have rode in what they call the race cart, and I have rode in buggies and wagons, and several other different kinds of vehicles. And I have also had the privilege of going in a plane. And when we got over to Hawaii they went from different islands by plane, and I enjoyed it very much. And I rode on the trains, and all over the country by bus. I like to travel by bus. When I get onto the bus I just relax, and let the driver do the driving. And I've enjoyed it very much, the different experiences that I have had. My folks moved to a big two story house down by the river in West Ogden, just across the viaduct, and we used to hold Sunday School there before this ward was organized. It was a Branch. We had a big parlor in this home, and also a big room kept just for the church meetings, with chairs set up and an organ. Before the meeting would start it was my job to make a big cake in a big dripper pan that filled the whole over. And Lenora peeled the potatoes and vegetables and had them in their pans, ready to be pushed to the front of the stove as soon as church was over so it wouldn't take long at all to have the dinner ready. When Lizzie's cake came out of the oven, Mother put a big beef roast in, and towards the end of the meeting the wonderful aroma of delicious roast beef would come into the meeting room.​It never took much coaxing to have the stake board visitors stay to dinner at our house. The potatoes and vegetables cooked while Mother made the gravy and a delicious dinner was ready. Mother was Relief Society President during much of this time and was very busy with this work. And Mother used to take in boarders. They were building the Globe Mills at the time, and these workmen stayed there. They were from Brigham City and Salt Lake and around, and so naturally we'd have lots of dishes, and my sister Louie never liked to do housework, or she never liked to wash dishes, and she'd slip away and go and play the piano and leave me to wash the dishes. And that's how my husband - I don't know whether it was he fell in love with me for that or what, but I was washing dishes and he said to me "I like the way you wash the dishes!" But that was after my mission. During the time I was working at Scowcrofts I was called to the Western States Mission. This was something I very much desired to do, and I was preparing to go and still working when one day Mr. Wright, who was our boss (he wasn't a member of the Church and was Manager of the Overall Dept.), came up to me and he said "Elizabeth, there are two gentlemen here to see you." Two men, Ray McArthur and Harry Bingham, had come to Scowcrofts and asked for me. Harry Bingham was Martha Leishman's brother (and it turned out he had recommended me), and the other gentleman I didn't know, and I couldn't figure out why they had come there. Harry said, "I guess you wonder what I'm here for." He said that they wanted me to go up into Chester, Idaho, to take care of Mr. McArthur's home. He had four children and his wife had just recently passed away. And I said, "I can't-- I have my call to go into the mission field." And they said "Oh, you've got called to the wrong mission!” I said, “I have nothing to do with it, I can’t go,” that I had accepted the call from Salt Lake. So they said they would go to see my Bishop, which they did. It was Frederick Walker, the West Ogden Ward Bishop. And Bishop Walker said he had nothing to do with it, that I had accepted the call from Salt Lake. So they went to President Joseph F. Smith. He said that I should go to Idaho, that it was a mission for me to go and take care of the McArthur home. He would release me now from my Western States call and if it should turn out to be a matrimonial case he would release me for rood, and if not, they would call me again. So I went up there with them, and I stayed there for six months. Mr. McArthur was 1st Counselor in the Bishopric. He had a dairy farm, and cows. His oldest child was 14 and the youngest 7 years old. There was a big garden, and we were very well provided for, and the children were very good to help me. When I came one of the children told me “Daddy said you were pretty, and I don't think you're pretty.” But when I left, he told me “I do think you're pretty!” Mr. McArthur wanted me to marry him and stay there, but I had made up my mind for the mission, and when they contacted me from Salt Lake again, I was ready to go. I would rather go on the mission. So I came home and left for my mission on the 14th of November 1917, on my birthday (24th). And I labored in Denver, Colorado for six weeks and from there went to Omaha, Nebraska, and labored there for almost 18 months, all during the time of the First World War.​I was there at the time the Armistice was signed. I came home in the month of June, 1919. On my way I went to the conference in Denver where they dedicated the chapel there. During this time President Smith had passed away and Pres. Heber J. Grant was the President, and he released me from my mission. I came home, and I met Mr. Gibson - Jim - a month or so after I got home, and we were married the following June 16, 1920. While I was in the mission field, Lenora worked at Wasatch Canning Factory. Jim Gibson worked there on the machinery, and he told Lenora “When your sister comes home, I'm going to get her!” And Lenora said “Oh, she wouldn't even look at you!” When I came home from my mission, I took Lenora's and the boy's lunches to them, and Lenora introduced Jim to me. After I'd left he asked Lenora if she thought her sister would like to go to a show, and she told him yes, she guessed I would. So when she came home she told me Jim Gibson was coming to take me to a show, and he took me to the Orpheum Theatre. On the night I gave my mission report in the ward, Jim went to his brother John's home (he was living in our ward), and said he'd go down to church with him. And he said while I was talking he kept thinking to himself, “I’m going to get her.” There weren't many cars at that time, but Jim had a Ford car, and he'd come up from Brigham to see me. The Christmas after I came home from my mission George James went up into the hills and brought us a big real Christmas tree, the only real one we’d ever had, and we decorated it. Jim came on Christmas, and oh, it was so cold, and brought me a beautiful manicure set with Mother of Pearl handles. Some of the pieces I still have. I had been corresponding with one of the missionaries I’d met in the field - Charles Winters of Otto, Wyoming, and in April Conference time we had agreed to meet on temple square at the Bureau of Information. I waited and waited, and Charles didn't come. Something had come up that he couldn't leave the ranch. But, Jim came down, and I went home with him. A group of us when we were fooling around used to go up on the sand hill and shoot guns across the sand banks, and that's where Jim took me to give me my engagement ring. My ring was a ruby. At that time diamonds weren't so popular, it was more rubies, but nowadays it's all diamonds. We were married in the Salt Lake Temple on June 16, 1920. Mother and a Mrs. Pingree who was a very good family friend went with us to the temple. James Forbes Gibson was born March 20, 1882 in West Weber, Utah, a son of Thomas and Catherine Forbes Hunter Gibson, sixth in a family of 10 children. My husband was a very considerate man, and he was a good provider, and we loved each other very much. We had two children, two boys, and he was so good about taking care of these boys. I never had to get up in the night to take care of them, he did. And it didn't matter what was wrong, if they had the toothache, he would take care of them, and he never allowed me to get up to take care of them. And he was 11 years older than I, but we got along just wonderful. He was very pleasant - he had what I would say a dry humor, but we enjoyed each other very much. Sister Call was an old lady that lived down the street. She used to come up here every once in a while, and she’d say “You know, I love to come and talk to your husband!” And I said “I wondered why you come up here so often!” And we’d laugh about it, but he was, he was good natured. He would always wait for me. He would take me to the show, and we’d go to the vaudeville every Saturday night - have dinner and then go to the vaudeville.​And then after the vaudeville quit, they had the picture shows and he didn't like picture shows, so he would take me up and wait for me until I came cut of the show. The most patient man that I ever met. We made our first home in Logan at the Sugar Factory house.​Jim was working at the sugar factory as foreman over the Kelley presses (where they squeezed the juice cut of the beets). Near our house, which was just south of Logan, there was a little stream of water close by. A boy about 8 or 9 years old was driving a hay rake and he got to close to the edge of the stream and the rake and he fell in. When they were able to get him out, they called Dr. William H. Budge, a young family practitioner, to attend him, and he was so kind and gentle with the boy, I said I was going to have him for my doctor. So he attended me when our son Carl was born in our home on March 20, 1921. His full name was Carlisle Forbes, and he was born on his Dad’s 39th birthday. A young woman who was a nurse stayed with me, and my sister Lenora came up to stay with me when he was born. Ed Poorte came up to see her, and unknown to me, they went to the courthouse in Logan and were married. Lenora was 18 years old. We came back down to Ogden in the Spring, and lived in one room of Lenora and Ed's home for a little while, and then moved to West Ogden onto Cahoon Street. We moved into my present home that same year. We bought the lot and had the home, which we purchased from Fred Walker, moved onto the lot at 2456 F Avenue, Globe Mill Road. My father helped us remodel the home, enclosing the back porch to become the kitchen. In the spring of 1925 we were expecting another baby. Mrs. Cannon, who had been our neighbor in Logan, called me and told me that Dr. Budge was moving his practice to Ogden. So I went to town to the Eccles Bldg., and they were just putting the name in the foyer directory. I went upstairs, and there was Dr. Budge, unpacking his office supplies. So I was his first patient in Ogden, and he delivered Grant at our home on Sunday, May 17, 1925. He weighed 8 lbs. and was a beautiful, healthy baby. As I said before, Jim was very good with the boys. He was also pretty good about celebrating Christmases. Though they had to be practical, it was a festive time, and I decorated the house up. Carl remembers they each got a pair of overalls, a book, and a game each Christmas. They never had a real Christmas tree, just a small artificial one. They always went to Grandma Gibson’s for Thanksgiving dinner and Christmas dinner. Grandma Catherine Hunter Gibson, my mother-in-law, had a “shanty” where she did all her cooking on the big coal cooking range. She made big “sheet cake” type fruit cakes and cut them to give each family a part. She kept a drawer full or sugar cookies, and made a rich cream cake that the grandsons really relished. The old part of the home, in Taylor, Utah, was made of adobe bricks, and it was a warm house with big rooms. They had a ‘folding bed’, high headboard with a mirror on top where Jim and I slept when we came down from Logan to visit. One night when we were visiting she cleaned her cooking range with a new blacking polish while the range was still warm, and it caused an odor so strong, she came into the bedroom and we were asleep and she thought we were dead from the fumes! When she passed away we were willed this bed, but as I had no room for it in our home, we sold it. Catherine was a good singer and enjoyed singing the pioneer songs. Grandpa Gibson, Thomas, had passed away when Jim and I were married, so I never knew him. Jim’s family was Tom, the oldest brother, who never married (his fiancée was killed at Loren Farr Park during one 24th of July fireworks.) George also never married. Joe married Violet Elizabeth (Lizzie) and worked at the sugar factory. A pile of sugar sacks fell on him and he passed away from the effects a month later. John married Elizabeth Sewell whom they called “Little Liz”. All the Gibson boys had gone for Elizabeths. Mary, a sister, died soon after Jim and I were married. She had married a Vaughn. There was also a sister Christina and a sister Elizabeth. One day when Tom went over to the little confectionary store there in West Weber he came home with two pair of long socks for Carl when he was a baby. He and George gave me their old suits and beautiful silk shirts and overcoats and I would remodel and make them down for Carl and Grant, and our boys were always well dressed. The first long pants Carl wore was when he was about 4 years old. We went uptown one day and Carl saw this model in Wright’s window (where J. C. Penny’s is now) - a boy mannequin in long pants), and he came back to me and said “Mama, I don't want any more maiden suits!” And he took my hand and took me to see the model.​I told my mother what Carl had said, and she said, “Oh, I have an old pair of Dad’s pants that would make some nice ones.” They were striped (that he had worn in England with a long tailed coat and a tall silk hat). So I made Carl some long pants - he was thrilled to death - and I took him to town and into the Wright’s store, and Mr. Wright said “Where did you get those nice pants?”, and Carl told him I had made them, and he stood Carl up on the counter and measured him and made him a new belt to go with the trousers. Everyone admired Carl's new pants, and they brought me their husband’s old pants to remodel for their boys. I made lots of boys’ pants, and my boys always looked nice. Not so long ago a man came to our ward to speak and he said “I see a lady here - Sister Gibson - she made my first long pants!” When Grant was in high school I got gabardine material from the Grant store and made his shirts, and the boys at school would say “My, you wear pretty shirts, where do you get them?” and he would tell them “Nye’s!” (An expensive men’s clothing store!) (One day Jim took Carl uptown with instructions to buy him a pair of new bib overalls, which the boys were always dressed in when they were younger so their shirttails would stay tucked in. Carl talked his Dad into buying him a pair of Levis instead. He wanted them so badly. When they returned home with them, Mom insisted that they take them right back and get the bib overalls. To this day - 50 years later - whenever she relates the story she tells how much neater the boys looked in their bib overalls, and when Carl tells the story he still feels sorry that he didn’t get the levis, so it proves that even a family unit is made up of individual personalities. - Beth) ​Grandpa and Grandma Lightfoot moved from the big home on B Avenue to a smaller home on F Avenue, and from there they moved to their tiny home behind Aunt Louie’s house. They didn’t have room for big family gatherings inside the house, but the families did gather there often and visit in the cool of Louie’s fruit orchard at the side of their house. It was our practice every summer to make a ‘vacation’ out of the trip to Provo to get pears for canning. We stopped on the way back in Salt Lake City to eat at a restaurant. While there Jim heard two men talking about the bank closing - the Ogden State Bank where we had our money! He paid for the meal, pulled on his purse strings, and never let them loose again! It happened that just before this Jim had bought a new car on time payments, which was very unusual for him. And he worried about this until he asked me if I didn’t think it would be a good idea to pay off the car, which I agreed on. So only two or three weeks before he had drawn that money from the bank and we didn’t owe on the car. But we hadn’t our winter supply of coal or sugar, which we usually did each Fall. It was a trying time. We lived on beans. Those depression years were really lean. I was able to remodel old coats into new smaller ones for the boys, and old suits into pants for them and tried to keep them looking fresh and neat. I sewed the same way for many people who came from all over town when they heard about my work, and they kept me busy, so I was able to help the family in this way. Jim would work whenever he could, as his work was seasonal and slim during this time too. When the country started to pull out of the depression and things got a little easier, Jim said, “Well, here we are, and we’re out of debt and we’ll start all over anew. And it was with your help.” And that made me feel really good that he so expressed his appreciation for the efforts I had made. It was then he got his job at the Royal Canning Factory. He had worked for the sugar factory in Wilson Lane, then he went to the Wasatch Canning Factory, and last to the Royal Canning Factory, working there until he retired. Jim’s health was very poor when he retired. He never liked to leave home, being content with his home and surroundings, but he did enjoy a trip we took with Louie and her husband Moroni and Agnes. We went up the coast to Portland, Oregon, and he said he would like to go again. But a series of small strokes had weakened him and soon after we returned from Oregon he suffered a massive stroke which took him on July 29, 1954, and he was buried in the West Weber Cemetery on July 31, 1954. I was a widow at age 61. Of course by this time the boys had left home. I'll tell you just a little bit more about them. When Carl was 6 years old he went to the Hopkins School, from there to Central High School, and graduated from the new Ogden High School in 1939. He was always fond of baseball, and he played on the American Legion team and the church teams. After he graduated he went to night school at Weber College, taking Drafting courses. Work was so hard to find, and he finally got on at the railroad; working in the freight handling for O.U.R. & D. Co. He was drafted into the Air Force in 1942. He was trained as a Sheet Metal Aircraft repairman, and spent 26 months in the South Pacific in New Guinea. When he came home in December, 1945, he went back to the railroad. He met Elizabeth Wight and they were married July 31, 1946. They have had a family of 4 daughters and a son, Carla Jean born July 24, 1947, Catherine, born July 4, 1950, Evan Carlisle born Feb. 5, 1952, Gayle, born Feb. 3, 1955, and Kaye, born Jan. 7, 1957. Carl is still working at the railroad, as the Demurrage Clerk for Union Pacific, and they live at 3647 Monroe Blvd. in Ogden. Thomas Grant went to Hopkins School, Central Jr. High, and Ogden High School, graduating in 1943. Grant didn’t care about sports, but he liked business, and worked at J. C. Penny Co. in the afternoons when he was going to high school. He also worked for Herrod Furniture Co. He went to work for the railroad in the Commissary Dept. He married Sylvia Shepherd in 1944. He was a Steward in charge of dining car service, and as railroad cuts were made he transferred to Denver, Colorado for a time. He left the railroad and returned to Ogden, employed by the Elks Lodge. Grant and Sylvia have three children, Cheryl Ann, born April 29, 1945, Alan Grant born Oct. 9, 1951, and Debra, born July 13, 1954. Sylvia passed away in 1977. Grant married Bertha Vaughn Myers in 1978. He is now employed by Wolfe's Sportsman’s Headquarters, and they live in Roy, Utah. ​I had always helped in the support of the family, especially during the depression years, with my sewing, dressmaking and tailoring, and after Jim's death I continued with this work, enabling me to maintain myself in complete independence, and also enjoying the trips which were a good diversion from my steady work at the machine. I have made many, many beautiful wedding dresses - among them Beth’s, Carla Jean’s, Cheryl’s, Cathy’s and three of Beth’s sisters - Charlene, Lorraine, and Janet’s. I’ve had many occasions to meet quite a number of the authorities of the Church, and I’ve enjoyed their company. President Brown, I think a great deal of him. He put his arm around my waist and he said “Peace be with you”, and I'll never forget it. I would like to tell about President David O. McKay and meeting him in our home in Carlisle. He was on his way to Scotland on his mission, and we had several of the Elders boarding at our home at the time. There was David Penman (from West Weber) and several others of the missionaries. And David O. McKay came there and visited and had dinner at our home, and then went on his mission to Scotland. He was a very handsome young man, very personable, and he and the other Elders all had their pictures taken together. He was a very attractive young fellow. After we’d come to this country, I went to his home on Madison Avenue in Ogden. Ida Dean Call, one of the girls I was chumming with at the time, sang in the Tabernacle Choir and knew Jeannette, President McKay’s daughter. While we were there, President McKay came home and greeted Jeannette, and pulled her onto his lap and said, “My little Jean” in his Scottish brogue. President McKay used to talk quite a bit of Scotch and we thought a great deal of him, and many times when he came to Ogden here we would shake his hand as he was sitting on the stand. And one time my father and mother went to a funeral in the Third Ward and he was sitting on the stand, and he happened to spy my father down in the audience, and he said “I'll have to go down, there’s a party down there I want to speak to.” And he came and talked to my father down in the audience. And I met him on the street one day, we were close by the Keeley’s restaurant, and I was talking to a party and I said “Joe, let's step to one side, here comes the President.” And I could just feel him coming along the street, it seemed like, and before he got to where we were. But when he got to where we were, he came over and shook hands with us, and I really admired him very much. President Joseph F. Smith, I knew him quite well. When I went to Salt Lake to stay with some friends of ours, I was about to leave to come home and I was to meet my parents by the tabernacle. And President Smith came out from the temple gate and he touched me on the shoulder and he said “Girlie, what are you doing here all alone?” And I said, well I was waiting for my parents to come and get me. And he said, “Now, you be careful, you know you shouldn't be here all alone.” And I never forgot it. I could always picture him with his long white beard, and I was quite thrilled about it, so I’ve had the privilege of meeting him too. I've had an interesting life. I've done a great many things. I taught Sunday School for 29 years, and I taught Relief Society 30 years, the Theology Lesson, and was one of the counselors in Mutual for quite some time. I served a Regional Mission for two years - 1957-58, with Eleanor Bates as my companion. When I was called to go into the Regional Mission, President Thompson was the President of the stake at the time, and I said to him “I don’t know whether I can do very much good or not!” He said, “Sister Gibson, with a personality like you've got, you can get anywhere!” And we were very successful in our work at that time. We were the means of having eight people baptized into the Church. Eleanor visits me still and we often talk about the good times we had together in the Regional Mission. I have really enjoyed my life. I would sew and be frugal and save, and then each summer after Jim’s passed away I would go on a vacation trip with the bus tours. I've done a great deal of traveling all over the United States and have met a great many people and have made lots and lots of friends I would never have met otherwise, and I really enjoyed it all. I’ve been to Hawaii and to Canada, and to Mexico (3 times), and every state all but Alaska. I hope and pray that I can do a little more before the end. And I'm happy. I've sewed for 40 years, and am still doing it. Today is my birthday - 80 years old, and I've really enjoyed it all! I made a trip to the Bahamas. We went down through the Southern States (by bus) into Florida, and from Miami over to the Bahamas. We went by boat, and stayed right on the boat at night and had all our meals on the boat. While we were there President Kennedy’s wife came there, in a yacht, and she went from there to the plane, but we saw her boat and it was beautiful. We visited some of the homes there. It is quite an attractive place, and then we went over across the channel in a glass-bottomed boat, and we saw all the different kinds of fish that were in the water, and we saw the fish that jump out of the water and back in again, and it was quite an attraction there. I surely enjoyed it. And then we got coral - the divers went down and got the coral and brought it back up. When I was in Hawaii we went by boat over to Captain Cook's island, and we saw the different fish there, all colors, the most beautiful sight that I've ever seen, and I never will forget. It was just like a garden down in the ocean. And all these different fish, they were striped - black and white striped, and there was pink and there was yellow and all different colors of fish. In Hawaii we had a wonderful time! Everywhere we went it seemed that they would give us the orchids and leis. On the Sunday we went to the docks, and there was a large ship that these wealthy people were going around the world on, on a trip. And the Hawaiians don’t dance on Sunday, so they would sing from the dock and the people on the ship would sing, and we would sing from the dock, and we really enjoyed the visit with them. And a lady came up to me and she said “Are you from Utah?”, and I said yes, and she said “I've got something for you.” And she placed the most beautiful gardenia lei on my neck and gave me the kiss, the Hawaiian kiss. And we went to the Hawaiian orchid gardens, and the bus driver, when we were in this store, he looked all over for me, and he said “Where's Mrs. Gibson?”, and they said oh, she's over there, and he came over and he said “I want to place this on your neck.” And he gave me a beautiful lei and kissed me. And the girls said "How do you rate?" “Wherever you go they put a lei on your neck!” And Bertha Hadley was my companion, and when we went back to the room we had a bathtub half full of gardenias and orchids and leis, and we often laughed about the orchids we had! In Hawaii at this place where they had the orchids, they were selling for $5, and when we got to San Francisco they were selling for $0.98! Oh yes, I remember the beautiful lei I got at Carla's college graduation. I had a little experience when my grand-daughter, Carla, graduated from college. There was a young Hawaiian and his family standing close by, and they placed a lei on his neck. And I said to him, “Oh, that’s the most beautiful lei I’ve ever seen!” He took it off his neck and put it on mine, and gave me the Hawaiian kiss. I’ve often thought about the kindness that has been shown me wherever I have gone, and how people have taken to me. ​On January 10, 1979 I was knocking down icicles and sweeping snow off my frond porch when I slipped and fell, breaking my right ankle in two places, which required surgery and a week’s stay in the McKay Dee Hospital. I am 85 years old and this is the first time I have ever been a patient in the hospital! ​(Mom Gibson stayed in the hospital 10 days, at Carl’s home for 4 days, then to her own home with Aunt Lenora staying with her for 5 days. Then she went to grand-daughter Cheryl’s home in sunset for 3 weeks, and back to Carl’s home for the month of March. Then she went back home on her own again. With her ‘walking cast’ she wasn’t very portable at all, but after the cast was off she went from walker to cane, and at the present time is on a trip to the Northwest with Aunt Lenora and her son Tom!) ​ ​One of Elizabeth’s greatest trips was taken in the fall of 1976 when she was 83. She went with Lenora by plane via New York to London, England, where they stayed with the Don Schaub family (boyhood friend of Lenora’s son Glen) in their lovely apartment home while they saw all the sights, going by bus to Carlisle, their home town! In Carlisle they stayed with the Relief Society President, but were able to contact and visit with their cousin, George Lightfoot, and his lovely wife, whom they have corresponded with ever since. They then flew to Frankfurt, Germany, and were welcomed by Betty White, a dear friend whom Mom had sewn for for years. She had a comfortable apartment there, being on TDY from Hill Field as a legal secretary, and she was able to take them in her Cadillac to France and Switzerland! A stopover in Washington, D.C. with Lenora’s son Glen made the trip home very special! ​As the years passed, Elizabeth finally had to give up her dressmaking for the public, and her crocheting took its place as she created doilies, scarves, and hats and hot pads by the dozens. Her eyesight made it necessary to give up the fine thread, and be content to make soft yarn items. But she was content to sit at her kitchen table in the sunlight and work by the hour. In the evening she watched Channel 5 television, and kept up on the news. Her hip “set”, and she had to resort to using a walker, but she faithfully attended church every Sunday – chauffeured there by her friends, the Jacksons. Carl arranged for a neighbor, Lorna Potts, to check on her every morning to see she was off to a good start with her clean dress with pockets and her hair neatly bobbed. Carl and Beth and family and Grant visited as often as possible and helped with groceries, yard work, etc. She loved her home and didn’t want to leave it. However, when Carl’s health was such that he could not longer help too effectively, she did consent to leave the home and resided for two years at Country Meadows Care Center in South Ogden. Here at one Christmas time, she had crocheted enough items to give every woman patient and the nurses, attendants, etc. a place mat, doily, scarf, hat, or table runner in white, pink or blue as a Christmas gift at the Center’s party! It was a very happy evening for her as she distributed them from her wheelchair! While Carl and Beth were in Los Angeles on their mission, the grandchildren had hosted a 90th birthday open house for her, and at the Center she enjoyed two birthday open houses. In November 1990 she had suffered a time with pneumonia, but had recovered, seemingly, by birthday time – November 14th. But as I visited her on December 11th, I told Carl as I returned home that I thought she was failing as she had not touched her crocheting all day. Early in the morning of December 12th, 1990, we received the call that she had quietly slipped away. She was 97 years of age. From the Millennial Star 28:14 Elder John Barker wrote the following December 22, 1865: I took the earliest opportunity of visiting Carlisle, in Cumberland, the place of my early associations and friendship, and where I had loudly proclaimed the Gospel over twenty years ago. ​Carlisle is a very ancient city. It is pleasantly situated on the banks of the Eden and Calder, which unite on the north side. On the whole the place is healthy and well laid out. There is an old castle in which generally a body of troops was garrisoned, but recently the barracks have been condemned. The place is rich in legendary lore, stories of raids and border warfare, and of the ancient moss-troopers and the border clans. The celebrated Gretna Green is about nine miles distant. ​A branch of the church was established in Carlisle in 1840 and 1841 by John Sanders from Alston Moor, under whom I received the Gospel. He emigrated in the spring of 1846. This is my second mission since that time – my friends and the Saints in Carlisle received me very warmly. The Saints, though few in number, showed much kindness to me.

Life timeline of Thomas Lightfoot

1866
Thomas Lightfoot was born on 10 Mar 1866
Thomas Lightfoot was 14 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1879
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Thomas Lightfoot was 23 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
1889
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Thomas Lightfoot was 33 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
1898
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Thomas Lightfoot was 40 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
1905
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Thomas Lightfoot was 46 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
1912
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Thomas Lightfoot was 63 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
1929
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Thomas Lightfoot was 65 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
1930
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Thomas Lightfoot was 79 years old when World War II: Nagasaki is devastated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, is dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. Thirty-five thousand people are killed outright, including 23,200-28,200 Japanese war workers, 2,000 Korean forced workers, and 150 Japanese soldiers. Nagasaki is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan. The city's name, 長崎, means "long cape" in Japanese. Nagasaki became a centre of colonial Portuguese and Dutch influence in the 16th through 19th centuries, and the Hidden Christian Sites in the Nagasaki Region have been recognized and included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Part of Nagasaki was home to a major Imperial Japanese Navy base during the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War.
1945
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Thomas Lightfoot died on 19 Apr 1950 at the age of 84
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Thomas Lightfoot (10 Mar 1866 - 19 Apr 1950), BillionGraves Record 4449209 Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States

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