Thomas Crookston

3 Aug 1839 - 25 Apr 1933

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Thomas Crookston

3 Aug 1839 - 25 Apr 1933
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THOMAS & ELIZABETH CRYSTAL CROOKSTON On Memorial Monument to early settlers of American Fork, Utah Cemetery (Copied 5-31-05 by Ione Bush) Thomas was born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 3 August 1839 to George and Jane Hutchison (Hutchinson) Crookston, the third in a family of seven. They were tenant

Life Information

Thomas Crookston

Born:
Married: 1871
Died:

American Fork Cemetery

601-699 Alpine Hwy
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Earnest in the pursuit of righteousness & revered for honesty

Headstone Description

Thomas was born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 3 August 1839 to George and Jan Hutchinson (Hutchinson) Crookston, the third in a family of seven. They were tenants of a coal company owned house. Thomas went to school for a short time but studied from his father's many books. When he was sixteen and his father forty five the family immigrated to America, like so many others, the six-week journey on a sailing ship was full of hardships. They landed in New York in 1855, then made the journey to Utah by ox team. Thomas and his sister, Janet, lived in several places before the family finally came together in American Fork where they lived in a dugout, later building a house at 145 South 100 West. /

In 1864 Thomas went to Montana to work in the mines where earned enough for a span of mules. He then freighted across Nevada and Montana. At the onset of the Black Hawk War he was hauling coal to a blacksmith in Salt Lake and was subsequently called to serve in the war in Manti's twelve mile canyon area. (Mayheld) /

Elizabeth (Betsy) Crystal was also born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 10 January 1852, the daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth cousins Crystal. The family of eight left Scotland 27 May 1863 on the ship Cynosure, enduring the eight-week trip with the usual hardships, but also measles. After landing in New York they started immediately for Utah by ox team. Baby William died during the journey and was hurriedly buried in the flour box of the wagon train captain. They were met in Salt Lake by an uncle Peter Adamson, coming directly to American Fork, where they settled on the northwest corner of what is now called Merchant ST. After the father made sufficient abodes they built a home on East State Road. In this house an additional seven children were welcomed into the famliy. /

Elizabeth worked for the Crooks family for a time, then was employed in Salt Lake until her marriage at age 20 in 1871. Thomas was then 32. The marriage was performed in Judge Obed Stricklands office. The judge was appointed associate justice to server in the first district at Provo by Abraham Lincoln. They became the parents of nine children, Elizabeth, Thomas, Andrew, George, John, Byron, Lenorah (died as a child), Pearl, and Frank. /

Elizabeth died 16 April 1925 at age 73 having endured the hard work and hardships of that era yet she was known as a kind, honest and industrious woman. The services were conducted in the family home by The Reverend W. Murphy of Payson, who also dedicated the grave in the American Fork Cemetery. /

At the time of his death on 25 April 1933, Thomas was the oldest resident of American Fork, being 94. His life was full of hardships but one of an earnest pursuit of righteousness. He was the proud father of nine children. He was cut off from the church because he would not stop trading at Auerbach's and Walkers in Salt Lake, where he could obtain better prices. He said in his typical Scottish brogue, "I'll go where I can get the most for my money." His religion was to pay his honest debts and to owe no man. He is buried in the American Fork Cemetery. /

The last paragraph was taken from an account by his son Byron. The rest of the information is from the family records in the possession of Phyllis O. Crookston. That which pertains to Judge Strickland is taken from the History of Utah by Andrew L. Neff.
Transcriber

Conyngham

June 27, 2011
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trishkovach

July 24, 2011
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Soonersports1

July 24, 2011
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ABC

April 7, 2020
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Mike M

April 14, 2020
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PapaMoose

June 26, 2011

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Thomas & Elizabeth Crystal Crookston bio at Amer. Frk. UT Cem.

Contributor: Conyngham Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

THOMAS & ELIZABETH CRYSTAL CROOKSTON On Memorial Monument to early settlers of American Fork, Utah Cemetery (Copied 5-31-05 by Ione Bush) Thomas was born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 3 August 1839 to George and Jane Hutchison (Hutchinson) Crookston, the third in a family of seven. They were tenants of a coal company owned house. Thomas went to school for a short time but studied from his father’s many books. When he was sixteen and his father forty five the family immigrated to America, like so many others, the six-week journey on a sailing ship was full of hardships. They landed in New York in 1855, then made the journey to Utah by ox team. Thomas and his sister, Janet, lived in several places before the family finally came together in American Fork where they lived in a dugout, later building a house at 145 South 100 West. In 1864 Thomas went to Montana to work in the mines where he earned enough for a span of mules. He then freighted across Nevada and Montana. At the onset of the Black Hawk War he was hauling coal to a blacksmith in Salt Lake, and was subsequently called to serve in the war in Manti’s, twelve mile canyon area, (Mayfield). Elizabeth (Betsy) Crystal was also born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 10 January 1852, the daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Cousins Crystal. The family of eight left Scotland 27 May 1863 on the ship Cynosure, enduring the eight-week trip with the usual hardships, but also measles. After landing in New York they started immediately for Utah by ox team. Baby William died during the journey and was hurriedly buried in the flour box of the wagon train captain. They were met in Salt Lake by an uncle Peter Adamson, coming directly to American Fork, where they settled on the northwest corner of what is now called Merchant St. After the father made sufficient adobes they built a home on East state Road. In this house an additional seven children were welcomed into the family. Elizabeth worked for the Crooks Family for a time, then was employed in Salt Lake until her marriage at age 20 in 1871. Thomas was then 32. The marriage was performed in Judge Obed Stricklands office. The judge was appointed associate justice to serve in the first district at Provo by Abraham Lincoln. They became the parents of nine children, Elizabeth, Thomas, Andrew, George, John, Byron, Lenorah (died as a child), Pearl and Frank. Elizabeth died 16 April 1925 at age 73 having endured the hard work and hardships of that era yet she was known as a kind, honest and industrious woman. The services were conducted in the family home by the Reverend W. Murphy of Payson, who also dedicated the grave in the American Fork Cemetery. At the time of his death on 25 April 1933, Thomas was the oldest resident of American Fork, being 94. His life was full of hardships but one of an earnest pursuit of righteousness. He was the proud father of nine children. He was cut off from the church because he would not stop trading at Auerbach’s and Walkers in Salt Lake, where he could obtain better prices. He said in the typical Scottish brogue, “I’ll go where I can get the most for my money.” His religion was to pay his honest debts and to owe no man. He is buried in the American Fork Cemetery. The last paragraph was taken from an account by his son Byron. The rest of the information is from family records in possession of Phyllis O. Crookston. That which pertains to Judge Strickland is taken from The History of Utah by Andrew L. Neff. EARNEST IN THE PURSUIT OF RIGHTEOUSNESS & REVERED FOR HONESTY.”

THOMAS CROOKSTON

Contributor: Conyngham Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

THOMAS CROOKSTON Thomas Crookston as born in Fifeshire, Scotland, August 3, 1839. He was the son of George Crookston and Jane Hutchinson Crookston and was the third in a family of seven. His brothers and sisters were: George, Jane, Janet, Jess, John, and Robert. The Crookston family lived in Fifeshire and were the tenants of a house owned by the coal mines. The house was one of several apartments which formed a long, low terrace of rooms. Thomas went to school only part time but studied from his father’s many books. When Thomas as 16 and his father 35, the family came to America in a sailing vessel. The six week trip was full of hardships. They landed in New York in 1855, then came to Utah by ox team. The family lived in Salt Lake with their uncle Robert. Thomas and his sister Janet lived with James Kippen for two years in Bountiful, Utah. Thomas then lived with George Walters in Springville, Utah. The Crookston family then moved to American Fork where they lived in a dugout. They went back to Kaysville when Johnson’s Army came to Salt Lake then went back to American Fork. In 1864-65 Thomas went to Montana to work in the mines. He carried freight with his mule team across the Nevada Desert. In 1865 when the Blackhawk War broke out, Thomas was hauling coal from Moroni to a blacksmith in Salt Lake. He was saved from being a murderer by his brother John. Thomas was going to shoot some men for taking his mule team away from him. The men were going to take the team to use in the Blackhawk War. He then hunted for Indians in Twelve Mile Canyon until the war was over. At the age of 32 he married Elizabeth Crystal, age 20. The Crystal family came to American Fork 8 years after the Crookston family arrived there. They were married in Judge Strickland’s office. At the age of 92 he looked back at a life of hardships, but one of an earnest pursuit of righteousness. He was the proud father of nine children. He was cut off from the church because they would not stop trading at Auerbach’s and Walkers in Salt Lake. His religion was to pay his honest debts and owe no man. At the age of 94 he died at his home in American Fork, Utah. He is buried in the American Fork Cemetery. This information was written by Byron and Alice Crookston. Submitted by Beth Crookston Wright of Pleasant Grove, Utah February 1965 and January 1966. (Crystal Family Organization July, 1966)

Thomas & Elizabeth Crystal Crookston bio at Amer. Frk. UT Cem.

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

THOMAS & ELIZABETH CRYSTAL CROOKSTON On Memorial Monument to early settlers of American Fork, Utah Cemetery (Copied 5-31-05 by Ione Bush) Thomas was born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 3 August 1839 to George and Jane Hutchison (Hutchinson) Crookston, the third in a family of seven. They were tenants of a coal company owned house. Thomas went to school for a short time but studied from his father’s many books. When he was sixteen and his father forty five the family immigrated to America, like so many others, the six-week journey on a sailing ship was full of hardships. They landed in New York in 1855, then made the journey to Utah by ox team. Thomas and his sister, Janet, lived in several places before the family finally came together in American Fork where they lived in a dugout, later building a house at 145 South 100 West. In 1864 Thomas went to Montana to work in the mines where he earned enough for a span of mules. He then freighted across Nevada and Montana. At the onset of the Black Hawk War he was hauling coal to a blacksmith in Salt Lake, and was subsequently called to serve in the war in Manti’s, twelve mile canyon area, (Mayfield). Elizabeth (Betsy) Crystal was also born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 10 January 1852, the daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Cousins Crystal. The family of eight left Scotland 27 May 1863 on the ship Cynosure, enduring the eight-week trip with the usual hardships, but also measles. After landing in New York they started immediately for Utah by ox team. Baby William died during the journey and was hurriedly buried in the flour box of the wagon train captain. They were met in Salt Lake by an uncle Peter Adamson, coming directly to American Fork, where they settled on the northwest corner of what is now called Merchant St. After the father made sufficient adobes they built a home on East state Road. In this house an additional seven children were welcomed into the family. Elizabeth worked for the Crooks Family for a time, then was employed in Salt Lake until her marriage at age 20 in 1871. Thomas was then 32. The marriage was performed in Judge Obed Stricklands office. The judge was appointed associate justice to serve in the first district at Provo by Abraham Lincoln. They became the parents of nine children, Elizabeth, Thomas, Andrew, George, John, Byron, Lenorah (died as a child), Pearl and Frank. Elizabeth died 16 April 1925 at age 73 having endured the hard work and hardships of that era yet she was known as a kind, honest and industrious woman. The services were conducted in the family home by the Reverend W. Murphy of Payson, who also dedicated the grave in the American Fork Cemetery. At the time of his death on 25 April 1933, Thomas was the oldest resident of American Fork, being 94. His life was full of hardships but one of an earnest pursuit of righteousness. He was the proud father of nine children. He was cut off from the church because he would not stop trading at Auerbach’s and Walkers in Salt Lake, where he could obtain better prices. He said in the typical Scottish brogue, “I’ll go where I can get the most for my money.” His religion was to pay his honest debts and to owe no man. He is buried in the American Fork Cemetery. The last paragraph was taken from an account by his son Byron. The rest of the information is from family records in possession of Phyllis O. Crookston. That which pertains to Judge Strickland is taken from The History of Utah by Andrew L. Neff. EARNEST IN THE PURSUIT OF RIGHTEOUSNESS & REVERED FOR HONESTY.”

THOMAS CROOKSTON

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

THOMAS CROOKSTON Thomas Crookston as born in Fifeshire, Scotland, August 3, 1839. He was the son of George Crookston and Jane Hutchinson Crookston and was the third in a family of seven. His brothers and sisters were: George, Jane, Janet, Jess, John, and Robert. The Crookston family lived in Fifeshire and were the tenants of a house owned by the coal mines. The house was one of several apartments which formed a long, low terrace of rooms. Thomas went to school only part time but studied from his father’s many books. When Thomas as 16 and his father 35, the family came to America in a sailing vessel. The six week trip was full of hardships. They landed in New York in 1855, then came to Utah by ox team. The family lived in Salt Lake with their uncle Robert. Thomas and his sister Janet lived with James Kippen for two years in Bountiful, Utah. Thomas then lived with George Walters in Springville, Utah. The Crookston family then moved to American Fork where they lived in a dugout. They went back to Kaysville when Johnson’s Army came to Salt Lake then went back to American Fork. In 1864-65 Thomas went to Montana to work in the mines. He carried freight with his mule team across the Nevada Desert. In 1865 when the Blackhawk War broke out, Thomas was hauling coal from Moroni to a blacksmith in Salt Lake. He was saved from being a murderer by his brother John. Thomas was going to shoot some men for taking his mule team away from him. The men were going to take the team to use in the Blackhawk War. He then hunted for Indians in Twelve Mile Canyon until the war was over. At the age of 32 he married Elizabeth Crystal, age 20. The Crystal family came to American Fork 8 years after the Crookston family arrived there. They were married in Judge Strickland’s office. At the age of 92 he looked back at a life of hardships, but one of an earnest pursuit of righteousness. He was the proud father of nine children. He was cut off from the church because they would not stop trading at Auerbach’s and Walkers in Salt Lake. His religion was to pay his honest debts and owe no man. At the age of 94 he died at his home in American Fork, Utah. He is buried in the American Fork Cemetery. This information was written by Byron and Alice Crookston. Submitted by Beth Crookston Wright of Pleasant Grove, Utah February 1965 and January 1966. (Crystal Family Organization July, 1966)

Life timeline of Thomas Crookston

1839
Thomas Crookston was born on 3 Aug 1839
Thomas Crookston was 1 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Thomas Crookston was 20 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Thomas Crookston was 30 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Thomas Crookston was 35 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Thomas Crookston was 44 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
Thomas Crookston was 54 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
Thomas Crookston was 64 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Thomas Crookston was 75 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Thomas Crookston was 90 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Thomas Crookston died on 25 Apr 1933 at the age of 93
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Thomas Crookston (3 Aug 1839 - 25 Apr 1933), BillionGraves Record 28095 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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