Sylvester Henry Earl

16 Aug 1815 - 23 Jul 1873

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Sylvester Henry Earl

16 Aug 1815 - 23 Jul 1873
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Found in findagrave website. Earl, James Calvin, a member of the Mormon Battalion, was born March 27, 1822, in Logan county, Ohio, the son of Joseph and Dorcas Tabitha Earl. He was baptized Oct. 24, 1838, in Schuyler county, Illinois, by his brother Sylvester H. Earl. He passed through the persecuti

Life Information

Sylvester Henry Earl

Born:
Married: 1939
Died:

Saint George City Cemetery

2-98 S 700 E
St George, Washington, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Missionary - 1847 Pioneer

Headstone Description

Married Lois Caroline Owen - 1839; Margaret Emily Jones - 1855., MISSIONARY - 1847 PIONEER
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Chynna67

July 21, 2011
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R and N Englestead

April 6, 2020
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LuciJoy

September 18, 2012
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foxdebrah67

April 6, 2020
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Clara Sevy

April 5, 2020
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GraveScavenger

July 19, 2011

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  • Lois Caroline Owen
    Wife
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  • Margaret Emily Jones
    Wife
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  • Caroline Owen Earl
    Wife
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  • Margaret Emily Jones Earl
    Wife
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Grave Site of Sylvester Henry

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Sylvester Henry Earl is buried in the Saint George City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Obituary of James Calvin Earl

Contributor: LuciJoy Created: 3 years ago Updated: 5 months ago

Found in findagrave website. Earl, James Calvin, a member of the Mormon Battalion, was born March 27, 1822, in Logan county, Ohio, the son of Joseph and Dorcas Tabitha Earl. He was baptized Oct. 24, 1838, in Schuyler county, Illinois, by his brother Sylvester H. Earl. He passed through the persecutions of the Saints in Illinois and went into exile with his co-religionists in 1846. While stopping temporarily at Mount Pisgah, Iowa, he enlisted in the Mormon Battalion July 10, 1847, and marched as far as Santa Fe, New Mexico, with the main body of the battalion; thence he was assigned to the sick detachment under Captain James Brown and spent the winter of 1846-1847 on the Arkansas river and arrived in Great Salt Lake Valley July 29, 1847, a few days after the arrival of the pioneers under Prest. Brigham Young. In 1848 he married Mary Elizabeth Parsons in Salt Lake City. Miss Parsons had crossed the plains in 1848, driving two yoke of oxen. She was born May 12, 1829, and baptized by Isaac Clark in Macedonia, Hancock county, Illinois. Her marriage to James Calvin Earl was blessed with nine children, namely, Amanda Ellen, James Calvin junior, Tabitha Jane, Louise Ann, Mary Elizabeth, Cyrus Hibbert Wheelock, Sylvester Henry, Minerva and Rosetta. Bro. Earl died in Pine Valley, Washington county, Utah, Feb. 27, 1871. His wife survived him and died Feb. 23, 1917, aged 49 years. James Earl is on the Company A re-enlistment roll in 1847 in California, "A James Earl 25". But he is also listed with the Santa Fe sick detachment which went a different direction:

Obituary of James Calvin Earl

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Found in findagrave website. Earl, James Calvin, a member of the Mormon Battalion, was born March 27, 1822, in Logan county, Ohio, the son of Joseph and Dorcas Tabitha Earl. He was baptized Oct. 24, 1838, in Schuyler county, Illinois, by his brother Sylvester H. Earl. He passed through the persecutions of the Saints in Illinois and went into exile with his co-religionists in 1846. While stopping temporarily at Mount Pisgah, Iowa, he enlisted in the Mormon Battalion July 10, 1847, and marched as far as Santa Fe, New Mexico, with the main body of the battalion; thence he was assigned to the sick detachment under Captain James Brown and spent the winter of 1846-1847 on the Arkansas river and arrived in Great Salt Lake Valley July 29, 1847, a few days after the arrival of the pioneers under Prest. Brigham Young. In 1848 he married Mary Elizabeth Parsons in Salt Lake City. Miss Parsons had crossed the plains in 1848, driving two yoke of oxen. She was born May 12, 1829, and baptized by Isaac Clark in Macedonia, Hancock county, Illinois. Her marriage to James Calvin Earl was blessed with nine children, namely, Amanda Ellen, James Calvin junior, Tabitha Jane, Louise Ann, Mary Elizabeth, Cyrus Hibbert Wheelock, Sylvester Henry, Minerva and Rosetta. Bro. Earl died in Pine Valley, Washington county, Utah, Feb. 27, 1871. His wife survived him and died Feb. 23, 1917, aged 49 years. James Earl is on the Company A re-enlistment roll in 1847 in California, "A James Earl 25". But he is also listed with the Santa Fe sick detachment which went a different direction:

Sylvester Henry Earl Pioneer

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Departure: 14 April 1847 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 21-24 July 1847 Company Information: The original pioneer company consisted of 142 men, 3 women, and 2 children, and 72 wagons when they left the outfitting post of Winter Quarters, Nebraska. They covered the 1031 miles of the trail in 111 days BIOGRAPHY: SYLVESTER HENRY EARL-MISSIONARY (from: "The First Company to Enter Salt Lake Valley" by The daughters of the Utah Pioneers) Sylvester Earl was born August 16, 1815 in Scioto County, Ohio to Joseph Earl and Dorcas Tabitha Wixom. At the age of seven years his father died and from the time he was twelve years of age, Sylvester assumed many of the responsibilities of the home. He remained at this post of duty until he was twenty-one years of age when he received a visit from his brothers, Asa and John, who had been living for some years in Illinois. From them he learned of the Latter-day Saint religion, they having already become members. He went with his brothers to llinois, taking with him his younger brother, Wilbur J., and on February 29, 1837, was baptized into the Church by Elder C. C. Rich. From that time on he performed mission­ary labors in the surrounding states until 1842, when he moved to Hancock County, Illinois and located near Nauvoo at the little village called Morley Settlement. In 1846 he and his family crossed the river, and when he was chosen to be one of the advanced guard he penned these words: "It is hard to leave my family here, sick and among howling wolves and the roaming savages of the west, but the servants of the Lord says go, and I feel as ever to leave all for the Gospel and the salvation of the people." On the return trip to the States for his family with the Brigham Young company he wrote: "Nothing of importance occurred until we came to the Platte River. Here we had our horses, seventeen in number, stolen. However we pursued our journey down to Fort Lar­amie. Here we learned that the balance of our company (who left the valley ten days after with horse teams) had their horses stolen at Strawberry Creek. We hired an interpreter who went with us to the Indians and we obtained sixteen head of horses which we immediately sent back to assist our brethren. While detained there, we be­came destitute of food, and I, in company with Horace Thornton, went to a small band of Indians and sold the shirt off my back for some meat. I then took my wagon cover and cut and made me another. We then pursued our journey for forty miles and came to an immense herd of buffalo. We killed some and dried all the meat we wanted and took hundreds of pounds home. Ten miles above the head of Grand Island the Indians came on our front guard and took a horse from J. Redden, also his knife and some other things, but no one was hurt. When we came to the head of the Island we found a company of U. S. troops under General Kearney. They were building a fort. Further on we met a few of our brethren from Winter Quarters with provisions. We arrived at Winter Quarters on the 1st of October 1847 where, with great joy, I met my wife and three sweet little children, all well. During the winter our youngest child a little girl, Rhodenia, died of measles." After returning to Utah with his family, Mr. Earl moved into the 8th Ward and in the fall of 1851, moved to the 19th Ward. In 1852 he was called on a mission to England where he remained two years. In the summer of 1861 the family located in Pine Valley at the head of the Santa Clara River where he purchased a share in a sawmiill. 'They sawed 200,000 feet of lumber and then the mill burned down. He wrote: "We then built another. I then sold out to Eli Whipple." Mr. Earl died July 23, 1873 at St. George, Utah.

Liverpool to Philadelphia 31 Mar 1855 - 5 May 1855

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Liverpool to Philadelphia 31 Mar 1855 - 5 May 1855 A Compilation of General Voyage Notes More Sharing Services "DEPARTURE. -- The ship Juventa sailed for Philadelphia on Saturday the 31st ultimo, with 537 souls of the Saints, under the presiding charge of Elder William Glover, late pastor of the Hull, Newcastle, and Carlisle Conferences. Elders Benjamin Brown, Sylvester H. Earl, Elias Gardner, Charles Smith, William Pitt, John Mayer, Noah T. Guyman, Joseph Hall, well known among the Saints in the British Isles for their distinguished labors in the conferences; also Elders George Mayer, in charge of a company of Saints from Switzerland; and Elder James F. Bell, late president of the Malta Mission, in charge of a company of the faithful from Piedmont in Italy; all sailed in this ship, and constitute the able counsel and immediate support of President Glover in the discharge of his important duties on shipboard. Most of these brethren -- elders of Israel, are returning to Zion, after an absence of about three years on missions to this and other countries. It has never been our privilege to clear a shipload of Saints containing such an embodiment of faith, and with such an entire feeling of satisfaction both in Saints and officers of the ship. An unusual number of pastors, presidents, and elders are gathering this year, and as the way to Zion becomes more difficult they will find ample occasion and scope for the exercise of their faith on the journey, that the sheaves which they bring with them may be safely delivered in the garner of the Lord, and they be found faithful laborers with the husbandman in the last time. May the joy which was manifested by the shouts sent up as we bade them adieu be increased in purity and fervor till their arrival in Utah among the people of God, and worlds without end." MS, 17:15 (Apr. 14, 1855), pp.233-34 "The Juventa. -- By letter from Elder Thomas C. Stayner, we learn that the Juventa arrived at Philadelphia by May 8, making a thirty-five days' passage. The winds were mostly contrary, but only one gale was experienced. Captain Watts is highly spoken of." MS, 17:22 (June 2, 1855), p.347 "EIGHTY-FIFTH COMPANY. -- Juventa, 573 souls. The ship Juventa sailed from Liverpool, England, for Philadelphia, on Saturday, March 31st, 1855, with five hundred and seventy-three Saints on board, under the presidency of Elder William Glover. Elders Benjamin Brown, Sylvester H. Earl, Elias Gardner, Charles Smith, William Pitt, John Mayer, Noah Y. Guyman and Joseph Hall, who had all labored as missionaries in the British Isles, also embarked for America in this vessel, together with Elder George Mayer, who was in charge of a company of Saints from Switzerland; and Elder James F. Bell, late president of the Malta Mission, in charge of a small number of Saints from Piedmont, in Italy. The voyage of the Juventa was a most prosperous one; no sickness, except seasickness, and a few cases of measles among the children, occurred among the passengers, and not one of the large number of emigrants found a watery grave. A child was born while a storm raged on the bosom of the deep, and the little one was named Juventa, after the ship. On the fourth of May the vessel cast anchor off Cape May, and on the fifth was tugged up the Delaware River to Philadelphia. On Tuesday the eighth, the emigrants continued to rail to Pittsburg, from which city about two hundred of the company proceeded down the rivers on the steamboat Equinox, to St. Louis, Missouri, where they arrived on the seventeenth of March, forty-six days after leaving Liverpool. About one hundred and fifty of the emigrants came from Pittsburg to St. Louis, by the steamboat Washington City. The Equinox continued up the Missouri River to Atchison, where she landed her passengers on the twenty-eighth of May. After arriving in Atchinson, the company was attacked with sickness, and a number died, among them Elder Bell, who had presided over the Malta Mission. The successful and quick journey made by the Juventa company, gave the new route, by way of Philadelphia, great prestige. As demonstrative evidence of the superior advantages of the route, Elder Glover remarked that he had three more in his company and fifty dollars more in his pocket on arriving in America than when he started from Liverpool. Thus both lives and time were saved, and the New Orleans route was discarded by the Saints never to be used by them afterwards. (Millennial Star, Vol. XVII, pp.233, 375, 490; Deseret News of August 8th, 1855)" Cont., 13:12 (Oct. 1892) p.546 "Sat. 31. [Mar. 1855] -- The ship Juventa sailed from Liverpool, England, with 573 Saints, under the direction of William Glover. It arrived at Philadelphia May 5th. From there the company went by rail to Pittsburgh, and further on steamboats down the Ohio river to St. Louis, Missouri." CC, p.53

Joseph Earl Sr.

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

OUR EARL ANCESTORS In August 1972, Winona Earl Wittwer, daughter of Joseph and Viola, gathered such information as was available concerning her father’s ancestors and, with the help of Rita Jones Nash who helped organize the material and typed it up, had it distributed to members of the Earl family in August 1972. This is a very valuable 16 page document titled “A History of Joseph and Dorcas Tabitha Wixom Earl and the Wixom and Earl Families.” During the early 1960’s, Winona corresponded with both Ruth Smith Hayes (Palmer Earll’s great granddaughter, Decorah, IA) and “Maida” Bickham, (Alanson Earl’s granddaughter, real name Mary Corn Estella Van Ness, Bellefontaine, OH). Both Maida and Ruth enjoyed genealogical work and had gathered considerable information about their Earl families. Maida’s cousin, James Elmer Earl, also a grandson of Alanson Earl, had copied quite a bit of family information from the family Bible belonging to Joseph and Dorcas Earl, while the Bible was still in fairly good shape and before it had succumbed to the ravages of age, use and moisture. James Elmer Earl had passed this information on to Maida Bickham, and Maida shared it with Winona. Winona and her daughter Viola Squires also visited Helen Blue and her brother Richard Smith, cousins in Noble County, IN, descendants of Palmer. Later Ruth Smith Hayes came out to Utah and visited Winona and her family and attended one of our Earl Reunions. JOSEPH EARL I To Winona Wittwer, Maida wrote: “The first Earl ancestor that I can say belonged to my mother’s and your father’s historical record was a Joseph Earl I. It was said that he came from England. At the (New York) immigration office on 11 Feb 1780, the registrar took out a book saying “How do you want to register?” He answered, “I am Joseph Earl, and (this is) my wife.” The registrar inquired if all these children were his. He answered, “Yes, these are mine. But my oldest son, and my married daughters, did not come.” An official record was made of his children: Solomon Earl, born in England, 1767 Daniel Earl, born in England, 1769 Lois Earl, born in England, 1772 William Earl, born in England, 1775 John Earl, born in England, 1777 The registrar began to question Joseph. “What is your occupation, business, trade, or calling, Mr. Earl?” His answer: “I am a Methodist Minister. I was once a school teacher. I am a cabinet maker and wheelwright I have also worked with leather, making boots and shoes, also harness and saddle making. I have been in the position where I have done what seemed best to do until I could do better.” JOSEPH EARL II IS BORN “As they were standing there, his wife laid her hand on his arm. He looked at her and quickly said, “My wife needs rest. Do you know where I can get a couple of rooms in which to lodge my family temporarily?” A tenement house stood next door and a couple of rooms in it were quickly made ready and some food served. That night Joseph Earl II, was born. Joseph Earl I registered his newborn son as Joseph Earl, Second, born in New York City, 1780. Born in U.S.A.” His date of birth we believe was 11 Feb 1780. “The next we hear from Joseph Earl I, he had moved his family down in the State of New York, taking care of a parish. He taught school during the week and was a Methodist Minister on the Sabbath, rendering religious reverence to our Father in Heaven, and trying to lead others to do likewise. The younger boys spent all their school days in their father’s school. It was thus that Joseph Earl II became educated for the ministry, for he was the baby of the family, he had his father to help him, and his father’s books and sermons to guide him. Joseph II loved to read and was encouraged to do so by his parents.” The above exhausts all the information we have concerning Joseph Earl I and his family and whereabouts. Exhaustive searches over the past many years have yielded nothing in the way of new information concerning the name of his wife, precisely where they lived, or where they died and are buried. The search continues. It seems likely to me that they lived in mid or western New York state and that that is where we’ll eventually find information on them.

Life Story

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

LIFE STORY OF SYLVESTER HENRY EARL November 27th, the year of our Lord 1864. This is a history of the life of Mr. Sylvester H. Earl and of my progenitors, connecting with my grandfather Joseph Earl who was born in the state of New York. My grandfather was the father of a large family. I can only give the names of Solomon, Daniel, William, John, and a daughter by the name of Lois, and then my father whose name was also Joseph. He was born in the state of New York about the year of 1780. He was educated for a Methodist parson. When he was twenty one years old he became acquainted with Miss Dorcas Tabitha Wixom whom he married soon after. She was born in the state of Vermont and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Barnabus Wixom. My parents still lived in the state of New York until the year 1812. During that year, they moved into Canada, but finding the people greatly excited in relation to the existing war between the English and the Americans, he concluded to return to New York again and here they remained twelve years in all during which time they had born unto them five sons whose names are as follows: Palmer W., John T., Joel, Asa C. and Alanson Earl. They moved to the state of Ohio, Scioto County, where I was born in the year 1815, August 16th. My father still remained a minister. When I was two years old, my father moved to Franklin County, state of Ohio, where my brother Wilber Joseph Earl was born and my sister Eliza; and here my brother Joel died. My father moved to Logan County. While here, my brother James C. Earl was born. Here we were seized with sickness which proved fatal to my sister Eliza. My father was sick twelve months with fever and ague. It turned to dropsy and caused his death in the year 1822. My mother was left with seven children and having had much sickness in the family was poor. We soon moved further south into Clark County. My three oldest brothers were left home and went to trades and Alanson the fourth being sickly, the burden of the family then came on me. Although young, I was steady in my habits and strove to act the part of a father to the children and to be a comfort to my mother. My brother Palmer soon married Miss Alenia Davis. John and Asa went to the state of Illinois where John married Miss Rebecca Pile and Asa married Miss Minerva Rich. My brother Alanson married Miss Rebecca Day. This left me with my mother and brothers, Wilber J. and James C. Earl alone. We lived together until the day that I was twenty-one years old. It was on Sunday and my mother and I and brother James were taking a ride on horseback. We were about four miles from home when to our astonishment we were met by my two brothers’ John and Asa and their families in carriages. My brothers had been gone seven years from us. It was a joyful meeting to all of us and we soon returned home. After we had past a few hours together my brother John called the family to order, and gave us to understand that he was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Later Day Saints and also his wife and brother Asa and his family. This was the first that we had heard of this people. I began to inquire into their faith. Then he told me they believed in God the Father, Jesus Christ His Son and the Holy Spirit which is God’s minister, and (said he) these three are one in all their councils. They called a meeting. My brothers both being ministers they preached faith, repentance and baptism for the remission of sins. They told us that a holy angel had brought the Holy Priesthood to Joseph Smith. This was joy to my heart to hear that holy angels were sent to earth again. They told me that Joseph Smith was a prophet of the Lord, and that the Lord had told him to gather all the good and faithful people to the Western Boundary in the state of Missouri, and there to build Zion, the New Jerusalem. This thought still inspires me. On the first of October, 1836, I left mother and my youngest brother James C. Earl taking my brother Wilber J. Earl with me, and we returned with my two brothers and their families to the State of Illinois. I continued to investigate the principles of the Later-Day Saints until I was convinced that they were right. On the 29th of February 1837 I was baptized under the hands of Charles C. Rich and Harvey Green. I soon left in the company of my brother Wilber, Sumer Brunson, Charles C. Rich, and G. M. Hinkel, to go to the city of Far West in the state of Missouri, in a steamboat by way of St. Louis. We landed at Far West the first of April, all in good spirits. I purchased ninety acres of land, bought me a yoke of oxen and several cows and began to prepare to make me a farm. In the month of September (1837) the Prophet Joseph and his brother Hyrum came here from Kirtland, Ohio. On October 6th 1837 they held a general conference here. I was called and ordained to the office of Elder under the hands of Hyrum Smith, Thomas B. Marsh, and Lyman Wight. On the 15th of February 1838, I started on a mission to the state of Ohio. My brother Wilber having returned in June, I felt anxious to get back. I went in a stage. When I got to Jackson’s Hill state of Missouri, I met brother Joseph Smith who was then moving his family to Far West. He gave me a blessing and I pursued my journey until I came to Schuyler County, state of Illinois. Here I stopped, preached and baptized six, ordained Seeley Owen to the office of Priest and Miner Lynn Lyman to the office of Teacher, and then pursued my journey, preaching and visiting my friends. September 15, my mother died and I buried her by the side of my father. It was hard to part with a good and tender hearted mother. I then took my two brothers Wilber and James with me and started for the Land of Zion. We went in a carriage until we got to Schuyler County, Illinois where I had raised a small branch. I here had the pleasure of baptizing my brothers. Then I sent my brother Wilber on with some traveling Saints to Far West, and I stayed in order to take some with me. About this time the mob arose in Missouri and the Saints had to suffer much in a war. My three brothers John, Asa, and Wilber, were all in the war and many others. David Patton was killed. My brother John was sent to prison and lay there forty days. He was acquitted. My brother Wilber returned to me in Schuyler County, Illinois and he then went back to the state of Ohio. January 28th, 1839 I was married to a young lady that I had baptized by the name of Lois C. Owen. After much persecution in Missouri, the church was driven back to the state of Illinois where the members settled in the town of Commerce on the Mississippi River, changing the name to the City of Nauvoo. April 6, 1847, ( possibly 1839 as the correct year ) I was sent on a mission to the States of Indiana and Ohio. In the month of July, I found my brother Wilber Earl. I ordained him an elder and took him with me. I took him home with me in the fall of the same year. In the fall of 1839, October 29th, my son Wilber B. Earl was born. In the year of 1842, I moved near the city of Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. Here I purchased a good farm. I had a good team and plenty of the comforts of life. In the year 1843, March 28th, my daughter Louisa B. Earl was born. The health of my companion was very poor. In the spring of 1844 I was sent on another mission. I left my family in good spirits. I traveled several weeks in the southern part of the state. I was preaching one day and felt impressed to go back home. I accordingly returned home. I found my little family in deep trouble for the mob had been there and ordered them to give up the place in three days or have the house burned over their heads. I was at this time solicited to go and help to keep the mob out of the city of Nauvoo. I left my family the next day and went and defended the city. The mob came and burned the houses of some of the Saints, threw stones at mine, and gave many insults. I was gone two weeks. When the time expired, the Prophet Joseph gave himself up for trial. He was taken to Carthage where he and Hyrum were murdered in the month of June, 27th day, year of our Lord 1844. Elder John Taylor was badly wounded. These bloody deeds caused great sorrow throughout the whole church. The church was then guided by the twelve apostles. In the fall of 1844, I was ordained to the office of Seventy in the tenth quorum. Soon after I was ordained to the office of president over the twentieth quorum. In the fall of 1845, I sold my farm, bought me a home and lot in the city of Nauvoo and moved into the city. On the 28th of August, 1845, my daughter Rhodaria was born. I spent the summer laboring in the temple. In the fall and winter I served as a guard at the temple and at the houses of the Twelve and sometimes was on horseback guarding many houses, barns and stacks of grain all out in the country. Many of the houses and barns were burned at the same time. We killed some of the mobsters and drove the balance off. These were the days of the deepest of sorrows. I ran many narrow risks of my life by carrying express to different parts of the army. We finished the upper rooms of the temple and there received our endowments. In the year 1846 and the month of February, on the 10th day, I took my family and crossed the Mississippi River with many hundreds of my brethren and sisters being compelled to go or have another war with the mob. I was captain of a company of the guard. President Brigham Young was at the head of the camp and seven more of the Twelve were with us and their wives and their children and their substance. We lay two weeks at Sugar Creek, Iowa waiting for all of our company to get over the river. While here my brother Willber came with his family, and my brother, James was with me. While here the snow fell two feet deep. We all suffered from the cold. We then pursed our journey through the wilderness making our road as we went. I need not attempt to describe the many sorrows which we had to pass through during the cool weather. In the month of March, many of us were without food. We then held a council and appointed twenty men to go down into the state of Missouri to work for food. Ephriam Green and myself were appointed to take our families and go with them. While in Missouri, we built a log jail and did much other work. I stayed two months and then took my family and returned to the camp with the Saints who were with me, with the exception of Brother Green’s wife who died while we were in Missouri. I found the first of the camp at Grand River where they were making some farms, but part of the company had gone on as far as the Missouri River, a distance of two hundred miles. I then traveled with my family until I overtook another portion of them making some farms on an elevated spot of ground which they called Mt. Pisgah. While here, the government of the United States sent and demanded of us five hundred of our ablest men to go to the Mexican War, which we sent. Among the balance my brother James went to war. I then went over the river with my family and joined again with the front of the camp. We moved up the river twelve miles, selected a place for our winter quarters, cut our hay, built our houses and prepared the best we could for the winter, which was severe. Many of my poor brethren and sisters died through sorrow and fatigue. Among the balance was my wife’s sister, Lydia Owen and two of my brother Wilber’s children. My wife took sick for some time, but we took all patience. In the spring of 1847, April 10th I left the place with one hundred and forty three of my brethren, three sisters and two children, with President Brigham Young at our head and six of the Twelve. It was hard for me to leave my little family sick among the howling wolves and the roaming savages of the west; but, the servants of the Lord said “Go” and I felt willing as ever to leave all for the benefit of the Gospel or the salvation of this people. We traveled up the Platte river on the north side, making a new road for five hundred miles, where we crossed at Fort Laramie, then through the Black Hills, then crossed the Platte River again, took the Sweetwater nearly to the head, then down the Pacific Springs, then crossed the two Sandy Rivers. Here we met with Mr. Bridger and made some inquiry about the Salt Lake Valley. He gave us to understand that he had been in the mountains nearly forty years and he knew that we could not raise grain in that valley, but did not discourage us. We pursued our journey, making our road. Here many of the brethren were sick with the mountain fever. I was very ill. We still worked our way along as fast as possible, although it was through much hard digging down of banks, building bridges, etc. On the 24th of July the whole camp arrived safe in the Salt Lake Valley. We camped on a small stream running from the mountain. The ground was very dry. The grass was dry from the hot rays of the sun and the ground infested with swarms of large crickets. A meeting was called to appoint each man his labor and we soon turned the stream, watered the land, plowed the ground and planted our garden seed, corn and potatoes. Thus we continued until we planted nearly one hundred acres. During this time, the surveyor Henry Sherwood, with a few others, surveyed the city, commencing at the temple block. We built a wall around ten acres of land suitable for a fort with houses on the inside. August the 16th, I started back to the states with a small company of brethren, nearly forty in number, with our ox teams, Tenis Rafilee being captain. Nothing of importance occurred until we came to the Platte River. Here we had our horses, seventeen in number, stolen. However we pursued our journey down to Ft. Laramie. Here we learned that the balance of our company, who left the valley ten days after us with horse teams, had their horses stolen on Strawberry Creek. We hired an interpreter who went with us to the Indians and we obtained sixteen head of horses which we immediately sent back to assist our brethren. While detained here, we were destitute of food, and I went in company with Horis Thornton to a small band of Indians and sold my shirt off my back for meat. I then took my wagon cover and cut and made me another shirt. We then pursued our journey about forty miles and came to an immense drove of buffalo. We killed some and dried all the meat we wanted and took hundreds of pounds home. Ten miles above the Grand Island, the Indians came on our front guard and took a horse from J. Redding, also his knife and some other things, but no one was hurt. When we came to the head of the Island, we found a company of U. S. A. troops under General Carny. They were building a fort. Here we held a council and decided whether to wait for the horse company or pursue our journey. We accordingly agreed to go on slowly. When we arrived at the Soup Fork, we to our great joy, met a few of our brethren from Winter Quarters with provisions. We stayed with them over night. They went back to the horse teams, and we still pursued our journey. We arrived in Winter Quarters on the 1st of October, 1847, where with great joy I met my wife and three wee sweet little children all well. I spent the winter in preparing to go with my family to the valley. During the winter, our children had the measles, which caused the death of our youngest child, a little girl, Rhodenia, born August 29, 1845. About the first of May, we started on our journey. All the Saints that could not go to the valley this year had to go back over the river into Iowa so as to be safe from the Indians. We had no bad luck on the way, only the loss of one cow. When we got opposite Ash Hollow on Sunday July the 9th we had a fine son born. We called him Sylvester Rhodans. We arrived in the Valley about the middle of October 1848, all in fine spirits, and found the Saints well. I moved on my city lot in the 8th ward. On the 26th, of October 1850 we had a fine daughter born. We called her Lois Orenia. In the fall of 1851, I moved into the 19th ward, and built another home. August 28th 1852, I was called on by the general conference on go to England on a mission. September 6, 1852 my son Joseph Ira was born. I felt well and left September 15th. I had a good time over the plains, took a steamboat at St. Joseph, Missouri and stayed a few days in St. Louis, took the train to Cincinnati, went by way of Cleveland, Buffalo, and Albany, to New York. December 18th, I took shipping for Liverpool and arrived January 5th, my health poor. January 8th, I received an appointment of pastorale charge of the Stafford and Shrepshire Conference, where I remained two years. I then received orders to return home. I left Liverpool March 31, 1855 on the ship I sailed with five hundred Saints on board. We encountered much sickness and one very hard storm. I was on the sea about five weeks. We then arrived in the great city of Philadelphia. Here we met Elder John Taylor who aided us in getting safe in the train cars bound for Pittsburgh. We were two days and nights on the way. We ran against another engine, which broke several cars and wounded several of the Saints. At Pittsburgh, we charted two steamboats which arrived us to St. Louis. Some of the Saints were sick. Here I left the Saints and continued up the Missouri River to the town of Atchison, the place of fit-out for the plains. I went up the Illinois River to Beardstown, and then through Schuyler and Brown counties, visited my brother John and family, also my wife’s brothers, Hemon, Bradley, and Ira Owen. After spending a few days with them, I returned to St. Louis on a steamboat. Here I purchased a few goods for my family. I then went on a steamboat up the Missouri River as far as Atchison. Here I fitted out for the plains. Our company was the three B. W. Company. Elder Blair was the captain. Elder Green and myself were his council. We left the campground on the 13th of June, traveled two days when the cholera broke out, taking nearly two-thirds of the company. This was the greatest sorrow that I ever witnessed. Edward Stevenson was appointed to take charge of the camp and Brother Barlow took the place of Brother Greer. We had no bad luck on the way. We lost one man, a gentile, a Mr. Wood from Texas. I arrived in the valley on the tenth of September, being gone three years and five days. I found all my family well. During the time of my being in England, in 1854, Elder Willard Richards died, and in April following, Elder J. M. Grant was appointed in his place. The city was partly walled in. In 1856 December 1st, J. M. Grant died. His loss was felt deeply by the Saints: He fought the devils, Taught the Saints, And done his duty well. He’ll raise in glory, Crowned with might, While the wicked go to Hell. At this time President Brigham Young called on the Saints to reform and to forsake all evil, lest the Lord destroy us all. The sacrament was now removed from the Saints until they repented and were rebaptized in the font prepared on the Temple block for this purpose. In the year 1856, I was ordained a councilor to Bishop Alonzo H. Releigh, Bishop of the 19th ward. In the winter of 1856-1857 we spent all our time in getting the people to see that they had need to reform. The bishops and councilors were rebaptized in October, the first presidency and families and the whole church in the spring of 1857. We now resumed our work on the temple. Several thousand were engaged in preparing materials. The prophet said “This will make the wicked mad, and they will seek to destroy us.” September 18th, 1856 my first wife Lois C. Earl had a fine daughter born. We called her Lydia V. Earl, and on April 21st, 1857 Margaret E. Earl had a fine son, we called him Hyrum H. Earl. In the month of August 1857, the U.S.A. refused to sent us the mail. President Buchanan had appointed Mr. Harny to come with 2500 soldiers to govern this people. We did not intend to let them come into the Valley. About the 8th of September, 1857 a Mr. Vanfleet came into the Valley. He was a quartermaster for the U.S.A. Army, and came to prepare for them. President Young informed him that the army would not be allowed to come in. He then returned. Our soldiers are on the plains ready to meet the enemy. On Sunday, September 20. Governor Young sent Lieutenant General Wells, John Taylor, and George A. Smith out on the road to meet our enemies who are nearly one hundred and thirty miles east and near Ft. Bridger. Colonel Kane came here to try to settle the difficulty. He visited our enemies, who still desire to come in. He had the governor visit us. I and my son W. B. Earl, were in the campaign during the hard part of the winter. April 6th, 1858, at general conference, President Brigham Young counseled the Saints to move southward. My wife Lois and my eldest daughter, having been sick, we were in poor health to start a journey. Having lost our little boy Elijah O. Earl, we felt it a trial, nevertheless, we started to make provisions and in the month of May we went as far as Springville, Utah County, and stopped with my brother Wilber J. Earl, who had been living there some years. My brother James C. Earl also moved there. We spent the time very pleasantly. During the month of June, the government sent a committee who met with the authorities of the church and compromised the whole matter, and the people again returned to their homes. I and my family arrived back home on the 9th of July, our home looked desolate, notwithstanding our fruit trees were loaded with fruit and the current bushes with currents. But we did thank God for the peaceful and quiet home which we enjoyed. Troops sent here were permitted to locate in Cedar Valley for the present. October 3, 1858, my oldest daughter took sick with bilious colic and died on the fifth of the same month, much lamented by all who knew her. We had a very hard winter, we lost about four hundred dollars worth of stock. In the year of 1859 I took the liver complaint and was sick all summer. This spring we had a daughter born and called her name Phebe Delora. She was the daughter of my wife Margaret Emily Earl. In the month of August 1859, my wife Lois Caroline had a daughter and called her name Elizabeth Tabitha. My health was very poor. November 3, 1860, a son was born to Margaret Emily Jones Earl we called him Thomas Franklin. In the summer of 1861, the government troops left us, bound for the states. In the fall of 1861, I was sent on a mission to Washington County in the southern part of this territory, a distance of three hundred miles. We started on the 29th of October, and had a pleasant journey most of the way. We located in Pine Valley on the head of the Santa Clara, January 22nd, we had a son born by Lois Caroline. We called his name John Owen Earl. He died and was buried February 2nd being eleven days old. He was a proper fine child, and his death was much regretted by the family. I purchased a share in a sawmill and was busy repairing it. We sawed 200,000 feet of lumber and the mill burned up, and then we built another. I then sold out to Eli Whipple. In the fall, Wilber and myself went to Salt Lake City. In 1862 I moved my first wife to Saint George, she was very sick in 1863 and 1864. We then all settled in Pine Valley, and got some good farming land, and in 1867, I was called upon to take my wives and go to Salt Lake to get our second anointing. The End This completes the history of Sylvester H. Earl as written by himself. The foregoing is all the writings we have of our father Sylvester Henry Earl except a journal of his missionary labors in England, commencing in the year 1852 and closing in 1855. I, Joseph Ira Earl, desire to write a few words at the close of our father’s history. Words cannot express the love and respect I have for his honored name, full of faith in the great latter day work. He was a strict observer of the Sabbath Day, honest and upright in his dealings, taught his family by precept and example to obey the commandments of the Lord, seldom missing getting all the family together for morning and evening prayer and occasionally holding family meeting’s where we were more fully taught the principals, and ordinances of the gospel as taught and revealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith. Father, loved the Prophet Joseph and spent much time helping to protect him from the mob, his enemies, and would give his life to save the prophet. My father was the husband of two wives, Lois Caroline Earl who was the wife of his youth and Margaret Jones Earl whom he married after his return from his mission to England. Both were good and noble women sharing all the hardships of a pioneer life, without a murmur or complaint as far as I know. It is a source of strength and encouragement to me to contemplate the life and teachings of my sainted mother. My heart is also full of love and praise for Aunt Margaret as we used to call her. She was always kind and cheerful, full of faith and good works. She was indeed a mother to me, giving much councils from time to time as I needed it. In the fall of 1870, the children were all sick with the measles which caused the death of my two brothers Sylvester Rhodanus and Hyrum. They died in December at Middleton, Washington County, Utah in 1871. Father having previously bought a place of one William Freams at Middleton, Utah, paying him $700.00 for it. He then moved Aunt Margaret down there. My mother still resided in Pine Valley, Washington County, Utah. In the spring of 1873, Father was taken sick and continued so until the 23 of July on which date he passed peacefully away at Middleton and was buried in the St. George cemetery on the 24th of July just twenty-six years from the time he landed in the Salt Lake Valley. The members of the family present at his death were Margaret and her two children, Phebe Delora and Thomas Franklin, my uncle Wilbur Joseph Earl, and my brother Wilber Bradley and myself. Of my father’s large family there are but three of his children left to perpetuate his honored name. My brother Wilber B. died on April 13th 1903, leaving a wife and five children, four by his wife of his youth, Harriet Wight Earl and one by his second wife, Lucresa Keel Earl. My sister Orena Earl Wixom died in Idaho leaving a husband and seven children. The three remaining children are Joseph Ira Earl, Thomas Franklin Earl and Elizabeth Darcus Earl. The above closing sketch of my father’s history was written on the 25th of April, 1907 at Bunkerville, Lincoln County, Nevada. (By Joseph Ira Earl) Copied in 1932 by Margaret Mae Earl Meeks, April 19, 1946 by Ida Beth Meeks Pierce, February 24, 1957 by Ann Baker Meeks, and May 25, 2001 by E. Leon & Janet Earl

Mission Diary

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

THIS IS A TRANSCRIPT OF HIS MISSION DIARY PROBABLY WRITTEN AT THE END OF HIS MISSION. HE SERVED IN THE ENGLAND MISSION. HE WAS GONE AWAY FROM HOME FROM 15 SEPTEMBER 1852 TO 10 SEPTEMBER 1855 HE WAS BORN 16 AUGUST 1815 IN SCIOTO COUNTY, OHIO HE DIED 23 JULY 1873 IN MIDDLETON, UTAH AND WAS BURIED 24 JULY 1873 IN ST. GEORGE, UTAH, HIS FATHER: JOSEPH EARL II HIS MOTHER: DORCAS TABITHA WIXOM HIS WIVES: LOIS CAROLINE OWEN MARGARET EMILY JONES This Transcription Of His Missionary Journal Was Made From The Original Journal By Owen Ken Earl, Moses Lake, Washington In August 1986 The Original Journal Is In The Possession Of Zelia Earl Wells Wendel, St George, Utah, One Of His Granddaughters This transcription is being included in this volume as an Appendix so that it will be available to as many of Sylvester’s descendants as possible. MISSION DIARY OF SYLVESTER HENRY EARL Note: Modern spelling will be used with occasional “original” spelling left for flavor or put in parentheses. From working with the original journal, it appeared to Ken Earl that Sylvester had kept copious notes of various dates and happenings during his mission, and had then written this “Diary” after returning from his mission. THE CALL August the 28, 1852, Great Salt Lake City, (Utah). A conference of about too (two) thousand Elders were met together and near one hundred and fifty Elders were sent on missions, and I was one of this number. I now commence to give a history of my travels to the land of England to which I was appointed. I spent the time from the time of my appointment to the time of my starting in fixing to leave my family in as good a circumstance as I can and on the 15th of September (1852) I started, bound for Europe. HIS DEPARTURE We went to Ecco (Echo) Cannion (Canyon) where we stopt and staid over Sunday and here the mail came to us and brought our Licenses and Recommends from the President (Brigham Young). We then traveled on with speed and with little or no difficulty until we got near Laramie (Wyoming) where we found that some of our horses were failing. And when we got to Laramie, the Brethren sold their poorest horses and we pursued our journey. A little below Laramie, we had a heavy snowstorm which injured our teams mutch, and we staid until noon and moved on, but our teems continued to fail and we got down to the South Fork of the Platte where we had a stampeded which injured our teams some. But we got a good horse, saddle and bridle and two blankets. He (didn’t say who “he” was) came to our camp and stayed with our horses. We pursued our journey. FORT CARNEY TO NEW YORK CITY When we got to Fort Carney (Kearny), I sold my horse for 20 dollars and hired my things balled (hauled) to the Missouri River and I went on foot, and then I hired them hailed to Joseph where I took a steamboat and went to St. Louis. We did not stay there long until we got on board of another (boat) bound for Cincinnati (Ohio) and in six days we were in Cincinnati. Then I took the car to New York and was there too (two) weeks, in which time I was getting money to take me to England. AND THEN TO LIVERPOOL I got thirty-eight dollars. This was plenty of money and I had some to spair. On the 18th of December (1852), I started from New York and in 19 days I was in Liverpool. We had a ruff journey over the sea and I got sick after being on the (boat) five days and a number of our boys were sick also, but we were 21 in number and we were kind to each other. There was one Roman Catholick died on the vessel and I was favored with the privilege of being helped to the deck where I saw him put over board. He was a very wicked man. JANUARY 1853 ARRIVAL AND ASSIGNMENT TO STAFFORDSHIRE & SHROPSHIRE On the 4 day of January (1853), I arrived in England and staid their 4 days and I received my appointment to the Pastoral (in) charge of the Staffordshire and Shropshire Conferences. I went immediately to my field of labor and my health was yet poor. I stayed two weeks at Sister Johnson’s and (she) doctored me up. (I was at) Shrewsbury the most of my time and then I took a car and went to the Stafford Conference to the City of Maccelsfield where I found Elder Westwood, President of the Conference, and also Elder Spicer Crandell that came over with me over the plains. MACCELSFIELD I got to Maccelsfield on the 24 of January (1853). The Saints had prepared a nice party for me in the evening and I enjoyed myself very well and when we closed, Brother Crandell and I went to Brother Barnes and stayed all knight. The day we spent with Brother Weitmoor and stayed again (that night) with Brother Barnes, and then went to the Potteries and stopped at Bro. Bates until evening. Then we went to a meeting and then went home with Win. Wright and stayed all knight. Took breckfast and then went to Burglum and took dinner with Brother J. Reed. On Wednesday I went to Crem; stayed all night with Win. Hayes and then I went to Middlewich, staid with Brother Thoinmy Nickson. At 10 AM I went to Council and settled some difficulty and at two o’clock I had a meeting, and in the evening I preached, and then five were baptized. FEBRUARY 1853 Monday, I went to Crem to Bro. Mayson’s, got supper and then got on the train and went to Tilton and stayed with Joseph Steel, and then walked five miles, and they took me in a cart and Bro. Weitmoor and Bro. Crandell were with me. We went two miles to the hail and held a meeting. They (the Saints) said they would be rebaptized and renew their covenants with the Lord. We started next morning. They sent a young man with the horse and cart two miles, then we went on foot to Bro. Wigginses and from there to Brother Daniel Holding’s. Brother Westwood then returned to Wigginses and on Friday, February 4 (1853) Bro. Crandell and myself went to Shrewsbury 15 miles on foot. This was the hardest day’s walk that I have had. FAST MEETINGS HELD TO REDUCE DEBTS We went to Sister Johnson’s; stayed there and rested Saturday, and on Sunday we went to the Conference. The Conference commenced at half past 10. The President, Bro. Henry Nesbitt, opened the meeting and motioned that John 0. Angus should preside over the Conference. He then commenced and regulated the Am. Star agency. They wanted to liquidate their debts; motioned and seconded that the Saints hold a fast on the 2nd Sunday of this month and then on the first day or Sunday in each month until the debts are paid, and then continue the temple fund. And in the afternoon the Elders that were going to the hall occupied the time and they gave excellent discourses. One was David James and the other Thommas Austin, and then the Travelling Elders talked a little and in the evening Bro. Crandell and I occupied the time, and then the meeting was dismissed. BACK TO THE STAFFORD CONFERENCE On Monday evening, we held a Council and on the next day we went back to the Stafford Conference. Went in the car to Stafford and then went 4 miles on foot to Little Heath and stopped at Bro. Gilling’s and held a meeting. And then went to Bro. Thomas Green’s and stayed all night. This was the 10th of February (1853). On the 11th, we went to Bro. John Fields’ and stayed until evening and returned to Bro. Green’s and stayed all night and took breakfast. Then went and paid a visit at Bro. Kendricks’ and then returned to Bro. Greens. On Saturday, the 12th, we went to Bro. Gillum’s and also to Bro. John Locklises and took supper with them, and then returned to Bro. Thomas Green’s again. MORE MEETINGS & TRAVELS (On) Sunday the 13th (February 1853) we held a meeting in the afternoon at Bro. Gillum’s. We partook of the sacrament and the Saints testified of the truth of the Gospel, and in the evening we had a large congregation. I preached on the subject of the Restitution of All Things, bringing in the Resurrection of the Just and their reigning (raining) with the Savior a thousand years. And Brother Crandell then followed and bore testimony, and then spoke on the Gospel. He then returned to Bro. Green’s to stay all night, and I stayed at Bro. Locklis’, and in the morning Bro. Crandell came to me and we blessed (blest) Brother James’ wife and Bro. Gilium’s wife and then went to Stafford on foot, and then took the car to Burglum. Stopped at Bro. Reed’s and took supper and then went to a meeting at Brother John Halley’s. It was a testifying meeting (following which) I went to Bro. Simpson’s and stayed all night. In the morning, Brother John Sickorigh came in and went to Brother Reed’s and met with Bro. Crandell and Brother Westwood. We then went to Handley and held a meeting and the Spirit of the Lord was with us and then I went home with Joseph Ellis. Brother Crandell stopped with me and in the morning we went to Burglum and then went to Bro. Win. Mumford’s and there we then stopped and took dinner. Then Bro. Westwood and I went to Bro. Win. Creswell’s in Longton and in the evening we preached to the Saints in Longton, and we had the spirit and power of God on us and on the congregation. Also we stayed here all night. TO THE POTTERIES And on Thursday, the 17th (February 1853), we visited the Saints and on the 18th we went to Bro. William Hargraves’ and took dinner and then went to the Handley Branch were I stayed with Win. Wrights. Then I spent a half day looking through the Potteries and the workmen. This was a great pleasure to me. I then went to Bro. Pool’s to dinner, and then went to Burglum where I met with Brother Spencer, and on Sunday the 20th (of February 1853) Brother Spencer and I preached at Tunstdll into the night. A NEW DRESS FOR LOIS CAROLINE Also on Monday, I and Brother Simpson got my wife a new dress, and the Saints were bringing in many presents for my family. They are doing more than we could expect, and the Lord will bless them for their kindness. BROTHER LICKRISH DIES In the afternoon, I was at Bro. Pool’s and in the evening we had a meeting at Bro. Boils. Brother Spencer and I went to Bro. Simpson’s, stayed all night and in the morning we went to Maccelsfield and then Brother Spencer returned to Liverpool and found Brother Crandell. In the evening we went to a meeting and Bro. Lickrish was very sick. We had a good meeting and then we went home with Bro. John Horrocks. In the morning we went again to see Bro. Lickrish. He’s still getting worse. We then visited Brother Jackson and took supper, and Sister Jackson gave me a silk handkerchief for Orenia. We then went again to Bro. Horrocks’, and the next morning we went to see Brother Lickrish and he is still worse, and on Friday morning he died. (He was) well respected and beloved by all who knew him. FUNERAL SERVICES FOR BRO. LICKRISH Later the 26th we remained at our boarding place for it snowed all day, and on Sunday we went to Bro. Boil’s to dinner, and then to the room. We went to a (funeral) meeting at three in the afternoon. We formed 2 and 2 and marched to the place where the corpse (Bro. Lickrish, who had died) was and then we commenced to prepare to go to the grave. The first thing done was to prepare the place for the mourners and also the pall bearers. These were eight in number, four in number of each kind. Myself, Spicer Crandell, George Simpson and John Horrocks were appointed Mourners and then there were eight men to carry the coffin. There were eighty Saints at the funeral and we appointed two men to take the charge of the Saints. The coffin was (taken) into the street Elder Simpson then read the following hymn: Why Do We Mourn For Dying Friends?, and the Saints sang it, and then we went to the Church. It was St. Paul’s Great Church in Maccelsfield. We marched to it in the best of order and we went into the chapel and set the coffin down and took our seats, and then the Priest read a prayer. Also the 15th Chapter of 2nd Corinthians and spoke a few words. Then we formed and went to the grave, and the Priest came and read prayers until the coffin was put into the grave, and then we were formed with the Mourners in the front and we returned to the house where he died. 24 Elders took supper there and this expense came on the Conference and it was paid. We then retired to the room to hold a meeting. I preached his funeral (sermon). He had no relation there but one sister. Brother Crandell and I then went home with some people that were not in the Church and took supper, and then we went again to Bro. John Horrocks’. And in the morning we went in company with Elder Simpson and Horrocks and had our likenesses taken (photographs). And then we went (and also Elder Simpson) to Burglum, and in the evening we had a festival in Handley to bid farewell to those Saints who are going to the Mountains. Their names are John Mayson and family, John Hoyl, Win. Burton. I then went to Bro. Right’s. In the morning I went and spent the day with Bro. Pool and in the evening we went to meeting and returned to Bro. Pool’s. In the morning I went to the store and got some pens and then returned to Bro. Pool’s and waited for Bro. Westwood and we were busy writing. MARCH 1853 This is now the 2nd day of March. It has been verry (very) cold wether (weather) all of the time for 2 weeks, and is yet cold and stormy. Snow and rain often falls, but it is not as coald (cold) as it is in America or in the North parts of it. In the afternoon, we went to Peter Bateses, and in the evening both Bro. Westwood and Bro. George Simpson came in and staid (stayed) to supper. Bro. Westwood then left on bisness (business) and some Saints came in and we spent a pleasant evening in singing and with music of the violin. We then returned to Bro. Pool’s. TO LIVERPOOL ON EMIGRATION MATTERS On the morning of the 3rd of March, we went to the town of Burglum and received a letter from Pres. S. W. Richards. I left Bro. Crandell and went on the car to Maccelsfield to see Elder Westwood about the emigration of the Saints. The next morning I went to Liverpool to see Bro. Richards about the emigration and settled the business. We sent John Mayson, his wife and four children, John Boil and Win. Burton. I then returned again to Maccelsfield. On March 6th (1853), I visited Brother Barnes who is sick and then I went to the chappel, partook of the sacrament, and in the evening I preached on the Persecution of the Saints. On Monday we visited the Saints. On Tuesday we went to the Bollington Branch and held a meeting in the evening and stayed all night. In the morning we visited a (nearby) mountain so as to see over the vast country, and then we returned to Maccelsfield. I then visited the Saints and on Friday I went to Burglum and took dinner at Bro. Reed’s. I then visited three that wair (were) sick and then went to Bro. Pool’s and stayed all knight I then went to Bro. Mallet’s and there visited the sick, and then back to Bro. Pool’s where on hearing that Bro. Win. Pitt was at Brother Right’s, I went to visit him and spent the evening with Bro. Pitt, who had just come from America. PACKS THINGS TO SEND HOME On Sunday I went to Meeting. Elder Pitt preached and I followed him. We had a good meeting. I then went to the City of Hamley and preached in the evening and then went to George Simpson’s and stayed all night and then went and bought a trunk to pack my things in to send to America. I put them in. They were clothing and chiney wair (china ware) and then I went to visit the Saints who were sick. They are the Brother Moliet’s wives. They are much afflicted. On Tuesday I went to Burglum to Brother Mumford’s. His family is sick and from there (I went) to Handley to a meeting where I preached on the Order and Power of the Priesthood. I then went to Brother Pool’s and stayed all night and all day. On Wednesday, the 16th of March (1853), I wrote a letter to my family, and then went to the Longton Branch to a meeting in the evening. We there had the best of meetings. I stayed all night and then returned to Handley. There I met with Bro. Westwood. It is now March 17 (1853, and it is snowing very hard, but we are in good health. And on the 18th we went to Middlewitch and there I stayed and Bro. Westwood went on to visit the Conference on Saturday the 19th. I spent some time in sending letters to the States and to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake, and then I went to visit some of the Saints and to view the city. In the evening, I went to the Priests’ Council and we had a good meeting. A DAY OF MEETINGS I went to my lodgings, and in the morning at 7:00 AM I went to the Saints Prayer Meeting. At 10 in the morning I went again to the room and held an Open Council. This continued until 12 and then at 2PM we met and partook of the Sacrament. And then the Saints gave their testimonies to the work of the Lord, and they spoke in the gift of tungs (Tongues). One sister sung in the gift of Tongues and the spirit of the Lord was in our midst. We closed our meeting at 4:00 in the afternoon, and at 6:00 in the evening we met again and menny (many) of the wourld (world) wair (were) present, and I preached to them on gospel subjects and on the Resurrection. I was followed by Elder Hudson. He exorted (exhorted) the Saints to take the council (counsel) of the sermon that I had delivered to them. We then closed by prayer by Elder Hudson, and then retired; and I slept with Elder Hudson. On Monday the 21st (of March, 1853) I went to the (train) station near Sandbatch and (took the train) from there to Crem, and from there to Stafford, and then changed into another car and went to Shrewsbury (where I) found the Saints all in good health. In the evening we that were in the Priesthood met in Bro. John Anguses upper room for (a) Private Council, and we had a good meeting. I spoke on the subject of the Apostacy of the Church in the days of the Apostles. (The meeting was) closed by prayer, and I stayed there all night. In the morning Bro. Henry Umphres and I took a pleasant walk through the fields and returned to our breakfast, and then I spent the remainder of the day in visiting the Saints. In the evening (I went) to Sister Johnson’s and stayed all night (Next day) I went to Father Umphres’ and spent the forenoon, and then I went to Bro. Smahlman’s and spent the afternoon. In the evening we had a good meeting. One brother and sister prophesied that I should prosper in my mission and that my family (in America) were all well. This gave me pleasure. EJECTED FROM A CATHOLIC MEETING On Thursday I went to Wellington and spent the night with Brother Buttler and family. In the evening his sons and I went to a Catholic meeting, but the oald (old) Priest soon began to suspicion me as being a Latter-day Saint (a litter day Saint), and he came to me and said, “Who are you, and what denomination are you?” And on telling him that I was a Latter-day Saint, he flew into a rage and said that he wanted me to go out of the chapel. I then went out and after I got out of the chapel, the Priest followed me and wanted me to tell him who gave me authority to preach. I then told him that it was the Lord my God. He then ordered me out of the yard. I went (Out of the yard) while him and three more were in a terrible rage, fearing lest I should brake (break) into their flock for we have been taking the best of them all reddy (already), and I intend to take all of the honnest (honest) in hart (heart). On Good Friday the Saints from Shrewsbury came to Wellington and we went to Newport for a tee (tea) party. We passed the evening in good pleasure. I and John 0. Angus stayed with Alfred Caswell, and later on we went to Burglum. From thence to Maccelsfield where we went to Brother Westwood’s. PRIESTS’ COUNCIL HELD We then went to the Rooms and held a Priests’ Council, and there we had the Presiding Elders from all the branches in Council. We then nominated men to the office of Elder and to the office of Priests, Teachers and Deacons, according to the dictation of the Spirit of the Lord. I gave them a short lecture on the necessity of building the temple. We dismissed until 10 AM in the morning and Brother Angus and I went home with Father John (?). And at 10 in the morning we met at the Room and commenced our conference, bringing before them the authorities of the Church for to know if they would sustain them, which was unanimous. I was then brought before them as their Pastor. It (the vote) was unanimous. Elder Westwood and Elder Spicer W. Crandell were presented to the conference, carried unanimous. We ordained those that were appointed to their several offices. We then dismist (dismissed) until half past two, and then continued to appoint Presidents of Districts and of Branches and (gave) some instruction to the Saints in general, and then closed until evening. Then Brother John 0. Angus, the President of the Shropshire Conference, delivered a lecture. He was followed by Elder Crandell, and then I gave the Saints that instruction that I thought would be for their good, and then we closed our conference by singing the hymn “Come, Come Ye Saints, No Toil Nor Labor Fear.’ I then closed the conference by prayer. On Monday the 28th of March (1853), we were engaged in visiting the Saints and in the evening we were all at the room at 6:00 to a large tea party. Many strangers met with us and we had a very good time. We continued until 11:00 o’clock, and then went to our lodgings. At 9:00 in the morning we were at the station and in forty minutes we were at Burglum Station, and there Brother Angus left for Shrewsbury and Elder Crandell and I came on foot to Win. Mumford’s and spent a fieu (few) hours, and then went to Elder Reed’s and took supper and then we went to the meeting in Handley. We had a good meeting. On Wednesday, we went to Longton and preached to them and I think that here is good prospects of some joining the Church. On Thursday we went to Bro. Argranes to dinner and here we met with Elder Westwood. From thence we went to visit Brother Savery who had been badly wounded in one of his eyes. We anointed it and blest (blessed) him and went our way to Handley where I preached on the necessity of paying tithing to build the temple and to pay the Conference debts. Then I called a vote to know if they would do this, and they unanimously voted that they would, and then I spent the night with Elder Right APRIL 1853 I and Elder Westwood then went to Burglum to Elder Simpson’s to audit the Conference books, and we spent the time until in the afternoon, and then I left them and went to Elder Simpson’s and got some supper. Then I went to the train and went to Crem and spent the evening with them. This is the 1st of April (1853). I then went to a Public House and stayed over night and then in the morning I went to Elder Waises (?) again and stayed until 11:00 PM. I then went on the train to the Sandbatch Station, and then I walked to Middlewitch and I stopped at Thomas Nickson’s and took my supper. I feel first rate and know that the Lord does bless me, and also all of the faithful in his kingdom. I stayed all night and then in the morning Elder Drinkwater and I went to Sostoc to Elder John Taylor’s and I stayed with them and Elder Drinkwater returned to Middlewitch for to preach in that city. I went to Elder Samuel Bramail’s; preached at 2:00 o’clock in the afternoon and again in the evening and the people gave good attention to what I said, and they wished to hear me again. I stayed here all night and after breakfast we went to visit the Saints and to see the country. A VISIT TO TABLEY PARK We first visited a large park called the Tabley Park belonging to John Lester. It is a pleasant place. We first came to a beautiful grove of Chestnut timber, and in this grove was a building for to keep their hunting dogs in for to train them to come at the sound of the horn. We then passed on to the old buildings made by his great grandfather in the time of war. It is built on a point of land projecting into a small lake, and a channel out across so as to make an island, and we have to cross on a bridge. Before we enter the bridge, we went through a small room. This can be loct (locked) so as to prevent any person from going on the island. On the island we saw the old castle and an old church with some small buildings. This is the most ancient work that I have seen. The Royal Family has left this and moved to a large and spacious building in the middle of the park, and we went past the front of the buildings and then past the burrow for rabbits where we could see hundreds at once. And then to the fish pond and viewed that. We then went to the town of Nutsford and spent a few hours with the Saints and I blessed one child. We then went to Brother Taylor’s, visiting the Saints by the way and I stayed with Elder Taylor and Elder Bramall returned home again. SYLVESTER MEDITATES ON APRIL 6TH On Tuesday night I held a meeting near Brother Taylor’s, and then stayed over knight (night) with them again. In the morning I took a pleasant walk all alone and I felt to meditate upon the situation of the Church, for this is Wednesday, the 6th of April (1853) and I am led to think on my home and of the Conference in the Land of Zion, and of the joy they have, and of the situation of my little family. In meditating on the glory of Zion and in all of my meditations, I did not forget to pray for the delivery of the Saints from this land to go to the Land of Zion. WITH JOHN TAYLOR I returned to the room and administered to Sister Harriett Taylor, and John Taylor gave me a nice vest. In the evening I went back to Middlewitch and held a meeting with the Saints and then stayed with Brother Nickson, and ordained Tommas Nickson and Tommas Lewis to the office of a Priest In the morning I went to Elder Drinkwater’s for my breakfast and then I started for Sandbatch accompanied by two of the Brethren who went with me three miles. I then went alone and when I got to Sandbatch, I found Elder Hudson quite ill, and also some little disturbance in the Branch. But I stayed and preached that night and we set all things aright and all is well. I stayed all night with Elder Skellin and took breakfast with Brother Smith’s family, and then I went back to Brother Snelson’s and took with me Elder John Hudson to accompany me to the station. Then I went to Crem and stopped with Elder Hays and spent the day in talking, singing, reading and writing. In the evening I preached at Elder Hayes’. One woman said that she was to be baptized, but I told her that she should try to get her husband to go along (and be baptized, too), and she said that she would try. I left it with Elder Hayes to baptize them and I went to the Potteries. On Sunday the 10th (of April 1853), I went to the Shropshire Conference, and in the evening I went to the chapel with Elder Angus and we had a large congregation. I preached and the Spirit of the Lord was upon me and on the Saints also. I stayed all night with Elder Angus. I have to say with regard to the Saints and the work of the Lord that they do prosper and the work of the Lord is rolling on and the devil can’t stop it! TO NORTH WALES On Monday, Brother Angus and I started out to visit the Saints in the North of Wales and we were gone until Monday, the 18th of April (1853). We found the Saints in tolerable good spirIts in the Branches and the work is still roiling (rouling) on. On Friday, the 22nd of April, Brother Angus and myself started to go around the North side of the Conference and we went to Wellington. There at Bro. Buttler’s we stayed until Saturday, and then we went to Newport and preached on Sunday. From there to Marketrayton, and there we hada splendid meeting and some are believing and others are going to be baptized on Saturday by Elder Bain. From there we went to Father Bates’ and spent 3 days in looking over the farms. On Sunday we had a meeting with the Saints and we administered to some that were sick. On Monday Brother Bates took his good spirits. MAY 1853 DID THEY NEED A LAWYER? From here (we went) to the Stafford Conference, and on Sunday, the first day of May (1853), I received a letter from Elder Westwood that he was in trouble and needed my assistance in the case of a man fining him for having the deacon hold the door in the time of prayer. I went to him (Elder Westwood) on the train and the trial was just opening. Brother Westwood got a lawyer to plead his case and then he was fined 40 pence. He then wanted to take an appeal; also some of the Saints here. I told them if the judges in England were like those of America, then they had better stop. However, they went on until they spent $50, and then I told them they MUST STOP. They accordingly done so and then I visited the Saints. Through most of the Conference, the Saints in general feel well. In one instance we had to cutoff a sister, the wife of Elder Long, for general bad conduct. Then I started again to the Shropshire Conference, which was on the 29th of May (1853), and here we were blessed with the presence of President S. W. Richards, Charles Smith and several Elders from other Conferences, from hoom (whom) we received mutch good instruction. Among the rest, President Richards gave us a beautiful lecture on the subject of Celestial Marriage. THE SHREWSBURY SHOWS On Monday, the 30th of May (1853), we went to Shrewsbury Shows and we were invited into an upper room so as to see over the whole scenery as it passed along. The streets were crowded to an excess with people and carriages, carts, hoises and all in an uproar. The scene was composed of a woman representing the Queen, followed by her waiters. Then another Queen in like manner as the first. Then came Mr. Lattimory, Play Actors all on horseback and drest (dressed) in costly array, and then the macannicks (mechanics) in their turn. I looked at the scenery and thought, “Oh, what a pity it is that so many people should be without the knowledge of the truth. Oh, that this people, like the people of Deseret, would hear the truth and imbrace (embrace) the same.” OUR OWN CELEBRATION We then returned to our lodgings, took dinner and then went to the chapel to the Festival which the Saints had prepared. The meeting was called to order by Brother Angus (followed by) singing and prayer by Sylvester H. Earl, and then some fine words by Elder Angus. At 4:00 o’clock we took tea and then proceeded with our meeting where all was peace and harmony. The room was well dressed with a variety of flowers and evergreens and of (banners) of Joseph and Hyrum, then the First Presidency and the Twelve, with many banners of the Beehive motto in Deseret. “We Are Free”, “Ye Elders of Israel”, “Heralds of Salvation”, and many, many more similar banners of like manner. Over the room waved a large flag of England and then an American flag. These were floating in the air as if to say “We Stars and Stripes will soon go away and leave the Black Ball to decay!” We had mutch (much) good instructions from President (S. W.) Richards and the Elders from other places. At 10:00 in the evening we closed by singing and prayer by S. H. Earl. MOUNT MORMON On Tuesday, Elder Angus and myself went to the station and saw President Richards off for Liverpool. And then we went, in company of about 25 Saints, to Wellington on the train and then to the mountain 3 miles to the East, taking some dinner with us. At this mountain we had a good meeting, administered to Brother Peel, who was ill, and named this place “Mount Mormon”. JUNE 1853 We then returned home and spent the remainder of the week in Shrewsbury. On Sunday, I preached to the Saints and on Monday I went to the Stafford Conference. I spent the week in visiting the Saints and holding prayer meetings. On Saturday evening I attended a special conference of Elders in Hanley, and on Sunday I went to a camp meeting of the Saints and we had a large congregation of the world to hear us. We had a good time and I think it will result in good. Then I went to Sandbatch and visited the Saints. On Monday I went to Crem and baptized 3. Then I went to Maccelsfield and stayed until Saturday with the Saints. I then went to Burglum and met with Elder Crandeli and spent a few hours with him. (At this point in the Sylvester Henry Earl Missionary Diary there is a two-page writing entitled, “A Song On The Death Of Tabitha Jane Earl, Daughter Of John T. Earl and Ann Rebeck Earl. (She died on 26 Oct 1853.)” As near as it can be deciphered, it reads: A SONG ON THE DEATH OF TABITHA JANE EARL 1 EARTHLY HAPPINESS IS FLEETING, EARTHLY PROSPECTS QUICKLY FADE, PARENTS’ HEARTS WITH PLEASURE BEATING IS TO BITTERNESS BETRAYED. 2 SCENES OF SORROW HAVE DISTRESSED YOU; SCENES THAT FILLED YOUR HEARTS WITH PAIN YET WILL YIELD THE CHOICEST BLESSING IF MOUNT ZION YOU REGAIN. 3 IN THE DARKEST DISPENSATION BROTHER, KNOW THAT GOD IS JUST. ‘TIS THE RICHEST CONSOLATION IN THE PRIESTHOOD POWER TO TRUST. 4 WHILE AFFLICTIONS’ SURGE COMES O’RE YOU, LOOK TO YONDER VALLEY FAR; SEE THE TEMPLE’S SPIRES ARISING HAIL THE PRIESTHOOD’S LOVELY CARE. 5 THOUGH YOUR LOVELY CHILD IS TAKEN; FROM YOUR BOSOM IT WAS TORN; SOON HER SLEEPING DUST WILL WAKEN AND HER SPIRIT WILL RETURN. 6 YES, AGAIN YOU WILL BEHOLD HER FAIRER THAN THE MORNING RAY. ON MOUNT ZION YOU’LL EMBRACE HER WHERE ALL TEARS ARE WIPED AWAY. 7 BROTHER, SISTER, NO MORE WEEPING; NEPHEWS, NIECES, CEASE TO MOURN. KNOW THAT THOSE WHO TRUST IN JESUS SHALL HAVE THEIR BABES WITH THEM. 8 WELCOME PEACE, YOUR CRYING WILL END FOR YOUR CHILD WILL SOON RETURN. IN THE TEMPLE SOON WELL MEET HER WITH JESUS, SAINTS AND ANGELS AGAIN. (It is assumed that Sylvester wrote this poem and sent it to his brother John after learning of Tabitha’s death, and that its location in this portion of his journal is not important. Perhaps this is an indication of Syslvester’s efforts to reactivate John, who had apparently become inactive in the Mormon Church by this time.”) (Continuing on Saturday) TO THE LEICESTER CONFERENCE I went to Shrewsbury and joined with Elder Angus and started to the Leicester Conference. The first day we went to Birmingham and spent a little time with Elder Orson Pratt and then went on to Leicester. We were met by the Saints at the station and were gladly received by them. I spent the most of my time with Elders Smith, Hunt and Mayer, and in conference and councils every night for one week. Then we went to Whitwick and spent the Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, and on Wednesday we returned to Shrewsbury. We found the Saints all well. JULY 1853 A VISIT TO A MONASTERY On Friday, July 1, 1853, while I was at Whitwick, I went in company with Elder Angus, Elder John Hurdley and another Elder to the Monastery to see the Monks. It is a splendid edifice and it contains at this time only 42 Monks. They have menney (many) peculiarities about them, too numerous to mention. Yet they say they must not many nor have wiming (women) about them and eat no flesh. And they have erected a Mount Calvary near the monastery and a cross and the image of the Savior nailed to it. We also went to their temple and saw the image of Our Savior and the wounds in his side, hands and feet. He is in full size and is lying on his back... Just behind him sits the Virgin Mary in full size and in rich apparel and seems to be weeping over him. The two are made of solid marble and were brought from Egypt They cost (it is said) ten thousand pounds. I also visited the cemetery and the monuments in Leicester which gave me much pleasure. AUGUST 1853 While in Birmingham, I went and saw the grave of James Flannagin, and since I returned to Shrewsbury, I have been the most of my time in my room writing until Friday evening. I took a walk in the country past the monuments, and then went to the city and held a prayer meeting. On Saturday I went to Wellington and visited Brother Butler and family. Spent the day with them, then returned home. On Sunday I spoke to the Saints and strangers in our large room. On Monday I returned to the Stafford Conference and helped the Saints to get ready for their conference, which came on the 7th of August (1853). President S. W. Richards and Elder Longforth were with us; also Elder John Angus and Elder John Mayer. On Monday we held a Tea Party and all was conducted in very good order and the Saints and Strangers all enjoyed themselves verry mutch (very much). FRIENDS DEPARTING Friends depart and memory takes them To her caverns pure and deep, And a forced smile only wakes them From the shadows where they sleep. Who can school the heart’s affections? Who can banish its regret? If you blame my deep dejection Teach, oh teach me to forget Lead me not to festive bowers I was with, I sat there last. Weave not for me Spring’s early flowers They’ll remind me of the past. Music seems like mournful wailing In the halls where we have met; Mirth’s joy call is unavailing, Teach, oh teach me to forget One who hopelessly remembers Cannot bear a dimming light. He would rather watch the emblems Of a love that once was right Who can school the heart’s affections? Who can banish its regret? If you blame my deep dejections, Teach, oh teach me to forget By Sylvester Henry Earl in his Missionary Diary Dated shortly after August 7, 1853 38TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION On Monday I went to Shrewsbury with Elder Angus and spent the week until Saturday, and then I went to the Newport Branch. On Sunday at half past 2:00 PM, unexpected in our meeting, a charge was preferred by Alfred Caswell against Robert Timis for adultary (adultery) and was sustained, and he was cut from the Church. I staid (stayed) there until Tuesday, August 16 (1853). This is my birthday and the Saints have made a fine supper for me and have presented me with some presants (presents). The supper was prepared by Sharlota Johnson, an aged lady and a particular friend of mine, for she it was that took cair (care) of me when I was sick. Our company at supper numbered 30. We spent the evening in speaking, drinking toasts and in singing. I remained in Shrewsbury until Sunday the 21st (of August 1853). I went in company with Charles Shaw and Henry Nesbett to Wellington and settled some difficulties that existed between Brother Butler’s family and Sister Ann Caiswell, and then returned to Shrewsbury. I went to the Room and spoke to the people. We had the Room crowded full; good attention was paid. A number of five were baptized during the week. After the meeting I went to Wellington and stayed all night SYLVESTER GOES TO DUBLIN On Monday, the 22nd of August (1853), I started on a visit to Dublin in Ireland. I arrived at Liverpool at 3:00 PM and went to Elder Linforth’s. In the evening I went, in company with Elders Linforth and Jakes, to a Council Meeting during which time Elder Hanson Jenson came in from Copenhagen in Denmark and informed us of the death of Elder Willard Snow. He died on the sea and was buried in it. About the same time, Elder Daniel Cams came in from Germany and Elder Richardson from the West Indies Islands and David Grant of the Liverpool Conference. So I spent the time with them until Saturday at 2:00 PM when I crossed the arm of the sea from Liverpool to Burton Head, and then I took the train one hundred miles along the sea coast (I went through) Willesglassing, the great suspension bridge over an arm of the sea and over those large Grand Bridges that are some of the wonders of the world. Also the ruins of many old castles which now lay in ruins. At 10:00 PM I arrived at Holley Head and got on board of a steamer and started for Dublin, and arrived there at 9:00 A.M. I went and found Elder Gilbert Clemmons and Win. Hays and spent the day with the Saints. I preached tonight and lodged with Elder Clemmons. THE QUEEN’S VISIT TO DUBLIN As it was the time of the Queen’s visit (to Dublin), I went on Monday and saw her, and in the afternoon I spent four hours in the Great Exhibition Hall. Thousands of people were present, many from America. On Tuesday, I visited the large Park and the residence of Lord Leftenant Minheir where the Queen stayed. I returned to Elder Hayes’ in the fog and rain, passing again (where the Royalty was) and saw Prince Albert and their two oldest sons. I visited many of the most prominent buildings and gardens in the city (of Dublin). Then I took the train and went to Eingstown. Paid a short visit. Eingstown is a handsome seaport town. I then returned to Dublin and at 10:00 PM I went on board the vessel and started for home. We had a pleasant voyage, but in the knight (night) we came near running against another vessel. I arrived at home at 10:00 the next evening - all well. I spent the remainder of the week visiting the Saints and on Sunday I spoke to the Saints and many Strangers. On Monday I went with Brother Angus and visited the Saints. In the evening we held our Council and ordained Charles Shaw to the office of an Elder and appointed him to labor in the vineyard. SEPTEMBER 1853 On Thursday, the 6th of September (1853), I returned to the Stafford Conference and visited the Saints (who were) generally well. I settled some difficulties in which Elder Shettleworth was cut from the Church for adultary (adultery), and on the 24th I returned to Shrewsbury. On the 25th we held our Quarterly Conference. The reports were very good from all parts of the Conference. On Monday we held a Tea Party, which also passed off well. Much good instruction was given and many joined with us. I spent the time until Saturday visiting the Saints and then I went with Bro. Angus to Newport. On Sunday we held a meeting and we had a good time. On Monday I started and went to the Stafford Conference. This evening we had a Tea Meeting in the City of Maccelsfield. All went on well. Several were baptized this week. I spent the week in visiting the Saints and some of the world who wished to hear me talk on the Gospel. OCTOBER 1853 On Sunday I spoke to a crowded congregation; a good spirit prevailed. On Monday evening we held Council. Brother Westwood was present. I then went with Bro. Crandell around the Conference visiting the small branches and comforting the hearts of the Saints until October 7th (1853). I returned to the Shropshire Conference. Elder Crandell also went with me and we joined in a Tea Meeting at Marketraton where menny Strangers came. We had the privaledge (privilege) of preaching the Gospel to them and I think it will result in good. On Tuesday I went to Shrewsbury in company with the following Elders: Angus, Crandeli and Nesbitt. I spent the week in Councils, Prayer Meetings and visiting the Saints until Saturday the 22nd (of October 1853). Elder Angus and myself went to the Lightmoon Green Branch. We spent the Sabbath with them. They are all in good spirits. We were sent for to see a little child that we had administered to on a previous visit. It (the child) is well. The parents say that they know it was healed by the power of God. This we can testify to. On Monday we returned to Shrewbury (where) all was well. I then composed the following song in Spirit: We feel the power, We are resurrected receiving immortality We passed the scourge of mobs and tyrants Eternally we shall be free. Chorus For we are the sons of God celestial And daughters, too, that are made free. Gods and Goddesses in His glory Reign through all eternity. Heaven’s broad day bath o’er me broken Far above earth’s span of sky And the dead may by this token Know that we have ceased to die. Now we soar amid the heavens, Passing on from world to world. Swifter than electric lightning To our view they were unfurled. As we passed the world called Venus A mighty Angel then did say “As you’re on your way returning, Will you spend one day with me?” Unto this the Angel Gabriel, Who was passing by with me, Turned and said, “We cannot tarry, Soon we will at Kolob be.” Then the Angel that talked with us Sprang from Venus, clasped my hand, Asked if we would pass Hercules That he might call and see a friend. Unto this we soon consented Although we had no time to stay, Passing by the Gods and Angels Who are set to guard the way. As we came to Kolob’s borders Another Angel then did cry “Have you got the signs and tokens?” Which we gave without delay. Then we heard the voice of Father Say “Welcome Children; Pleasant Day. Do you like Celestial Glory? Would you like with us to stay?” “Yes” we exclaimed, all united, “We would like with you to stay. But, we’ve left our wives and children On the earth that’s faraway.” Then exclaimed Michael-Adam “Come my sons and go with me. See the worlds that are Celestial; Like one of these our earth shall be.” “And all my children who were willing Celestial laws for to obey Shall be redeemed from pollution And in my presence they shall be.” “Our earth under Celestial curtain And all the Saints upon it be Gods and Goddesses in perfection Shall reign to all eternity.” On Tuesday the 25th of October (1853), I spent the day in writing the Saints and administering to the sick. On Thursday I went in company with Elder I. 0. Angus to the Stanley (?) Branch. It rained very hard and we got very wet. We took a cold but were nurrished (nourished) by the Saints and soon recovered. We spent two days with them and returned by coach to Shrewsbury on Saturday (to find) all well. On Sunday, the 30th of October, we held our meeting as usual and were mutch annoyed by the mobs. The city is in a wonderful uproar, but the Lord is our God and he will save us and exalt us in his kingdom; therefore, we fear no danger. On Monday, the 31st of October (1853), 1 bid the Saints farewell and started to the Stafford Conference, traveling by train to Newport. I spent the afternoon with the Saints a stayed all night with John Bate. NOVEMBER 1853 On the first of November, I took the train to Gnagel and visited the Saints. I confirmed Sister Lewis and blessed her and then blessed Brother Hall who was sick. I then went to Brother John Thomases and stayed all night. I spent the evening in conversation with two gentlemen who said they believed the Doctrine to be true. One said he would be baptized. On Wednesday, the 2nd of November (1853), I went to the Little Heath Branch and preached at Elder Gillums, (where) we had a good meeting. On Thursday the 3rd I took the train to the Potteries and spent the time in visiting the Saints until Saturday, the fifth, when I again entered into Council on the case of Elders Hughes and Hargraves. We investigated the case and settled it. QUARTERLY CONFERENCE On Sunday I preached at Hanley and on Monday I went to Sandbatch and preached at the Room to the Saints. We had a good meeting. I then went to Middlemutch and from thence to Laytock to Elder John Taylor’s. Stayed until Saturday evening and then went to Maccelsfield to attend our Quarterly Conference. We held our Council on Saturday evening. Sunday morning, November 18, 1853, at half past 10 AM we commenced our Conference and we had much business on hand such as finances of the conference, the changing of the officers and the releasing of those that have to go to the Land of Zion this coming season. Among these are Joseph Westwood, his wife and two children. Also George Simpson and family. Much good instruction was given and the conference closed at 10 PM. EARL & CRANDELL REBAPTIZE EACH OTHER On Monday we had a farewell party (where there was) much good preaching, recitations and singing. The meeting was both opened and closed by prayer. On Tuesday (November 20) evening we had our fellowship meeting. On this day Spicer W. Crandell and myself were rebaptized by each other and reconfirmed by each other. I then anointed and blessed him for the restoration of his health. Our meeting was closed by Samuel Herron. I then spent the remainder of the week in visiting the Saints to find who could go to the Land of Zion. The Saints are in good spirits. On Sunday (November 25) we had a good meeting. Many Strangers were present and they paid good attention (to what was said and done). On Monday evening we held an Open Council to lay before the Saints all the affairs of the Branch. On Tuesday the 22nd (November 1853) I went to the Potteries and visited the Saints in that part and preached three times in the course of the week. I also held an Open Council in the Hanley Room to lay before them the affairs of the Branch and to see about getting means to send Elder Westwood to Zion. On Sunday the 27th (November 1853), I went on the train to Maccelsfield and held our meeting at half past 2:00 PM. I heard the testimonies of the Saints and then at 6:00 PM I preached in the chapel to a large congregation - all in good spirits. On Monday (November 28, 1853) we held an Open Council and took into consideration (the proposal for) a Tea Party for the 2nd of January 1854. I appointed a comity (committee) of nine to oversee the same. I spent the balance of the week in visiting the Saints of the Conference, and on Saturday I went to Shrewsbury. Here the Saints are much annoyed with a Male party who came to the Room to disturb the meeting. DECEMBER 1853 On Sunday, the 4th of December (1853), I and Elder John Mayer spoke to the people who gave very good attention - and all is going well. Elder John Mayer is appointed to succeed Elder Angus in the presidency of the Conference. RAISING MONEY TO SEND ANGUS TO ZION On Monday, (December 5 1853), we held a Council in Shrewsbury and entered into some arrangements for our conference to be held in Shrewsbury for the Shropshire Conference. I then started, in company with Elders Angus and Mayer, to visit the Saints in the Branches and to raise money to send Elder Angus to Zion. This day we went to Juksays and found them in good spirits. On the day following, we went to Newport (where we) left Elder Mayer and pursued our journey to Gnagel. Visited the Saints and instructed them in their emigration affairs. On Thursday the 8th (of December 1853) we returned to Newport and then to Marketraytown and held a meeting and collected some money for the emigration of Elder Angus. While here we received a note from Elder Nesbitt stating that the Male has come on Wednesday night and interrupted their meeting and whipt (whipped) one of the Brethren very hard. On receiving this (note), I sent Elder Mayer back to take charge of them, and on Saturday the 10th (December 1853) we went to the Lightmoor Green Branch and preached to them. We raised 7 pounds for Elder Angus, and on Monday the 12th (of December 1853) we returned to Shrewsbury.. We held our Council at night The Saints are in good spirits. TROUBLE WITH “THE MALE” On the Wednesday following (December 14, 1853), I went in company with Elder Mayer to the Ashterly Branch and held our meeting on Thursday night. Elder Mayer returned to Shrewsbury and Elder Angus came to me and reported that the Male was more hostile on Wednesday evening. We held a meeting again on Sunday and the Saints were in good spirits and wishing to emigrate. On Friday we returned to Shrewbury and found the Saints in much trouble, the Male having disturbed their peace of mind and also hurt some of them. Bro. Thos. Williams has prosecuted one of them but has not got justice, and this is as much as we can expect of them (their justice system). On Saturday, December 24 (1853), we held our Council to prepare for the Conference on the following day. On Sunday, December 25 (Christmas Day), we held our Conference. All went on in good order. We held our Tea Party on Monday, but the Male came and broke it up, but not without a good deal of trouble. On Monday evening we held our Council and all the Priesthood were in good spirits. On Tuesday I went to the Potteries and met with Bro. Denal and Bro. Crandell. JANUARY 1854 Here I spent the Sabbath, being New Years Day (January 1, 1854). On Monday I went to Maccelsfield to a great Party. Also on Tuesday evening Elders Angus and Hunt were with us. On Wednesday a heavy snowstorm came, the heaviest ever known (here) for 30 years. It covered up the many railway carriages and blocked all of the highways. On Friday, I went with the Brethren, Elders Demel, Crandell, Angus and Hunt, to the Potteries. On Sunday I went to Maccelsfield again and preached in the Hall; confirmed two. All in good spirits. I started preparing the Saints for the Valley (Zion), that are going this turn, until Wednesday. Then I returned to Burglum and then to Sandbatch and met with Elders Daniel and Bond. A good meeting was held at night, and on Friday I went to Crem and opened a large Hall. I preached on the First Principles of the Gospel to a large and respectable congregation. I made arrangements for delivering 12 lectures in the said Room. TO LIVERPOOL TO SEE THE SAINTS OFF On the day following I and Elder I. Bond went to the Potteries, and on Sunday the 15th (January 1854), I went to Maccelsfield and preached in the Room to the Saints and many Strangers. I stayed and visited the Saints. On Sunday the 22nd (January 1854) I went to Bury and preached in Tunstell in the Room, and in Handley in the evening. On Monday (23rd) I went to Crem and stayed two days. From thence I went to Draton and preached. On Friday (27th) to Newport and on Saturday (28th) to Shrewsbury. I took very sick and on Monday (30th) I started on the train to Liverpool to see the Saints start to Zion. In the evening (January 30,1854) I wrote down these lines: TO BE LONG REMEMBERED Will you go along with me, Bonnie Lassie 0? Far away across the Sea, Bonnie Lassie 0? O’er the ocean deep and wide Never fearing wind or tide I should love thee by my side, Bonnie Lassie 0. Yonder temples rearing high, Bonnie Lassie 0. With its turrets in the sky, Bonnie Lassie 0. And our God has said he’d bless It with hearts of humbleness We will to its porches press, Bonnie Lassie 0. Nay the journ’s not so hard, Bonnie Lassie 0. If thy will does not retard, Bonnie Lassie 0. All thy weaknesses I’ll bear, Bonnie Lassie 0. BY THE TWO LOVERS: We have here our friends and home, Bonnie Laddie 0. And why seekest thou to roam, Bonnie Laddie 0? Does thy country thee not please Or do sorrows vex and tease? That sits not thy heart at ease, Bonnie Laddie 0? But the Journey’s long and drear, Bonnie Laddie 0. And my heart is full of fear, Bonnie Laddie 0. With the passage o’re the plain Midst both frost and snow and rain I should perish with the pain, Bonnie Laddie 0. Oh then must I leave my home, Bonnie Laddie 0? And like Abraham’s Sarah roam, Bonnie Laddie 0? From my mother’s tender arms? For I love thee ever dear And so banish all thy fear, Bonnie Lassie 0. Yes, but here we have no home, Bonnie Lassie 0. Nor a stone to call our own, Bonnie Lassie 0. But in yonder valley free There’s a home for you and me So I pray thee go and see, Bonnie Lassie 0. Leave my country with its charms, Bonnie Laddie 0? There to buffet unknown harms, Bonnie Laddie 0? Near together we have lived, Thou hast never me deceived, And I”ll never with thee part But I’ll go with all my heart So prepare to make a start, Bonnie Laddie 0. BOTH Then together we will go, Lad and Lassie 0. Since our God commands it so, Lad and Lassie 0, As we bow ourselves to pray May He help us on the way, Lad and Lassie 0. VISITS SAINTS ON THE “GOLCONDA” I went to a suorea (soiree) in the Large Room, and Tuesday (January 31, 1854) I went and visited the Saints on board the GOLCONDA. Brother Hall was sick. I then did some business at the (Mission) office with President S. W. Richards and with Bro. Linforth. I stayed with Spicer W. Crandell. (Note by Ken Earl: When I read this poem and contemplated Sylvester’s November 1855 marriage to Margaret Emily Jones shortly after his return from England, I surmised that she was a passenger on the GOLCONDA. Though during later research I found a passenger by that name, the age given for that person did not match the much younger age of Margaret. I intend to ask Grandpa Sylvester about all this when we meet but if you get there first, you ask him. So far, we have been unable to learn when she emigrated from England or on what ship she was a passenger.) FEBRUARY 1854 February 1st (1854) I went again to the vessel (GOLCONI)A) and bid a sorry farewell to the Saints and then returned by way of Manchester. I stayed over night at Stockport with Brother Dunn and from thence to Maccelsfield. Met with Bro. Demel and held our Meeting on Sunday. The Saints are all in good spirits. On Monday evening we held our Council and all is well. The work is prospering in this city. VISITS MORE BRANCHES On Tuesday the 7th of February (1854), three were baptized and were confirmed in the evening at a testimony meeting where we enjoyed much of the Spirit of the Lord. On Wednesday I went to the Lostoc Branch on the coach and I preached on Thursday evening. The Saints are in good spirits although the work is not prospering in this part. On Friday I went to Middlewitch. Here the Saints are nearly all sick. On Saturday I went to Sandbatch and met in Council. The report is rather unfavorable. Two more were cut from the Church and several more Sisters (were called before) the Council to answer to the charges made against them. On Sunday, February the 12th (1854), I preached in Sandbatch at half past 2:00 PM and then I started, in company of 10 of the Saints, to Crem, a distance of six miles on foot, expecting to hear Elder J. Bond deliver a lecture on the necessity of present revelation, but as he did not come, I had to speak on the subject. I enjoyed the Spirit of the Lord and the people were very quiet, and the present prospect is that we shall do good here. On Monday I went to the Potteries and met with Bro. Demel; spent two days visiting the Saints. On Thursday, the 16th (of February 1854), I went to Maccelsfield and spent the evening with the Saints in the Room in speaking dialogues and reciting pieces. My health is very poor. I have just received a letter from Bro. Comard in Shrewsbury stating that Bro. Mayer is very sick. But on receiving another letter from him, he was on the mend. On Sunday, February 26, he came to our Conference in Maccelsfield where Elder Demel presides. The Conference went on in good order, and all is peaceful as a general thing. We have entered into measures to pay off the debts and also establish an Elders Fund so as to take care of the traveling Elders, and also to pay off the Book debts at Liverpool. MARCH 1854 I remained in Maccelsfield strengthening the Saints until Saturday. I then went to Burglum in company with Elder Bond, Elder Demel having gone before to prepare to hold a District Council. On Sunday, the 5th of March (1854), we held an Open Council, commencing at 10:00 in the morning, and laid before them the most important business of the conference and took their sanction on the same. Removed Elder Hargraves from the presidency of the Handley Branch and put Elder Moses Mollet in his stead. Appointed Elders Simpson and White to preach to the higher class and Elder Robert Hughes to preach to the Welch people from the Potteries.Also much other business and closed at ten in the evening - all in good spirits. I spent the week in the Potteries (where I) attended two weddings, one by Bro. MolIet and wife and the other by Elder Simpson and partner. On Saturday I went to (the) Sandbatch District, having sent Elder Demel to call a District Meeting. On Sunday the 12th (of March 1854) in the town of Middlewitch we commenced at half past 10:00 AM, and again at 2:00 PM, and again in the evening. We laid before them the present business of the Conference. Much was said about the Conference funds and also the means to get the Conference out of debt. In the evening, John Taylor preached on the divine mission of Joseph Smith and was followed by Elder Demel. The meeting closed by singing and prayer. On Monday, the 20th (of March 1854), Elder Demel and I went to the Harthil Branch and stayed (at the home of) Joseph Steel where all were in good health. On Wednesday the 22nd we went to Coxbank and found Henry Billington in poor state of health. Here I left Elder Demel and went to Market Drayton in the Shropshire Conference and preached to the Saints. The Saints are in good spirits and the place is all alive about the Saints going to the Land of Zion. I stayed with Brother Win. Haywood over night And on Friday I went and visited the Saints and stayed over night with Win. Haywood again. Brother (John) Taylor also stayed with me. I then returned to Coxbank and held a meeting on Sunday (March 26, 1854) and at night I went to Market Drayton and held a meeting again. From there to Shrewsbury and found the Saints in good spirits, although some are sick and the Male party is much quieter, and the Saints are on the mend. Back on Monday, (March 20, 1854), I received a letter from Samuel Horrocks and wife, who had left Maccelsfield to go to Zion, and were in Liverpool. (The letter) stated that they had lost their little baby who died in her arms while walking the streets. Supposed to have been wrapped too warm and smothered. I felt to mourn much and do still, but I must submit to the arm of Omnipotence and say the Lord knows best. I spent the balance of the week (from March 26, 1854) with the Saints in Shrewsbury. We had a good meeting at Sister Lloyd’s on Wednesday evening. APRIL 1854 On Sunday, the 2nd of April (1854), we held our Quarterly Conference, and, on account of the Male, we were obliged to hold it in a small Room and do but little business. Some few were ordained to the Priesthood. Elder Mayer and Elder Taylor are faithful, and the work is beginning to revive throughout the Conference. TO BIRMINGHAM I visited some of the small branches, and on Friday, the 7th of April, I went to Birmingham and visited Elder Israel Barlow. I stayed all night and then went to the Worcester Conference and spent four days with Noah T. Guyman. We had a good time and went tolerable well. Elder France was also with us. On Monday we went and took a view of the City and at the Cathedral that had been built seven hundred years ago by the Catholics, and was taken from them by Cromwell, the mighty waryer (warrior) against King Charles the First, and he changed the government to that of a Republic. But it was retaken by King Charles the 2nd. It is a very grand building. On the inside (are) many tooms (tombs) and monuments, all made of solid marble. It is a fine edifice. A VISIT TO MORRIN HILLS On Monday we held a meeting at the Chapel. Elder France and myself spoke to the Saints. On Tuesday Elder France of the Cheltenham Conference, and Elder Hall of the Birmingham Conference, returned to their fields of labor. Then Elder Guzman, myself and Sister Harris, and some more of the Saints, took coach and went to the Morrin Hills. (We) went all over them, inspected St. Ann’s Well, and I thought it looked more like the mountains and valleys at home than any place that I have ever seen. The scenery is beautiful. We held a meeting at Brother Turner’s and returned home to Worcester the same knight (night) much fatigued. The next day I spent in mostly writing and visiting the Saints. On Thursday I returned home by the way of Birmingham. While walking through the streets of Birmingham, a young man dropped dead in the street a few rods before me, which is quite common. I looked at him and at the people around him, and I thought, “Oh, vain mortals, how unconcerned you go down the broad road to destruction.” On Friday, April 14 (1854), I was in Shrewbury and the Saints are in good spirits. I preached at night. Saturday I went to Stoke and stayed with Bro. Lavery and visited the Saints in Longton where I administered to the sick. On Sunday (the 16th) I preached in Hanley. The Saints there are in good spirits. I then went to Maccelsfield to a party on Monday evening and visited several that are not in the Church in company with Brothers Demel and B. Brown. On Thursday evening I called a Private Council and set the Priesthood in good order. The remainder of the week was spent in visiting the Saints. On Sunday, April 23, 1854, I spent the morning in the Room (where we held) Sunday School. At 2:00 PM we held Sacrament Meeting and then I spoak (spoke) in the evening. All in good spirits and two were baptized. On Wednesday, April 26 (1854), this being a day set apart by the Queen for to fast and pray for the cessation of the War between Russia and Turkey, I felt to fast and pray for the progress of the work of the Almighty, as I called on the Saints to meet at 7:00 AM and take a walk, which they done (did) in splendid order. I then retired to the Room where we had a good meeting and five Strangers wished to be baptized, along with 20 of the Saints (who wished) to be rebaptized. We attended to this and then in the evening we had a good meeting, speaking in Tungs (Tongues), prophesying and so on. We confirmed (those who had been baptized) and reconfirmed those that were rebaptized. Thus ended the pleasant day’s labor on Wednesday in perfect piece (peace) and harmony. On Thursday I took (the) train to Burglum and met Bro. Demel. We visited and administered to Old Shuffelbattim, who was verry (very) sick. Friday evening, April 28 (1854) I called a Private Council and took into consideration when and where to hold our next Conference, and also to inquire into the course of conduct of Elder Bond, who said he would try to do just right in all things for the future. On Sunday, April 30 (1854), I held another Council in the Hanley Room and done much business for the District. I appointed a committee to hire a Room to hold our Conference in. Elder Bond’s case was mentioned and he was suspended. He made his confession and I told him to be rebaptized, and he said he would. I preached in Tunstell at night. MAY 1854 On Monday, being May 1 (1854), I went to see the ordinance of baptism attended to by Elder Pool. Two new members and 20 rebaptisms - all in good spirits. On Tuesday I went to Crem and stayed with the Saints until Thursday. Then I went to Sandbatch and held a meeting in the evening. On Friday I went, in company with Elder Bond, to Lanton and preached out of doors. On Saturday (Saturday) we went to Maccelsfield where I preached on the Green and in the Room at night. A good spirit prevailed. On Monday evening we held a Council Meeting cut three from the Church. (We also) done considerable busness (business). Tuesday evening I preached in the Room and red (read) the sircular (circular) sent me by President Richards. On Wednesday I went to Lantona and preached. On Thursday to Hanley and held a Fellowship Meeting. On Friday I went to the Stafford Branch and found them all well. Saturday I spent in writing, and on Sunday, the 14th (of May 1854), I preached. Some Strangers attended and when asked how they liked it, they replied, “Very well,” and said they would come again. On Monday (May 15, 1854) I went to the Gnocel Branch and found them all in good spirits. (I then) went to Newsport and visited until Wednesday, and then went to Shrewsbury and preached at night. I spent the time until Saturday in visiting the Saints and strengthening them. Saturday evening we spent at the Funeral (viewing?) of Sister Manford, who had died. On Sunday, May 21, 1854, I met at 10:00 AM with the Saints and we had a good meeting. In the evening I preached the Funeral of Sister Manford. Monday evening I spent in Council. SYLVESTER ENCOUNTERS PROBLEMS On Tuesday I went to Wellington. On Wednesday to Hinksais and on Thursday to Newport. Here I learned that Elder Alfred Caswell had been guilty of adultery. I left the matter (with) Brother Mayer to settle and went to Market Drayton and there found Elder Tyler who gave me to understand that Sister Haywood and Bro. Oliver Welch were guilty of unlawful connection and she is in the family way. On Sunday, May 28 (1854), I called an Open Council and presented the case of Mary Haywood. She said she was guilty of fornication with Elder Oliver Welch and was not worthy to be called a Saint. She was then severed from the Church. Concerning 0. Welch, (he) having removed to the Birmingham Conference, I then sent the particulars to Pastor I. Barlow so that he might have him tried. Brother Tyler and myself then visited the Cortank and Heart Hill Branches and found all well. From thence to Crem and then stayed over night. From there to Sandbatch where we held a meeting. All was well there. I then wrote the following song: FARE THEE WELL TO ZION BOUND 1 Mingled thoughts of grief and gladness Highly in our bosoms swell Lastly joys resign to sadness When we bid our friends farewell True affection pleads with duty To prolong thy stay awhile. Thy well-known worth in all its beauty Defies a cheerful fare thee well. 2 Homely ties for long both bound us; We all were friends, what ‘ere befell. When ills on ills did gather round us We n’er bade the other fare thee well. Nor when seas and lands us sever, And in other climes you dwell, A lesser love we’ll harbor never Than what we bear at thy farewell. 3 And while thy homes the restless billow Our humble horizons shall tell, Heaven’s guards shall tend thy pillows And never bid our friends farewell. So then go andpeace attend thee, Against our fate we’ll not rebell. To Heaven’s care we now commend thee, Fare thee well, dear friends, farewell. 4 O’er scorching sands and towering mountains May Angels guide thy peaceful way And land thee safe in Salt Lake Valley There dwell in peace, we’ll follow thee. The Temple’s spires in splendor rising To welcome Strangers to the hale There for the dead we’ll be baptized Eternal lives we then shall gain. JUNE 1854 We then went to the Potteries and on Sunday we held our Quarterly Conference in a large Hall rented for that purpose. We done (handled) the bisness (business) in the fore part of the AM and spent the night preaching. All went off well and on Monday, June 5 (1854) we held a social party. I stayed and visited the Saints until Thursday when I received a letter from President S. W. Richards stating that Elder Win. Young was to labor under my direction and James Bond was to go to the Nottingham Conference. Bro. Young came the same day to me and I appointed him to labor under Elder Otto Demel. ELDER OLIVER WELCH On Friday Elder Tyler and I went to Maccelsfield and found many of the Saints sick. Elder James Bond came to us on the following day and we spent the Sabbath (together). Two came forward to be baptized. On Monday evening we held our Council. Ann Berriford was cut off for general bad conduct. It was a good meeting. On Tuesday evening we also had a good meeting, and on Wednesday we went to Cosbank and found the Saints all well. On Thursday (we went) to Drayton and held a Council in Hatton. We tried the case of Oliver Welch for fornication with Mary Haywood, in which he was cutoff (from the Church). I then went to Shrewsbury with Elders Tyler and Bond and found Elder Mayer and the Saints in good spirits. TO ATTEND CONFERENCE IN LONDON I here (in Shrewsbury) received a letter from Brother F. David and Pres. S. W. Richards (of the British Isles Mission) to attend a General Conference at London. On Sunday the 18th (of June 1854), we held our own General Conference in the large Cheese Hall (in Shrewsbury). At our Conference, the Branches were represented in general good standing, except the Newport Branch. A. Carswell, (its) President, was suspended and Bro. Hudson put in his place. The Little Heath Branch was received into this Conference. The authonties (of the Church) were sustained by a unanimous vote. (There was) no trouble from our enemies. On Monday we had a good Tea Party, excellent singing and reciting. Also another (Tea Party) on Wednesday evening with very good attention from our strong company. All went off well and we thanked God for it. I spent my time in visiting the Saints until Saturday, the 24th (of June 1854). TO LONDON FOR GENERAL CONFERENCE Started on the train for London (on Saturday, June 24, 1854). EIder Mayer is poorly at this time and is going with me. I feel in good spirits all the time. We started in the morning and arrived in London at 3:00 in the afternoon and attended Council at night. We stayed over night at Samuel Read’s, 2 Hawthorn Dean Place, Westindia near Lime House, London. They were very kind to me and I have to say that I never wish to be treated better. On Sunday (June 25) I attended the London Conference and it was a glorious time, being favored with Franklin D. Richards, one of the Twelve (Apostles), S. W. Richards, President of the British Isles Mission and his Counselor, Daniel Spencer, as well as the Pastors and Presidents of the Conferences. On Monday (June 26) we met at 10:00 AM, according to appointment, for (a continuation of) our General Conference. We spent the day in hearing the representatives of conferences, all generally in good standing. Much good teaching (was received) from the Presidency. On Tuesday, about the same. On Wednesday (June 28) we heard speeches from many of the Brethren, and at evening we partook of the Lord’s Supper. On Thursday (June 29) I was poorly, but I went to the party that evening (anyway)! On Friday (June 30) I visited the House of Lords, also the Westminster Abbey, and also I went to the Bazaar and Pantheon, which were filled with all of the costliest articles in the world, with all manner of costly paintings, gardens and birds of all kinds all most beautiful. JULY 1854 SYLVESTER PREACHES IN LONDON On Sunday (July 2, 1854)1 preached at the Lime House Branch (in London), a most popular branch, and found a good spirit among the Saints. One Priest’s name is Hull, the other Cotrell (Not sure what he’s referring to). TO THE TOWER OF LONDON On Monday (July 3) I went with Brother Brown to the Tower of London, taking our guard with us. We crossed a deep ravine on a bridge. This ravine can be filled with water 20 feet deep all around the Tower. We then went to the inside (of the Tower) and saw the ancient Kings and Nobles on horseback in full stature, some with gold, some with silver, and some steel armor. Some as ancient as 3,000 years old. We saw King Edward and the King Jameses, from the first to the 8th; then all manner of implements of war of all nations. We saw the crowns of the Kings and Queens, the gold staff of King Edward weighing 14 pounds, and the golden seplers with many golden dishes. The cost of all is 3 1/2 million pounds. We went also the place of erecting the gallows on which the noted Anne Bolyne, Sr. Walter Raleigh, and others were slain. We saw the execution block and instruments of torturing a prisoner. TO SAINT PAUL’S CHURCH AND OTHER NOTABLE PLACES (We then went) to St. Paul’s Church. This is one of the most splendid of all buildings in the world. Then to Thames Tunnel. This runs under the river 3/4ths of a mile, dug through and arched, very strong (with) plenty of music within going by steam and many shops to sell boz (booze) and jewelry, as well as cutlery. We then visited the Cattle Market and saw 2,000 head (of cattle), also 3,550 sheep. This is a grand sight to see. We then went to the British Museum where we saw all manner of species of Beasts...and Sea Fowls and creeping things, as well as all minerals, ancient engravings and images of ancient date. I consider this worthy of the attention of the Noble of the earth. While here we met with Sister Rede and Sister Elizabeth Hunter. While on our way home, Sister Rede got three of her ribs broken being crushed with a wagon, and she is very ill. I am very weary with my day’s labor and must retire. TO THE CRYSTAL PALACE On Tuesday, the 4th of July (1854), I went, in company with Benjamin Brown and Read, to the Crystal Palace. This is one of the wonders of the world, being built wholly of iron and glass, (and is) transparent. The whole length is 3,476 feet (and) the beauty (of it is) in proportion. It is filled with all the varieties of the world. BACK TO SHREWSBURY On Wednesday at 6:00 AM, I left London and got to Shrewsbury at 8:00 PM, and found the Saints in Good spirits. On Thursday I am writing to my brother John Earl in the United States. Friday, I visited the Saints in Wellington, all well; and on Saturday I went to the Potteries. I spent Sunday (July 9) in Handley and on Monday evening Elder Spencer came to see me and we had a Council Meeting, and Robert Hughes was cut off from the Church. This he had deserved for some time. On Tuesday (July 11), Elders Spencer and Otto Demel accompanied me to Maccelsfield where we had a good meeting in the evening, and also on Wednesday evening. On Thursday I baptized five and rebaptized 14, and Elder Spencer left me and started for Scotland. Friday I am writing to Liverpool on business relative to the stock in the hands of the Book Agent. On Sunday, July 16(1854), I preached twice in the open air with good attendance. The Sunday School is in good order. Elder Demel spoke at the Room at night, and again the spirit prevailed with a fieu (few) exceptions. Monday I spent in visiting the Saints. Tuesday evening I preached in the Room to a large and attentive congregation. One was confirmed (and) a good spirit prevailed. On Wednesday I went to the Lostoc District in a coach and preached at Bro. J. Taylor’s at night. The Saints boar (bore) testamony (testimony) to the truth of the Gosple (Gospel). I spent the remainder of the week with them. SYLVESTER CHALLENGED BY FORMER ELDER HUGHES On Sunday, July 23 (1854), I went and preached at Cranage and then I went to Middlewitch and met with Bro. Demel and stayed over night. From here (I went) to Sostoc and again took Bro. Demel with me. I left him here to attend a meeting. I took a coach and went to Maccelsfield and met Bro. Cyrus Whitlock. He is to help me a few days. Elder (Robert) Hughes, he that was cut off from the Church, has just published a challenge to meet me and he will prove Mormonism false. This publication is in the Staffordshire Signal, but he (Hughes) is a very wicked man and beneath my notice; so I don’t feel to have anything to do with him in this matter. On Wednesday, July 26 (1854), I preached in Lawton; Thursday in Sandbatch, and then returned to Maccelsfield for Sunday, where I met with Bro. Whelock and held a camp meeting in the city. (We had) good attendance. In the evening at the Room, a very good feeling prevailed. Monday evening at Council, and Tuesday evening preaching at the Room again. Four came to be baptized. AUGUST 1854 SAMUEL AND HANNAH TAYLOR DIE - SYLVESTER SPEAKS On Wednesday, (August 2, 1854) Elder Whelock baptized those (four) and rebaptized 12. This evening a letter came from Samuel Horrocks and John Taylor stating (telling of) the death of Samuel Taylor and Hannah, his sister. Thursday, August 3, 1854, I sent Elder Whelock to Sandbatch and I went to comfort those relatives of the deceased. On Friday Elders Demel and Young came to me in very good spirits. Saturday (the 5th of August 1854) Elder Demel leaves for Cranage to attend a camp meeting. Brother Young stays with me. He attended the outdoor preaching and I went to the school. In the afternoon we had Sacrament Meeting at the Room and a good spirit prevailed. We have just received the request that I should preach the funeral (services) of Samuel and Hannah Taylor. This I done (did) in my weakness. In the evening (on Monday, August 7) I attended Council. On Tuesday, Elder Whelock came to me (and he was) sick. On Wednesday I and Elder Young went to the Potteries to a Tea Party at Barley Hedge. The Saints were very wild and ungovernable. I spent the remainder of the week visiting the Saints and found the Longton Saints in a deplorable condisheon (condition) having lost all confidence in their President, Win. Creswell, whom I removed and placed Elder Hargraves (to preside). Elder Crandall has just come on a visit and he attended the meeting with me in Handley (following the Longton meeting). On Monday (August 14) Elder Crandell and I went to Maccelsfield where I stayed, visiting the Saints and those that were believing the Gospel. Elder Crandell returned to Liverpool. Elder Whelock visits the Potteries. Sunday, August 20 (1854), Elder B. Brown is with me and I have just baptized a young lady - all in good spirits. The Brethren are preaching in the street and doing much good. The work is in a good and prosperous condition. On the 23rd (August 1854), I went with Bro. Whelock to the Manchester Conference on a visit and spent several days. Elder Whelock goes to Liverpool and I returned home. On Thursday I wrote for Elder Demel to come to me. On Sunday, the 27th (of August 1854), he came and gave me a report of his labors. I spent Sunday with pleasure in speaking to the Saints and Strangers. SEPTEMBER 1854 On Friday, September 1st (1854), I held a Private Council with Elders Whelock and Demel, in which we decided to hold a General Open Council in the Potteries. I then traveled through the Lostoc and Sandbatch Districts and found times good with the Saints. All are well with plenty of opposition from the enemies of truth. On Friday, September 8, I got to the Potteries. On Saturday, September 9, 1854, Elder Joseph Taylor came to me, as I had selected him to labor in the vineyard (there). We spent the day in writing. On Sunday (September 10, 1854) we held our Open Council in which we spent (the time) in speaking on different subjects. At night Elder Whelock spoke on the rise and progress of the Church - but little opposition. We then blessed (the people) and Bro. Taylor closed (the meeting). TO LIVERPOOL AND BACK I then went to Shrewsbury and visited the Saints threw (throughout) the conference. On Sunday (September 17, 1854) I went to the Liverpool Conference and spent several days with Brothers Fulmer, F. Richards, Spicer Crandell, G. Riser Stevens and Grant. On the 24th I held our Quarterly Conference in Shrewsbury when we were again interrupted by the Male, but by the assistance of the police, we were enabled to keep them quiet. The police, however, had to come into the Hall and quell them. Elder N. T. Guzman was with us on that occasion. On the 28th (of September 1854) Elder Mayer and myself went to the Staffordshire Conference, which was held in Maccelsfield. OCTOBER 1854 On the 1st of October (1854), Elder Joseph Young was with us. On Monday the 2nd we had a Tea Party and all went off in good order. Elders James Flint and Able Shufflebottum were cut off from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints during the conference. Elder Flint was cut off for using the Church money and not repaying it again according to promise, and Shuffelbottum for much wicked conduct. On Thursday the 5th (of October 1854), I held a General Open Council in Hanley and there I presented the affairs of the Conference, when Elder Pool manifested a bad spirit (during the Council), but I and my Brethren kept it down. During the conference we also blessed Elder Brown, President of the Potteries District, and also Elders Win. Hargraves and Tho. Williams, to assist him (Elder Brown) in getting all things moving on well. On the morning of the 6th (October 1854), I went in surch (search) of a chappel (chapel) and found one to be let, if all is well, next week. On Saturday, the 9th, I took the train to Stafford and then walked to Little Heath to a Tea Party. My health is but middling. We had a good time at the party. I then went to Shrewbury and visited all the small branches. The work is mooving (moving) on lively. Elders Tyler and Shaw are doing well. On October 21, I took the Magistrates Hall in the City at Stoke to hoald (hold) our meetings in for the turin (term) of one year. It is a fine hall. On Sunday, October 22nd, I opened the Hall, joined the Longton and Hanley Branches together and called it the Stoke Branch. I appointed Elder Hargraves President of the same. Elder Whelock is appointed to labor in the London Conference, and has now gone to his new field of labor. NOVEMBER 1854 On Monday, the 6th of November (1854), I went to a Tea Party at Middlewitch where we had a good time. Many Strangers were there. On Wednesday I settled the old difficulties in the Sandbatch Branch and on Friday I settled the old difficulties in the Heart Hill Branch. I then went to Hanlum and helped Elder Joseph Taylor open a large Room for lecturing - all were in good spirits. On November 26, I was in Maccelsfield where we had five more baptisms. DECEMBER 1854 SYLVESTER NOTIFIED GOING HOME IN 1855 A letter came from R. D. Richards and a (Millenial) Star giving notice to prepare to go the Land of Zion this year (1855). The Saints took it rather hard. Sunday the 3rd (of December 1854), I spent in Maccelsfield. The Saints wept to think that I am going to leave them. I am now very buisy preparing to go home! Elders Mayer and Demel are also to go (in 1855). PLANS TO RAISE MONEY TO RETURN HOME ON Sunday the 10th of December (1854) I spent in the Room at Stoke and then went to Shrewsbury and set the Conference (plans) to raise means for the emigration of myself and Elder Mayer. On Sunday, the 17th I went to Lightwood Green and preached to the Saints; had a good meeting at night. I and Elder Howels went to Elder Bates and I borrowed forty pound of him for myself and Elder Mayer. On Monday (December 18) I and Elder Howels went to Shrewsbury on the train. My health is but middling. On Friday (December 22) I went with Elder 0. Shaw and visited the Asherly Saints and found all well. We then returned to Shrewsbury. On Sunday December 24 (1854), we held our Quarterly Conference in the large Pheas (?) Hall in Shrewsbury. The Conference went off well - no mobbing. Elder Hudson was suspended for using the Book money. On Monday we had a comfortable party in the same hail. On Wednesday (December 27) I went to Birmingham on a visit with Elders Whelock, Elsworth, Barlow and Evans, where I had a good time with the Saints and Elder Peel’s family. I returned to Sbrewsbury on Friday the 29th with a nice present of some buttons, presented by Elder Peel. On my return, Bro. Edward Taylor gave me 200 pounds worth of flax thread. On Saturday (December 30) I went to Hatton and on Sunday (December 31, 1854) I preached at Drayton. I then went to some of the small branches, preaching and strengthening them. JANUARY 1855 On Sunday, January 7 (1855), we held our Quarterly Conference in the Magistrates Hall in the town of Stoke for the Staffordshire Conference. Bro. Win. G. Young now takes the Presidency of the Conference in the place of Bro. Otto M. Demel. Much business was done - all in good order. Elder James Little was with us. On Monday (January 8) we had a good visit at Bro. Hurdles’ and on Tuesday (January 9)1 went with Elder Mayer to Maccelsfield and held a meeting. The Saints feel well, although very poor. I stayed over Sunday (January 14, 1855) and had a good meeting. Many Strangers were present. I spoke on the Law of Celestial Marriage. We had the best of attention (throughout the meeting). Bro. Young bore testimony, too. I continued visiting in this city until Wednesday (January 17, 1855). TO THE POTTERIES AGAIN I then went to the Potteries and held meetings in Hanley and Burglum. The Saints seem to work slow in relation to the means for my emigration. On Friday (January 19) I went to the Little Heath Branch. Here I met with Elder E. C. Shaw. We held a meeting and the Saints bore testimony against the President, James Gillim, for getting drunk. We cut him from the Church and appointed Elder Swift to preside. On Saturday (January 20), I went to Shrewsbury where I found Elder James Park, who is appointed to succeed Elder John Mayer in the Presidency of the Shropshire Conference. SYLVESTER RELEASED I know (now) give up my field of Laber (Labor) and shall prepare for going home. On Sunday the 21st (January 1855), I went to Brother Bates in company with Elders Mayer, Tyler and Park and Sisters Eliza Williams, Eliza Griffis and Ann James. We held a meeting at 2:00 in the afternoon and a Tea at 5:00. The evening was spent in speaking and singing. The income (I suppose for the emigration of the two Elders) was 30 shillings. This (amount) Sister Bates divided between Elders Earl and Mayer. We then borrowed a piece (?) to help us home to Zion. FAREWELL TRAVELS On Monday (January 22), we returned home to Shrewsbury and held Council in the evening. It was decided that I should have the clothing that I kneeded (needed) to make me cumfortable (comfortable) on my way. I then visited the Ashterly Branch where I received some”means” and preached my farewell sermon and bade them farewell. I then returned to Shrewsbury in the coach and then took the train to Wellington where I staid (stayed) over night. On Sunday morning (January 28) at 10:00 AM I met Elder Mayer at the train and went to Drayton to a Tea Party. Elders Park and Tyler were with us. We had a generally good time. On Monday we went to Shrewbury again and met with the Council. We tried the case of Sister Howels and cut her from the Church; and also Harriet Toncus and Sharlot Green. (He does not give the reasons for these actions.) FEBRUARY 1855 On Sunday, February 4th (1855), I preached my farewell sermon in Shrewsbury on the Order of Celestial Marriage. The Room was crowded and good attention was had. On Tuesday I took my leave of the Saints and started to the Stafford Conference where on Sunday (February 11)1 preached in Tunstel. (I preached) on Monday in Burglum, Tuesday in Badley Hedge, Wednesday in Longton and on Thursday (February 15) I went to Maccelsfield. Spent the week in writing and visiting the Saints here. Elder Taylor came to me poorly with a bad cold. On Sunday (February 18) I went to the Room and spoke on the Gathering and the need of raising means for Elder Demel to go to the Land of Zion. I then began to prepare for myself. The Saints were very kind to help me to all that I kneeded (needed) for boath (both) myself and family. President Mayer and Young were Brethren to me, indeed. MARCH 1855 SYLVESTER DEPARTS FOR ZION On the 25th of March 1855 I left the Staffordshire Conference to go to my Mountain Home. I went to Liverpool and spent the time in preparing for the trip until the evening of the 30th (of March 1855) when we were all on board of the ship JUVENTA, owned by Captain Watte. WE DEPARTED FOR AMERICA ON MARCH 31, 1855! APRIL 1855 THE ATLANTIC VOYAGE On Sunday, April 1st, 1855, we (the American Elders, 11 in number, with Elder Glover at our head, who was appointed by President S. W. Richards), divided the Ship into 12 wards and appointed men to preside over the same. The total number (of passengers) was 573. We had a fine voyage. Many were seasick. On Tuesday, the 3rd of April 1855, a storm (hit us). On the evening of the 21st, one child was born. Some marriages were performed soon after we started (on this voyage). Cold weather (hit us) while crossing the Banks off Newfoundland, and here we saw many whales and porpoises and very large fish. MAY 1855 THE LANDING AT PHILADELPHIA We landed at Philadelphia on (Saturday) the 5th of May 1855, all in good health. That evening another baby was born. On Sunday (May 6, 1855) I went to the Saints Room (in Philadelphia) and spoke to the Saints. Here we met Elders Taylor, Clinton and Fullmer who, with the Saints, all met us with a pleasant smile on their countenances and welcomed us to their home, THE LAND OF THE FREE! I was then appointed to take the care of 123 of the Saints while in the City (of Philadelphia). I took them to a Mr. Fisher’s for food and lodgings. HEADED WEST On Tuesday (May 8, 1855), we started for Pittsburg and landed on Thursday (May 10). On Friday (May 11, 1855), I started with the Saints composing the Poor Farm Company (and got them) on board the boat AGNANOK (?). Those that had their own fare out (I suppose, who were able to pay their own way) went on the boat called THE CITY OF WASHINGTON. We got to the City of Cincinnati on Sunday (May 13, 1855), all well and in good spirits. The Captain and crew felt well towards us. The country looks pleasant times are hard, prices are high. SYLVESTER VISITS HIS FAMILY IN ILLINOIS On May 16, 1855 (a Wednesday), we started up the Mississippi River and on the 17th we got to St. Louis, Missouri. Hear (here) I left the Saints and went up the Illinois River and made my friends a good visit. Some wished to be rebaptized by me, but I thought best to send them a good faithful Elder from St. Louis (to teach and rebaptize them). (Note: In his “life story”, Sylvester writes: “Here I left the Saints and continued up the Missouri River to the town of Atchison, the place of out-fit for the Plains. I went up the Illinois River to Beardstown, and then through Schuyler and Brown Counties. Visited my brother John and family; also my wife’s brother(s), Heman, Bradley and Ira Owen. After spending a few days with them, I returned to St. Louis on a steamship. Here I purchased a few goods for my family. Here I went on a steamship on the Missouri River as far as Atchison (Kansas). Here I fitted out for the Plains.”) I then returned to St. Louis and found Elder Blair. On May 27th I entered into arrangements to go home with Brother Blair. On May 30th Elder Spencer has just come from England and will go with us. This day, May 30th, we are now on the Boat called the ALMA with about 30 good Saints. We had a good voyage up to Atchison. Here we found many of the Saints sick and some dead and others dying. Among their numbers were Elder 0. Simpson and Elder Ball and wife. JUNE 1855 MEMBER OF THIRD FIFTY On June 7 (1855, a Thursday), Elders Snow and Spencer organized our company, being the Third Fifty. Elder Blair is our Captain. Elder East (is our) cook. I was appointed a counselor and also Captain of one Ten and also the Chaplain. We started our camp on the 11th of June 1855 and traveled eight miles where we camped and stayed until the 17th (of June). This is a sickley (sickly) place. CHOLERA STRIKES THE CAMP The most of the camp left this day (June 17, 1855), but I had to stay until the next day, when I left with the remainder of the camp. When I got within about one mile of the camp, a messenger came to me stating that Brother Jones was taken with the Colary (Cholera) and wished me to hasten to his relief by administering the ordinance of the House of God to him. But having a very hard ravine to cross, I was detained (for) some time. I found Brother Jones coald (cold) and cramt (cramped). I called Brothers Mayer, George C. Riser and Ausker (Oscar) Tyler to my assistance, for they were men who had had their endowments. We approached the sick and dying, for by this time four more were taken, but the Spirit forbade me rebuking it at this time. Yet, I felt to pray the Almighty to stay the plague if it be His will. Brother Jones soon died and in the evening Sister Lankford died. This night Brother East’s child died; also Brother Lankford and some others. On the 18th (of June 1855) we buried six persons. This is, indeed a doalful time to us all. WE TRAVEL ON AND BURY THE DEAD AS WE GO This day (June 18, 1855), we met the Brethren from the Valley (going) on missions. They were under Captain Hate (Haight). We started our camp and a number of the missionaries returned with us to where we nooned. Sister Elizabeth Poast died this forenoon in the wagon. We buried her the same hour and did not stop the train. At noon we had a good meeting, during which time several more died. We parted with the missionaries and hauled our dead until night, when a number more were dead. Some, however, were taken and when I administered to them they got well immediately. We continued to travel a little every day and still bury the dead (while traveling). On Sunday the 24th of June 1855 (he wrote “15th” but that is in error) we camped on a small stream called the Vermillion. Here we buried Old Father Greer and several more died and were buried. I then spoke to Bro. Blair of the propriety of rebaptizing those who wished it, and baptizing those that had not been baptized. Accordingly, I went to them and baptized (several) persons. We then traveled six miles. ELDER STEVENSON PUT IN CHARGE OF COMPANY This evening (Sunday, June 24, 1855), Elder Stevenson came to us from the Mormon Grove with some butter to help us. In the morning, I called the Saints together. Captain Blair then read a letter from President Ballentine stating that Bro. Stevenson was appointed to take charge of our company. Elder Stevenson then chose myself, Sylvester Henry Earl, and Brother Barlow to be his counselors. That night a man by the name of Wood from Texas got lost from the camp. He was ill with the cholera. The mules wandered all night with him lying helpless in the carriage. We are still mourning in the midst of death on Saturday, June the 30th, 1855. This same man, Wood, got out of his carriage just at dusk, unbeknowns to the driver, and left him more near the camping place, and we soon made a general hunt (for him), nearly all night, and nearly all the next day, but we found him not. And with much sorrow we pursued our journey without him. JULY 1855 Sunday, July 1st 1855, the camp is in better health. Sunday, July 8th, 1855, we got to Ft. Cama, all in good health and spirits, except a little difficulty between Brothers Middlemuss and Right, which we took into Council and strove to settle. On Monday, the 9th (of July), we came up to the first camp under the care of Captain Hinley and found them all in good health and spirits. We held a Council with them. Elder Cowan read some instruction from Erastus Snow. We decided to travel on the next day and went accordingly. Sunday, the 15th (of July 1855), we got to the Cottonwood Springs, about 80 miles from Carney (Kearney), all in good health. Some of the Saints wish to press on a little too fast for our teams, for some of them are failing a little, but still we pursue our journey. On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, we were detained on account of Bro. Stevenson’s having to go back some six miles for his coat. During this time, Brothers L. Blair and T. Geer, being wagon masters, concluded to stay all day. This gave some dissatisfaction in the camp. In the evening, Bro. Stevenson and myself held a Private Council and determined to set all aright before we left. We then called a General Council Meeting of the whole camp, and we both spoke to the Saints, and soon got a good spirit. In the evening we held a Testimony Meeting and all felt well. On Friday, July 20, 1855, we crossed the South Fork of the Platte (River) and had no bad luck. On Saturday, we got to Ash Hollow. Here we stayed until Sunday, July 22, shoeing oxen, holding meetings and fixing to go on. We traveled on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday - the road is very sandy; our teams are failing. On Sunday, July 29th, we traveled eight miles, then camped on a nice place and had a good meeting. On Monday and Tuesday we traveled hard and got to Fort Laramie. On Wednesday we went on past Laramie 10 miles and came to a small trading post. Here we bought 10 yoke of oxen at $100 per yoke (,pair). This enabled us to go on our way more comfortable. AUGUST 1855 On Sunday the 5th of August 1855 we are in the Black Hills, about 58 miles from Ft. Laramie, and stayed here all day. The guarding has not been well, done so Elders Stevenson, Barlow and myself held a Private Council and agreed that Elder Mayer be released from acting as Assistant Sargent with a vote of thanks, and that Bro. Bancroft take his place. We had a good meeting in the evening and all feel well. On Thursday the 9th of August we got over the Black Hills. No wagons broke down and no one sick or left behind. On Friday the 10th we got safely over the Black Hills, all in fine spirits. On Sunday the 12th of August 1855 we got to the last crossing of the Platte River where we crossed and traveled up the river 13 miles. We then left the river and camped on a small creek. The feelings of the camp are hard towards Elder Stevenson for bad management; wishes were expressed to divide the camp. On Monday (August 13, 1855) Elder Stevenson and I went and held a Private Council; then called the officers of the camp (together) and had a General Council (with them). The decision is to go on, all together. On Wednesday, August 15, 1855, we are on the Sweetwater. THIS IS MY BIRTHDAY. I AM NOW 40 YEARS OLD AND AM NOW CROSSING THE PLAINS FOR THE FIFTH TIME. (Sylvester’s birthday was on August 16th; not the 15th. However, I suspect that we’ll all forgive him this slight lapse of memory considering his long and arduous journey.) FEELINGS BAD TOWARDS BRO. STEVENSON On Sunday, August 19, 1855, we are laying by (stopping) for the day...The feelings of (the members of) the camp are all confusion and they have little or no regard for Bro. Stevenson. Brother Bancroft feels dissatisfied and desires to be released from the office of Assistant Sargent (because) he and the Captain have a dispute. Some hard words were passed. Also Bro. Stevenson and Bro. Phelps have had some hard words about fasting. Henry (Phelps) said his health was too poor to fast. Bro. Stevenson said if he had more faith in his dumplins than he had in his God, then he might take them, for, says he, you have got a bad spirit. Henry said he had not, and so forth. I told them that they, being the anointed of the Lord, should not dispute before the Saints. At 10:00 AM we had a meeting; also one in the evening, but the feelings of the Saints are bad towards Bro. Stevenson. On Wednesday, August 22, 1855, we camped near the upper crossing of the Sweetwater. Sarah Harris accused Brother York of trying to seduce her. The Saints still find fault with Bro. Stevenson, mostly for pushing the teams too fast and (stopping) too late at night. Some wish to divide the camp (again), and it is all we can do to keep it together. On Thursday, August 23, 1855, we got to the Pacific Springs. Bro. Greer’s Ten having got there some time before the balance of the company, they camped before Bro. Stevenson came up. This made him mad and he then said the camp should go on a few miles further. This we done (did) with much hard feeling in the camp against him for his unwise course and ruff (rough) talk, which causes much unpleasant feelings. Brothers Stevenson, Barlow and myself went into Council by ourselves and we prayed for power to control the camp, and we felt well. We then tried Elder Lamont Bancroft for his rebellion and cut him off from the Church. On Monday, August 27, 1855, we got to Green River. On the 28th we held a Council on the case of James York and Sarah Harris, for his offering to seduce her, which terminated rather in his (York’s) favor. On the morning of the 29th (August 1855), at about 3:00 AM Elder and Mrs. Charles Basset came into our camp in good health and spirits. He gave us some good instructions. The report from the Saints in the rear is good. They stayed five hours. We gave them food and changes and gave them three fresh mules. I sent some letters and went with them three miles on the way. On Thursday the 30th we started the train. This day Elders Mayer, Phelps and Mr. Bancroft left us, bound for the Valley. This day, also, Bro. Thomas Greer purchased about 20 yoke of oxen to help us on our way. SEPTEMBER 1855 NEARLY BACK HOME AGAIN! On Saturday, September 1, 1855, the camp seems in good spirits. On Sunday, September 2nd, Elder Blair came to us from the Valley and this morning Elder Stevenson started to the Valley, but meeting Bro. Blair he concluded to stay. We are now camped at Fort Bridger, which is now settled by the Saints. We then pursued our journey and when I got to Bear River, I mashed my little finger very bad. By Sunday we are at the Weber River, and I now leave the company and start for home, in company with Brothers Johnson, York, Bancroft and the two Sisters Johnson. SYLVESTER ARRIVES BACK IN THE VALLEY WE ARRIVED INTO THE VALLEY ON THE 10TH OF SEPTEMBER 1855, BEING 3 YEARS, LACKING 5 DAYS, ABSENT FROM MY HOME AND FAMILY. I found them all alive and well and all in fine spirits, and with joy to my soul I feel to thank the Lord for His perennial care over me and my family while I was on my mission. I spent a happy time at the General Conference with my family. A LIST OF PRESENTS TO MY FAMILY BY THE SAINTS IN ENGLAND MARGARET BATES, 1 Pair of waiters, 1 Farion pitcher, 1 Hank of thread, 1 Yard of print, 1 Piece of tape CLAY, 2 Hanks of thread, 1 Piece of tape, 1 Spool of cotton MARY BLACKWELL, 1 pitcher basket AMELIA SMITH & MOTHER, A parcel of thread and silk for sewing MOTHER STEEL & ELIZABETH MOLLET, Sends a parcel of thread, Silk thread needles, Fine laces and many other like things SARAH MOLLET, 7 Spools of cotton, 1 Toy pitcher MOTHER JANE POTS, A parcel of thread & needles, pins and cotton thread JOSEPH ELLIS, 1 Cup and saucer gilt, 1 Mug ELIZABETH POOL, 1 Cup & saucer SARAH POOL, 1 Allapack Dress SISTER REED, 6 Yards of print, 2 Ganats (?) CRISTANIA BOIL, 2 Lamps and 1 Pitcher, 2 Sac Pool SISTER JACKSON, 1 Handkerchief SISTER HORRICKS, 1 Handkerchief, Black THE POTFERIES BRANCH, 1 Black Allapack Dress and trimming GEORGE SIMPSON, 8 Yards of Print, Calico Note by Owen Ken Earl: There are no punctuation marks in Sylvester Henry Earl’s Missionary Diary, so I have included such punctuation as I thought proper in order to make his diary more readable and understandable. Likewise, I have used our modern spelling, though in many instances I thought his more colorful and have put the modern spelling in parenthesis. Grandpa Sylvester Henry Earl had very little formal education and it is interesting to note that on the last page of his journal, in his handwriting, is the following: A comma marked thus (,) is a pause or resting in speech, while you may count one. There were some additional entries in this same journal concerning events occurring after Sylvester’s return from his mission, but those are included in the story of his life located in another part of this volume. One other comment needs to be made concerning the spelling of various peoples’ names mentioned by Sylvester, and the spelling of various place names: his hand writing was very difficult to decipher, and there are undoubtedly many times that he spelled both people and place names phonetically, so in many cases it turned into a guessing game as to how certain words should be spelled. I tried checking place names with an atlas of England, but didn’t fare much better. In too many instances, Sylvester also referred to people by either the preface “Brother” or “Elder” without giving their first names, so that, too, turned into a guessing game at times as to whom he might have been referring to. Even so, Sylvester’s Missionary Diary makes for informative and interesting reading, and I hope you enjoy it and catch the spirit of his mission and the times in which it was performed with such dedication and sacrifice.

Life History of Sylvester Henry Earl by Joseph Gary Earl

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Download the life history of Sylvester Henry Earl by Joseph Gary Earl, great grandson. Copy and paste this link into your browser to download: https://www.dropbox.com/s/hrxs0icwygeo6oi/E.%20Sylvester%20H.%20Earl%27s%20Life%20Story.pdf?dl=0

Sylvester Henry Earl on LDS History Website

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Cut and paste to your browser to read: https://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/pioneerDetail?lang=eng&pioneerId=373

Blessing

Contributor: Chynna67 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Cut and paste link into your browser to read Sylvester Henry Earl's blessing: https://www.dropbox.com/s/tp6l0uzav9pkgok/Patriarchal%20Blessing%20-%20Sylvester%20Henry%20Earl.pdf?dl=0

Sylvester Henry Earl Pioneer

Contributor: LuciJoy Created: 3 years ago Updated: 5 months ago

Departure: 14 April 1847 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 21-24 July 1847 Company Information: The original pioneer company consisted of 142 men, 3 women, and 2 children, and 72 wagons when they left the outfitting post of Winter Quarters, Nebraska. They covered the 1031 miles of the trail in 111 days BIOGRAPHY: SYLVESTER HENRY EARL-MISSIONARY (from: "The First Company to Enter Salt Lake Valley" by The daughters of the Utah Pioneers) Sylvester Earl was born August 16, 1815 in Scioto County, Ohio to Joseph Earl and Dorcas Tabitha Wixom. At the age of seven years his father died and from the time he was twelve years of age, Sylvester assumed many of the responsibilities of the home. He remained at this post of duty until he was twenty-one years of age when he received a visit from his brothers, Asa and John, who had been living for some years in Illinois. From them he learned of the Latter-day Saint religion, they having already become members. He went with his brothers to llinois, taking with him his younger brother, Wilbur J., and on February 29, 1837, was baptized into the Church by Elder C. C. Rich. From that time on he performed mission­ary labors in the surrounding states until 1842, when he moved to Hancock County, Illinois and located near Nauvoo at the little village called Morley Settlement. In 1846 he and his family crossed the river, and when he was chosen to be one of the advanced guard he penned these words: "It is hard to leave my family here, sick and among howling wolves and the roaming savages of the west, but the servants of the Lord says go, and I feel as ever to leave all for the Gospel and the salvation of the people." On the return trip to the States for his family with the Brigham Young company he wrote: "Nothing of importance occurred until we came to the Platte River. Here we had our horses, seventeen in number, stolen. However we pursued our journey down to Fort Lar­amie. Here we learned that the balance of our company (who left the valley ten days after with horse teams) had their horses stolen at Strawberry Creek. We hired an interpreter who went with us to the Indians and we obtained sixteen head of horses which we immediately sent back to assist our brethren. While detained there, we be­came destitute of food, and I, in company with Horace Thornton, went to a small band of Indians and sold the shirt off my back for some meat. I then took my wagon cover and cut and made me another. We then pursued our journey for forty miles and came to an immense herd of buffalo. We killed some and dried all the meat we wanted and took hundreds of pounds home. Ten miles above the head of Grand Island the Indians came on our front guard and took a horse from J. Redden, also his knife and some other things, but no one was hurt. When we came to the head of the Island we found a company of U. S. troops under General Kearney. They were building a fort. Further on we met a few of our brethren from Winter Quarters with provisions. We arrived at Winter Quarters on the 1st of October 1847 where, with great joy, I met my wife and three sweet little children, all well. During the winter our youngest child a little girl, Rhodenia, died of measles." After returning to Utah with his family, Mr. Earl moved into the 8th Ward and in the fall of 1851, moved to the 19th Ward. In 1852 he was called on a mission to England where he remained two years. In the summer of 1861 the family located in Pine Valley at the head of the Santa Clara River where he purchased a share in a sawmiill. 'They sawed 200,000 feet of lumber and then the mill burned down. He wrote: "We then built another. I then sold out to Eli Whipple." Mr. Earl died July 23, 1873 at St. George, Utah.

Liverpool to Philadelphia 31 Mar 1855 - 5 May 1855

Contributor: LuciJoy Created: 3 years ago Updated: 5 months ago

Liverpool to Philadelphia 31 Mar 1855 - 5 May 1855 A Compilation of General Voyage Notes More Sharing Services "DEPARTURE. -- The ship Juventa sailed for Philadelphia on Saturday the 31st ultimo, with 537 souls of the Saints, under the presiding charge of Elder William Glover, late pastor of the Hull, Newcastle, and Carlisle Conferences. Elders Benjamin Brown, Sylvester H. Earl, Elias Gardner, Charles Smith, William Pitt, John Mayer, Noah T. Guyman, Joseph Hall, well known among the Saints in the British Isles for their distinguished labors in the conferences; also Elders George Mayer, in charge of a company of Saints from Switzerland; and Elder James F. Bell, late president of the Malta Mission, in charge of a company of the faithful from Piedmont in Italy; all sailed in this ship, and constitute the able counsel and immediate support of President Glover in the discharge of his important duties on shipboard. Most of these brethren -- elders of Israel, are returning to Zion, after an absence of about three years on missions to this and other countries. It has never been our privilege to clear a shipload of Saints containing such an embodiment of faith, and with such an entire feeling of satisfaction both in Saints and officers of the ship. An unusual number of pastors, presidents, and elders are gathering this year, and as the way to Zion becomes more difficult they will find ample occasion and scope for the exercise of their faith on the journey, that the sheaves which they bring with them may be safely delivered in the garner of the Lord, and they be found faithful laborers with the husbandman in the last time. May the joy which was manifested by the shouts sent up as we bade them adieu be increased in purity and fervor till their arrival in Utah among the people of God, and worlds without end." MS, 17:15 (Apr. 14, 1855), pp.233-34 "The Juventa. -- By letter from Elder Thomas C. Stayner, we learn that the Juventa arrived at Philadelphia by May 8, making a thirty-five days' passage. The winds were mostly contrary, but only one gale was experienced. Captain Watts is highly spoken of." MS, 17:22 (June 2, 1855), p.347 "EIGHTY-FIFTH COMPANY. -- Juventa, 573 souls. The ship Juventa sailed from Liverpool, England, for Philadelphia, on Saturday, March 31st, 1855, with five hundred and seventy-three Saints on board, under the presidency of Elder William Glover. Elders Benjamin Brown, Sylvester H. Earl, Elias Gardner, Charles Smith, William Pitt, John Mayer, Noah Y. Guyman and Joseph Hall, who had all labored as missionaries in the British Isles, also embarked for America in this vessel, together with Elder George Mayer, who was in charge of a company of Saints from Switzerland; and Elder James F. Bell, late president of the Malta Mission, in charge of a small number of Saints from Piedmont, in Italy. The voyage of the Juventa was a most prosperous one; no sickness, except seasickness, and a few cases of measles among the children, occurred among the passengers, and not one of the large number of emigrants found a watery grave. A child was born while a storm raged on the bosom of the deep, and the little one was named Juventa, after the ship. On the fourth of May the vessel cast anchor off Cape May, and on the fifth was tugged up the Delaware River to Philadelphia. On Tuesday the eighth, the emigrants continued to rail to Pittsburg, from which city about two hundred of the company proceeded down the rivers on the steamboat Equinox, to St. Louis, Missouri, where they arrived on the seventeenth of March, forty-six days after leaving Liverpool. About one hundred and fifty of the emigrants came from Pittsburg to St. Louis, by the steamboat Washington City. The Equinox continued up the Missouri River to Atchison, where she landed her passengers on the twenty-eighth of May. After arriving in Atchinson, the company was attacked with sickness, and a number died, among them Elder Bell, who had presided over the Malta Mission. The successful and quick journey made by the Juventa company, gave the new route, by way of Philadelphia, great prestige. As demonstrative evidence of the superior advantages of the route, Elder Glover remarked that he had three more in his company and fifty dollars more in his pocket on arriving in America than when he started from Liverpool. Thus both lives and time were saved, and the New Orleans route was discarded by the Saints never to be used by them afterwards. (Millennial Star, Vol. XVII, pp.233, 375, 490; Deseret News of August 8th, 1855)" Cont., 13:12 (Oct. 1892) p.546 "Sat. 31. [Mar. 1855] -- The ship Juventa sailed from Liverpool, England, with 573 Saints, under the direction of William Glover. It arrived at Philadelphia May 5th. From there the company went by rail to Pittsburgh, and further on steamboats down the Ohio river to St. Louis, Missouri." CC, p.53

Joseph Earl Sr.

Contributor: LuciJoy Created: 3 years ago Updated: 5 months ago

OUR EARL ANCESTORS In August 1972, Winona Earl Wittwer, daughter of Joseph and Viola, gathered such information as was available concerning her father’s ancestors and, with the help of Rita Jones Nash who helped organize the material and typed it up, had it distributed to members of the Earl family in August 1972. This is a very valuable 16 page document titled “A History of Joseph and Dorcas Tabitha Wixom Earl and the Wixom and Earl Families.” During the early 1960’s, Winona corresponded with both Ruth Smith Hayes (Palmer Earll’s great granddaughter, Decorah, IA) and “Maida” Bickham, (Alanson Earl’s granddaughter, real name Mary Corn Estella Van Ness, Bellefontaine, OH). Both Maida and Ruth enjoyed genealogical work and had gathered considerable information about their Earl families. Maida’s cousin, James Elmer Earl, also a grandson of Alanson Earl, had copied quite a bit of family information from the family Bible belonging to Joseph and Dorcas Earl, while the Bible was still in fairly good shape and before it had succumbed to the ravages of age, use and moisture. James Elmer Earl had passed this information on to Maida Bickham, and Maida shared it with Winona. Winona and her daughter Viola Squires also visited Helen Blue and her brother Richard Smith, cousins in Noble County, IN, descendants of Palmer. Later Ruth Smith Hayes came out to Utah and visited Winona and her family and attended one of our Earl Reunions. JOSEPH EARL I To Winona Wittwer, Maida wrote: “The first Earl ancestor that I can say belonged to my mother’s and your father’s historical record was a Joseph Earl I. It was said that he came from England. At the (New York) immigration office on 11 Feb 1780, the registrar took out a book saying “How do you want to register?” He answered, “I am Joseph Earl, and (this is) my wife.” The registrar inquired if all these children were his. He answered, “Yes, these are mine. But my oldest son, and my married daughters, did not come.” An official record was made of his children: Solomon Earl, born in England, 1767 Daniel Earl, born in England, 1769 Lois Earl, born in England, 1772 William Earl, born in England, 1775 John Earl, born in England, 1777 The registrar began to question Joseph. “What is your occupation, business, trade, or calling, Mr. Earl?” His answer: “I am a Methodist Minister. I was once a school teacher. I am a cabinet maker and wheelwright I have also worked with leather, making boots and shoes, also harness and saddle making. I have been in the position where I have done what seemed best to do until I could do better.” JOSEPH EARL II IS BORN “As they were standing there, his wife laid her hand on his arm. He looked at her and quickly said, “My wife needs rest. Do you know where I can get a couple of rooms in which to lodge my family temporarily?” A tenement house stood next door and a couple of rooms in it were quickly made ready and some food served. That night Joseph Earl II, was born. Joseph Earl I registered his newborn son as Joseph Earl, Second, born in New York City, 1780. Born in U.S.A.” His date of birth we believe was 11 Feb 1780. “The next we hear from Joseph Earl I, he had moved his family down in the State of New York, taking care of a parish. He taught school during the week and was a Methodist Minister on the Sabbath, rendering religious reverence to our Father in Heaven, and trying to lead others to do likewise. The younger boys spent all their school days in their father’s school. It was thus that Joseph Earl II became educated for the ministry, for he was the baby of the family, he had his father to help him, and his father’s books and sermons to guide him. Joseph II loved to read and was encouraged to do so by his parents.” The above exhausts all the information we have concerning Joseph Earl I and his family and whereabouts. Exhaustive searches over the past many years have yielded nothing in the way of new information concerning the name of his wife, precisely where they lived, or where they died and are buried. The search continues. It seems likely to me that they lived in mid or western New York state and that that is where we’ll eventually find information on them.

Life Story

Contributor: LuciJoy Created: 3 years ago Updated: 5 months ago

LIFE STORY OF SYLVESTER HENRY EARL November 27th, the year of our Lord 1864. This is a history of the life of Mr. Sylvester H. Earl and of my progenitors, connecting with my grandfather Joseph Earl who was born in the state of New York. My grandfather was the father of a large family. I can only give the names of Solomon, Daniel, William, John, and a daughter by the name of Lois, and then my father whose name was also Joseph. He was born in the state of New York about the year of 1780. He was educated for a Methodist parson. When he was twenty one years old he became acquainted with Miss Dorcas Tabitha Wixom whom he married soon after. She was born in the state of Vermont and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Barnabus Wixom. My parents still lived in the state of New York until the year 1812. During that year, they moved into Canada, but finding the people greatly excited in relation to the existing war between the English and the Americans, he concluded to return to New York again and here they remained twelve years in all during which time they had born unto them five sons whose names are as follows: Palmer W., John T., Joel, Asa C. and Alanson Earl. They moved to the state of Ohio, Scioto County, where I was born in the year 1815, August 16th. My father still remained a minister. When I was two years old, my father moved to Franklin County, state of Ohio, where my brother Wilber Joseph Earl was born and my sister Eliza; and here my brother Joel died. My father moved to Logan County. While here, my brother James C. Earl was born. Here we were seized with sickness which proved fatal to my sister Eliza. My father was sick twelve months with fever and ague. It turned to dropsy and caused his death in the year 1822. My mother was left with seven children and having had much sickness in the family was poor. We soon moved further south into Clark County. My three oldest brothers were left home and went to trades and Alanson the fourth being sickly, the burden of the family then came on me. Although young, I was steady in my habits and strove to act the part of a father to the children and to be a comfort to my mother. My brother Palmer soon married Miss Alenia Davis. John and Asa went to the state of Illinois where John married Miss Rebecca Pile and Asa married Miss Minerva Rich. My brother Alanson married Miss Rebecca Day. This left me with my mother and brothers, Wilber J. and James C. Earl alone. We lived together until the day that I was twenty-one years old. It was on Sunday and my mother and I and brother James were taking a ride on horseback. We were about four miles from home when to our astonishment we were met by my two brothers’ John and Asa and their families in carriages. My brothers had been gone seven years from us. It was a joyful meeting to all of us and we soon returned home. After we had past a few hours together my brother John called the family to order, and gave us to understand that he was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Later Day Saints and also his wife and brother Asa and his family. This was the first that we had heard of this people. I began to inquire into their faith. Then he told me they believed in God the Father, Jesus Christ His Son and the Holy Spirit which is God’s minister, and (said he) these three are one in all their councils. They called a meeting. My brothers both being ministers they preached faith, repentance and baptism for the remission of sins. They told us that a holy angel had brought the Holy Priesthood to Joseph Smith. This was joy to my heart to hear that holy angels were sent to earth again. They told me that Joseph Smith was a prophet of the Lord, and that the Lord had told him to gather all the good and faithful people to the Western Boundary in the state of Missouri, and there to build Zion, the New Jerusalem. This thought still inspires me. On the first of October, 1836, I left mother and my youngest brother James C. Earl taking my brother Wilber J. Earl with me, and we returned with my two brothers and their families to the State of Illinois. I continued to investigate the principles of the Later-Day Saints until I was convinced that they were right. On the 29th of February 1837 I was baptized under the hands of Charles C. Rich and Harvey Green. I soon left in the company of my brother Wilber, Sumer Brunson, Charles C. Rich, and G. M. Hinkel, to go to the city of Far West in the state of Missouri, in a steamboat by way of St. Louis. We landed at Far West the first of April, all in good spirits. I purchased ninety acres of land, bought me a yoke of oxen and several cows and began to prepare to make me a farm. In the month of September (1837) the Prophet Joseph and his brother Hyrum came here from Kirtland, Ohio. On October 6th 1837 they held a general conference here. I was called and ordained to the office of Elder under the hands of Hyrum Smith, Thomas B. Marsh, and Lyman Wight. On the 15th of February 1838, I started on a mission to the state of Ohio. My brother Wilber having returned in June, I felt anxious to get back. I went in a stage. When I got to Jackson’s Hill state of Missouri, I met brother Joseph Smith who was then moving his family to Far West. He gave me a blessing and I pursued my journey until I came to Schuyler County, state of Illinois. Here I stopped, preached and baptized six, ordained Seeley Owen to the office of Priest and Miner Lynn Lyman to the office of Teacher, and then pursued my journey, preaching and visiting my friends. September 15, my mother died and I buried her by the side of my father. It was hard to part with a good and tender hearted mother. I then took my two brothers Wilber and James with me and started for the Land of Zion. We went in a carriage until we got to Schuyler County, Illinois where I had raised a small branch. I here had the pleasure of baptizing my brothers. Then I sent my brother Wilber on with some traveling Saints to Far West, and I stayed in order to take some with me. About this time the mob arose in Missouri and the Saints had to suffer much in a war. My three brothers John, Asa, and Wilber, were all in the war and many others. David Patton was killed. My brother John was sent to prison and lay there forty days. He was acquitted. My brother Wilber returned to me in Schuyler County, Illinois and he then went back to the state of Ohio. January 28th, 1839 I was married to a young lady that I had baptized by the name of Lois C. Owen. After much persecution in Missouri, the church was driven back to the state of Illinois where the members settled in the town of Commerce on the Mississippi River, changing the name to the City of Nauvoo. April 6, 1847, ( possibly 1839 as the correct year ) I was sent on a mission to the States of Indiana and Ohio. In the month of July, I found my brother Wilber Earl. I ordained him an elder and took him with me. I took him home with me in the fall of the same year. In the fall of 1839, October 29th, my son Wilber B. Earl was born. In the year of 1842, I moved near the city of Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. Here I purchased a good farm. I had a good team and plenty of the comforts of life. In the year 1843, March 28th, my daughter Louisa B. Earl was born. The health of my companion was very poor. In the spring of 1844 I was sent on another mission. I left my family in good spirits. I traveled several weeks in the southern part of the state. I was preaching one day and felt impressed to go back home. I accordingly returned home. I found my little family in deep trouble for the mob had been there and ordered them to give up the place in three days or have the house burned over their heads. I was at this time solicited to go and help to keep the mob out of the city of Nauvoo. I left my family the next day and went and defended the city. The mob came and burned the houses of some of the Saints, threw stones at mine, and gave many insults. I was gone two weeks. When the time expired, the Prophet Joseph gave himself up for trial. He was taken to Carthage where he and Hyrum were murdered in the month of June, 27th day, year of our Lord 1844. Elder John Taylor was badly wounded. These bloody deeds caused great sorrow throughout the whole church. The church was then guided by the twelve apostles. In the fall of 1844, I was ordained to the office of Seventy in the tenth quorum. Soon after I was ordained to the office of president over the twentieth quorum. In the fall of 1845, I sold my farm, bought me a home and lot in the city of Nauvoo and moved into the city. On the 28th of August, 1845, my daughter Rhodaria was born. I spent the summer laboring in the temple. In the fall and winter I served as a guard at the temple and at the houses of the Twelve and sometimes was on horseback guarding many houses, barns and stacks of grain all out in the country. Many of the houses and barns were burned at the same time. We killed some of the mobsters and drove the balance off. These were the days of the deepest of sorrows. I ran many narrow risks of my life by carrying express to different parts of the army. We finished the upper rooms of the temple and there received our endowments. In the year 1846 and the month of February, on the 10th day, I took my family and crossed the Mississippi River with many hundreds of my brethren and sisters being compelled to go or have another war with the mob. I was captain of a company of the guard. President Brigham Young was at the head of the camp and seven more of the Twelve were with us and their wives and their children and their substance. We lay two weeks at Sugar Creek, Iowa waiting for all of our company to get over the river. While here my brother Willber came with his family, and my brother, James was with me. While here the snow fell two feet deep. We all suffered from the cold. We then pursed our journey through the wilderness making our road as we went. I need not attempt to describe the many sorrows which we had to pass through during the cool weather. In the month of March, many of us were without food. We then held a council and appointed twenty men to go down into the state of Missouri to work for food. Ephriam Green and myself were appointed to take our families and go with them. While in Missouri, we built a log jail and did much other work. I stayed two months and then took my family and returned to the camp with the Saints who were with me, with the exception of Brother Green’s wife who died while we were in Missouri. I found the first of the camp at Grand River where they were making some farms, but part of the company had gone on as far as the Missouri River, a distance of two hundred miles. I then traveled with my family until I overtook another portion of them making some farms on an elevated spot of ground which they called Mt. Pisgah. While here, the government of the United States sent and demanded of us five hundred of our ablest men to go to the Mexican War, which we sent. Among the balance my brother James went to war. I then went over the river with my family and joined again with the front of the camp. We moved up the river twelve miles, selected a place for our winter quarters, cut our hay, built our houses and prepared the best we could for the winter, which was severe. Many of my poor brethren and sisters died through sorrow and fatigue. Among the balance was my wife’s sister, Lydia Owen and two of my brother Wilber’s children. My wife took sick for some time, but we took all patience. In the spring of 1847, April 10th I left the place with one hundred and forty three of my brethren, three sisters and two children, with President Brigham Young at our head and six of the Twelve. It was hard for me to leave my little family sick among the howling wolves and the roaming savages of the west; but, the servants of the Lord said “Go” and I felt willing as ever to leave all for the benefit of the Gospel or the salvation of this people. We traveled up the Platte river on the north side, making a new road for five hundred miles, where we crossed at Fort Laramie, then through the Black Hills, then crossed the Platte River again, took the Sweetwater nearly to the head, then down the Pacific Springs, then crossed the two Sandy Rivers. Here we met with Mr. Bridger and made some inquiry about the Salt Lake Valley. He gave us to understand that he had been in the mountains nearly forty years and he knew that we could not raise grain in that valley, but did not discourage us. We pursued our journey, making our road. Here many of the brethren were sick with the mountain fever. I was very ill. We still worked our way along as fast as possible, although it was through much hard digging down of banks, building bridges, etc. On the 24th of July the whole camp arrived safe in the Salt Lake Valley. We camped on a small stream running from the mountain. The ground was very dry. The grass was dry from the hot rays of the sun and the ground infested with swarms of large crickets. A meeting was called to appoint each man his labor and we soon turned the stream, watered the land, plowed the ground and planted our garden seed, corn and potatoes. Thus we continued until we planted nearly one hundred acres. During this time, the surveyor Henry Sherwood, with a few others, surveyed the city, commencing at the temple block. We built a wall around ten acres of land suitable for a fort with houses on the inside. August the 16th, I started back to the states with a small company of brethren, nearly forty in number, with our ox teams, Tenis Rafilee being captain. Nothing of importance occurred until we came to the Platte River. Here we had our horses, seventeen in number, stolen. However we pursued our journey down to Ft. Laramie. Here we learned that the balance of our company, who left the valley ten days after us with horse teams, had their horses stolen on Strawberry Creek. We hired an interpreter who went with us to the Indians and we obtained sixteen head of horses which we immediately sent back to assist our brethren. While detained here, we were destitute of food, and I went in company with Horis Thornton to a small band of Indians and sold my shirt off my back for meat. I then took my wagon cover and cut and made me another shirt. We then pursued our journey about forty miles and came to an immense drove of buffalo. We killed some and dried all the meat we wanted and took hundreds of pounds home. Ten miles above the Grand Island, the Indians came on our front guard and took a horse from J. Redding, also his knife and some other things, but no one was hurt. When we came to the head of the Island, we found a company of U. S. A. troops under General Carny. They were building a fort. Here we held a council and decided whether to wait for the horse company or pursue our journey. We accordingly agreed to go on slowly. When we arrived at the Soup Fork, we to our great joy, met a few of our brethren from Winter Quarters with provisions. We stayed with them over night. They went back to the horse teams, and we still pursued our journey. We arrived in Winter Quarters on the 1st of October, 1847, where with great joy I met my wife and three wee sweet little children all well. I spent the winter in preparing to go with my family to the valley. During the winter, our children had the measles, which caused the death of our youngest child, a little girl, Rhodenia, born August 29, 1845. About the first of May, we started on our journey. All the Saints that could not go to the valley this year had to go back over the river into Iowa so as to be safe from the Indians. We had no bad luck on the way, only the loss of one cow. When we got opposite Ash Hollow on Sunday July the 9th we had a fine son born. We called him Sylvester Rhodans. We arrived in the Valley about the middle of October 1848, all in fine spirits, and found the Saints well. I moved on my city lot in the 8th ward. On the 26th, of October 1850 we had a fine daughter born. We called her Lois Orenia. In the fall of 1851, I moved into the 19th ward, and built another home. August 28th 1852, I was called on by the general conference on go to England on a mission. September 6, 1852 my son Joseph Ira was born. I felt well and left September 15th. I had a good time over the plains, took a steamboat at St. Joseph, Missouri and stayed a few days in St. Louis, took the train to Cincinnati, went by way of Cleveland, Buffalo, and Albany, to New York. December 18th, I took shipping for Liverpool and arrived January 5th, my health poor. January 8th, I received an appointment of pastorale charge of the Stafford and Shrepshire Conference, where I remained two years. I then received orders to return home. I left Liverpool March 31, 1855 on the ship I sailed with five hundred Saints on board. We encountered much sickness and one very hard storm. I was on the sea about five weeks. We then arrived in the great city of Philadelphia. Here we met Elder John Taylor who aided us in getting safe in the train cars bound for Pittsburgh. We were two days and nights on the way. We ran against another engine, which broke several cars and wounded several of the Saints. At Pittsburgh, we charted two steamboats which arrived us to St. Louis. Some of the Saints were sick. Here I left the Saints and continued up the Missouri River to the town of Atchison, the place of fit-out for the plains. I went up the Illinois River to Beardstown, and then through Schuyler and Brown counties, visited my brother John and family, also my wife’s brothers, Hemon, Bradley, and Ira Owen. After spending a few days with them, I returned to St. Louis on a steamboat. Here I purchased a few goods for my family. I then went on a steamboat up the Missouri River as far as Atchison. Here I fitted out for the plains. Our company was the three B. W. Company. Elder Blair was the captain. Elder Green and myself were his council. We left the campground on the 13th of June, traveled two days when the cholera broke out, taking nearly two-thirds of the company. This was the greatest sorrow that I ever witnessed. Edward Stevenson was appointed to take charge of the camp and Brother Barlow took the place of Brother Greer. We had no bad luck on the way. We lost one man, a gentile, a Mr. Wood from Texas. I arrived in the valley on the tenth of September, being gone three years and five days. I found all my family well. During the time of my being in England, in 1854, Elder Willard Richards died, and in April following, Elder J. M. Grant was appointed in his place. The city was partly walled in. In 1856 December 1st, J. M. Grant died. His loss was felt deeply by the Saints: He fought the devils, Taught the Saints, And done his duty well. He’ll raise in glory, Crowned with might, While the wicked go to Hell. At this time President Brigham Young called on the Saints to reform and to forsake all evil, lest the Lord destroy us all. The sacrament was now removed from the Saints until they repented and were rebaptized in the font prepared on the Temple block for this purpose. In the year 1856, I was ordained a councilor to Bishop Alonzo H. Releigh, Bishop of the 19th ward. In the winter of 1856-1857 we spent all our time in getting the people to see that they had need to reform. The bishops and councilors were rebaptized in October, the first presidency and families and the whole church in the spring of 1857. We now resumed our work on the temple. Several thousand were engaged in preparing materials. The prophet said “This will make the wicked mad, and they will seek to destroy us.” September 18th, 1856 my first wife Lois C. Earl had a fine daughter born. We called her Lydia V. Earl, and on April 21st, 1857 Margaret E. Earl had a fine son, we called him Hyrum H. Earl. In the month of August 1857, the U.S.A. refused to sent us the mail. President Buchanan had appointed Mr. Harny to come with 2500 soldiers to govern this people. We did not intend to let them come into the Valley. About the 8th of September, 1857 a Mr. Vanfleet came into the Valley. He was a quartermaster for the U.S.A. Army, and came to prepare for them. President Young informed him that the army would not be allowed to come in. He then returned. Our soldiers are on the plains ready to meet the enemy. On Sunday, September 20. Governor Young sent Lieutenant General Wells, John Taylor, and George A. Smith out on the road to meet our enemies who are nearly one hundred and thirty miles east and near Ft. Bridger. Colonel Kane came here to try to settle the difficulty. He visited our enemies, who still desire to come in. He had the governor visit us. I and my son W. B. Earl, were in the campaign during the hard part of the winter. April 6th, 1858, at general conference, President Brigham Young counseled the Saints to move southward. My wife Lois and my eldest daughter, having been sick, we were in poor health to start a journey. Having lost our little boy Elijah O. Earl, we felt it a trial, nevertheless, we started to make provisions and in the month of May we went as far as Springville, Utah County, and stopped with my brother Wilber J. Earl, who had been living there some years. My brother James C. Earl also moved there. We spent the time very pleasantly. During the month of June, the government sent a committee who met with the authorities of the church and compromised the whole matter, and the people again returned to their homes. I and my family arrived back home on the 9th of July, our home looked desolate, notwithstanding our fruit trees were loaded with fruit and the current bushes with currents. But we did thank God for the peaceful and quiet home which we enjoyed. Troops sent here were permitted to locate in Cedar Valley for the present. October 3, 1858, my oldest daughter took sick with bilious colic and died on the fifth of the same month, much lamented by all who knew her. We had a very hard winter, we lost about four hundred dollars worth of stock. In the year of 1859 I took the liver complaint and was sick all summer. This spring we had a daughter born and called her name Phebe Delora. She was the daughter of my wife Margaret Emily Earl. In the month of August 1859, my wife Lois Caroline had a daughter and called her name Elizabeth Tabitha. My health was very poor. November 3, 1860, a son was born to Margaret Emily Jones Earl we called him Thomas Franklin. In the summer of 1861, the government troops left us, bound for the states. In the fall of 1861, I was sent on a mission to Washington County in the southern part of this territory, a distance of three hundred miles. We started on the 29th of October, and had a pleasant journey most of the way. We located in Pine Valley on the head of the Santa Clara, January 22nd, we had a son born by Lois Caroline. We called his name John Owen Earl. He died and was buried February 2nd being eleven days old. He was a proper fine child, and his death was much regretted by the family. I purchased a share in a sawmill and was busy repairing it. We sawed 200,000 feet of lumber and the mill burned up, and then we built another. I then sold out to Eli Whipple. In the fall, Wilber and myself went to Salt Lake City. In 1862 I moved my first wife to Saint George, she was very sick in 1863 and 1864. We then all settled in Pine Valley, and got some good farming land, and in 1867, I was called upon to take my wives and go to Salt Lake to get our second anointing. The End This completes the history of Sylvester H. Earl as written by himself. The foregoing is all the writings we have of our father Sylvester Henry Earl except a journal of his missionary labors in England, commencing in the year 1852 and closing in 1855. I, Joseph Ira Earl, desire to write a few words at the close of our father’s history. Words cannot express the love and respect I have for his honored name, full of faith in the great latter day work. He was a strict observer of the Sabbath Day, honest and upright in his dealings, taught his family by precept and example to obey the commandments of the Lord, seldom missing getting all the family together for morning and evening prayer and occasionally holding family meeting’s where we were more fully taught the principals, and ordinances of the gospel as taught and revealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith. Father, loved the Prophet Joseph and spent much time helping to protect him from the mob, his enemies, and would give his life to save the prophet. My father was the husband of two wives, Lois Caroline Earl who was the wife of his youth and Margaret Jones Earl whom he married after his return from his mission to England. Both were good and noble women sharing all the hardships of a pioneer life, without a murmur or complaint as far as I know. It is a source of strength and encouragement to me to contemplate the life and teachings of my sainted mother. My heart is also full of love and praise for Aunt Margaret as we used to call her. She was always kind and cheerful, full of faith and good works. She was indeed a mother to me, giving much councils from time to time as I needed it. In the fall of 1870, the children were all sick with the measles which caused the death of my two brothers Sylvester Rhodanus and Hyrum. They died in December at Middleton, Washington County, Utah in 1871. Father having previously bought a place of one William Freams at Middleton, Utah, paying him $700.00 for it. He then moved Aunt Margaret down there. My mother still resided in Pine Valley, Washington County, Utah. In the spring of 1873, Father was taken sick and continued so until the 23 of July on which date he passed peacefully away at Middleton and was buried in the St. George cemetery on the 24th of July just twenty-six years from the time he landed in the Salt Lake Valley. The members of the family present at his death were Margaret and her two children, Phebe Delora and Thomas Franklin, my uncle Wilbur Joseph Earl, and my brother Wilber Bradley and myself. Of my father’s large family there are but three of his children left to perpetuate his honored name. My brother Wilber B. died on April 13th 1903, leaving a wife and five children, four by his wife of his youth, Harriet Wight Earl and one by his second wife, Lucresa Keel Earl. My sister Orena Earl Wixom died in Idaho leaving a husband and seven children. The three remaining children are Joseph Ira Earl, Thomas Franklin Earl and Elizabeth Darcus Earl. The above closing sketch of my father’s history was written on the 25th of April, 1907 at Bunkerville, Lincoln County, Nevada. (By Joseph Ira Earl) Copied in 1932 by Margaret Mae Earl Meeks, April 19, 1946 by Ida Beth Meeks Pierce, February 24, 1957 by Ann Baker Meeks, and May 25, 2001 by E. Leon & Janet Earl

Mission Diary

Contributor: LuciJoy Created: 3 years ago Updated: 5 months ago

THIS IS A TRANSCRIPT OF HIS MISSION DIARY PROBABLY WRITTEN AT THE END OF HIS MISSION. HE SERVED IN THE ENGLAND MISSION. HE WAS GONE AWAY FROM HOME FROM 15 SEPTEMBER 1852 TO 10 SEPTEMBER 1855 HE WAS BORN 16 AUGUST 1815 IN SCIOTO COUNTY, OHIO HE DIED 23 JULY 1873 IN MIDDLETON, UTAH AND WAS BURIED 24 JULY 1873 IN ST. GEORGE, UTAH, HIS FATHER: JOSEPH EARL II HIS MOTHER: DORCAS TABITHA WIXOM HIS WIVES: LOIS CAROLINE OWEN MARGARET EMILY JONES This Transcription Of His Missionary Journal Was Made From The Original Journal By Owen Ken Earl, Moses Lake, Washington In August 1986 The Original Journal Is In The Possession Of Zelia Earl Wells Wendel, St George, Utah, One Of His Granddaughters This transcription is being included in this volume as an Appendix so that it will be available to as many of Sylvester’s descendants as possible. MISSION DIARY OF SYLVESTER HENRY EARL Note: Modern spelling will be used with occasional “original” spelling left for flavor or put in parentheses. From working with the original journal, it appeared to Ken Earl that Sylvester had kept copious notes of various dates and happenings during his mission, and had then written this “Diary” after returning from his mission. THE CALL August the 28, 1852, Great Salt Lake City, (Utah). A conference of about too (two) thousand Elders were met together and near one hundred and fifty Elders were sent on missions, and I was one of this number. I now commence to give a history of my travels to the land of England to which I was appointed. I spent the time from the time of my appointment to the time of my starting in fixing to leave my family in as good a circumstance as I can and on the 15th of September (1852) I started, bound for Europe. HIS DEPARTURE We went to Ecco (Echo) Cannion (Canyon) where we stopt and staid over Sunday and here the mail came to us and brought our Licenses and Recommends from the President (Brigham Young). We then traveled on with speed and with little or no difficulty until we got near Laramie (Wyoming) where we found that some of our horses were failing. And when we got to Laramie, the Brethren sold their poorest horses and we pursued our journey. A little below Laramie, we had a heavy snowstorm which injured our teams mutch, and we staid until noon and moved on, but our teems continued to fail and we got down to the South Fork of the Platte where we had a stampeded which injured our teams some. But we got a good horse, saddle and bridle and two blankets. He (didn’t say who “he” was) came to our camp and stayed with our horses. We pursued our journey. FORT CARNEY TO NEW YORK CITY When we got to Fort Carney (Kearny), I sold my horse for 20 dollars and hired my things balled (hauled) to the Missouri River and I went on foot, and then I hired them hailed to Joseph where I took a steamboat and went to St. Louis. We did not stay there long until we got on board of another (boat) bound for Cincinnati (Ohio) and in six days we were in Cincinnati. Then I took the car to New York and was there too (two) weeks, in which time I was getting money to take me to England. AND THEN TO LIVERPOOL I got thirty-eight dollars. This was plenty of money and I had some to spair. On the 18th of December (1852), I started from New York and in 19 days I was in Liverpool. We had a ruff journey over the sea and I got sick after being on the (boat) five days and a number of our boys were sick also, but we were 21 in number and we were kind to each other. There was one Roman Catholick died on the vessel and I was favored with the privilege of being helped to the deck where I saw him put over board. He was a very wicked man. JANUARY 1853 ARRIVAL AND ASSIGNMENT TO STAFFORDSHIRE & SHROPSHIRE On the 4 day of January (1853), I arrived in England and staid their 4 days and I received my appointment to the Pastoral (in) charge of the Staffordshire and Shropshire Conferences. I went immediately to my field of labor and my health was yet poor. I stayed two weeks at Sister Johnson’s and (she) doctored me up. (I was at) Shrewsbury the most of my time and then I took a car and went to the Stafford Conference to the City of Maccelsfield where I found Elder Westwood, President of the Conference, and also Elder Spicer Crandell that came over with me over the plains. MACCELSFIELD I got to Maccelsfield on the 24 of January (1853). The Saints had prepared a nice party for me in the evening and I enjoyed myself very well and when we closed, Brother Crandell and I went to Brother Barnes and stayed all knight. The day we spent with Brother Weitmoor and stayed again (that night) with Brother Barnes, and then went to the Potteries and stopped at Bro. Bates until evening. Then we went to a meeting and then went home with Win. Wright and stayed all knight. Took breckfast and then went to Burglum and took dinner with Brother J. Reed. On Wednesday I went to Crem; stayed all night with Win. Hayes and then I went to Middlewich, staid with Brother Thoinmy Nickson. At 10 AM I went to Council and settled some difficulty and at two o’clock I had a meeting, and in the evening I preached, and then five were baptized. FEBRUARY 1853 Monday, I went to Crem to Bro. Mayson’s, got supper and then got on the train and went to Tilton and stayed with Joseph Steel, and then walked five miles, and they took me in a cart and Bro. Weitmoor and Bro. Crandell were with me. We went two miles to the hail and held a meeting. They (the Saints) said they would be rebaptized and renew their covenants with the Lord. We started next morning. They sent a young man with the horse and cart two miles, then we went on foot to Bro. Wigginses and from there to Brother Daniel Holding’s. Brother Westwood then returned to Wigginses and on Friday, February 4 (1853) Bro. Crandell and myself went to Shrewsbury 15 miles on foot. This was the hardest day’s walk that I have had. FAST MEETINGS HELD TO REDUCE DEBTS We went to Sister Johnson’s; stayed there and rested Saturday, and on Sunday we went to the Conference. The Conference commenced at half past 10. The President, Bro. Henry Nesbitt, opened the meeting and motioned that John 0. Angus should preside over the Conference. He then commenced and regulated the Am. Star agency. They wanted to liquidate their debts; motioned and seconded that the Saints hold a fast on the 2nd Sunday of this month and then on the first day or Sunday in each month until the debts are paid, and then continue the temple fund. And in the afternoon the Elders that were going to the hall occupied the time and they gave excellent discourses. One was David James and the other Thommas Austin, and then the Travelling Elders talked a little and in the evening Bro. Crandell and I occupied the time, and then the meeting was dismissed. BACK TO THE STAFFORD CONFERENCE On Monday evening, we held a Council and on the next day we went back to the Stafford Conference. Went in the car to Stafford and then went 4 miles on foot to Little Heath and stopped at Bro. Gilling’s and held a meeting. And then went to Bro. Thomas Green’s and stayed all night. This was the 10th of February (1853). On the 11th, we went to Bro. John Fields’ and stayed until evening and returned to Bro. Green’s and stayed all night and took breakfast. Then went and paid a visit at Bro. Kendricks’ and then returned to Bro. Greens. On Saturday, the 12th, we went to Bro. Gillum’s and also to Bro. John Locklises and took supper with them, and then returned to Bro. Thomas Green’s again. MORE MEETINGS & TRAVELS (On) Sunday the 13th (February 1853) we held a meeting in the afternoon at Bro. Gillum’s. We partook of the sacrament and the Saints testified of the truth of the Gospel, and in the evening we had a large congregation. I preached on the subject of the Restitution of All Things, bringing in the Resurrection of the Just and their reigning (raining) with the Savior a thousand years. And Brother Crandell then followed and bore testimony, and then spoke on the Gospel. He then returned to Bro. Green’s to stay all night, and I stayed at Bro. Locklis’, and in the morning Bro. Crandell came to me and we blessed (blest) Brother James’ wife and Bro. Gilium’s wife and then went to Stafford on foot, and then took the car to Burglum. Stopped at Bro. Reed’s and took supper and then went to a meeting at Brother John Halley’s. It was a testifying meeting (following which) I went to Bro. Simpson’s and stayed all night. In the morning, Brother John Sickorigh came in and went to Brother Reed’s and met with Bro. Crandell and Brother Westwood. We then went to Handley and held a meeting and the Spirit of the Lord was with us and then I went home with Joseph Ellis. Brother Crandell stopped with me and in the morning we went to Burglum and then went to Bro. Win. Mumford’s and there we then stopped and took dinner. Then Bro. Westwood and I went to Bro. Win. Creswell’s in Longton and in the evening we preached to the Saints in Longton, and we had the spirit and power of God on us and on the congregation. Also we stayed here all night. TO THE POTTERIES And on Thursday, the 17th (February 1853), we visited the Saints and on the 18th we went to Bro. William Hargraves’ and took dinner and then went to the Handley Branch were I stayed with Win. Wrights. Then I spent a half day looking through the Potteries and the workmen. This was a great pleasure to me. I then went to Bro. Pool’s to dinner, and then went to Burglum where I met with Brother Spencer, and on Sunday the 20th (of February 1853) Brother Spencer and I preached at Tunstdll into the night. A NEW DRESS FOR LOIS CAROLINE Also on Monday, I and Brother Simpson got my wife a new dress, and the Saints were bringing in many presents for my family. They are doing more than we could expect, and the Lord will bless them for their kindness. BROTHER LICKRISH DIES In the afternoon, I was at Bro. Pool’s and in the evening we had a meeting at Bro. Boils. Brother Spencer and I went to Bro. Simpson’s, stayed all night and in the morning we went to Maccelsfield and then Brother Spencer returned to Liverpool and found Brother Crandell. In the evening we went to a meeting and Bro. Lickrish was very sick. We had a good meeting and then we went home with Bro. John Horrocks. In the morning we went again to see Bro. Lickrish. He’s still getting worse. We then visited Brother Jackson and took supper, and Sister Jackson gave me a silk handkerchief for Orenia. We then went again to Bro. Horrocks’, and the next morning we went to see Brother Lickrish and he is still worse, and on Friday morning he died. (He was) well respected and beloved by all who knew him. FUNERAL SERVICES FOR BRO. LICKRISH Later the 26th we remained at our boarding place for it snowed all day, and on Sunday we went to Bro. Boil’s to dinner, and then to the room. We went to a (funeral) meeting at three in the afternoon. We formed 2 and 2 and marched to the place where the corpse (Bro. Lickrish, who had died) was and then we commenced to prepare to go to the grave. The first thing done was to prepare the place for the mourners and also the pall bearers. These were eight in number, four in number of each kind. Myself, Spicer Crandell, George Simpson and John Horrocks were appointed Mourners and then there were eight men to carry the coffin. There were eighty Saints at the funeral and we appointed two men to take the charge of the Saints. The coffin was (taken) into the street Elder Simpson then read the following hymn: Why Do We Mourn For Dying Friends?, and the Saints sang it, and then we went to the Church. It was St. Paul’s Great Church in Maccelsfield. We marched to it in the best of order and we went into the chapel and set the coffin down and took our seats, and then the Priest read a prayer. Also the 15th Chapter of 2nd Corinthians and spoke a few words. Then we formed and went to the grave, and the Priest came and read prayers until the coffin was put into the grave, and then we were formed with the Mourners in the front and we returned to the house where he died. 24 Elders took supper there and this expense came on the Conference and it was paid. We then retired to the room to hold a meeting. I preached his funeral (sermon). He had no relation there but one sister. Brother Crandell and I then went home with some people that were not in the Church and took supper, and then we went again to Bro. John Horrocks’. And in the morning we went in company with Elder Simpson and Horrocks and had our likenesses taken (photographs). And then we went (and also Elder Simpson) to Burglum, and in the evening we had a festival in Handley to bid farewell to those Saints who are going to the Mountains. Their names are John Mayson and family, John Hoyl, Win. Burton. I then went to Bro. Right’s. In the morning I went and spent the day with Bro. Pool and in the evening we went to meeting and returned to Bro. Pool’s. In the morning I went to the store and got some pens and then returned to Bro. Pool’s and waited for Bro. Westwood and we were busy writing. MARCH 1853 This is now the 2nd day of March. It has been verry (very) cold wether (weather) all of the time for 2 weeks, and is yet cold and stormy. Snow and rain often falls, but it is not as coald (cold) as it is in America or in the North parts of it. In the afternoon, we went to Peter Bateses, and in the evening both Bro. Westwood and Bro. George Simpson came in and staid (stayed) to supper. Bro. Westwood then left on bisness (business) and some Saints came in and we spent a pleasant evening in singing and with music of the violin. We then returned to Bro. Pool’s. TO LIVERPOOL ON EMIGRATION MATTERS On the morning of the 3rd of March, we went to the town of Burglum and received a letter from Pres. S. W. Richards. I left Bro. Crandell and went on the car to Maccelsfield to see Elder Westwood about the emigration of the Saints. The next morning I went to Liverpool to see Bro. Richards about the emigration and settled the business. We sent John Mayson, his wife and four children, John Boil and Win. Burton. I then returned again to Maccelsfield. On March 6th (1853), I visited Brother Barnes who is sick and then I went to the chappel, partook of the sacrament, and in the evening I preached on the Persecution of the Saints. On Monday we visited the Saints. On Tuesday we went to the Bollington Branch and held a meeting in the evening and stayed all night. In the morning we visited a (nearby) mountain so as to see over the vast country, and then we returned to Maccelsfield. I then visited the Saints and on Friday I went to Burglum and took dinner at Bro. Reed’s. I then visited three that wair (were) sick and then went to Bro. Pool’s and stayed all knight I then went to Bro. Mallet’s and there visited the sick, and then back to Bro. Pool’s where on hearing that Bro. Win. Pitt was at Brother Right’s, I went to visit him and spent the evening with Bro. Pitt, who had just come from America. PACKS THINGS TO SEND HOME On Sunday I went to Meeting. Elder Pitt preached and I followed him. We had a good meeting. I then went to the City of Hamley and preached in the evening and then went to George Simpson’s and stayed all night and then went and bought a trunk to pack my things in to send to America. I put them in. They were clothing and chiney wair (china ware) and then I went to visit the Saints who were sick. They are the Brother Moliet’s wives. They are much afflicted. On Tuesday I went to Burglum to Brother Mumford’s. His family is sick and from there (I went) to Handley to a meeting where I preached on the Order and Power of the Priesthood. I then went to Brother Pool’s and stayed all night and all day. On Wednesday, the 16th of March (1853), I wrote a letter to my family, and then went to the Longton Branch to a meeting in the evening. We there had the best of meetings. I stayed all night and then returned to Handley. There I met with Bro. Westwood. It is now March 17 (1853, and it is snowing very hard, but we are in good health. And on the 18th we went to Middlewitch and there I stayed and Bro. Westwood went on to visit the Conference on Saturday the 19th. I spent some time in sending letters to the States and to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake, and then I went to visit some of the Saints and to view the city. In the evening, I went to the Priests’ Council and we had a good meeting. A DAY OF MEETINGS I went to my lodgings, and in the morning at 7:00 AM I went to the Saints Prayer Meeting. At 10 in the morning I went again to the room and held an Open Council. This continued until 12 and then at 2PM we met and partook of the Sacrament. And then the Saints gave their testimonies to the work of the Lord, and they spoke in the gift of tungs (Tongues). One sister sung in the gift of Tongues and the spirit of the Lord was in our midst. We closed our meeting at 4:00 in the afternoon, and at 6:00 in the evening we met again and menny (many) of the wourld (world) wair (were) present, and I preached to them on gospel subjects and on the Resurrection. I was followed by Elder Hudson. He exorted (exhorted) the Saints to take the council (counsel) of the sermon that I had delivered to them. We then closed by prayer by Elder Hudson, and then retired; and I slept with Elder Hudson. On Monday the 21st (of March, 1853) I went to the (train) station near Sandbatch and (took the train) from there to Crem, and from there to Stafford, and then changed into another car and went to Shrewsbury (where I) found the Saints all in good health. In the evening we that were in the Priesthood met in Bro. John Anguses upper room for (a) Private Council, and we had a good meeting. I spoke on the subject of the Apostacy of the Church in the days of the Apostles. (The meeting was) closed by prayer, and I stayed there all night. In the morning Bro. Henry Umphres and I took a pleasant walk through the fields and returned to our breakfast, and then I spent the remainder of the day in visiting the Saints. In the evening (I went) to Sister Johnson’s and stayed all night (Next day) I went to Father Umphres’ and spent the forenoon, and then I went to Bro. Smahlman’s and spent the afternoon. In the evening we had a good meeting. One brother and sister prophesied that I should prosper in my mission and that my family (in America) were all well. This gave me pleasure. EJECTED FROM A CATHOLIC MEETING On Thursday I went to Wellington and spent the night with Brother Buttler and family. In the evening his sons and I went to a Catholic meeting, but the oald (old) Priest soon began to suspicion me as being a Latter-day Saint (a litter day Saint), and he came to me and said, “Who are you, and what denomination are you?” And on telling him that I was a Latter-day Saint, he flew into a rage and said that he wanted me to go out of the chapel. I then went out and after I got out of the chapel, the Priest followed me and wanted me to tell him who gave me authority to preach. I then told him that it was the Lord my God. He then ordered me out of the yard. I went (Out of the yard) while him and three more were in a terrible rage, fearing lest I should brake (break) into their flock for we have been taking the best of them all reddy (already), and I intend to take all of the honnest (honest) in hart (heart). On Good Friday the Saints from Shrewsbury came to Wellington and we went to Newport for a tee (tea) party. We passed the evening in good pleasure. I and John 0. Angus stayed with Alfred Caswell, and later on we went to Burglum. From thence to Maccelsfield where we went to Brother Westwood’s. PRIESTS’ COUNCIL HELD We then went to the Rooms and held a Priests’ Council, and there we had the Presiding Elders from all the branches in Council. We then nominated men to the office of Elder and to the office of Priests, Teachers and Deacons, according to the dictation of the Spirit of the Lord. I gave them a short lecture on the necessity of building the temple. We dismissed until 10 AM in the morning and Brother Angus and I went home with Father John (?). And at 10 in the morning we met at the Room and commenced our conference, bringing before them the authorities of the Church for to know if they would sustain them, which was unanimous. I was then brought before them as their Pastor. It (the vote) was unanimous. Elder Westwood and Elder Spicer W. Crandell were presented to the conference, carried unanimous. We ordained those that were appointed to their several offices. We then dismist (dismissed) until half past two, and then continued to appoint Presidents of Districts and of Branches and (gave) some instruction to the Saints in general, and then closed until evening. Then Brother John 0. Angus, the President of the Shropshire Conference, delivered a lecture. He was followed by Elder Crandell, and then I gave the Saints that instruction that I thought would be for their good, and then we closed our conference by singing the hymn “Come, Come Ye Saints, No Toil Nor Labor Fear.’ I then closed the conference by prayer. On Monday the 28th of March (1853), we were engaged in visiting the Saints and in the evening we were all at the room at 6:00 to a large tea party. Many strangers met with us and we had a very good time. We continued until 11:00 o’clock, and then went to our lodgings. At 9:00 in the morning we were at the station and in forty minutes we were at Burglum Station, and there Brother Angus left for Shrewsbury and Elder Crandell and I came on foot to Win. Mumford’s and spent a fieu (few) hours, and then went to Elder Reed’s and took supper and then we went to the meeting in Handley. We had a good meeting. On Wednesday, we went to Longton and preached to them and I think that here is good prospects of some joining the Church. On Thursday we went to Bro. Argranes to dinner and here we met with Elder Westwood. From thence we went to visit Brother Savery who had been badly wounded in one of his eyes. We anointed it and blest (blessed) him and went our way to Handley where I preached on the necessity of paying tithing to build the temple and to pay the Conference debts. Then I called a vote to know if they would do this, and they unanimously voted that they would, and then I spent the night with Elder Right APRIL 1853 I and Elder Westwood then went to Burglum to Elder Simpson’s to audit the Conference books, and we spent the time until in the afternoon, and then I left them and went to Elder Simpson’s and got some supper. Then I went to the train and went to Crem and spent the evening with them. This is the 1st of April (1853). I then went to a Public House and stayed over night and then in the morning I went to Elder Waises (?) again and stayed until 11:00 PM. I then went on the train to the Sandbatch Station, and then I walked to Middlewitch and I stopped at Thomas Nickson’s and took my supper. I feel first rate and know that the Lord does bless me, and also all of the faithful in his kingdom. I stayed all night and then in the morning Elder Drinkwater and I went to Sostoc to Elder John Taylor’s and I stayed with them and Elder Drinkwater returned to Middlewitch for to preach in that city. I went to Elder Samuel Bramail’s; preached at 2:00 o’clock in the afternoon and again in the evening and the people gave good attention to what I said, and they wished to hear me again. I stayed here all night and after breakfast we went to visit the Saints and to see the country. A VISIT TO TABLEY PARK We first visited a large park called the Tabley Park belonging to John Lester. It is a pleasant place. We first came to a beautiful grove of Chestnut timber, and in this grove was a building for to keep their hunting dogs in for to train them to come at the sound of the horn. We then passed on to the old buildings made by his great grandfather in the time of war. It is built on a point of land projecting into a small lake, and a channel out across so as to make an island, and we have to cross on a bridge. Before we enter the bridge, we went through a small room. This can be loct (locked) so as to prevent any person from going on the island. On the island we saw the old castle and an old church with some small buildings. This is the most ancient work that I have seen. The Royal Family has left this and moved to a large and spacious building in the middle of the park, and we went past the front of the buildings and then past the burrow for rabbits where we could see hundreds at once. And then to the fish pond and viewed that. We then went to the town of Nutsford and spent a few hours with the Saints and I blessed one child. We then went to Brother Taylor’s, visiting the Saints by the way and I stayed with Elder Taylor and Elder Bramall returned home again. SYLVESTER MEDITATES ON APRIL 6TH On Tuesday night I held a meeting near Brother Taylor’s, and then stayed over knight (night) with them again. In the morning I took a pleasant walk all alone and I felt to meditate upon the situation of the Church, for this is Wednesday, the 6th of April (1853) and I am led to think on my home and of the Conference in the Land of Zion, and of the joy they have, and of the situation of my little family. In meditating on the glory of Zion and in all of my meditations, I did not forget to pray for the delivery of the Saints from this land to go to the Land of Zion. WITH JOHN TAYLOR I returned to the room and administered to Sister Harriett Taylor, and John Taylor gave me a nice vest. In the evening I went back to Middlewitch and held a meeting with the Saints and then stayed with Brother Nickson, and ordained Tommas Nickson and Tommas Lewis to the office of a Priest In the morning I went to Elder Drinkwater’s for my breakfast and then I started for Sandbatch accompanied by two of the Brethren who went with me three miles. I then went alone and when I got to Sandbatch, I found Elder Hudson quite ill, and also some little disturbance in the Branch. But I stayed and preached that night and we set all things aright and all is well. I stayed all night with Elder Skellin and took breakfast with Brother Smith’s family, and then I went back to Brother Snelson’s and took with me Elder John Hudson to accompany me to the station. Then I went to Crem and stopped with Elder Hays and spent the day in talking, singing, reading and writing. In the evening I preached at Elder Hayes’. One woman said that she was to be baptized, but I told her that she should try to get her husband to go along (and be baptized, too), and she said that she would try. I left it with Elder Hayes to baptize them and I went to the Potteries. On Sunday the 10th (of April 1853), I went to the Shropshire Conference, and in the evening I went to the chapel with Elder Angus and we had a large congregation. I preached and the Spirit of the Lord was upon me and on the Saints also. I stayed all night with Elder Angus. I have to say with regard to the Saints and the work of the Lord that they do prosper and the work of the Lord is rolling on and the devil can’t stop it! TO NORTH WALES On Monday, Brother Angus and I started out to visit the Saints in the North of Wales and we were gone until Monday, the 18th of April (1853). We found the Saints in tolerable good spirIts in the Branches and the work is still roiling (rouling) on. On Friday, the 22nd of April, Brother Angus and myself started to go around the North side of the Conference and we went to Wellington. There at Bro. Buttler’s we stayed until Saturday, and then we went to Newport and preached on Sunday. From there to Marketrayton, and there we hada splendid meeting and some are believing and others are going to be baptized on Saturday by Elder Bain. From there we went to Father Bates’ and spent 3 days in looking over the farms. On Sunday we had a meeting with the Saints and we administered to some that were sick. On Monday Brother Bates took his good spirits. MAY 1853 DID THEY NEED A LAWYER? From here (we went) to the Stafford Conference, and on Sunday, the first day of May (1853), I received a letter from Elder Westwood that he was in trouble and needed my assistance in the case of a man fining him for having the deacon hold the door in the time of prayer. I went to him (Elder Westwood) on the train and the trial was just opening. Brother Westwood got a lawyer to plead his case and then he was fined 40 pence. He then wanted to take an appeal; also some of the Saints here. I told them if the judges in England were like those of America, then they had better stop. However, they went on until they spent $50, and then I told them they MUST STOP. They accordingly done so and then I visited the Saints. Through most of the Conference, the Saints in general feel well. In one instance we had to cutoff a sister, the wife of Elder Long, for general bad conduct. Then I started again to the Shropshire Conference, which was on the 29th of May (1853), and here we were blessed with the presence of President S. W. Richards, Charles Smith and several Elders from other Conferences, from hoom (whom) we received mutch good instruction. Among the rest, President Richards gave us a beautiful lecture on the subject of Celestial Marriage. THE SHREWSBURY SHOWS On Monday, the 30th of May (1853), we went to Shrewsbury Shows and we were invited into an upper room so as to see over the whole scenery as it passed along. The streets were crowded to an excess with people and carriages, carts, hoises and all in an uproar. The scene was composed of a woman representing the Queen, followed by her waiters. Then another Queen in like manner as the first. Then came Mr. Lattimory, Play Actors all on horseback and drest (dressed) in costly array, and then the macannicks (mechanics) in their turn. I looked at the scenery and thought, “Oh, what a pity it is that so many people should be without the knowledge of the truth. Oh, that this people, like the people of Deseret, would hear the truth and imbrace (embrace) the same.” OUR OWN CELEBRATION We then returned to our lodgings, took dinner and then went to the chapel to the Festival which the Saints had prepared. The meeting was called to order by Brother Angus (followed by) singing and prayer by Sylvester H. Earl, and then some fine words by Elder Angus. At 4:00 o’clock we took tea and then proceeded with our meeting where all was peace and harmony. The room was well dressed with a variety of flowers and evergreens and of (banners) of Joseph and Hyrum, then the First Presidency and the Twelve, with many banners of the Beehive motto in Deseret. “We Are Free”, “Ye Elders of Israel”, “Heralds of Salvation”, and many, many more similar banners of like manner. Over the room waved a large flag of England and then an American flag. These were floating in the air as if to say “We Stars and Stripes will soon go away and leave the Black Ball to decay!” We had mutch (much) good instructions from President (S. W.) Richards and the Elders from other places. At 10:00 in the evening we closed by singing and prayer by S. H. Earl. MOUNT MORMON On Tuesday, Elder Angus and myself went to the station and saw President Richards off for Liverpool. And then we went, in company of about 25 Saints, to Wellington on the train and then to the mountain 3 miles to the East, taking some dinner with us. At this mountain we had a good meeting, administered to Brother Peel, who was ill, and named this place “Mount Mormon”. JUNE 1853 We then returned home and spent the remainder of the week in Shrewsbury. On Sunday, I preached to the Saints and on Monday I went to the Stafford Conference. I spent the week in visiting the Saints and holding prayer meetings. On Saturday evening I attended a special conference of Elders in Hanley, and on Sunday I went to a camp meeting of the Saints and we had a large congregation of the world to hear us. We had a good time and I think it will result in good. Then I went to Sandbatch and visited the Saints. On Monday I went to Crem and baptized 3. Then I went to Maccelsfield and stayed until Saturday with the Saints. I then went to Burglum and met with Elder Crandeli and spent a few hours with him. (At this point in the Sylvester Henry Earl Missionary Diary there is a two-page writing entitled, “A Song On The Death Of Tabitha Jane Earl, Daughter Of John T. Earl and Ann Rebeck Earl. (She died on 26 Oct 1853.)” As near as it can be deciphered, it reads: A SONG ON THE DEATH OF TABITHA JANE EARL 1 EARTHLY HAPPINESS IS FLEETING, EARTHLY PROSPECTS QUICKLY FADE, PARENTS’ HEARTS WITH PLEASURE BEATING IS TO BITTERNESS BETRAYED. 2 SCENES OF SORROW HAVE DISTRESSED YOU; SCENES THAT FILLED YOUR HEARTS WITH PAIN YET WILL YIELD THE CHOICEST BLESSING IF MOUNT ZION YOU REGAIN. 3 IN THE DARKEST DISPENSATION BROTHER, KNOW THAT GOD IS JUST. ‘TIS THE RICHEST CONSOLATION IN THE PRIESTHOOD POWER TO TRUST. 4 WHILE AFFLICTIONS’ SURGE COMES O’RE YOU, LOOK TO YONDER VALLEY FAR; SEE THE TEMPLE’S SPIRES ARISING HAIL THE PRIESTHOOD’S LOVELY CARE. 5 THOUGH YOUR LOVELY CHILD IS TAKEN; FROM YOUR BOSOM IT WAS TORN; SOON HER SLEEPING DUST WILL WAKEN AND HER SPIRIT WILL RETURN. 6 YES, AGAIN YOU WILL BEHOLD HER FAIRER THAN THE MORNING RAY. ON MOUNT ZION YOU’LL EMBRACE HER WHERE ALL TEARS ARE WIPED AWAY. 7 BROTHER, SISTER, NO MORE WEEPING; NEPHEWS, NIECES, CEASE TO MOURN. KNOW THAT THOSE WHO TRUST IN JESUS SHALL HAVE THEIR BABES WITH THEM. 8 WELCOME PEACE, YOUR CRYING WILL END FOR YOUR CHILD WILL SOON RETURN. IN THE TEMPLE SOON WELL MEET HER WITH JESUS, SAINTS AND ANGELS AGAIN. (It is assumed that Sylvester wrote this poem and sent it to his brother John after learning of Tabitha’s death, and that its location in this portion of his journal is not important. Perhaps this is an indication of Syslvester’s efforts to reactivate John, who had apparently become inactive in the Mormon Church by this time.”) (Continuing on Saturday) TO THE LEICESTER CONFERENCE I went to Shrewsbury and joined with Elder Angus and started to the Leicester Conference. The first day we went to Birmingham and spent a little time with Elder Orson Pratt and then went on to Leicester. We were met by the Saints at the station and were gladly received by them. I spent the most of my time with Elders Smith, Hunt and Mayer, and in conference and councils every night for one week. Then we went to Whitwick and spent the Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, and on Wednesday we returned to Shrewsbury. We found the Saints all well. JULY 1853 A VISIT TO A MONASTERY On Friday, July 1, 1853, while I was at Whitwick, I went in company with Elder Angus, Elder John Hurdley and another Elder to the Monastery to see the Monks. It is a splendid edifice and it contains at this time only 42 Monks. They have menney (many) peculiarities about them, too numerous to mention. Yet they say they must not many nor have wiming (women) about them and eat no flesh. And they have erected a Mount Calvary near the monastery and a cross and the image of the Savior nailed to it. We also went to their temple and saw the image of Our Savior and the wounds in his side, hands and feet. He is in full size and is lying on his back... Just behind him sits the Virgin Mary in full size and in rich apparel and seems to be weeping over him. The two are made of solid marble and were brought from Egypt They cost (it is said) ten thousand pounds. I also visited the cemetery and the monuments in Leicester which gave me much pleasure. AUGUST 1853 While in Birmingham, I went and saw the grave of James Flannagin, and since I returned to Shrewsbury, I have been the most of my time in my room writing until Friday evening. I took a walk in the country past the monuments, and then went to the city and held a prayer meeting. On Saturday I went to Wellington and visited Brother Butler and family. Spent the day with them, then returned home. On Sunday I spoke to the Saints and strangers in our large room. On Monday I returned to the Stafford Conference and helped the Saints to get ready for their conference, which came on the 7th of August (1853). President S. W. Richards and Elder Longforth were with us; also Elder John Angus and Elder John Mayer. On Monday we held a Tea Party and all was conducted in very good order and the Saints and Strangers all enjoyed themselves verry mutch (very much). FRIENDS DEPARTING Friends depart and memory takes them To her caverns pure and deep, And a forced smile only wakes them From the shadows where they sleep. Who can school the heart’s affections? Who can banish its regret? If you blame my deep dejection Teach, oh teach me to forget Lead me not to festive bowers I was with, I sat there last. Weave not for me Spring’s early flowers They’ll remind me of the past. Music seems like mournful wailing In the halls where we have met; Mirth’s joy call is unavailing, Teach, oh teach me to forget One who hopelessly remembers Cannot bear a dimming light. He would rather watch the emblems Of a love that once was right Who can school the heart’s affections? Who can banish its regret? If you blame my deep dejections, Teach, oh teach me to forget By Sylvester Henry Earl in his Missionary Diary Dated shortly after August 7, 1853 38TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION On Monday I went to Shrewsbury with Elder Angus and spent the week until Saturday, and then I went to the Newport Branch. On Sunday at half past 2:00 PM, unexpected in our meeting, a charge was preferred by Alfred Caswell against Robert Timis for adultary (adultery) and was sustained, and he was cut from the Church. I staid (stayed) there until Tuesday, August 16 (1853). This is my birthday and the Saints have made a fine supper for me and have presented me with some presants (presents). The supper was prepared by Sharlota Johnson, an aged lady and a particular friend of mine, for she it was that took cair (care) of me when I was sick. Our company at supper numbered 30. We spent the evening in speaking, drinking toasts and in singing. I remained in Shrewsbury until Sunday the 21st (of August 1853). I went in company with Charles Shaw and Henry Nesbett to Wellington and settled some difficulties that existed between Brother Butler’s family and Sister Ann Caiswell, and then returned to Shrewsbury. I went to the Room and spoke to the people. We had the Room crowded full; good attention was paid. A number of five were baptized during the week. After the meeting I went to Wellington and stayed all night SYLVESTER GOES TO DUBLIN On Monday, the 22nd of August (1853), I started on a visit to Dublin in Ireland. I arrived at Liverpool at 3:00 PM and went to Elder Linforth’s. In the evening I went, in company with Elders Linforth and Jakes, to a Council Meeting during which time Elder Hanson Jenson came in from Copenhagen in Denmark and informed us of the death of Elder Willard Snow. He died on the sea and was buried in it. About the same time, Elder Daniel Cams came in from Germany and Elder Richardson from the West Indies Islands and David Grant of the Liverpool Conference. So I spent the time with them until Saturday at 2:00 PM when I crossed the arm of the sea from Liverpool to Burton Head, and then I took the train one hundred miles along the sea coast (I went through) Willesglassing, the great suspension bridge over an arm of the sea and over those large Grand Bridges that are some of the wonders of the world. Also the ruins of many old castles which now lay in ruins. At 10:00 PM I arrived at Holley Head and got on board of a steamer and started for Dublin, and arrived there at 9:00 A.M. I went and found Elder Gilbert Clemmons and Win. Hays and spent the day with the Saints. I preached tonight and lodged with Elder Clemmons. THE QUEEN’S VISIT TO DUBLIN As it was the time of the Queen’s visit (to Dublin), I went on Monday and saw her, and in the afternoon I spent four hours in the Great Exhibition Hall. Thousands of people were present, many from America. On Tuesday, I visited the large Park and the residence of Lord Leftenant Minheir where the Queen stayed. I returned to Elder Hayes’ in the fog and rain, passing again (where the Royalty was) and saw Prince Albert and their two oldest sons. I visited many of the most prominent buildings and gardens in the city (of Dublin). Then I took the train and went to Eingstown. Paid a short visit. Eingstown is a handsome seaport town. I then returned to Dublin and at 10:00 PM I went on board the vessel and started for home. We had a pleasant voyage, but in the knight (night) we came near running against another vessel. I arrived at home at 10:00 the next evening - all well. I spent the remainder of the week visiting the Saints and on Sunday I spoke to the Saints and many Strangers. On Monday I went with Brother Angus and visited the Saints. In the evening we held our Council and ordained Charles Shaw to the office of an Elder and appointed him to labor in the vineyard. SEPTEMBER 1853 On Thursday, the 6th of September (1853), I returned to the Stafford Conference and visited the Saints (who were) generally well. I settled some difficulties in which Elder Shettleworth was cut from the Church for adultary (adultery), and on the 24th I returned to Shrewsbury. On the 25th we held our Quarterly Conference. The reports were very good from all parts of the Conference. On Monday we held a Tea Party, which also passed off well. Much good instruction was given and many joined with us. I spent the time until Saturday visiting the Saints and then I went with Bro. Angus to Newport. On Sunday we held a meeting and we had a good time. On Monday I started and went to the Stafford Conference. This evening we had a Tea Meeting in the City of Maccelsfield. All went on well. Several were baptized this week. I spent the week in visiting the Saints and some of the world who wished to hear me talk on the Gospel. OCTOBER 1853 On Sunday I spoke to a crowded congregation; a good spirit prevailed. On Monday evening we held Council. Brother Westwood was present. I then went with Bro. Crandell around the Conference visiting the small branches and comforting the hearts of the Saints until October 7th (1853). I returned to the Shropshire Conference. Elder Crandell also went with me and we joined in a Tea Meeting at Marketraton where menny Strangers came. We had the privaledge (privilege) of preaching the Gospel to them and I think it will result in good. On Tuesday I went to Shrewsbury in company with the following Elders: Angus, Crandeli and Nesbitt. I spent the week in Councils, Prayer Meetings and visiting the Saints until Saturday the 22nd (of October 1853). Elder Angus and myself went to the Lightmoon Green Branch. We spent the Sabbath with them. They are all in good spirits. We were sent for to see a little child that we had administered to on a previous visit. It (the child) is well. The parents say that they know it was healed by the power of God. This we can testify to. On Monday we returned to Shrewbury (where) all was well. I then composed the following song in Spirit: We feel the power, We are resurrected receiving immortality We passed the scourge of mobs and tyrants Eternally we shall be free. Chorus For we are the sons of God celestial And daughters, too, that are made free. Gods and Goddesses in His glory Reign through all eternity. Heaven’s broad day bath o’er me broken Far above earth’s span of sky And the dead may by this token Know that we have ceased to die. Now we soar amid the heavens, Passing on from world to world. Swifter than electric lightning To our view they were unfurled. As we passed the world called Venus A mighty Angel then did say “As you’re on your way returning, Will you spend one day with me?” Unto this the Angel Gabriel, Who was passing by with me, Turned and said, “We cannot tarry, Soon we will at Kolob be.” Then the Angel that talked with us Sprang from Venus, clasped my hand, Asked if we would pass Hercules That he might call and see a friend. Unto this we soon consented Although we had no time to stay, Passing by the Gods and Angels Who are set to guard the way. As we came to Kolob’s borders Another Angel then did cry “Have you got the signs and tokens?” Which we gave without delay. Then we heard the voice of Father Say “Welcome Children; Pleasant Day. Do you like Celestial Glory? Would you like with us to stay?” “Yes” we exclaimed, all united, “We would like with you to stay. But, we’ve left our wives and children On the earth that’s faraway.” Then exclaimed Michael-Adam “Come my sons and go with me. See the worlds that are Celestial; Like one of these our earth shall be.” “And all my children who were willing Celestial laws for to obey Shall be redeemed from pollution And in my presence they shall be.” “Our earth under Celestial curtain And all the Saints upon it be Gods and Goddesses in perfection Shall reign to all eternity.” On Tuesday the 25th of October (1853), I spent the day in writing the Saints and administering to the sick. On Thursday I went in company with Elder I. 0. Angus to the Stanley (?) Branch. It rained very hard and we got very wet. We took a cold but were nurrished (nourished) by the Saints and soon recovered. We spent two days with them and returned by coach to Shrewsbury on Saturday (to find) all well. On Sunday, the 30th of October, we held our meeting as usual and were mutch annoyed by the mobs. The city is in a wonderful uproar, but the Lord is our God and he will save us and exalt us in his kingdom; therefore, we fear no danger. On Monday, the 31st of October (1853), 1 bid the Saints farewell and started to the Stafford Conference, traveling by train to Newport. I spent the afternoon with the Saints a stayed all night with John Bate. NOVEMBER 1853 On the first of November, I took the train to Gnagel and visited the Saints. I confirmed Sister Lewis and blessed her and then blessed Brother Hall who was sick. I then went to Brother John Thomases and stayed all night. I spent the evening in conversation with two gentlemen who said they believed the Doctrine to be true. One said he would be baptized. On Wednesday, the 2nd of November (1853), I went to the Little Heath Branch and preached at Elder Gillums, (where) we had a good meeting. On Thursday the 3rd I took the train to the Potteries and spent the time in visiting the Saints until Saturday, the fifth, when I again entered into Council on the case of Elders Hughes and Hargraves. We investigated the case and settled it. QUARTERLY CONFERENCE On Sunday I preached at Hanley and on Monday I went to Sandbatch and preached at the Room to the Saints. We had a good meeting. I then went to Middlemutch and from thence to Laytock to Elder John Taylor’s. Stayed until Saturday evening and then went to Maccelsfield to attend our Quarterly Conference. We held our Council on Saturday evening. Sunday morning, November 18, 1853, at half past 10 AM we commenced our Conference and we had much business on hand such as finances of the conference, the changing of the officers and the releasing of those that have to go to the Land of Zion this coming season. Among these are Joseph Westwood, his wife and two children. Also George Simpson and family. Much good instruction was given and the conference closed at 10 PM. EARL & CRANDELL REBAPTIZE EACH OTHER On Monday we had a farewell party (where there was) much good preaching, recitations and singing. The meeting was both opened and closed by prayer. On Tuesday (November 20) evening we had our fellowship meeting. On this day Spicer W. Crandell and myself were rebaptized by each other and reconfirmed by each other. I then anointed and blessed him for the restoration of his health. Our meeting was closed by Samuel Herron. I then spent the remainder of the week in visiting the Saints to find who could go to the Land of Zion. The Saints are in good spirits. On Sunday (November 25) we had a good meeting. Many Strangers were present and they paid good attention (to what was said and done). On Monday evening we held an Open Council to lay before the Saints all the affairs of the Branch. On Tuesday the 22nd (November 1853) I went to the Potteries and visited the Saints in that part and preached three times in the course of the week. I also held an Open Council in the Hanley Room to lay before them the affairs of the Branch and to see about getting means to send Elder Westwood to Zion. On Sunday the 27th (November 1853), I went on the train to Maccelsfield and held our meeting at half past 2:00 PM. I heard the testimonies of the Saints and then at 6:00 PM I preached in the chapel to a large congregation - all in good spirits. On Monday (November 28, 1853) we held an Open Council and took into consideration (the proposal for) a Tea Party for the 2nd of January 1854. I appointed a comity (committee) of nine to oversee the same. I spent the balance of the week in visiting the Saints of the Conference, and on Saturday I went to Shrewsbury. Here the Saints are much annoyed with a Male party who came to the Room to disturb the meeting. DECEMBER 1853 On Sunday, the 4th of December (1853), I and Elder John Mayer spoke to the people who gave very good attention - and all is going well. Elder John Mayer is appointed to succeed Elder Angus in the presidency of the Conference. RAISING MONEY TO SEND ANGUS TO ZION On Monday, (December 5 1853), we held a Council in Shrewsbury and entered into some arrangements for our conference to be held in Shrewsbury for the Shropshire Conference. I then started, in company with Elders Angus and Mayer, to visit the Saints in the Branches and to raise money to send Elder Angus to Zion. This day we went to Juksays and found them in good spirits. On the day following, we went to Newport (where we) left Elder Mayer and pursued our journey to Gnagel. Visited the Saints and instructed them in their emigration affairs. On Thursday the 8th (of December 1853) we returned to Newport and then to Marketraytown and held a meeting and collected some money for the emigration of Elder Angus. While here we received a note from Elder Nesbitt stating that the Male has come on Wednesday night and interrupted their meeting and whipt (whipped) one of the Brethren very hard. On receiving this (note), I sent Elder Mayer back to take charge of them, and on Saturday the 10th (December 1853) we went to the Lightmoor Green Branch and preached to them. We raised 7 pounds for Elder Angus, and on Monday the 12th (of December 1853) we returned to Shrewsbury.. We held our Council at night The Saints are in good spirits. TROUBLE WITH “THE MALE” On the Wednesday following (December 14, 1853), I went in company with Elder Mayer to the Ashterly Branch and held our meeting on Thursday night. Elder Mayer returned to Shrewsbury and Elder Angus came to me and reported that the Male was more hostile on Wednesday evening. We held a meeting again on Sunday and the Saints were in good spirits and wishing to emigrate. On Friday we returned to Shrewbury and found the Saints in much trouble, the Male having disturbed their peace of mind and also hurt some of them. Bro. Thos. Williams has prosecuted one of them but has not got justice, and this is as much as we can expect of them (their justice system). On Saturday, December 24 (1853), we held our Council to prepare for the Conference on the following day. On Sunday, December 25 (Christmas Day), we held our Conference. All went on in good order. We held our Tea Party on Monday, but the Male came and broke it up, but not without a good deal of trouble. On Monday evening we held our Council and all the Priesthood were in good spirits. On Tuesday I went to the Potteries and met with Bro. Denal and Bro. Crandell. JANUARY 1854 Here I spent the Sabbath, being New Years Day (January 1, 1854). On Monday I went to Maccelsfield to a great Party. Also on Tuesday evening Elders Angus and Hunt were with us. On Wednesday a heavy snowstorm came, the heaviest ever known (here) for 30 years. It covered up the many railway carriages and blocked all of the highways. On Friday, I went with the Brethren, Elders Demel, Crandell, Angus and Hunt, to the Potteries. On Sunday I went to Maccelsfield again and preached in the Hall; confirmed two. All in good spirits. I started preparing the Saints for the Valley (Zion), that are going this turn, until Wednesday. Then I returned to Burglum and then to Sandbatch and met with Elders Daniel and Bond. A good meeting was held at night, and on Friday I went to Crem and opened a large Hall. I preached on the First Principles of the Gospel to a large and respectable congregation. I made arrangements for delivering 12 lectures in the said Room. TO LIVERPOOL TO SEE THE SAINTS OFF On the day following I and Elder I. Bond went to the Potteries, and on Sunday the 15th (January 1854), I went to Maccelsfield and preached in the Room to the Saints and many Strangers. I stayed and visited the Saints. On Sunday the 22nd (January 1854) I went to Bury and preached in Tunstell in the Room, and in Handley in the evening. On Monday (23rd) I went to Crem and stayed two days. From thence I went to Draton and preached. On Friday (27th) to Newport and on Saturday (28th) to Shrewsbury. I took very sick and on Monday (30th) I started on the train to Liverpool to see the Saints start to Zion. In the evening (January 30,1854) I wrote down these lines: TO BE LONG REMEMBERED Will you go along with me, Bonnie Lassie 0? Far away across the Sea, Bonnie Lassie 0? O’er the ocean deep and wide Never fearing wind or tide I should love thee by my side, Bonnie Lassie 0. Yonder temples rearing high, Bonnie Lassie 0. With its turrets in the sky, Bonnie Lassie 0. And our God has said he’d bless It with hearts of humbleness We will to its porches press, Bonnie Lassie 0. Nay the journ’s not so hard, Bonnie Lassie 0. If thy will does not retard, Bonnie Lassie 0. All thy weaknesses I’ll bear, Bonnie Lassie 0. BY THE TWO LOVERS: We have here our friends and home, Bonnie Laddie 0. And why seekest thou to roam, Bonnie Laddie 0? Does thy country thee not please Or do sorrows vex and tease? That sits not thy heart at ease, Bonnie Laddie 0? But the Journey’s long and drear, Bonnie Laddie 0. And my heart is full of fear, Bonnie Laddie 0. With the passage o’re the plain Midst both frost and snow and rain I should perish with the pain, Bonnie Laddie 0. Oh then must I leave my home, Bonnie Laddie 0? And like Abraham’s Sarah roam, Bonnie Laddie 0? From my mother’s tender arms? For I love thee ever dear And so banish all thy fear, Bonnie Lassie 0. Yes, but here we have no home, Bonnie Lassie 0. Nor a stone to call our own, Bonnie Lassie 0. But in yonder valley free There’s a home for you and me So I pray thee go and see, Bonnie Lassie 0. Leave my country with its charms, Bonnie Laddie 0? There to buffet unknown harms, Bonnie Laddie 0? Near together we have lived, Thou hast never me deceived, And I”ll never with thee part But I’ll go with all my heart So prepare to make a start, Bonnie Laddie 0. BOTH Then together we will go, Lad and Lassie 0. Since our God commands it so, Lad and Lassie 0, As we bow ourselves to pray May He help us on the way, Lad and Lassie 0. VISITS SAINTS ON THE “GOLCONDA” I went to a suorea (soiree) in the Large Room, and Tuesday (January 31, 1854) I went and visited the Saints on board the GOLCONDA. Brother Hall was sick. I then did some business at the (Mission) office with President S. W. Richards and with Bro. Linforth. I stayed with Spicer W. Crandell. (Note by Ken Earl: When I read this poem and contemplated Sylvester’s November 1855 marriage to Margaret Emily Jones shortly after his return from England, I surmised that she was a passenger on the GOLCONDA. Though during later research I found a passenger by that name, the age given for that person did not match the much younger age of Margaret. I intend to ask Grandpa Sylvester about all this when we meet but if you get there first, you ask him. So far, we have been unable to learn when she emigrated from England or on what ship she was a passenger.) FEBRUARY 1854 February 1st (1854) I went again to the vessel (GOLCONI)A) and bid a sorry farewell to the Saints and then returned by way of Manchester. I stayed over night at Stockport with Brother Dunn and from thence to Maccelsfield. Met with Bro. Demel and held our Meeting on Sunday. The Saints are all in good spirits. On Monday evening we held our Council and all is well. The work is prospering in this city. VISITS MORE BRANCHES On Tuesday the 7th of February (1854), three were baptized and were confirmed in the evening at a testimony meeting where we enjoyed much of the Spirit of the Lord. On Wednesday I went to the Lostoc Branch on the coach and I preached on Thursday evening. The Saints are in good spirits although the work is not prospering in this part. On Friday I went to Middlewitch. Here the Saints are nearly all sick. On Saturday I went to Sandbatch and met in Council. The report is rather unfavorable. Two more were cut from the Church and several more Sisters (were called before) the Council to answer to the charges made against them. On Sunday, February the 12th (1854), I preached in Sandbatch at half past 2:00 PM and then I started, in company of 10 of the Saints, to Crem, a distance of six miles on foot, expecting to hear Elder J. Bond deliver a lecture on the necessity of present revelation, but as he did not come, I had to speak on the subject. I enjoyed the Spirit of the Lord and the people were very quiet, and the present prospect is that we shall do good here. On Monday I went to the Potteries and met with Bro. Demel; spent two days visiting the Saints. On Thursday, the 16th (of February 1854), I went to Maccelsfield and spent the evening with the Saints in the Room in speaking dialogues and reciting pieces. My health is very poor. I have just received a letter from Bro. Comard in Shrewsbury stating that Bro. Mayer is very sick. But on receiving another letter from him, he was on the mend. On Sunday, February 26, he came to our Conference in Maccelsfield where Elder Demel presides. The Conference went on in good order, and all is peaceful as a general thing. We have entered into measures to pay off the debts and also establish an Elders Fund so as to take care of the traveling Elders, and also to pay off the Book debts at Liverpool. MARCH 1854 I remained in Maccelsfield strengthening the Saints until Saturday. I then went to Burglum in company with Elder Bond, Elder Demel having gone before to prepare to hold a District Council. On Sunday, the 5th of March (1854), we held an Open Council, commencing at 10:00 in the morning, and laid before them the most important business of the conference and took their sanction on the same. Removed Elder Hargraves from the presidency of the Handley Branch and put Elder Moses Mollet in his stead. Appointed Elders Simpson and White to preach to the higher class and Elder Robert Hughes to preach to the Welch people from the Potteries.Also much other business and closed at ten in the evening - all in good spirits. I spent the week in the Potteries (where I) attended two weddings, one by Bro. MolIet and wife and the other by Elder Simpson and partner. On Saturday I went to (the) Sandbatch District, having sent Elder Demel to call a District Meeting. On Sunday the 12th (of March 1854) in the town of Middlewitch we commenced at half past 10:00 AM, and again at 2:00 PM, and again in the evening. We laid before them the present business of the Conference. Much was said about the Conference funds and also the means to get the Conference out of debt. In the evening, John Taylor preached on the divine mission of Joseph Smith and was followed by Elder Demel. The meeting closed by singing and prayer. On Monday, the 20th (of March 1854), Elder Demel and I went to the Harthil Branch and stayed (at the home of) Joseph Steel where all were in good health. On Wednesday the 22nd we went to Coxbank and found Henry Billington in poor state of health. Here I left Elder Demel and went to Market Drayton in the Shropshire Conference and preached to the Saints. The Saints are in good spirits and the place is all alive about the Saints going to the Land of Zion. I stayed with Brother Win. Haywood over night And on Friday I went and visited the Saints and stayed over night with Win. Haywood again. Brother (John) Taylor also stayed with me. I then returned to Coxbank and held a meeting on Sunday (March 26, 1854) and at night I went to Market Drayton and held a meeting again. From there to Shrewsbury and found the Saints in good spirits, although some are sick and the Male party is much quieter, and the Saints are on the mend. Back on Monday, (March 20, 1854), I received a letter from Samuel Horrocks and wife, who had left Maccelsfield to go to Zion, and were in Liverpool. (The letter) stated that they had lost their little baby who died in her arms while walking the streets. Supposed to have been wrapped too warm and smothered. I felt to mourn much and do still, but I must submit to the arm of Omnipotence and say the Lord knows best. I spent the balance of the week (from March 26, 1854) with the Saints in Shrewsbury. We had a good meeting at Sister Lloyd’s on Wednesday evening. APRIL 1854 On Sunday, the 2nd of April (1854), we held our Quarterly Conference, and, on account of the Male, we were obliged to hold it in a small Room and do but little business. Some few were ordained to the Priesthood. Elder Mayer and Elder Taylor are faithful, and the work is beginning to revive throughout the Conference. TO BIRMINGHAM I visited some of the small branches, and on Friday, the 7th of April, I went to Birmingham and visited Elder Israel Barlow. I stayed all night and then went to the Worcester Conference and spent four days with Noah T. Guyman. We had a good time and went tolerable well. Elder France was also with us. On Monday we went and took a view of the City and at the Cathedral that had been built seven hundred years ago by the Catholics, and was taken from them by Cromwell, the mighty waryer (warrior) against King Charles the First, and he changed the government to that of a Republic. But it was retaken by King Charles the 2nd. It is a very grand building. On the inside (are) many tooms (tombs) and monuments, all made of solid marble. It is a fine edifice. A VISIT TO MORRIN HILLS On Monday we held a meeting at the Chapel. Elder France and myself spoke to the Saints. On Tuesday Elder France of the Cheltenham Conference, and Elder Hall of the Birmingham Conference, returned to their fields of labor. Then Elder Guzman, myself and Sister Harris, and some more of the Saints, took coach and went to the Morrin Hills. (We) went all over them, inspected St. Ann’s Well, and I thought it looked more like the mountains and valleys at home than any place that I have ever seen. The scenery is beautiful. We held a meeting at Brother Turner’s and returned home to Worcester the same knight (night) much fatigued. The next day I spent in mostly writing and visiting the Saints. On Thursday I returned home by the way of Birmingham. While walking through the streets of Birmingham, a young man dropped dead in the street a few rods before me, which is quite common. I looked at him and at the people around him, and I thought, “Oh, vain mortals, how unconcerned you go down the broad road to destruction.” On Friday, April 14 (1854), I was in Shrewbury and the Saints are in good spirits. I preached at night. Saturday I went to Stoke and stayed with Bro. Lavery and visited the Saints in Longton where I administered to the sick. On Sunday (the 16th) I preached in Hanley. The Saints there are in good spirits. I then went to Maccelsfield to a party on Monday evening and visited several that are not in the Church in company with Brothers Demel and B. Brown. On Thursday evening I called a Private Council and set the Priesthood in good order. The remainder of the week was spent in visiting the Saints. On Sunday, April 23, 1854, I spent the morning in the Room (where we held) Sunday School. At 2:00 PM we held Sacrament Meeting and then I spoak (spoke) in the evening. All in good spirits and two were baptized. On Wednesday, April 26 (1854), this being a day set apart by the Queen for to fast and pray for the cessation of the War between Russia and Turkey, I felt to fast and pray for the progress of the work of the Almighty, as I called on the Saints to meet at 7:00 AM and take a walk, which they done (did) in splendid order. I then retired to the Room where we had a good meeting and five Strangers wished to be baptized, along with 20 of the Saints (who wished) to be rebaptized. We attended to this and then in the evening we had a good meeting, speaking in Tungs (Tongues), prophesying and so on. We confirmed (those who had been baptized) and reconfirmed those that were rebaptized. Thus ended the pleasant day’s labor on Wednesday in perfect piece (peace) and harmony. On Thursday I took (the) train to Burglum and met Bro. Demel. We visited and administered to Old Shuffelbattim, who was verry (very) sick. Friday evening, April 28 (1854) I called a Private Council and took into consideration when and where to hold our next Conference, and also to inquire into the course of conduct of Elder Bond, who said he would try to do just right in all things for the future. On Sunday, April 30 (1854), I held another Council in the Hanley Room and done much business for the District. I appointed a committee to hire a Room to hold our Conference in. Elder Bond’s case was mentioned and he was suspended. He made his confession and I told him to be rebaptized, and he said he would. I preached in Tunstell at night. MAY 1854 On Monday, being May 1 (1854), I went to see the ordinance of baptism attended to by Elder Pool. Two new members and 20 rebaptisms - all in good spirits. On Tuesday I went to Crem and stayed with the Saints until Thursday. Then I went to Sandbatch and held a meeting in the evening. On Friday I went, in company with Elder Bond, to Lanton and preached out of doors. On Saturday (Saturday) we went to Maccelsfield where I preached on the Green and in the Room at night. A good spirit prevailed. On Monday evening we held a Council Meeting cut three from the Church. (We also) done considerable busness (business). Tuesday evening I preached in the Room and red (read) the sircular (circular) sent me by President Richards. On Wednesday I went to Lantona and preached. On Thursday to Hanley and held a Fellowship Meeting. On Friday I went to the Stafford Branch and found them all well. Saturday I spent in writing, and on Sunday, the 14th (of May 1854), I preached. Some Strangers attended and when asked how they liked it, they replied, “Very well,” and said they would come again. On Monday (May 15, 1854) I went to the Gnocel Branch and found them all in good spirits. (I then) went to Newsport and visited until Wednesday, and then went to Shrewsbury and preached at night. I spent the time until Saturday in visiting the Saints and strengthening them. Saturday evening we spent at the Funeral (viewing?) of Sister Manford, who had died. On Sunday, May 21, 1854, I met at 10:00 AM with the Saints and we had a good meeting. In the evening I preached the Funeral of Sister Manford. Monday evening I spent in Council. SYLVESTER ENCOUNTERS PROBLEMS On Tuesday I went to Wellington. On Wednesday to Hinksais and on Thursday to Newport. Here I learned that Elder Alfred Caswell had been guilty of adultery. I left the matter (with) Brother Mayer to settle and went to Market Drayton and there found Elder Tyler who gave me to understand that Sister Haywood and Bro. Oliver Welch were guilty of unlawful connection and she is in the family way. On Sunday, May 28 (1854), I called an Open Council and presented the case of Mary Haywood. She said she was guilty of fornication with Elder Oliver Welch and was not worthy to be called a Saint. She was then severed from the Church. Concerning 0. Welch, (he) having removed to the Birmingham Conference, I then sent the particulars to Pastor I. Barlow so that he might have him tried. Brother Tyler and myself then visited the Cortank and Heart Hill Branches and found all well. From thence to Crem and then stayed over night. From there to Sandbatch where we held a meeting. All was well there. I then wrote the following song: FARE THEE WELL TO ZION BOUND 1 Mingled thoughts of grief and gladness Highly in our bosoms swell Lastly joys resign to sadness When we bid our friends farewell True affection pleads with duty To prolong thy stay awhile. Thy well-known worth in all its beauty Defies a cheerful fare thee well. 2 Homely ties for long both bound us; We all were friends, what ‘ere befell. When ills on ills did gather round us We n’er bade the other fare thee well. Nor when seas and lands us sever, And in other climes you dwell, A lesser love we’ll harbor never Than what we bear at thy farewell. 3 And while thy homes the restless billow Our humble horizons shall tell, Heaven’s guards shall tend thy pillows And never bid our friends farewell. So then go andpeace attend thee, Against our fate we’ll not rebell. To Heaven’s care we now commend thee, Fare thee well, dear friends, farewell. 4 O’er scorching sands and towering mountains May Angels guide thy peaceful way And land thee safe in Salt Lake Valley There dwell in peace, we’ll follow thee. The Temple’s spires in splendor rising To welcome Strangers to the hale There for the dead we’ll be baptized Eternal lives we then shall gain. JUNE 1854 We then went to the Potteries and on Sunday we held our Quarterly Conference in a large Hall rented for that purpose. We done (handled) the bisness (business) in the fore part of the AM and spent the night preaching. All went off well and on Monday, June 5 (1854) we held a social party. I stayed and visited the Saints until Thursday when I received a letter from President S. W. Richards stating that Elder Win. Young was to labor under my direction and James Bond was to go to the Nottingham Conference. Bro. Young came the same day to me and I appointed him to labor under Elder Otto Demel. ELDER OLIVER WELCH On Friday Elder Tyler and I went to Maccelsfield and found many of the Saints sick. Elder James Bond came to us on the following day and we spent the Sabbath (together). Two came forward to be baptized. On Monday evening we held our Council. Ann Berriford was cut off for general bad conduct. It was a good meeting. On Tuesday evening we also had a good meeting, and on Wednesday we went to Cosbank and found the Saints all well. On Thursday (we went) to Drayton and held a Council in Hatton. We tried the case of Oliver Welch for fornication with Mary Haywood, in which he was cutoff (from the Church). I then went to Shrewsbury with Elders Tyler and Bond and found Elder Mayer and the Saints in good spirits. TO ATTEND CONFERENCE IN LONDON I here (in Shrewsbury) received a letter from Brother F. David and Pres. S. W. Richards (of the British Isles Mission) to attend a General Conference at London. On Sunday the 18th (of June 1854), we held our own General Conference in the large Cheese Hall (in Shrewsbury). At our Conference, the Branches were represented in general good standing, except the Newport Branch. A. Carswell, (its) President, was suspended and Bro. Hudson put in his place. The Little Heath Branch was received into this Conference. The authonties (of the Church) were sustained by a unanimous vote. (There was) no trouble from our enemies. On Monday we had a good Tea Party, excellent singing and reciting. Also another (Tea Party) on Wednesday evening with very good attention from our strong company. All went off well and we thanked God for it. I spent my time in visiting the Saints until Saturday, the 24th (of June 1854). TO LONDON FOR GENERAL CONFERENCE Started on the train for London (on Saturday, June 24, 1854). EIder Mayer is poorly at this time and is going with me. I feel in good spirits all the time. We started in the morning and arrived in London at 3:00 in the afternoon and attended Council at night. We stayed over night at Samuel Read’s, 2 Hawthorn Dean Place, Westindia near Lime House, London. They were very kind to me and I have to say that I never wish to be treated better. On Sunday (June 25) I attended the London Conference and it was a glorious time, being favored with Franklin D. Richards, one of the Twelve (Apostles), S. W. Richards, President of the British Isles Mission and his Counselor, Daniel Spencer, as well as the Pastors and Presidents of the Conferences. On Monday (June 26) we met at 10:00 AM, according to appointment, for (a continuation of) our General Conference. We spent the day in hearing the representatives of conferences, all generally in good standing. Much good teaching (was received) from the Presidency. On Tuesday, about the same. On Wednesday (June 28) we heard speeches from many of the Brethren, and at evening we partook of the Lord’s Supper. On Thursday (June 29) I was poorly, but I went to the party that evening (anyway)! On Friday (June 30) I visited the House of Lords, also the Westminster Abbey, and also I went to the Bazaar and Pantheon, which were filled with all of the costliest articles in the world, with all manner of costly paintings, gardens and birds of all kinds all most beautiful. JULY 1854 SYLVESTER PREACHES IN LONDON On Sunday (July 2, 1854)1 preached at the Lime House Branch (in London), a most popular branch, and found a good spirit among the Saints. One Priest’s name is Hull, the other Cotrell (Not sure what he’s referring to). TO THE TOWER OF LONDON On Monday (July 3) I went with Brother Brown to the Tower of London, taking our guard with us. We crossed a deep ravine on a bridge. This ravine can be filled with water 20 feet deep all around the Tower. We then went to the inside (of the Tower) and saw the ancient Kings and Nobles on horseback in full stature, some with gold, some with silver, and some steel armor. Some as ancient as 3,000 years old. We saw King Edward and the King Jameses, from the first to the 8th; then all manner of implements of war of all nations. We saw the crowns of the Kings and Queens, the gold staff of King Edward weighing 14 pounds, and the golden seplers with many golden dishes. The cost of all is 3 1/2 million pounds. We went also the place of erecting the gallows on which the noted Anne Bolyne, Sr. Walter Raleigh, and others were slain. We saw the execution block and instruments of torturing a prisoner. TO SAINT PAUL’S CHURCH AND OTHER NOTABLE PLACES (We then went) to St. Paul’s Church. This is one of the most splendid of all buildings in the world. Then to Thames Tunnel. This runs under the river 3/4ths of a mile, dug through and arched, very strong (with) plenty of music within going by steam and many shops to sell boz (booze) and jewelry, as well as cutlery. We then visited the Cattle Market and saw 2,000 head (of cattle), also 3,550 sheep. This is a grand sight to see. We then went to the British Museum where we saw all manner of species of Beasts...and Sea Fowls and creeping things, as well as all minerals, ancient engravings and images of ancient date. I consider this worthy of the attention of the Noble of the earth. While here we met with Sister Rede and Sister Elizabeth Hunter. While on our way home, Sister Rede got three of her ribs broken being crushed with a wagon, and she is very ill. I am very weary with my day’s labor and must retire. TO THE CRYSTAL PALACE On Tuesday, the 4th of July (1854), I went, in company with Benjamin Brown and Read, to the Crystal Palace. This is one of the wonders of the world, being built wholly of iron and glass, (and is) transparent. The whole length is 3,476 feet (and) the beauty (of it is) in proportion. It is filled with all the varieties of the world. BACK TO SHREWSBURY On Wednesday at 6:00 AM, I left London and got to Shrewsbury at 8:00 PM, and found the Saints in Good spirits. On Thursday I am writing to my brother John Earl in the United States. Friday, I visited the Saints in Wellington, all well; and on Saturday I went to the Potteries. I spent Sunday (July 9) in Handley and on Monday evening Elder Spencer came to see me and we had a Council Meeting, and Robert Hughes was cut off from the Church. This he had deserved for some time. On Tuesday (July 11), Elders Spencer and Otto Demel accompanied me to Maccelsfield where we had a good meeting in the evening, and also on Wednesday evening. On Thursday I baptized five and rebaptized 14, and Elder Spencer left me and started for Scotland. Friday I am writing to Liverpool on business relative to the stock in the hands of the Book Agent. On Sunday, July 16(1854), I preached twice in the open air with good attendance. The Sunday School is in good order. Elder Demel spoke at the Room at night, and again the spirit prevailed with a fieu (few) exceptions. Monday I spent in visiting the Saints. Tuesday evening I preached in the Room to a large and attentive congregation. One was confirmed (and) a good spirit prevailed. On Wednesday I went to the Lostoc District in a coach and preached at Bro. J. Taylor’s at night. The Saints boar (bore) testamony (testimony) to the truth of the Gosple (Gospel). I spent the remainder of the week with them. SYLVESTER CHALLENGED BY FORMER ELDER HUGHES On Sunday, July 23 (1854), I went and preached at Cranage and then I went to Middlewitch and met with Bro. Demel and stayed over night. From here (I went) to Sostoc and again took Bro. Demel with me. I left him here to attend a meeting. I took a coach and went to Maccelsfield and met Bro. Cyrus Whitlock. He is to help me a few days. Elder (Robert) Hughes, he that was cut off from the Church, has just published a challenge to meet me and he will prove Mormonism false. This publication is in the Staffordshire Signal, but he (Hughes) is a very wicked man and beneath my notice; so I don’t feel to have anything to do with him in this matter. On Wednesday, July 26 (1854), I preached in Lawton; Thursday in Sandbatch, and then returned to Maccelsfield for Sunday, where I met with Bro. Whelock and held a camp meeting in the city. (We had) good attendance. In the evening at the Room, a very good feeling prevailed. Monday evening at Council, and Tuesday evening preaching at the Room again. Four came to be baptized. AUGUST 1854 SAMUEL AND HANNAH TAYLOR DIE - SYLVESTER SPEAKS On Wednesday, (August 2, 1854) Elder Whelock baptized those (four) and rebaptized 12. This evening a letter came from Samuel Horrocks and John Taylor stating (telling of) the death of Samuel Taylor and Hannah, his sister. Thursday, August 3, 1854, I sent Elder Whelock to Sandbatch and I went to comfort those relatives of the deceased. On Friday Elders Demel and Young came to me in very good spirits. Saturday (the 5th of August 1854) Elder Demel leaves for Cranage to attend a camp meeting. Brother Young stays with me. He attended the outdoor preaching and I went to the school. In the afternoon we had Sacrament Meeting at the Room and a good spirit prevailed. We have just received the request that I should preach the funeral (services) of Samuel and Hannah Taylor. This I done (did) in my weakness. In the evening (on Monday, August 7) I attended Council. On Tuesday, Elder Whelock came to me (and he was) sick. On Wednesday I and Elder Young went to the Potteries to a Tea Party at Barley Hedge. The Saints were very wild and ungovernable. I spent the remainder of the week visiting the Saints and found the Longton Saints in a deplorable condisheon (condition) having lost all confidence in their President, Win. Creswell, whom I removed and placed Elder Hargraves (to preside). Elder Crandall has just come on a visit and he attended the meeting with me in Handley (following the Longton meeting). On Monday (August 14) Elder Crandell and I went to Maccelsfield where I stayed, visiting the Saints and those that were believing the Gospel. Elder Crandell returned to Liverpool. Elder Whelock visits the Potteries. Sunday, August 20 (1854), Elder B. Brown is with me and I have just baptized a young lady - all in good spirits. The Brethren are preaching in the street and doing much good. The work is in a good and prosperous condition. On the 23rd (August 1854), I went with Bro. Whelock to the Manchester Conference on a visit and spent several days. Elder Whelock goes to Liverpool and I returned home. On Thursday I wrote for Elder Demel to come to me. On Sunday, the 27th (of August 1854), he came and gave me a report of his labors. I spent Sunday with pleasure in speaking to the Saints and Strangers. SEPTEMBER 1854 On Friday, September 1st (1854), I held a Private Council with Elders Whelock and Demel, in which we decided to hold a General Open Council in the Potteries. I then traveled through the Lostoc and Sandbatch Districts and found times good with the Saints. All are well with plenty of opposition from the enemies of truth. On Friday, September 8, I got to the Potteries. On Saturday, September 9, 1854, Elder Joseph Taylor came to me, as I had selected him to labor in the vineyard (there). We spent the day in writing. On Sunday (September 10, 1854) we held our Open Council in which we spent (the time) in speaking on different subjects. At night Elder Whelock spoke on the rise and progress of the Church - but little opposition. We then blessed (the people) and Bro. Taylor closed (the meeting). TO LIVERPOOL AND BACK I then went to Shrewsbury and visited the Saints threw (throughout) the conference. On Sunday (September 17, 1854) I went to the Liverpool Conference and spent several days with Brothers Fulmer, F. Richards, Spicer Crandell, G. Riser Stevens and Grant. On the 24th I held our Quarterly Conference in Shrewsbury when we were again interrupted by the Male, but by the assistance of the police, we were enabled to keep them quiet. The police, however, had to come into the Hall and quell them. Elder N. T. Guzman was with us on that occasion. On the 28th (of September 1854) Elder Mayer and myself went to the Staffordshire Conference, which was held in Maccelsfield. OCTOBER 1854 On the 1st of October (1854), Elder Joseph Young was with us. On Monday the 2nd we had a Tea Party and all went off in good order. Elders James Flint and Able Shufflebottum were cut off from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints during the conference. Elder Flint was cut off for using the Church money and not repaying it again according to promise, and Shuffelbottum for much wicked conduct. On Thursday the 5th (of October 1854), I held a General Open Council in Hanley and there I presented the affairs of the Conference, when Elder Pool manifested a bad spirit (during the Council), but I and my Brethren kept it down. During the conference we also blessed Elder Brown, President of the Potteries District, and also Elders Win. Hargraves and Tho. Williams, to assist him (Elder Brown) in getting all things moving on well. On the morning of the 6th (October 1854), I went in surch (search) of a chappel (chapel) and found one to be let, if all is well, next week. On Saturday, the 9th, I took the train to Stafford and then walked to Little Heath to a Tea Party. My health is but middling. We had a good time at the party. I then went to Shrewbury and visited all the small branches. The work is mooving (moving) on lively. Elders Tyler and Shaw are doing well. On October 21, I took the Magistrates Hall in the City at Stoke to hoald (hold) our meetings in for the turin (term) of one year. It is a fine hall. On Sunday, October 22nd, I opened the Hall, joined the Longton and Hanley Branches together and called it the Stoke Branch. I appointed Elder Hargraves President of the same. Elder Whelock is appointed to labor in the London Conference, and has now gone to his new field of labor. NOVEMBER 1854 On Monday, the 6th of November (1854), I went to a Tea Party at Middlewitch where we had a good time. Many Strangers were there. On Wednesday I settled the old difficulties in the Sandbatch Branch and on Friday I settled the old difficulties in the Heart Hill Branch. I then went to Hanlum and helped Elder Joseph Taylor open a large Room for lecturing - all were in good spirits. On November 26, I was in Maccelsfield where we had five more baptisms. DECEMBER 1854 SYLVESTER NOTIFIED GOING HOME IN 1855 A letter came from R. D. Richards and a (Millenial) Star giving notice to prepare to go the Land of Zion this year (1855). The Saints took it rather hard. Sunday the 3rd (of December 1854), I spent in Maccelsfield. The Saints wept to think that I am going to leave them. I am now very buisy preparing to go home! Elders Mayer and Demel are also to go (in 1855). PLANS TO RAISE MONEY TO RETURN HOME ON Sunday the 10th of December (1854) I spent in the Room at Stoke and then went to Shrewsbury and set the Conference (plans) to raise means for the emigration of myself and Elder Mayer. On Sunday, the 17th I went to Lightwood Green and preached to the Saints; had a good meeting at night. I and Elder Howels went to Elder Bates and I borrowed forty pound of him for myself and Elder Mayer. On Monday (December 18) I and Elder Howels went to Shrewsbury on the train. My health is but middling. On Friday (December 22) I went with Elder 0. Shaw and visited the Asherly Saints and found all well. We then returned to Shrewsbury. On Sunday December 24 (1854), we held our Quarterly Conference in the large Pheas (?) Hall in Shrewsbury. The Conference went off well - no mobbing. Elder Hudson was suspended for using the Book money. On Monday we had a comfortable party in the same hail. On Wednesday (December 27) I went to Birmingham on a visit with Elders Whelock, Elsworth, Barlow and Evans, where I had a good time with the Saints and Elder Peel’s family. I returned to Sbrewsbury on Friday the 29th with a nice present of some buttons, presented by Elder Peel. On my return, Bro. Edward Taylor gave me 200 pounds worth of flax thread. On Saturday (December 30) I went to Hatton and on Sunday (December 31, 1854) I preached at Drayton. I then went to some of the small branches, preaching and strengthening them. JANUARY 1855 On Sunday, January 7 (1855), we held our Quarterly Conference in the Magistrates Hall in the town of Stoke for the Staffordshire Conference. Bro. Win. G. Young now takes the Presidency of the Conference in the place of Bro. Otto M. Demel. Much business was done - all in good order. Elder James Little was with us. On Monday (January 8) we had a good visit at Bro. Hurdles’ and on Tuesday (January 9)1 went with Elder Mayer to Maccelsfield and held a meeting. The Saints feel well, although very poor. I stayed over Sunday (January 14, 1855) and had a good meeting. Many Strangers were present. I spoke on the Law of Celestial Marriage. We had the best of attention (throughout the meeting). Bro. Young bore testimony, too. I continued visiting in this city until Wednesday (January 17, 1855). TO THE POTTERIES AGAIN I then went to the Potteries and held meetings in Hanley and Burglum. The Saints seem to work slow in relation to the means for my emigration. On Friday (January 19) I went to the Little Heath Branch. Here I met with Elder E. C. Shaw. We held a meeting and the Saints bore testimony against the President, James Gillim, for getting drunk. We cut him from the Church and appointed Elder Swift to preside. On Saturday (January 20), I went to Shrewsbury where I found Elder James Park, who is appointed to succeed Elder John Mayer in the Presidency of the Shropshire Conference. SYLVESTER RELEASED I know (now) give up my field of Laber (Labor) and shall prepare for going home. On Sunday the 21st (January 1855), I went to Brother Bates in company with Elders Mayer, Tyler and Park and Sisters Eliza Williams, Eliza Griffis and Ann James. We held a meeting at 2:00 in the afternoon and a Tea at 5:00. The evening was spent in speaking and singing. The income (I suppose for the emigration of the two Elders) was 30 shillings. This (amount) Sister Bates divided between Elders Earl and Mayer. We then borrowed a piece (?) to help us home to Zion. FAREWELL TRAVELS On Monday (January 22), we returned home to Shrewsbury and held Council in the evening. It was decided that I should have the clothing that I kneeded (needed) to make me cumfortable (comfortable) on my way. I then visited the Ashterly Branch where I received some”means” and preached my farewell sermon and bade them farewell. I then returned to Shrewsbury in the coach and then took the train to Wellington where I staid (stayed) over night. On Sunday morning (January 28) at 10:00 AM I met Elder Mayer at the train and went to Drayton to a Tea Party. Elders Park and Tyler were with us. We had a generally good time. On Monday we went to Shrewbury again and met with the Council. We tried the case of Sister Howels and cut her from the Church; and also Harriet Toncus and Sharlot Green. (He does not give the reasons for these actions.) FEBRUARY 1855 On Sunday, February 4th (1855), I preached my farewell sermon in Shrewsbury on the Order of Celestial Marriage. The Room was crowded and good attention was had. On Tuesday I took my leave of the Saints and started to the Stafford Conference where on Sunday (February 11)1 preached in Tunstel. (I preached) on Monday in Burglum, Tuesday in Badley Hedge, Wednesday in Longton and on Thursday (February 15) I went to Maccelsfield. Spent the week in writing and visiting the Saints here. Elder Taylor came to me poorly with a bad cold. On Sunday (February 18) I went to the Room and spoke on the Gathering and the need of raising means for Elder Demel to go to the Land of Zion. I then began to prepare for myself. The Saints were very kind to help me to all that I kneeded (needed) for boath (both) myself and family. President Mayer and Young were Brethren to me, indeed. MARCH 1855 SYLVESTER DEPARTS FOR ZION On the 25th of March 1855 I left the Staffordshire Conference to go to my Mountain Home. I went to Liverpool and spent the time in preparing for the trip until the evening of the 30th (of March 1855) when we were all on board of the ship JUVENTA, owned by Captain Watte. WE DEPARTED FOR AMERICA ON MARCH 31, 1855! APRIL 1855 THE ATLANTIC VOYAGE On Sunday, April 1st, 1855, we (the American Elders, 11 in number, with Elder Glover at our head, who was appointed by President S. W. Richards), divided the Ship into 12 wards and appointed men to preside over the same. The total number (of passengers) was 573. We had a fine voyage. Many were seasick. On Tuesday, the 3rd of April 1855, a storm (hit us). On the evening of the 21st, one child was born. Some marriages were performed soon after we started (on this voyage). Cold weather (hit us) while crossing the Banks off Newfoundland, and here we saw many whales and porpoises and very large fish. MAY 1855 THE LANDING AT PHILADELPHIA We landed at Philadelphia on (Saturday) the 5th of May 1855, all in good health. That evening another baby was born. On Sunday (May 6, 1855) I went to the Saints Room (in Philadelphia) and spoke to the Saints. Here we met Elders Taylor, Clinton and Fullmer who, with the Saints, all met us with a pleasant smile on their countenances and welcomed us to their home, THE LAND OF THE FREE! I was then appointed to take the care of 123 of the Saints while in the City (of Philadelphia). I took them to a Mr. Fisher’s for food and lodgings. HEADED WEST On Tuesday (May 8, 1855), we started for Pittsburg and landed on Thursday (May 10). On Friday (May 11, 1855), I started with the Saints composing the Poor Farm Company (and got them) on board the boat AGNANOK (?). Those that had their own fare out (I suppose, who were able to pay their own way) went on the boat called THE CITY OF WASHINGTON. We got to the City of Cincinnati on Sunday (May 13, 1855), all well and in good spirits. The Captain and crew felt well towards us. The country looks pleasant times are hard, prices are high. SYLVESTER VISITS HIS FAMILY IN ILLINOIS On May 16, 1855 (a Wednesday), we started up the Mississippi River and on the 17th we got to St. Louis, Missouri. Hear (here) I left the Saints and went up the Illinois River and made my friends a good visit. Some wished to be rebaptized by me, but I thought best to send them a good faithful Elder from St. Louis (to teach and rebaptize them). (Note: In his “life story”, Sylvester writes: “Here I left the Saints and continued up the Missouri River to the town of Atchison, the place of out-fit for the Plains. I went up the Illinois River to Beardstown, and then through Schuyler and Brown Counties. Visited my brother John and family; also my wife’s brother(s), Heman, Bradley and Ira Owen. After spending a few days with them, I returned to St. Louis on a steamship. Here I purchased a few goods for my family. Here I went on a steamship on the Missouri River as far as Atchison (Kansas). Here I fitted out for the Plains.”) I then returned to St. Louis and found Elder Blair. On May 27th I entered into arrangements to go home with Brother Blair. On May 30th Elder Spencer has just come from England and will go with us. This day, May 30th, we are now on the Boat called the ALMA with about 30 good Saints. We had a good voyage up to Atchison. Here we found many of the Saints sick and some dead and others dying. Among their numbers were Elder 0. Simpson and Elder Ball and wife. JUNE 1855 MEMBER OF THIRD FIFTY On June 7 (1855, a Thursday), Elders Snow and Spencer organized our company, being the Third Fifty. Elder Blair is our Captain. Elder East (is our) cook. I was appointed a counselor and also Captain of one Ten and also the Chaplain. We started our camp on the 11th of June 1855 and traveled eight miles where we camped and stayed until the 17th (of June). This is a sickley (sickly) place. CHOLERA STRIKES THE CAMP The most of the camp left this day (June 17, 1855), but I had to stay until the next day, when I left with the remainder of the camp. When I got within about one mile of the camp, a messenger came to me stating that Brother Jones was taken with the Colary (Cholera) and wished me to hasten to his relief by administering the ordinance of the House of God to him. But having a very hard ravine to cross, I was detained (for) some time. I found Brother Jones coald (cold) and cramt (cramped). I called Brothers Mayer, George C. Riser and Ausker (Oscar) Tyler to my assistance, for they were men who had had their endowments. We approached the sick and dying, for by this time four more were taken, but the Spirit forbade me rebuking it at this time. Yet, I felt to pray the Almighty to stay the plague if it be His will. Brother Jones soon died and in the evening Sister Lankford died. This night Brother East’s child died; also Brother Lankford and some others. On the 18th (of June 1855) we buried six persons. This is, indeed a doalful time to us all. WE TRAVEL ON AND BURY THE DEAD AS WE GO This day (June 18, 1855), we met the Brethren from the Valley (going) on missions. They were under Captain Hate (Haight). We started our camp and a number of the missionaries returned with us to where we nooned. Sister Elizabeth Poast died this forenoon in the wagon. We buried her the same hour and did not stop the train. At noon we had a good meeting, during which time several more died. We parted with the missionaries and hauled our dead until night, when a number more were dead. Some, however, were taken and when I administered to them they got well immediately. We continued to travel a little every day and still bury the dead (while traveling). On Sunday the 24th of June 1855 (he wrote “15th” but that is in error) we camped on a small stream called the Vermillion. Here we buried Old Father Greer and several more died and were buried. I then spoke to Bro. Blair of the propriety of rebaptizing those who wished it, and baptizing those that had not been baptized. Accordingly, I went to them and baptized (several) persons. We then traveled six miles. ELDER STEVENSON PUT IN CHARGE OF COMPANY This evening (Sunday, June 24, 1855), Elder Stevenson came to us from the Mormon Grove with some butter to help us. In the morning, I called the Saints together. Captain Blair then read a letter from President Ballentine stating that Bro. Stevenson was appointed to take charge of our company. Elder Stevenson then chose myself, Sylvester Henry Earl, and Brother Barlow to be his counselors. That night a man by the name of Wood from Texas got lost from the camp. He was ill with the cholera. The mules wandered all night with him lying helpless in the carriage. We are still mourning in the midst of death on Saturday, June the 30th, 1855. This same man, Wood, got out of his carriage just at dusk, unbeknowns to the driver, and left him more near the camping place, and we soon made a general hunt (for him), nearly all night, and nearly all the next day, but we found him not. And with much sorrow we pursued our journey without him. JULY 1855 Sunday, July 1st 1855, the camp is in better health. Sunday, July 8th, 1855, we got to Ft. Cama, all in good health and spirits, except a little difficulty between Brothers Middlemuss and Right, which we took into Council and strove to settle. On Monday, the 9th (of July), we came up to the first camp under the care of Captain Hinley and found them all in good health and spirits. We held a Council with them. Elder Cowan read some instruction from Erastus Snow. We decided to travel on the next day and went accordingly. Sunday, the 15th (of July 1855), we got to the Cottonwood Springs, about 80 miles from Carney (Kearney), all in good health. Some of the Saints wish to press on a little too fast for our teams, for some of them are failing a little, but still we pursue our journey. On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, we were detained on account of Bro. Stevenson’s having to go back some six miles for his coat. During this time, Brothers L. Blair and T. Geer, being wagon masters, concluded to stay all day. This gave some dissatisfaction in the camp. In the evening, Bro. Stevenson and myself held a Private Council and determined to set all aright before we left. We then called a General Council Meeting of the whole camp, and we both spoke to the Saints, and soon got a good spirit. In the evening we held a Testimony Meeting and all felt well. On Friday, July 20, 1855, we crossed the South Fork of the Platte (River) and had no bad luck. On Saturday, we got to Ash Hollow. Here we stayed until Sunday, July 22, shoeing oxen, holding meetings and fixing to go on. We traveled on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday - the road is very sandy; our teams are failing. On Sunday, July 29th, we traveled eight miles, then camped on a nice place and had a good meeting. On Monday and Tuesday we traveled hard and got to Fort Laramie. On Wednesday we went on past Laramie 10 miles and came to a small trading post. Here we bought 10 yoke of oxen at $100 per yoke (,pair). This enabled us to go on our way more comfortable. AUGUST 1855 On Sunday the 5th of August 1855 we are in the Black Hills, about 58 miles from Ft. Laramie, and stayed here all day. The guarding has not been well, done so Elders Stevenson, Barlow and myself held a Private Council and agreed that Elder Mayer be released from acting as Assistant Sargent with a vote of thanks, and that Bro. Bancroft take his place. We had a good meeting in the evening and all feel well. On Thursday the 9th of August we got over the Black Hills. No wagons broke down and no one sick or left behind. On Friday the 10th we got safely over the Black Hills, all in fine spirits. On Sunday the 12th of August 1855 we got to the last crossing of the Platte River where we crossed and traveled up the river 13 miles. We then left the river and camped on a small creek. The feelings of the camp are hard towards Elder Stevenson for bad management; wishes were expressed to divide the camp. On Monday (August 13, 1855) Elder Stevenson and I went and held a Private Council; then called the officers of the camp (together) and had a General Council (with them). The decision is to go on, all together. On Wednesday, August 15, 1855, we are on the Sweetwater. THIS IS MY BIRTHDAY. I AM NOW 40 YEARS OLD AND AM NOW CROSSING THE PLAINS FOR THE FIFTH TIME. (Sylvester’s birthday was on August 16th; not the 15th. However, I suspect that we’ll all forgive him this slight lapse of memory considering his long and arduous journey.) FEELINGS BAD TOWARDS BRO. STEVENSON On Sunday, August 19, 1855, we are laying by (stopping) for the day...The feelings of (the members of) the camp are all confusion and they have little or no regard for Bro. Stevenson. Brother Bancroft feels dissatisfied and desires to be released from the office of Assistant Sargent (because) he and the Captain have a dispute. Some hard words were passed. Also Bro. Stevenson and Bro. Phelps have had some hard words about fasting. Henry (Phelps) said his health was too poor to fast. Bro. Stevenson said if he had more faith in his dumplins than he had in his God, then he might take them, for, says he, you have got a bad spirit. Henry said he had not, and so forth. I told them that they, being the anointed of the Lord, should not dispute before the Saints. At 10:00 AM we had a meeting; also one in the evening, but the feelings of the Saints are bad towards Bro. Stevenson. On Wednesday, August 22, 1855, we camped near the upper crossing of the Sweetwater. Sarah Harris accused Brother York of trying to seduce her. The Saints still find fault with Bro. Stevenson, mostly for pushing the teams too fast and (stopping) too late at night. Some wish to divide the camp (again), and it is all we can do to keep it together. On Thursday, August 23, 1855, we got to the Pacific Springs. Bro. Greer’s Ten having got there some time before the balance of the company, they camped before Bro. Stevenson came up. This made him mad and he then said the camp should go on a few miles further. This we done (did) with much hard feeling in the camp against him for his unwise course and ruff (rough) talk, which causes much unpleasant feelings. Brothers Stevenson, Barlow and myself went into Council by ourselves and we prayed for power to control the camp, and we felt well. We then tried Elder Lamont Bancroft for his rebellion and cut him off from the Church. On Monday, August 27, 1855, we got to Green River. On the 28th we held a Council on the case of James York and Sarah Harris, for his offering to seduce her, which terminated rather in his (York’s) favor. On the morning of the 29th (August 1855), at about 3:00 AM Elder and Mrs. Charles Basset came into our camp in good health and spirits. He gave us some good instructions. The report from the Saints in the rear is good. They stayed five hours. We gave them food and changes and gave them three fresh mules. I sent some letters and went with them three miles on the way. On Thursday the 30th we started the train. This day Elders Mayer, Phelps and Mr. Bancroft left us, bound for the Valley. This day, also, Bro. Thomas Greer purchased about 20 yoke of oxen to help us on our way. SEPTEMBER 1855 NEARLY BACK HOME AGAIN! On Saturday, September 1, 1855, the camp seems in good spirits. On Sunday, September 2nd, Elder Blair came to us from the Valley and this morning Elder Stevenson started to the Valley, but meeting Bro. Blair he concluded to stay. We are now camped at Fort Bridger, which is now settled by the Saints. We then pursued our journey and when I got to Bear River, I mashed my little finger very bad. By Sunday we are at the Weber River, and I now leave the company and start for home, in company with Brothers Johnson, York, Bancroft and the two Sisters Johnson. SYLVESTER ARRIVES BACK IN THE VALLEY WE ARRIVED INTO THE VALLEY ON THE 10TH OF SEPTEMBER 1855, BEING 3 YEARS, LACKING 5 DAYS, ABSENT FROM MY HOME AND FAMILY. I found them all alive and well and all in fine spirits, and with joy to my soul I feel to thank the Lord for His perennial care over me and my family while I was on my mission. I spent a happy time at the General Conference with my family. A LIST OF PRESENTS TO MY FAMILY BY THE SAINTS IN ENGLAND MARGARET BATES, 1 Pair of waiters, 1 Farion pitcher, 1 Hank of thread, 1 Yard of print, 1 Piece of tape CLAY, 2 Hanks of thread, 1 Piece of tape, 1 Spool of cotton MARY BLACKWELL, 1 pitcher basket AMELIA SMITH & MOTHER, A parcel of thread and silk for sewing MOTHER STEEL & ELIZABETH MOLLET, Sends a parcel of thread, Silk thread needles, Fine laces and many other like things SARAH MOLLET, 7 Spools of cotton, 1 Toy pitcher MOTHER JANE POTS, A parcel of thread & needles, pins and cotton thread JOSEPH ELLIS, 1 Cup and saucer gilt, 1 Mug ELIZABETH POOL, 1 Cup & saucer SARAH POOL, 1 Allapack Dress SISTER REED, 6 Yards of print, 2 Ganats (?) CRISTANIA BOIL, 2 Lamps and 1 Pitcher, 2 Sac Pool SISTER JACKSON, 1 Handkerchief SISTER HORRICKS, 1 Handkerchief, Black THE POTFERIES BRANCH, 1 Black Allapack Dress and trimming GEORGE SIMPSON, 8 Yards of Print, Calico Note by Owen Ken Earl: There are no punctuation marks in Sylvester Henry Earl’s Missionary Diary, so I have included such punctuation as I thought proper in order to make his diary more readable and understandable. Likewise, I have used our modern spelling, though in many instances I thought his more colorful and have put the modern spelling in parenthesis. Grandpa Sylvester Henry Earl had very little formal education and it is interesting to note that on the last page of his journal, in his handwriting, is the following: A comma marked thus (,) is a pause or resting in speech, while you may count one. There were some additional entries in this same journal concerning events occurring after Sylvester’s return from his mission, but those are included in the story of his life located in another part of this volume. One other comment needs to be made concerning the spelling of various peoples’ names mentioned by Sylvester, and the spelling of various place names: his hand writing was very difficult to decipher, and there are undoubtedly many times that he spelled both people and place names phonetically, so in many cases it turned into a guessing game as to how certain words should be spelled. I tried checking place names with an atlas of England, but didn’t fare much better. In too many instances, Sylvester also referred to people by either the preface “Brother” or “Elder” without giving their first names, so that, too, turned into a guessing game at times as to whom he might have been referring to. Even so, Sylvester’s Missionary Diary makes for informative and interesting reading, and I hope you enjoy it and catch the spirit of his mission and the times in which it was performed with such dedication and sacrifice.

Life History of Sylvester Henry Earl by Joseph Gary Earl

Contributor: LuciJoy Created: 3 years ago Updated: 5 months ago

Download the life history of Sylvester Henry Earl by Joseph Gary Earl, great grandson. Copy and paste this link into your browser to download: https://www.dropbox.com/s/hrxs0icwygeo6oi/E.%20Sylvester%20H.%20Earl%27s%20Life%20Story.pdf?dl=0

Sylvester Henry Earl on LDS History Website

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Cut and paste to your browser to read: https://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/pioneerDetail?lang=eng&pioneerId=373

Blessing

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Cut and paste link into your browser to read Sylvester Henry Earl's blessing: https://www.dropbox.com/s/tp6l0uzav9pkgok/Patriarchal%20Blessing%20-%20Sylvester%20Henry%20Earl.pdf?dl=0

Life timeline of Sylvester Henry Earl

1815
Sylvester Henry Earl was born on 16 Aug 1815
Sylvester Henry Earl was 10 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Sylvester Henry Earl was 16 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Sylvester Henry Earl was 25 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Sylvester Henry Earl was 44 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Sylvester Henry Earl was 47 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Sylvester Henry Earl died on 23 Jul 1873 at the age of 57
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Sylvester Henry Earl (16 Aug 1815 - 23 Jul 1873), BillionGraves Record 59202 St George, Washington, Utah, United States

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