Swen Swenson

4 Jan 1850 - 21 Aug 1925

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Swen Swenson

4 Jan 1850 - 21 Aug 1925
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Son of Swen and Kerstin Olson, was born in the parish of Ifvetofta, Christianstad lan. Sweden, Jan. 4, 1850. He received a good education, graduated with honors from the University of Lund in 1875 and attended a seminary for teachers in Skane in 1882-1883. In 1873 he married Thilda Pehrson, daughter
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Life Information

Swen Swenson

Born:
Died:

Pleasant Grove City Cemetery

301-945 Utah 146
Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Father
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trishkovach

June 26, 2011
Photographer

GraveScavenger

June 25, 2011

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Memories

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“History of the Swedish Mission” p. 445

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Son of Swen and Kerstin Olson, was born in the parish of Ifvetofta, Christianstad lan. Sweden, Jan. 4, 1850. He received a good education, graduated with honors from the University of Lund in 1875 and attended a seminary for teachers in Skane in 1882-1883. In 1873 he married Thilda Pehrson, daughter of Pehr Poulson and Maria Sophia Hennig; ten children were born to them. Elder Swenson taught school for fifteen years. Becoming a convert to the gospel, he and his family were baptized June 5, 1892, and in April, 1895 he was called to Copenhagen to labor as a writer for “Nordstjernan.” In 1896 he emigrated and joined his family, who, one by one, as opportunity offered had preceded him to Utah and were located in Pleasant Grove, Utah Co. In 1905 he was called on a mission to Scandinavia to write again for “Nordstjernan.” On the division of the Scandinavian Mission in 1905 the office of the magazine was moved to Stockholm, the headquarters of the new mission. Elder Swenson returned home in 1908, but in November, 1911, he was, for the third time called to edit “Nordstjernan,” in Stockholm, succeeding his son, D.A. Swenson, in that position. While in Sweden he also translated the “Pearl of Great Price” into the Swedish language and returned home in January, 1916. Soon afterwards he became almost blind, but partially regained his sight and again went to Stockholm as writer for “Nordstjernan.” He was, however, released in January, 1920, on account of failing eyesight. After his return from this last mission he devoted himself to Temple work and lived to have ordinances performed for every name on his record. The last two years of his life were spent in total blindness. Brother Swenson died in Salt Lake City, Aug 21, 1925.

Memories of Swen Swenson by his Grandson Richard Merrill Swenson

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Excerpt from Me and My Family by Richard Merrill Swenson, Self Published, 1993. Here Richard records memories of his Grandfather. My grandfather Swen Swenson was born January 4, 1850, in Grodby, Kristianstad, Sweden. He died August 21, 1925, in Salt Lake City, Utah. At the age of twenty he enrolled in Lund University on September 30, 1870, and received his graduation certificate dated June 8, 1875. In Uncle Dan’s writings there is a list of the subjects Grandfather took and the grades he received while studying at the University. Anyone who has seen samples of his handwriting could have guessed that he received a grade of “Excellent” in Penmanship. He had a free flowing artistic style. One of our cherished possessions is a book of organ music copied in his handwriting that we obtained from my parents. In view of Grandfather's interest in music and the organ, I wonder what he would think about his great-granddaughter, Linda, being a Temple Square Organist and playing the Tabernacle Organ. Because of our daughter Linda’s proficiency on the organ, we thought it fitting that she have the book, so it is now in her possession. Grandfather was a school teacher in Sweden. In the summer of 1888 misfortune struck the family. He lost his teaching job, for what reason I do not know. They left their substantial home, which was attached to the school house, and moved to a humble three-room cottage in another town named Hasslarod. This undoubtedly was a sore trial for them but one that in the end proved to be a blessing. The owner of the cottage, Emma Erickson, had joined the church, and through this circumstance Grandfather chanced to meet some missionaries, one of whom was Olof Monson of Pleasant Grove, Utah. Grandfather became interested in their teachings and invited them to his home. To make a long story short, eventually all the family joined the church, and one by one (except the mother with two babies and an older son who went together) immigrated to Utah. My father was the last to leave in October, 1894, when eleven years old, except for his father who stayed and continued to find work wherever he could. Grandfather occasionally took the ferry to Copenhagen to visit the headquarters of the Scandinavian Mission which at that time included Denmark, Norway and Sweden. His departure to Utah was delayed, when the President of the Mission, Peter Sundwall, called him to Copenhagen to be editor of the mission periodical, theNorth Star. He served in this capacity for one-and-a-half years. Upon his release, he immigrated to Utah in October 1896, for a glorious reunion with his family. This was the first of four missions he served to the Scandinavian and Swedish Missions. While on his second mission he served again as editor of the North Star. He also revised the Swedish translation of the Book of Mormon, removing grammatical and spelling errors and making the language more truly Swedish. His third mission was his longest, four years, serving again as editor of theNorth Star. Incidentally he replaced his son, Dan, who had been called to Sweden as a missionary and was serving as the Star's editor. He also translated the Pearl of Great Price. Grandfather’s eye sight began to fail. He became almost totally blind and, consequently, was released from his third mission. After returning home, through a blessing, his sight was restored in one eye. Eventually he was called back to Sweden for his fourth mission, serving as editor of theNorth Star. After six months his eye sight again failed, and he was released January 8, 1920, (the year I was born). Upon returning home he did extensive temple work.Though I was only five when Grandfather died, I remember him as a kind and loving man. He was a talented, faithful servant of the Lord who, in spite of personal hardship, was always willing to accept any call from the Lord. In so doing he set an example for his posterity to emulate.

Life timeline of Swen Swenson

1850
Swen Swenson was born on 4 Jan 1850
Swen Swenson was 13 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1862
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Swen Swenson was 30 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1879
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Swen Swenson was 34 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
1883
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Swen Swenson was 46 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
1895
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Swen Swenson was 54 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
1903
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Swen Swenson was 62 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
1912
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Swen Swenson died on 21 Aug 1925 at the age of 75
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Grave record for Swen Swenson (4 Jan 1850 - 21 Aug 1925), BillionGraves Record 25729 Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States

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