Thomas Davis Giles

28 Nov 1829 - 2 Nov 1894

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Thomas Davis Giles

28 Nov 1829 - 2 Nov 1894
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Wherever Thomas Giles went, music traveled with him. Crowds gathered to hear this master coax lovely melodies from his harp. He was much in demand throughout northern Utah, and nowhere was his music more welcome than in Brigham Young's home. His talent and skill were unusual, but there was something

Life Information

Thomas Davis Giles

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Blaemovon Mons Wales Died Provo, Utah

Headstone Description

Born Blaemovon Mons Wales
Died Provo, Utah
Transcriber

trishkovach

June 14, 2011
Transcriber

teripenna

April 11, 2020
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Drewski

June 9, 2011

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Thomas Davis Giles-Written by Anna Young Centerville 20th Ward

Contributor: AYoung Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Wherever Thomas Giles went, music traveled with him. Crowds gathered to hear this master coax lovely melodies from his harp. He was much in demand throughout northern Utah, and nowhere was his music more welcome than in Brigham Young's home. His talent and skill were unusual, but there was something else that made Giles special: he could not read music because he had no sight. His music came from his heart and carried the tones of troubles and triumphs, mourning and merriment. He earned fame as the blind harpist of Utah.
Born and raised in Wales, Giles made his living as a coal miner, a very hazardous occupation then. In 1848 a large piece of coal fell on him, causing severe head injuries and leaving him totally blind. Yet, a month later he was up and carrying out his duties for the Mormon church, often guided from place to place by a family friend, the widow Hannah Evans Bowen. Sometime after the accident Mormons in Wales gave him a harp as a gift of love and respect. He learned to play it skillfully. In 1856, 36-year-old Giles and his wife Margaret decided to emigrate with their children Joseph, Hyrum, and Maria, ages 9, 7, and 1.
With limited financial resources the family had to travel with a handcart company. Seventeen pounds was the limit for personal belongings on the carts, so most likely the harp was left behind to be freighted to Utah later. Sorrow struck again when little Maria became sick and died. The Giles’s were part of the Edward Bunker company of handcarts, composed almost entirely of immigrants from Wales. Despite the difficulties of handcart travel, music was part of the Welsh soul, and the people often burst into merry song as they walked. Blind as he was, Thomas pulled and sang with the rest. Alfred Reese, his partner with the cart, led the way for him. However, troubles followed them westward. Not far from Fort Laramie, Margaret gave birth to baby Elizabeth, but neither mother nor child would survive. Then, because of Thomas's blindness, his two boys were sent back along the trail to join the Hunt wagon company with which some Welsh immigrants were traveling. Friends of Giles would care for Joseph and Hyrum.
Alone, grief-stricken, and concerned about his sons, Giles traveled on. As they neared Fort Bridger he became seriously ill. For a couple of days, the group delayed for him, but when the captain felt there was no hope for his recovery, they left him in camp with two men to bury him. Giles had heard that Apostle Parley P. Pratt was coming east. Remarkable faith and the frequent administrations of the Elders who attended him kept Thomas Giles alive until evening when Parley P. Pratt, who had known Brother Giles in Wales, reached the camp. Elder Pratt gave Brother Giles a remarkable blessing. In it he made these promises: he should instantly be healed and made well, that he should rejoin his company and arrive safely in the Salt Lake Valley; that he should rear a family; and that because of his faithfulness he should be able to live as long as he wanted.” Elder Giles who regained his health, caught up with the company, and entered Salt Lake Valley on October 2, 1856.
Meanwhile, snow was about to delay the Hunt wagon company, traveling with the Martin handcart company. Hannah Evans Bowen, immigrating with her daughter Ann, took responsibility for Joseph and Hyrum Giles during the terrible storms that left the two companies snowbound. Though emaciated and frostbitten, the boys survived the tragedy that took so many lives and were able to rejoin their father. Hannah, who had cuddled the boys in her long skirts to keep them warm, suffered severely frostbitten feet. She remained with the Giles family as a housekeeper at first and then as wife and mother. She became Thomas's eyes. They had one son, Henry Evans Giles.
To make a living, Giles's hobby became an occupation. He used a harp owned by Brigham Young until his own harp arrived. Young gave him a letter of introduction that allowed him to travel through the settlements giving concerts. Large audiences came to hear him play the harp and sing hymns and popular songs. Admission cost whatever the people could contribute. Luke Gallup attended a concert in Springville, paying in wheat, and felt that Giles had entertained them well for it. Giles also played and sang at dances, socials, and church services. Sometimes the family traveled as far north as the Mormon settlements in Idaho, but for many years Ogden was home, since Thomas's mother and a sister lived there. In Ogden he was the leader of community singing, particularly of popular songs. In October 1869 he led the Tabernacle Choir during the Weber Stake Conference. Later the family moved to Salt Lake City. Brigham Young especially enjoyed his music, and Giles often played for parties and social functions at the Beehive House, the Social Hall, and occasionally the Salt Lake Theatre. When Thomas's harp was accidentally damaged beyond repair, Brigham Young replaced it with a valuable new one now on display at the DUP Museum in Salt Lake City.
Music was a family affair. His sons traveled and performed with him. Hyrum played the violin to accompany his father on the harp. Later, Henry, who learned the violin from his brother, joined the ensemble. Henry also played the piano and organ. Joseph, Hyrum, Henry, and Thomas all sang beautifully as well. Their concerts and dances provided the family income. After a concert the chairs were moved to the edges of the hall and dancing would begin. The Gileses provided the music and "called" the dances, brightening many a pioneer evening.
Thomas and Hannah spent their twilight years with Henry's large family in Provo where Henry taught music. On November 2, 1895, the harp became silent; the blind harpist had died at age 75. His death occurred after he expressed a desire to go. Thomas Davis Giles gave to Utah his musical skill and provided entertainment for its citizens, but, more important, he left a legacy of personal courage and resilience.
As President Faust spoke of the life of Brother Giles more than one hundred years later: “We all face trials. Members in the early days of the Church were tested and refined when they had to decide if they had the faith, like Brother Giles, to put their belongings in a wagon or a pioneer handcart and travel across the American plains. Some did not have the faith. Those who did traveled “with faith in every footstep”.
In our time we are going through an increasingly difficult time of refining and testing. None of us knows the wisdom of the Lord. We do not know in advance exactly how He will get us from where we are to where we need to be. We encounter many bumps, bends, and forks in the road of life that leads to the eternities. 
As we live on earth we must walk in faith, nothing doubting. We have much to reason to hope. Joy can be ours if we are willing to sacrifice all for the Lord. Then we can look forward to the priceless possibility of overcoming all the challenges of this life. Then we will be with the Savior forever.”

Story of Thomas Davis Giles

Contributor: AYoung Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

"Thomas B. Giles, widely known later as "The Blind Harpist." With a wife and baby girl and two boys, aged 7 and 9, he pulled his handcart westward. "Soon after starting across the plains, the baby girl became ill and died. She was buried beside the trail and the company moved onward. A few weeks later, his wife died. She also was buried beside the trail. "The two boys, because of their father's condition, were sent back to join another company... Somewhere on the Sweetwater "Elder Giles himself became seriously ill. After holding the company for two days, Captain Bunker ordered the camp to move on, leaving two of the men to bury the sick man when he died. It was expected that death would come in a matter of hours. "Remarkable faith and the frequent administrations of the Elders who attended him kept the patient alive until evening when Parley P. Pratt the Apostle, who had known Brother Giles in Wales, reached the camp. Elder Pratt gave Brother Giles a remarkable blessing. In it he made these promises: he should instantly be healed and made well, that he should rejoin his company and arrive safely in the Salt Lake Valley; that he should there rear a family; and that because of his faithfulness he should be permitted to live as long as he wanted... "Elder Giles rejoined his company, reached the Valley, Oct. 2, 1856, remarried, and lived to bless and name 7 of his grandchildren. His death occurred... after he expressed a desire to go."(See, Heart Throbs of the West, 10:325-6) Additional biographic information. Thomas' wife Margaret was pregnant and delivered baby Elizabeth while en route to Salt Lake Valley. Mother and child both died (their cenotaph headstone in Provo City Cemetery says they both died in September of 1856). Maria is the name of the 2 year old daughter that passed away on the plains as mentioned above. (Thanks to Annie Duckett Hundley for additional information)

Biographical notes for Thomas Davis Giles.

Contributor: AYoung Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIRTH: Family Notes MARRIAGE: Thomas Davis Giles Family Bible DEATH: Sexton's Records, Provo Cemetery, 1849-1929. 979.224/P, V.22h. BAPTISM: F.H.L. Film #26,675, Salt Lake 15th Ward Records, p.10. Baptized 1 Nov 1844 by Abel Evans, Confirmed 4 Nov by Abel Evans. Rebaptized 5 Aug 1884 by John Choltan. Re-Confirmed by ___ Bird. ENDOWMENT: F.H.L. Film #183,404 EHOUS, p.10, #257. SEALED TO PARENTS: F.H.L. Film #178,087, p.662, #4. SEALED TO SPOUSE: (1) Margaret Thomas F.H.L. Film #1,149,514 EHOUS, p.161, #5460. Hannah Evans Giles proxy. (2) Hannah Evans F.H.L. Film #1,149,514 EHOUS, p.161, #5460. Both sealed by Brigham Young. FURTHER SEALINGS TO SPOUSES: 1. Rebecca Wilkins deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #13,858 (30 Aug 1859). Endowment Reference for Rebecca: F.H.L. Film #177,955 LOGAN, p.135, #131 -. Mary Bown Giles proxy. 2. Sarah Allen deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #13,858 (30 Aug 1859). 3. Martha Williams deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #13,858 (30 Aug 1859). Endowment Reference for Martha: F.H.L. Film #177,955 LOGAN, p.135, #346. Catherine Evans Giles proxy. 4. Mary Rees deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #13,060 (30 Aug 1859). 5. Margaret Richards deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #138580 (30 Aug 1859). 6. Ann Davies deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #13,060 (30 Aug 1859). * 7. Jane Bowen, deceased F.H.L. Film #183,399 EHOUS, p.363, #3849. * 8. Jane Dobie Thorn, deceased F.H.L. Film #183,399 EHOUS, p. , #3849. * 9. Mary Thomas, deceased F.H.L. Film #183,401 EHOUS, p.363, #5150. * 10. Ann Umphries, deceased . F.H.L. Film #183,401 EHOUS, p.363, #5150. *11. Charlotte Thomas, deceased F.H.L. Film #183,401 EHOUS, p.363, #5150. Endowment record for Charlotte: F.H.L. Film #177,955 LOGAN, p.135, #142. *12. Margaret Jones, deceased. F.H.L. Film #183,401 EHOUS, p. 363, #5150. *13. Hannah Giles, F.H.L. Film #183,401 EHOUS, p.363, #5150. 14. Margaret Firth deceased, F.H.L. Film #178,969, LOGAN, p.77, #1442. Mary Brown Giles Proxy. 15. Mary Kirkland deceased, F.H.L. Film #178,060 LOGAN, p.84, #1576. Mary Brown Giles Proxy. * Hannah Evans Giles stood proxy for each of these women as they were sealed to Thomas. Excerpts from Edward Bunker, in charge of Thomas Handcart Train. The voyage was pleasant with the exception of one storm during which one sailor was drowned. We landed in New York, at Castle Garden, thence by rail to St. Louis, then by steamboat up the Mississippi River to Iowa City, which place we reached in the month of June, 1856. Here the company were fitted out with handcarts. I was given charge of a Welsh Company and left Iowa City, June 28, 1856. We procured our provisions and teams to haul our supplies at Council Bluffs. After leaving Iowa City we encountered some heavy rain and wind storms which blew down our tents and washed away our handcarts. I got a heavy drenching which brought on a spell of rheumatism that confined me to my bed a portion of the journey. I had for my counselors brothers Grant, a Scotchman and a tailor by trade, and MacDonald, a cabinet maker, neither of whom had had much experience in handling teams. Both were returned missionaries. The Welsh had no experience at all and very few of them could speak English. This made my burden very heavy. I had the mule team to drive and had to instruct the teamsters about yoking the oxen. The journey from Missouri River to Salt Lake City was accomplished in 65 days. We were short of provisions all the way and would have suffered for food had not supplies reached us from the valley. However, we arrived safely in Salt Lake City, October 2, 1856. [p.8] BIB: Bunker, Edward. Autobiography (Ms 1581), pp. 7-8. (HIDA's) OBITUARY: Death of a Blind Harpist. Thomas D. Giles, the blind harpist, died at the residence of his son, Prof. H. E. Giles, in this city, [Provo] Friday afternoon. The deceased came to the Territory in 1856, and pulled a handcart across the plains. He was known from one end of the Territoy to the other and had friends everywhere. For the last few years he has been living with his son in this ciy: but was for many years a resident of Salt Lake City. The funeral services were held in the Tabernacle last Sunday, and were largely attended. Bishop J. E. Booth of the Fourth Ward presided. Appropriate and counsoling remarks were made by Elders Lorin Farr of Ogden, George Bywater of Salt Lake, David John of Provo, and Thomas Martell, of Spanish Fork, who all spoke words of praise of the devout life and noble character of the departed. Beautiful music was furnished by the Boshard and Pyme Bros. quartette, accompanied by Prof. Giles on the organ. This was in conformity with a request made by Brother Giles in his lifetime. F.H.L. Film #026,935, Deseret News, Nov. 6, 1894, p.5. The following notice also appeared in the Millenial Star Publication of the Church in Great Britain: DIED: Giles. - At Provo City, Utah, November 2, 1894, Thomas D. Giles. born in Wales. He emigrated to Utah in 1856, pulling a handcart across the plains. He was known to nearly all the people in Zion. Millenial Star, Monday Dec. 3, 1894, p.784. 1851 British Census F.H.L. Film #104,186. Tredegar, Bedwelty, Glamorganshire, South Wales Instructions for this census were to include the names and surnames of only those persons who abode in the house on the night of the 30 March, 1851, Thomas D. Giles name does not appear here with his family. His journal does not begin until 1852, but it is presumed he was off on an assignment when this census was take. The Giles Family resided at 54 Church Square. Margaret Giles was listed as head of family, married, 29 years old, occupation was domestic duties and she was born at Merthr Tydfil, Glamorganshire. Margaret Giles, a daughter, was 4 years old, also born at Merthyr. Joseph Giles, a son, was 3 years old, born at Nantyglo, Monmouthshire. Hyrgum Giles, a son, was 1 year old, born at Merthyr. Ann Hughes, a niece, 11 years old, was a servant, born at Neath. David Phillips, a lodger, was 45 years old, a coal miner born in Glamorganshire. United States Census, State of Utah, Weber County, Ogden, 1860 This census lists: Thomas D. Giles, 40 years old, male, Reals estate 230, Personal estate, 150, born in Wales, & blind. Hannah Giles, 39 years old, female, born in Wales. Joseph, 12, male, born in Wales. Hyrum, 10, male, born in Wales. Henry, 1 year old, born in Utah. 1867 & 1869 Salt Lake City Directories list - Giles, Thomas D. Harper 15th Ward 6 W between 1 & 2nd So. Not found in 1873 or 1874 Directories. In response to a request Thomas D. Giles made to Charles R. Savage: Nov. 8th, 1873 Bro. Giles, I can give Henry $4.00 per week for the first 6 months $6.00 per week for the next 6 months $8.00 per week for the next 6 months $10.00 for the next. This is the best I can do. Yours truly, C. R. Savage United States Census, State of Utah, Salt Lake Territory, 15th Ward, p. 18. Taken on the 19th of July, 1870. Giles, Thomas 49 years old, white, musician, real estate 600.00, personal estate, 2000.00 born in England, was blind. Hannah Giles, 50 years old, female, white, born in England. Joseph Giles, 22 years old, male, white, carpenter, born in England. Hyrum Giles, 20 years old, male, white, wood painter, born in England. Henry Giles, 11 years old, male, white, at school, born in Utah. United States Census, State of Utah, Salt Lake Territory, p.66B. 1880 Giles, Thomas D. Self -employed, Male, Married, White, 59 years old, born in Wales. Occ. Harpest Father born in Wales, Mother born in Wales. Hannah E. Wife, Female, Married, White, 61, born in Wales. Occ. Keeping House Father born in Wales, Mother born in Wales. Henry E. Son, Male, Married, White, 21years old, born in Utah. Occ. Music Teacher Father born in Wales, Mother born in Wales. Catherine Daughter in law, Female, Married, White, 19, born in Wales. Occ. At Home Father born in Wales, Mother born in Wales. Giles, William H. GrandSon, Male, Single, White, 4 years old, born in Utah. Father born in Wales, Mother born in England. Giles, Henry E. GrandSon Male, Single, White, 1 Month old, born in Utah. Father born in Utah, Mother born in

Thomas D. Giles

Contributor: AYoung Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIRTH: Family Notes MARRIAGE: Thomas Davis Giles Family Bible DEATH: Sexton's Records, Provo Cemetery, 1849-1929. 979.224/P, V.22h. BAPTISM: F.H.L. Film #26,675, Salt Lake 15th Ward Records, p.10. Baptized 1 Nov 1844 by Abel Evans, Confirmed 4 Nov by Abel Evans. Rebaptized 5 Aug 1884 by John Choltan. Re-Confirmed by ___ Bird. ENDOWMENT: F.H.L. Film #183,404 EHOUS, p.10, #257. SEALED TO PARENTS: F.H.L. Film #178,087, p.662, #4. SEALED TO SPOUSE: (1) Margaret Thomas F.H.L. Film #1,149,514 EHOUS, p.161, #5460. Hannah Evans Giles proxy. (2) Hannah Evans F.H.L. Film #1,149,514 EHOUS, p.161, #5460. Both sealed by Brigham Young. FURTHER SEALINGS TO SPOUSES: 1. Rebecca Wilkins deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #13,858 (30 Aug 1859). Endowment Reference for Rebecca: F.H.L. Film #177,955 LOGAN, p.135, #131 -. Mary Bown Giles proxy. 2. Sarah Allen deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #13,858 (30 Aug 1859). 3. Martha Williams deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #13,858 (30 Aug 1859). Endowment Reference for Martha: F.H.L. Film #177,955 LOGAN, p.135, #346. Catherine Evans Giles proxy. 4. Mary Rees deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #13,060 (30 Aug 1859). 5. Margaret Richards deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #138580 (30 Aug 1859). 6. Ann Davies deceased S\S F.H.L. Film #1,149,515 EHOUS, p.9, #13,060 (30 Aug 1859). * 7. Jane Bowen, deceased F.H.L. Film #183,399 EHOUS, p.363, #3849. * 8. Jane Dobie Thorn, deceased F.H.L. Film #183,399 EHOUS, p. , #3849. * 9. Mary Thomas, deceased F.H.L. Film #183,401 EHOUS, p.363, #5150. * 10. Ann Umphries, deceased . F.H.L. Film #183,401 EHOUS, p.363, #5150. *11. Charlotte Thomas, deceased F.H.L. Film #183,401 EHOUS, p.363, #5150. Endowment record for Charlotte: F.H.L. Film #177,955 LOGAN, p.135, #142. *12. Margaret Jones, deceased. F.H.L. Film #183,401 EHOUS, p. 363, #5150. *13. Hannah Giles, F.H.L. Film #183,401 EHOUS, p.363, #5150. 14. Margaret Firth deceased, F.H.L. Film #178,969, LOGAN, p.77, #1442. Mary Brown Giles Proxy. 15. Mary Kirkland deceased, F.H.L. Film #178,060 LOGAN, p.84, #1576. Mary Brown Giles Proxy. * Hannah Evans Giles stood proxy for each of these women as they were sealed to Thomas. Excerpts from Edward Bunker, in charge of Thomas Handcart Train. The voyage was pleasant with the exception of one storm during which one sailor was drowned. We landed in New York, at Castle Garden, thence by rail to St. Louis, then by steamboat up the Mississippi River to Iowa City, which place we reached in the month of June, 1856. Here the company were fitted out with handcarts. I was given charge of a Welsh Company and left Iowa City, June 28, 1856. We procured our provisions and teams to haul our supplies at Council Bluffs. After leaving Iowa City we encountered some heavy rain and wind storms which blew down our tents and washed away our handcarts. I got a heavy drenching which brought on a spell of rheumatism that confined me to my bed a portion of the journey. I had for my counselors brothers Grant, a Scotchman and a tailor by trade, and MacDonald, a cabinet maker, neither of whom had had much experience in handling teams. Both were returned missionaries. The Welsh had no experience at all and very few of them could speak English. This made my burden very heavy. I had the mule team to drive and had to instruct the teamsters about yoking the oxen. The journey from Missouri River to Salt Lake City was accomplished in 65 days. We were short of provisions all the way and would have suffered for food had not supplies reached us from the valley. However, we arrived safely in Salt Lake City, October 2, 1856. [p.8] BIB: Bunker, Edward. Autobiography (Ms 1581), pp. 7-8. (HIDA's) OBITUARY: Death of a Blind Harpist. Thomas D. Giles, the blind harpist, died at the residence of his son, Prof. H. E. Giles, in this city, [Provo] Friday afternoon. The deceased came to the Territory in 1856, and pulled a handcart across the plains. He was known from one end of the Territory to the other and had friends everywhere. For the last few years he has been living with his son in this city: but was for many years a resident of Salt Lake City. The funeral services were held in the Tabernacle last Sunday, and were largely attended. Bishop J. E. Booth of the Fourth Ward presided. Appropriate and consoling remarks were made by Elders Lorin Farr of Ogden, George Bywater of Salt Lake, David John of Provo, and Thomas Martell, of Spanish Fork, who all spoke words of praise of the devout life and noble character of the departed. Beautiful music was furnished by the Boshard and Pyme Bros. quartette, accompanied by Prof. Giles on the organ. This was in conformity with a request made by Brother Giles in his lifetime. F.H.L. Film #026,935, Deseret News, Nov. 6, 1894, p.5. The following notice also appeared in the Millennial Star Publication of the Church in Great Britain: DIED: Giles. - At Provo City, Utah, November 2, 1894, Thomas D. Giles. born in Wales. He emigrated to Utah in 1856, pulling a handcart across the plains. He was known to nearly all the people in Zion. Millennial Star, Monday Dec. 3, 1894, p.784. 1851 British Census F.H.L. Film #104,186. Tredegar, Bedwelty, Glamorganshire, South Wales Instructions for this census were to include the names and surnames of only those persons who abode in the house on the night of the 30 March, 1851, Thomas D. Giles name does not appear here with his family. His journal does not begin until 1852, but it is presumed he was off on an assignment when this census was take. The Giles Family resided at 54 Church Square. Margaret Giles was listed as head of family, married, 29 years old, occupation was domestic duties and she was born at Merthr Tydfil, Glamorganshire. Margaret Giles, a daughter, was 4 years old, also born at Merthyr. Joseph Giles, a son, was 3 years old, born at Nantyglo, Monmouthshire. Hyrgum Giles, a son, was 1 year old, born at Merthyr. Ann Hughes, a niece, 11 years old, was a servant, born at Neath. David Phillips, a lodger, was 45 years old, a coal miner born in Glamorganshire. United States Census, State of Utah, Weber County, Ogden, 1860 This census lists: Thomas D. Giles, 40 years old, male, Reals estate 230, Personal estate, 150, born in Wales, & blind. Hannah Giles, 39 years old, female, born in Wales. Joseph, 12, male, born in Wales. Hyrum, 10, male, born in Wales. Henry, 1 year old, born in Utah. 1867 & 1869 Salt Lake City Directories list - Giles, Thomas D. Harper 15th Ward 6 W between 1 & 2nd So. Not found in 1873 or 1874 Directories. In response to a request Thomas D. Giles made to Charles R. Savage: Nov. 8th, 1873 Bro. Giles, I can give Henry $4.00 per week for the first 6 months $6.00 per week for the next 6 months $8.00 per week for the next 6 months $10.00 for the next. This is the best I can do. Yours truly, C. R. Savage United States Census, State of Utah, Salt Lake Territory, 15th Ward, p. 18. Taken on the 19th of July, 1870. Giles, Thomas 49 years old, white, musician, real estate 600.00, personal estate, 2000.00 born in England, was blind. Hannah Giles, 50 years old, female, white, born in England. Joseph Giles, 22 years old, male, white, carpenter, born in England. Hyrum Giles, 20 years old, male, white, wood painter, born in England. Henry Giles, 11 years old, male, white, at school, born in Utah. United States Census, State of Utah, Salt Lake Territory, p.66B. 1880 Giles, Thomas D. Self -employed, Male, Married, White, 59 years old, born in Wales. Occ. Harpest Father born in Wales, Mother born in Wales. Hannah E. Wife, Female, Married, White, 61, born in Wales. Occ. Keeping House Father born in Wales, Mother born in Wales. Henry E. Son, Male, Married, White, 21years old, born in Utah. Occ. Music Teacher Father born in Wales, Mother born in Wales. Catherine Daughter in law, Female, Married, White, 19, born in Wales. Occ. At Home Father born in Wales, Mother born in Wales. Giles, William H. Grandson, Male, Single, White, 4 years old, born in Utah. Father born in Wales, Mother born in England. Giles, Henry E. Grandson Male, Single, White, 1 Month old, born in Utah. Father born in Utah, Mother born in

HYRUM LORENZO GILES Notes

Contributor: AYoung Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIRTH: Thomas Davis Family History dictated to scribe * Family Group Sheet prepared by Mrs. Helen S. Brinkley. MARRIAGE: DEATH: Obituary, Salt Lake Telegram Feb. 22, 1904. BAPTISM: ENDOWMENT & SEALED TO SPOUSE: from Computer IGI, North America, Main - Addendum. SEALED TO SPOUSE located on F.H.L. Film #851,127, p.148, Book of Signatures of previously married couples coming to the temple to be sealed. HYRUM L. GILES, PIONEER, DIES Came to Utah with Handcart Company in 1856 Hyrum L. Giles, president and general manager of the Giles Mining and Milling company, with mines in the Big Cottonwood district, died at 7:50 a.m. today [Feb. 22, 1904] at the family residence, 69 West Fifth South street, after a lingering illness covering several years. In his earlier life Mr. Giles was a musician, having been violinist at the Salt Lake theatre under Professor George Careless. With his father, Thomas D. Giles, the blind harpist of early Utah days, he was well known throughout the West. Mr. Giles was born in Wales in 1850 and came to Utah in 1856 with the handcart company which arrived in that year. Since that time he had resided in Utah. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Minnie Jensen Giles; one brother, Professor Henry E. Giles, and the following children: Hyrum, Art, Adrian, Mrs. Robert T. Daquin, Mrs. Dollie Brinkley, Mrs. Harvey B. Snow, Mrs. Kenneth Anderson, Mrs. F. C. Cleveland, Mrs. Harian C. Ford, and eighteen grandchildren. Salt Lake Telegram Hyrum L. Giles passed away Feb. 33 at his home in Salt Lake City. He was born in Wales, in 1850, and came to Utah in 1856 with his father, who was a member of one of the handcart companies. His mother died on the plains. He was known as a musician and mining man. Improvement Era, Vol. 27, 1923-34, p.577.

Life timeline of Thomas Davis Giles

Thomas Davis Giles was born on 28 Nov 1829
Thomas Davis Giles was 2 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Thomas Davis Giles was 11 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Thomas Davis Giles was 30 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Thomas Davis Giles was 31 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
Thomas Davis Giles was 50 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Thomas Davis Giles was 54 years old when Krakatoa begins to erupt; the volcano explodes three months later, killing more than 36,000 people. Krakatoa, or Krakatau, is a volcanic island situated in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra in the Indonesian province of Lampung. The name is also used for the surrounding island group comprising the remnants of a much larger island of three volcanic peaks which was obliterated in a cataclysmic 1883 eruption.
Thomas Davis Giles died on 2 Nov 1894 at the age of 64
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Thomas Davis Giles (28 Nov 1829 - 2 Nov 1894), BillionGraves Record 18038 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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