Stephen Chipman

8 Aug 1805 - 17 Feb 1868

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Stephen Chipman

8 Aug 1805 - 17 Feb 1868
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Bernard Niels Christensen was born on October 3, 1876 to Niels Christensen and Phoebe Adelaide Chipman at the home of Stephen Chipman, Phoebe’s parents. This home is located at 13 North Merchant Street in American Fork. Bernard was named and blessed on December 7, 1876 by Bishop Leonard E. Harring
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Life Information

Stephen Chipman

Born:
Died:

American Fork Cemetery

601-699 Alpine Hwy
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Mayflower and American Revolution Ancestry Utah Pioneer 1847 Co-founder of American Fork
Transcriber

crex

June 26, 2011
Photographer

PapaMoose

June 26, 2011

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Stephen Chipman Obituary

Contributor: Celique Created: 5 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

In American Fork City, Feb 17th 1868 Stephen Chipman, aged 62 years, 6 months and 10 days. Deceased was a native of Johnstown, Leeds Co., Canada West, where he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October, 1836, and emigrated to Caldwell co., Mo., as the Church moved from Kirtland to Jackson.; thence he moved to Nauvoo, Ill., and at the exodus of 1847, he followed the Pioneers, arriving in Salt Lake Valley in September the same year. In the fall of 1850 he settled in American Fork, where he has since resided. He lived and died a Latter-day Saint.

Stephen Chipman Obituary

Contributor: KarenWilliamsThorne Created: 1 year ago Updated: 5 months ago

In American Fork City, Feb 17th 1868 Stephen Chipman, aged 62 years, 6 months and 10 days. Deceased was a native of Johnstown, Leeds Co., Canada West, where he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October, 1836, and emigrated to Caldwell co., Mo., as the Church moved from Kirtland to Jackson.; thence he moved to Nauvoo, Ill., and at the exodus of 1847, he followed the Pioneers, arriving in Salt Lake Valley in September the same year. In the fall of 1850 he settled in American Fork, where he has since resided. He lived and died a Latter-day Saint.

Bernard Niels Christensen - A History

Contributor: KarenWilliamsThorne Created: 1 year ago Updated: 5 months ago

Bernard Niels Christensen was born on October 3, 1876 to Niels Christensen and Phoebe Adelaide Chipman at the home of Stephen Chipman, Phoebe’s parents. This home is located at 13 North Merchant Street in American Fork. Bernard was named and blessed on December 7, 1876 by Bishop Leonard E. Harrington. During Bernard’s early years the street known today as Center Street was then called Water Street. Its name came from the fact that an open canal ran down the middle of the street from about First North to Second South. At this point the canal ran to the west to Spring Creek. This water was used for irrigation and stock watering. One morning as Bernard’s father was leading his horses to the canal for watering with Bernard on the back of one of the horses, the horse shied causing Bernard to fall and strike his head on a rock. The scar remained with Bernard the rest of his life. Bernard attended the Central School when old enough. The school was a big adobe building which served as the school, the church, the dance hall, and the jail. The jail was a dungeon in the basement. In the winter season, the water in the canal often flooded and froze. Bernard was anxious for some ice skates. His uncle, Stephen Davis Chipman, promised to lend him a pair if Bernard would feed his livestock for a month. Having done this, Bernard received a pair of dull and rusty skates but he was delighted. He would skate up the canal and then walk up the steps to school with his skates on waiting to return home. His love of skating was to last the rest of his life. His mother had told him that he would be a great skater if he observed the Sabbath. One Sunday, Bernard decided to go skating but knowing his mother’s feelings, he slipped his skates out of the bedroom window and then walked out the door. He picked up his skates and started for Utah Lake. Along the way, his conscience and love for his mother made him return home. His children and grandchildren attest to the fact that he did become a great skater as well as speed skater. One cold winter night Bernard was responsible for saving many boys from drowning in the cold lake. A group of boys from American Fork decided to go skating on the lake before if was sufficiently frozen. Two boys decided to skate out on the lake even though the ice was thin. One of the boys broke through into the icy water. The other boy skated near him and tried to pull him out by throwing his coat towards the boy. Then the ice broke under the second boy . Bernard was the oldest in the group and he ordered the others to stay away. Bernard then skated to shore for a pole to get the boys out. The two boys in the water got excited and started thrashing around and drowned before Bernard could get to them. However, by warning the other boys to stay back Bernard prevented the loss of additional lives. Bernard was baptized a member of the Church on November 6, 1884. Bernard was unable to start school in the fall because there were few field fences and the livestock had to be herded until the crops were gathered and the fields declared open. Several of the boys would go together with their cattle and stock horses. After the crops were harvested, Bernard ‘s father would go to the west hill country for fuel wood. Bernard would often accompany his father. One morning, they were hurrying along the winding road that led through the sagebrush toward the Tickville Wash. Both father and son were walking to spare the horses an unnecessary burden. Bernard had been warned not to get behind, but he lagged behind. Bernard’s father looked anxiously back several times but kept moving on with the team. Suddenly Bernard realized that he was far behind and alone in the wilds. He began running and crying and finally caught the wagon. His father stopped long enough to give him a spanking before going on. On another trip for wood, Bernard’s father selected a young maple curving out from a hillside. He cut the sapling to the right length and then split it down the middle and fashioned sled runners for Bernard. Spokes came from a buggy wheel and it was the strongest and easiest-drawn sled in town. The boys loved to hitch their sleds to the horse-drawn bobsleighs. The summer of 1890 when Bernard was fourteen he rode into Salt Lake City on a load of hay with his father. Bernard’s father allowed his son to see the town while the hay was being sold and delivered. When Bernard returned to Market Square that evening he informed his father that he had taken a job in a printer’s shop and was starting work the next morning. After some serious consideration, Bernard’s father determined to allow him to stay and work for the printer. Bernard was paid at a rate of one dollar per week which he gave to his Aunt Blanche for his board. The printer was sorry when Bernard decided to leave his employ a month later. Bernard then went to work for the Holts in Parley’s Canyon. Toward autumn, Bernard became very homesick. He went down to Market Square in Salt Lake City where he found some teamsters from American Fork. He caught a ride home. He had been out in the sun so much that summer that his skin was deeply tanned. When he climbed through the pole fence and walked down through the lot, one of his sisters said, “Look, Mamma, here comes a little Indian.” Bernard’s mother was delighted when he handed her his entire savings of $29.00. On October 2, 1890, Bernard’s sister, Phoebe Helen, died suddenly at the age of sixteen. Bernard’s grieving was dispelled because of a dream wherein he stood with Helen at the foot of the bed where her body lay and Helen told him they would meet again and it would not seem long. When Bernard returned to school again, he began to realize that his progress had been slow. He therefore resolved to try elsewhere for his education. He applied for membership in the Presbyterian school held at the Presbyterian church. Because the tuition was one dollar and Bernard had no money, he asked the schoolmaster if he could work the tuition off. The schoolmaster agreed and allowed Bernard to come an hour early in the mornings to build the fires, sweep, dust, and ring the bell in the belfry. The rate of pay was five cents per week for twenty weeks. The quality of the schooling was much better there and Bernard was pleased. The Presbyterian church still stands on First East about half a block north of Main. During the summers of 1891 and 1892 Bernard worked for John W. Young and Company. The Young firm was building the Saltair Railroad. Bernard’s chief duties were that of cook’s helper and water boy. On July 14, 1894 Bernard was riding his little black mare on his way to Utah Lake to go for a swim when he met his mother coming out of a neighbor’s gate. She greeted him with a smile and turned and went up the street as Bernard watched her go. He had a strong urge to go with her but turned his horse south and went for his swim. When he returned home he found a crowd of people in front of the family home – Bernard’s mother was dying. Earlier in the day, his mother had sung with the choir at a funeral and she had fallen unconscious, probably the result of a massive cerebral hemorrhage. Bernard’s uncle, Washburn Chipman (older half-brother to his mother) paid the funeral expenses and helped in many other ways. Bernard remembered this kindness when thirty-five years later Washburn’s daughter needed help at harvest time. Bernard was ever aware of the gratitude he owed his uncle. After the death of his mother, Bernard felt that his duty was at home. His younger siblings needed his help and this deep loyalty and love was instilled amongst them. In the fall of 1896 Bernard told his father that he was going to get a job at the sugar factory in Lehi. His father said, “Oh you can’t get a job, they are not even hiring married men.” Bernard was a man of no small determination. For the next seventeen days, he was at the factory twice each day. On the morning of the seventeenth day, someone was ill and Bernard was hired. The shifts at the sugar mill were twelve hours long and the rate of pay was $1.75 per shift. The first day he worked in the pulp silos. Later he worked at the sugar spinners. One morning after an argument with an overbearing foreman, Bernard walked out of the mill. As he was about to leave the mill grounds, the superintendent came hurrying after him and requested that he stay. The superintendent gave Bernard a job as a foreman over a gang of men who were laying a pipeline. While Bernard was working for the sugar company, he received a call to go to the Southern States Mission. He explained to his bishop that he could not go at that time and asked if his mission could be deferred for a year or two. That winter Bernard took a six-week missionary course at the Brigham Young Academy in Provo. Between seasons at the sugar mill, he helped his father and his Uncle Washburn Chipman. He also spent two quarters at the University of Utah. During this time he played on the American Fork town baseball team. One day amongst those watching was a young lady named Maud Driggs. They were introduced and the beginnings of a romance ensued. During the fall of 1900 Bernard worked in the American Fork Canyon helping to build the pipeline that delivered the water to the generators at the power plant at the mouth of the canyon. The pipeline was finished about the first of December. With the completion of that project, electric lights were turned on in American Fork for the first time. In 1900 Bernard went back to his bishop and told him he was now ready to serve a mission. Bernard then went to Maud and told her their marriage would have to wait until after he returned from his mission to New Zealand. On December 6, 1900, Bernard bade farewell to his family and friends who had gathered at the train depot in American Fork to wish him well. Maud and Bernard’s sister, Mable, accompanied him as far as Ogden. On December 7, 1900, Bernard was ordained a Seventy and set apart as a missionary by President J. Golden Kimball of the First Council of the Seventy. The train then took him to Ogden and then west to San Francisco. He spent two days there then sailed on December 12, 1900 for Honolulu, Hawaii. From there they sailed through the South Pacific and arrived in the Samoan Islands on December 28th and finally arrived in New Zealand on January 4, 1901. Bernard labored diligently on his mission for nearly three years and returned to American Fork on August 9, 1903. Bernard labored diligently on his mission. His journal tells of his work among the Europeans and the generous hospitality of the Maoris. The warmth and hospitality of these Polynesian people were in marked contrast to the coolness and indifference of the white settlers. The spiritual strength which Bernard acquired during this prolonged period of personal discipline and sacrifice, prepared him for a life of service in positions of influence and trust. In the fall of 1903 Bernard left American Fork to work for the Utah-Idaho Sugar Company in Idaho Falls. Maud Driggs also moved to Rexburg where she had accepted a teaching position at Ricks Academy – only thirty miles from Idaho Falls. On September 14, 1904, Bernard Niels Christensen married Maud Rosalie Driggs in the Salt Lake Temple. They lived the first months of their marriage in Sugar City, Idaho. In 1905, Bernard began work with the National Tea Company as a salesman in the Utah mining towns of Eureka, Silver City, and Mammoth. His brother-in-law (Mable’s husband Edward Reese) was a principal partner in that business. Bernard’s‘ integrity and hard work earned him a great clientele in the area. One night the sheriff of Eureka asked Bernard to take $300 in gold out of the area. Bernard was very anxious about the possibility of foul play. Therefore, as night fell, Bernard put the gold in his shoes and, hiking along the railroad tracks, quietly slipped out of town. An electrical storm that night proved to be a blessing in disguise. When the lightning would flash, he would check the tracks ahead and therefore was able to travel safely. Bernard built a home for his family during the years of 1911 and 1912. He had purchased the Hans Christensen home from his father and uncle with the thought of remodeling it. However, after consulting an architect, it was determined to tear the structure down and use materials from it to build a modern home. That decision was met with some opposition. It was an enormous job. Bernard worked from 4:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. tearing down the old house and building his new home. His brothers and father assisted in the project. In addition to the razing of the “Big House,” Bernard moved the granary which stood behind it to the lot in back of his own home. At this time Bernard also began developing a fine herd of Jersey milk cows. Bernard then ran for and became a Utah County Commissioner. One of the public works projects undertaken while Bernard was county commissioner was the construction of a road in the American Fork Canyon. Bernard wanted the spectacular canyon accessible to families for camping and other recreational purposes. Another incident which occurred during Bernard’s term as a commissioner is revealing of Bernard’s character. An American Fork City ordinance prohibited the operation of saloons with the city limits. A group of unscrupulous men had been operating a saloon in a building north of the Chipman Mercantile and Boley Building. Bernard’s cousin, Stephen L. Chipman, in his capacity as president of the Alpine Stake said the ordinance should be enforced and the law obeyed. In response, an agent of the lawless detonated a bomb under the window of the Stephen L. Chipman home. The American Fork marshal and the city administrators were afraid to act. Bernard determined the law would be enforced. He made arrangements to do so with the Utah County sheriff. Early one morning, the sheriff and his deputies arrived in American Fork. Bernard went with them to the saloon. The sheriff and his men, guns drawn and armed with the necessary legal documents went into the saloon. The sheriff ordered them out in the name of the law. The morning was spent carrying the gaming tables and liquor bottles and kegs into the street where they were destroyed and burned. Bernard had displayed the courage which had been lacking in the city officials. About the time Bernard left the Utah County Commissioner’s office, he began working for the American Fork Branch of the Consolidated Wagon and Machine Company. The firm had farm machinery outlets in Utah and Idaho. The company headquarters were in Salt Lake City at approximately 150 South State Street. In his first years with Con Wagon, Bernard solicited business using a horse and buggy for transportation. During this period he also served as a member of the Alpine Stake Sunday School Board. The Alpine Stake then included the area from Cedar Valley on the west to Lindon on the east. Although it was a lengthy buggy ride from American Fork to Cedar Fort, Bernard would rise early and drive there in time for Sunday School. In the winter season he placed heated bricks on the buggy floor to keep his feet from freezing. Near the end of 1917 Bernard was called to the Alpine Stake High Council. He served continuously in this assignment until his death on January 21, 1940. He also continued to do some farming although his father was the mainstay on the farm. During the years that he managed the Con Wagon, Bernard also continued to operate his dairy. He arranged to ship cream daily to the Finch and Rogers Café in Salt Lake City. The cream had to be delivered to the Orem Electric train depot on Main Street in American Fork where the café would send a man to meet that train each morning. There was no refrigeration on the train, so the cream had to be cold when it was shipped and also when it arrived. Bernard’s son, Clare, was in charge of that three-gallon can delivery each day. The Orem Electric train tracks disappeared following WWII but the depot building still stands at 67 West Main Street. Bernard’s sales territory for Con Wagon reached from Fairfield and Cedar Fort on the west to Lindon and Vineyard on the east. He made his calls using a Ford Model T. Another activity Bernard was involved with was the exploration of Timpanogos Cave. Bernard , with a group of men, acted as an exploratory committee for additional caves within the Timpanogos Cave area. The first cave, Hansen Cave, had been vandalized earlier but two additional caves were still untouched. Using kerosene lanterns and binder twine, the group went into the cave. The twine was used as a road map back out. The interior rooms or caverns of these deep limestone caves were dark and had narrow passages. A financial committee was eventually founded with Bernard and his friends acting as members. These local leaders were determined to protect the new discoveries and did so until in 1922 Timpanogos Cave was made a National Monument. His love for Mount Timpanogos would last throughout his life, Bernard loved to hike to the top several times each summer; once with President Heber J. Grant. Bernard left his position at the Con Wagon in 1924 to pursue farming full time. He helped organize the Utah Poultry Growers Association as a farm cooperative. One of their products was “Utah milk-white eggs.” The Intermountain Farmers is the remnant of this organization. Bernard also loved to hunt. One October 3rd, early in the morning, he went to the lake shore duck hunting. Because it was a cold and drizzly day, he had not seen any ducks. Just as he decided to abandon his hunting, he saw three mallards winging towards him. He watched them intently and as they circled to make a landing, they were all in a line. He fired once and all three ducks tumbled out of the sky. Bernard came home a happy hunter and his wife, Maud, cooked a lovely duck dinner for his birthday. On January 21, 1940, Bernard died. The death was unexpected and shocking to the family though he had mentioned that he wasn’t feeling well before he

Stephen Chipman Story

Contributor: KarenWilliamsThorne Created: 1 year ago Updated: 5 months ago

The Chipman odyssey began in 1836, in Ontario, Canada. Stephen Chipman stopped to hear a group of Mormon missionaries sing and commented, "Men who can sing like that must be men of God." Shortly after their conversions to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Stephen Chipman and his nephews, Arza and Barnabus Adams, gathered their families and crossed the St. Lawrence River into America to join the Saints in Ohio. Stephen and Amanda Washburn Chipman both claimed Mayflower ancestors, and from the time that their eight Pilgrim progenitors stepped off the boat this roving family had not stayed in one place long enough to bury two generations. Leaving their beloved "Plum Hollow" farm, they started on a journey that would build a city and establish a prominent family. During the next nine years they oved westward with Mormon migration, and with uncanny ability the Chipmans were questioned about their faith. Amanda said, "We stay with the Saints." With four wagons, cattle, sheep and supplies they joined the Abraham O. Smoot company of pioneers crossing the plains to Utah in 1847. During the trading trip to Provo in 1850, Stephen, with his son, William Henry, and Arza Adams and his son, Nathan, camped among the cottonwoods on American Fork Creek. Nathan told his father, "I think I would like to live here," and because the meadows were abundant and the water plentiful, the men decided this would make a fine cattle ranch. With permission from Brigham Young, the Chipman, Adams and Eldredge families - all related by blood or marriage - made a survey and formed a joint stock company of their land claims. Soon afterwards the surrounding land was divided among the settlers moving into the area, but the Chipman and Adams families maintained large sections of land. With the help of his sons, Washburn, William Henry, James and Stephen D. the Chipman family became a dominating force in the building of American Fork City, They were prominent in business, banking, politics, farming and livestock raising. Washburn and Stephen D. were excellent farmers. Henry brought the first sheep into the valley and had herds of cattle and fine horses. James was a banker, businessman, and Utah's first state treasurer. They were respected members and active in all aspects of community life. Stephen Chipman's character was the very essence of the pioneer spirit. His faith, hard work, thrift, and honesty allowed him to provide for his large family as well as build the community. His generosity is well documented - always giving more than asked. Brigham Young said that because of Stephen's generous nature his posterity would be blesssed "and they would never know hunger." His ideal that "anything worth doing is worth doing right," is a Chipman standard. His patriarchal blessing promising a "posterity too numerous to count" is being fulfilled. For the first time in over 250 years, this branch of the Chipman family had permanently settled. Seven generations have now found a final resting place in this dedicated ground. Whatever Chipmans live today, the roots Stephen Chipman and his wives, Amanda and Phoebe, planted makes American Fork our home. Family links: Parents: Barnabas Lothrop Chipman (1762 - 1847) Beulah Evarts Chipman (1761 - 1830) Children: Washburn Chipman (1829 - 1926)* Sinah Ceneth Chipman Eldredge (1831 - 1895)* William Henry Chipman (1833 - 1891)* James Chipman (1839 - 1922)* Phoebe Adelaide Chipman Christensen (1852 - 1894)* Betsy Chipman (1854 - 1861)* Stephen Davis Chipman (1857 - 1951)* Milton Davis Chipman (1862 - 1863)* Olive Chipman Crandall (1864 - 1913)* Spouses: Amanda Washburn Chipman (1804 - 1872) Phoebe Davis Chipman (1828 - 1872) *Point here for explanation Burial:American Fork Cemetery American ForkUtah CountyUtah, USAPlot: B_238_8 Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?] Created by: SMSmithRecord added: Jan 28, 2009

Stephen Chipman at the Nauvoo Temple

Contributor: KarenWilliamsThorne Created: 1 year ago Updated: 5 months ago

The following paragraph is found in History of the Church, Volume 7, page 579. Great Anxiety of the Saints to Receive Endowments Tuesday December 3, 1846—Notwithstanding that I had announced that we would not attend to the administration of the ordinances, the House of the Lord was thronged all day, the anxiety being so great to receive, as if the brethren would have us stay here and continue the endowments until our way would be hedged up, and our enemies would intercept us. But I informed the brethren that this was not wise, and that we should build more Temples, and have further opportunities to receive the blessings of the Lord, as soon as the saints were prepared to receive them. In this Temple we have been abundantly rewarded, if we receive no more. I also informed the brethren that I was going to get my wagons started and be off. I walked some distance from the Temple supposing the crowd would disperse, but on returning I found the house filled to overflowing. Looking upon the multitude and knowing their anxiety, as they were thirsting and hungering for the word, we continued at work diligently in the House of the Lord. Two hundred and ninety-five persons received ordinances. Stephen Chipman was among those 295 saints in attendance at the Nauvoo Temple that day. Therefore, he was one of the last to receive their endowment before the saints were forced to abandon the temple and their homes to begin the migration west.

Information on the life of Phoebe Davis

Contributor: KarenWilliamsThorne Created: 1 year ago Updated: 5 months ago

"Phoebe Davis was a convert from England who migrated to New Orleans with her parents arriving there in April 1849. They joined with the other saints at Council Bluffs in June for the march toward the Rocky Mountains under the direction of Orson Spencer. The family located at Millcreek, where Phoebe met Stephen Chipman. She died, a widow, in her 44th year leaving four young children in the care of her oldest daughter, Phoebe Adelade, who married Niels Christensen three months later." "Stephen Chipman Pioneer," by Dean Whitaker Chipman, p. 15.

AMERICAN FORK'S FIRST SETTLERS

Contributor: KarenWilliamsThorne Created: 1 year ago Updated: 5 months ago

Almost as soon as the original band of Mormon pioneers landed in Salt Lake Valley in July, 1847, under the leadership of Brigham young, to take care of the many people that were to follow, it became the policy of the leaders of the church that settlements should not be confined to the Salt Lake Valley but should spread out over the adjacent country. This became a necessity inasmuch as farming and stock raising were the chief occupations of the people. Accordingly scouts were sent out to find new desirable places for settlement. As early as 1849 a few families were located on the Provo or Timpanogos River. The latter name was used by the Indians for the trading post which had been earlier established there. The Chipman and the Adams families were temporarily residing in Salt Lake Valley. In the early summer of 1850, Stephen Chipman and his son, William Henry, then a lad of fourteen years, with Arza Adams and his son, Nathan, were desirous of doing some trading at Fort Provo. On their way south, night overtook them and they camped on American Fork creek among the cottonwoods that grew along its banks. While the fathers were engaged in preparing supper the two boys scouted around the vicinity and upon their return. Nathan Adams exclaimed, "I think I would live to live here." At that time the lower lands toward the lake were meadows and the upper lands were covered more or less with bunch grass with an occasional patch of sagebrush. Upon their return trip they also camped on the American Fork Creek and were still more favorably impressed with the surrounding country. They had brought a few cattle and sheep to Utah with them when they crossed the plains in 1847. All were impressed with the thought that the location would not only be a fine one to make homes but would be ideal for a big pasture and cattle ranch. Upon their return to Salt Lake City, Stephen Chipman, Arza Adams and the Edlredge Brothers, Ira and John, went to Brigham Young and asked if it would be advisable to make the location. President Young replied, "Go and take up what land you want." Hebert C. Kimball, being present at the time, said, "At the time you are surveying your tract of land, I should like you to survey for me a tract adjoining yours." Accordingly, a little later on, plans were laid for making the survey. There were seven in the company interested in making it, namely, Grandfather Eldridge and his sons, Ira and John, Arza Adams, Barnabas Adams, Stephen Chipman and his son, Washburn. When on their way down to make the survey, they met Messrs. Fox and Lemmon, surveyors, near the Porter Rockwell home at the Point of the Mountain. A survey, it was learned, had just been made at Lehi and the new party established their base line from the Lehi survey. Ira Eldridge did the surveying under the direction of Mr. Fox, who was head surveyor in the Territory. The survey commenced at the northwest corner located on Spring Creek and extended east along what is now Second South Street, to what is now Second East Street, thence south to the shore of Utah Lake, thence in a westerly direction along the Lake shore to a point due south of the starting point, thence north to the place of beginning. At that time Spring Creek did not run almost due south, as it does today, but ran in a southeasterly direction and emptied into the Lake near where American Fork Creek emptied. This was known as the "Big Survey" and at first the interested parties made a joint stock company of their land claims, but soon afterwards the land was individually divided among the settlers. In accordance with the wishes of President Heber C. Kimball, a tract of land about half a mile wide and paralleling on the north for the full distance east and west of the first survey was made for him. After making the survey, which was commenced July 20, 1850 the surveying party went back to their homes in Salt Lake Valley to look after the harvesting of their crops. During the late months of 1850 and the spring of 1851, other settlers were attracted to American Fork and among the number was a man who was destined to take a prominent part in the social, civic and religious life of the community. Reference has already been made to a tract of land immediately north of the "Big Survey" being surveyed for Heber C. Kimball. Leonard E. Harrington came to American Fork as Mr. Kimball's agent or representative. The following extract is taken from Mr. Harrington's journal: "In the fall of 1850, we moved to American Fork in Utah valley, Utah County. Lived in a tent until we could build a house, which we did and moved into it about Christmas. Farmed through the summer of 1851." In the early part of 1851 several more families came here to settle; and by the end of the year, the following people, most of them with their families, had become residents of American Fork: Stephen Chipman, Washburn Chipman, James Chipman, Arza Adams, Joshua Adams, John Eldredge, Edward Robinson, Henry Mott and his four sons, Stephen, Hyrum, Israel and Squire, Solomon Thomas, Noah Guymon, James Guymon, John Cole, William Greenwood, Leonard E. Harrington, James B. Shelley and his three sons, James, John and Joseph, and some others.

Stephen Chipman (8 August 1805 – 17 February 1868)

Contributor: KarenWilliamsThorne Created: 1 year ago Updated: 5 months ago

Son of Barnabas Lathrop Chipman and Beulah Evarts Married Amanda Washburn, 23 May 1825, Leeds County, Ontario, Canada. Children - Beulah, Washburn, Sinah Ceneth, William Henry, James, Martha. Married Phoebe Davis, 20 Jan 1852, American Fork, Utah, Utah. Children - Phoebe, Betsy, Stephen Davis, Milton, Olive, Bertha. Stephen Chipman, Man of God, Utah Pioneer of 1847, and Co-founder of American Fork The Chipman odyssey began in 1836, in Ontario, Canada. Stephen Chipman stopped to hear a group of Mormon missionaries sing and commented, "Men who can sing like that must be men of God." Shortly after their conversions to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Stephen Chipman and his nephews, Arza and Barnabus Adams, gathered their families and crossed the St. Lawrence River into America to join the Saints in Ohio. Stephen and Amanda Washburn Chipman both claimed Mayflower ancestors, and from the time that their eight Pilgrim progenitors stepped off the boat this roving family had not stayed in one place long enough to bury two generations. Leaving their beloved "Plum Hollow" farm, they started on a journey that would build a city and establish a prominent family. During the next nine years they moved westward with Mormon migration, and with uncanny ability the Chipmans were questioned about their faith. Amanda said, "We stay with the Saints." With four wagons, cattle, sheep and supplies they joined the Abraham O. Smoot company of pioneers crossing the plains to Utah in 1847. During the trading trip to Provo in 1850, Stephen, with his son, William Henry, and Arza Adams and his son, Nathan, camped among the cottonwoods on American Fork Creek. Nathan told his father, "I think I would like to live here," and because the meadows were abundant and the water plentiful, the men decided this would make a fine cattle ranch. With permission from Brigham Young, the Chipman, Adams and Eldredge families - all related by blood or marriage - made a survey and formed a joint stock company of their land claims. Soon afterwards the surrounding land was divided among the settlers moving into the area, but the Chipman and Adams families maintained large sections of land. With the help of his sons, Washburn, William Henry, James and Stephen D. the Chipman family became a dominating force in the building of American Fork City, They were prominent in business, banking, politics, farming and livestock raising. Washburn and Stephen D. were excellent farmers. Henry brought the first sheep into the valley and had herds of cattle and fine horses. James was a banker, businessman, and Utah's first state treasurer. They were respected members and active in all aspects of community life. Stephen Chipman's character was the very essence of the pioneer spirit. His faith, hard work, thrift, and honesty allowed him to provide for his large family as well as build the community. His generosity is well documented - always giving more than asked. Brigham Young said that because of Stephen's generous nature his posterity would be blessed "and they would never know hunger." His ideal that "anything worth doing is worth doing right," is a Chipman standard. His patriarchal blessing promising a "posterity too numerous to count" is being fulfilled. For the first time in over 250 years, this branch of the Chipman family had permanently settled. Seven generations have now found a final resting place in this dedicated ground. Whatever Chipmans live today, the roots Stephen Chipman and his wives, Amanda and Phoebe, planted makes American Fork our home. Newspaper - In American Fork City, Feb 17th 1868 Stephen Chipman, aged 62 years, 6 months and 10 days. Deceased was a native of Johnstown, Leeds Co., Canada West, where he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October, 1836, and emigrated to Caldwell co., Mo., as the Church moved from Kirtland to Jackson.; thence he moved to Nauvoo, Ill., and at the exodus of 1847, he followed the Pioneers, arriving in Salt Lake Valley in September the same year. In the fall of 1850 he settled in American Fork, where he has since resided. He lived and died a Latter-day Saint. __________________________ "Lines to Memory of Bro. Stephen Chipman." With sorrowing hearts, we bid a last adieu, To one whom God saw fit to take from earth, Who in the walks of life was ever true, And always proved himself a man of worth. He lived respected, honored and revered, He died regretted by his many friends; To wife and children, he was soul-endeared, But now he leaves them, life's long journey ends. For him will many a bitter tear be shed, And oft' midst praises, shall his name resound. Time-honored father, sleep thou sweetly on! And with the just made perfect thou shalt rise. When from the east, the resurrection dawn, In golden tapestry adorns the skies. Robt. G. Eccles Published in the Deseret News Weekly on 11 Mar 1868; FHL US/CAN Film 0026591, item 2 (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=33341779)

Bernard Niels Christensen - A History

Contributor: Celique Created: 5 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

Bernard Niels Christensen was born on October 3, 1876 to Niels Christensen and Phoebe Adelaide Chipman at the home of Stephen Chipman, Phoebe’s parents. This home is located at 13 North Merchant Street in American Fork. Bernard was named and blessed on December 7, 1876 by Bishop Leonard E. Harrington. During Bernard’s early years the street known today as Center Street was then called Water Street. Its name came from the fact that an open canal ran down the middle of the street from about First North to Second South. At this point the canal ran to the west to Spring Creek. This water was used for irrigation and stock watering. One morning as Bernard’s father was leading his horses to the canal for watering with Bernard on the back of one of the horses, the horse shied causing Bernard to fall and strike his head on a rock. The scar remained with Bernard the rest of his life. Bernard attended the Central School when old enough. The school was a big adobe building which served as the school, the church, the dance hall, and the jail. The jail was a dungeon in the basement. In the winter season, the water in the canal often flooded and froze. Bernard was anxious for some ice skates. His uncle, Stephen Davis Chipman, promised to lend him a pair if Bernard would feed his livestock for a month. Having done this, Bernard received a pair of dull and rusty skates but he was delighted. He would skate up the canal and then walk up the steps to school with his skates on waiting to return home. His love of skating was to last the rest of his life. His mother had told him that he would be a great skater if he observed the Sabbath. One Sunday, Bernard decided to go skating but knowing his mother’s feelings, he slipped his skates out of the bedroom window and then walked out the door. He picked up his skates and started for Utah Lake. Along the way, his conscience and love for his mother made him return home. His children and grandchildren attest to the fact that he did become a great skater as well as speed skater. One cold winter night Bernard was responsible for saving many boys from drowning in the cold lake. A group of boys from American Fork decided to go skating on the lake before if was sufficiently frozen. Two boys decided to skate out on the lake even though the ice was thin. One of the boys broke through into the icy water. The other boy skated near him and tried to pull him out by throwing his coat towards the boy. Then the ice broke under the second boy . Bernard was the oldest in the group and he ordered the others to stay away. Bernard then skated to shore for a pole to get the boys out. The two boys in the water got excited and started thrashing around and drowned before Bernard could get to them. However, by warning the other boys to stay back Bernard prevented the loss of additional lives. Bernard was baptized a member of the Church on November 6, 1884. Bernard was unable to start school in the fall because there were few field fences and the livestock had to be herded until the crops were gathered and the fields declared open. Several of the boys would go together with their cattle and stock horses. After the crops were harvested, Bernard ‘s father would go to the west hill country for fuel wood. Bernard would often accompany his father. One morning, they were hurrying along the winding road that led through the sagebrush toward the Tickville Wash. Both father and son were walking to spare the horses an unnecessary burden. Bernard had been warned not to get behind, but he lagged behind. Bernard’s father looked anxiously back several times but kept moving on with the team. Suddenly Bernard realized that he was far behind and alone in the wilds. He began running and crying and finally caught the wagon. His father stopped long enough to give him a spanking before going on. On another trip for wood, Bernard’s father selected a young maple curving out from a hillside. He cut the sapling to the right length and then split it down the middle and fashioned sled runners for Bernard. Spokes came from a buggy wheel and it was the strongest and easiest-drawn sled in town. The boys loved to hitch their sleds to the horse-drawn bobsleighs. The summer of 1890 when Bernard was fourteen he rode into Salt Lake City on a load of hay with his father. Bernard’s father allowed his son to see the town while the hay was being sold and delivered. When Bernard returned to Market Square that evening he informed his father that he had taken a job in a printer’s shop and was starting work the next morning. After some serious consideration, Bernard’s father determined to allow him to stay and work for the printer. Bernard was paid at a rate of one dollar per week which he gave to his Aunt Blanche for his board. The printer was sorry when Bernard decided to leave his employ a month later. Bernard then went to work for the Holts in Parley’s Canyon. Toward autumn, Bernard became very homesick. He went down to Market Square in Salt Lake City where he found some teamsters from American Fork. He caught a ride home. He had been out in the sun so much that summer that his skin was deeply tanned. When he climbed through the pole fence and walked down through the lot, one of his sisters said, “Look, Mamma, here comes a little Indian.” Bernard’s mother was delighted when he handed her his entire savings of $29.00. On October 2, 1890, Bernard’s sister, Phoebe Helen, died suddenly at the age of sixteen. Bernard’s grieving was dispelled because of a dream wherein he stood with Helen at the foot of the bed where her body lay and Helen told him they would meet again and it would not seem long. When Bernard returned to school again, he began to realize that his progress had been slow. He therefore resolved to try elsewhere for his education. He applied for membership in the Presbyterian school held at the Presbyterian church. Because the tuition was one dollar and Bernard had no money, he asked the schoolmaster if he could work the tuition off. The schoolmaster agreed and allowed Bernard to come an hour early in the mornings to build the fires, sweep, dust, and ring the bell in the belfry. The rate of pay was five cents per week for twenty weeks. The quality of the schooling was much better there and Bernard was pleased. The Presbyterian church still stands on First East about half a block north of Main. During the summers of 1891 and 1892 Bernard worked for John W. Young and Company. The Young firm was building the Saltair Railroad. Bernard’s chief duties were that of cook’s helper and water boy. On July 14, 1894 Bernard was riding his little black mare on his way to Utah Lake to go for a swim when he met his mother coming out of a neighbor’s gate. She greeted him with a smile and turned and went up the street as Bernard watched her go. He had a strong urge to go with her but turned his horse south and went for his swim. When he returned home he found a crowd of people in front of the family home – Bernard’s mother was dying. Earlier in the day, his mother had sung with the choir at a funeral and she had fallen unconscious, probably the result of a massive cerebral hemorrhage. Bernard’s uncle, Washburn Chipman (older half-brother to his mother) paid the funeral expenses and helped in many other ways. Bernard remembered this kindness when thirty-five years later Washburn’s daughter needed help at harvest time. Bernard was ever aware of the gratitude he owed his uncle. After the death of his mother, Bernard felt that his duty was at home. His younger siblings needed his help and this deep loyalty and love was instilled amongst them. In the fall of 1896 Bernard told his father that he was going to get a job at the sugar factory in Lehi. His father said, “Oh you can’t get a job, they are not even hiring married men.” Bernard was a man of no small determination. For the next seventeen days, he was at the factory twice each day. On the morning of the seventeenth day, someone was ill and Bernard was hired. The shifts at the sugar mill were twelve hours long and the rate of pay was $1.75 per shift. The first day he worked in the pulp silos. Later he worked at the sugar spinners. One morning after an argument with an overbearing foreman, Bernard walked out of the mill. As he was about to leave the mill grounds, the superintendent came hurrying after him and requested that he stay. The superintendent gave Bernard a job as a foreman over a gang of men who were laying a pipeline. While Bernard was working for the sugar company, he received a call to go to the Southern States Mission. He explained to his bishop that he could not go at that time and asked if his mission could be deferred for a year or two. That winter Bernard took a six-week missionary course at the Brigham Young Academy in Provo. Between seasons at the sugar mill, he helped his father and his Uncle Washburn Chipman. He also spent two quarters at the University of Utah. During this time he played on the American Fork town baseball team. One day amongst those watching was a young lady named Maud Driggs. They were introduced and the beginnings of a romance ensued. During the fall of 1900 Bernard worked in the American Fork Canyon helping to build the pipeline that delivered the water to the generators at the power plant at the mouth of the canyon. The pipeline was finished about the first of December. With the completion of that project, electric lights were turned on in American Fork for the first time. In 1900 Bernard went back to his bishop and told him he was now ready to serve a mission. Bernard then went to Maud and told her their marriage would have to wait until after he returned from his mission to New Zealand. On December 6, 1900, Bernard bade farewell to his family and friends who had gathered at the train depot in American Fork to wish him well. Maud and Bernard’s sister, Mable, accompanied him as far as Ogden. On December 7, 1900, Bernard was ordained a Seventy and set apart as a missionary by President J. Golden Kimball of the First Council of the Seventy. The train then took him to Ogden and then west to San Francisco. He spent two days there then sailed on December 12, 1900 for Honolulu, Hawaii. From there they sailed through the South Pacific and arrived in the Samoan Islands on December 28th and finally arrived in New Zealand on January 4, 1901. Bernard labored diligently on his mission for nearly three years and returned to American Fork on August 9, 1903. Bernard labored diligently on his mission. His journal tells of his work among the Europeans and the generous hospitality of the Maoris. The warmth and hospitality of these Polynesian people were in marked contrast to the coolness and indifference of the white settlers. The spiritual strength which Bernard acquired during this prolonged period of personal discipline and sacrifice, prepared him for a life of service in positions of influence and trust. In the fall of 1903 Bernard left American Fork to work for the Utah-Idaho Sugar Company in Idaho Falls. Maud Driggs also moved to Rexburg where she had accepted a teaching position at Ricks Academy – only thirty miles from Idaho Falls. On September 14, 1904, Bernard Niels Christensen married Maud Rosalie Driggs in the Salt Lake Temple. They lived the first months of their marriage in Sugar City, Idaho. In 1905, Bernard began work with the National Tea Company as a salesman in the Utah mining towns of Eureka, Silver City, and Mammoth. His brother-in-law (Mable’s husband Edward Reese) was a principal partner in that business. Bernard’s‘ integrity and hard work earned him a great clientele in the area. One night the sheriff of Eureka asked Bernard to take $300 in gold out of the area. Bernard was very anxious about the possibility of foul play. Therefore, as night fell, Bernard put the gold in his shoes and, hiking along the railroad tracks, quietly slipped out of town. An electrical storm that night proved to be a blessing in disguise. When the lightning would flash, he would check the tracks ahead and therefore was able to travel safely. Bernard built a home for his family during the years of 1911 and 1912. He had purchased the Hans Christensen home from his father and uncle with the thought of remodeling it. However, after consulting an architect, it was determined to tear the structure down and use materials from it to build a modern home. That decision was met with some opposition. It was an enormous job. Bernard worked from 4:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. tearing down the old house and building his new home. His brothers and father assisted in the project. In addition to the razing of the “Big House,” Bernard moved the granary which stood behind it to the lot in back of his own home. At this time Bernard also began developing a fine herd of Jersey milk cows. Bernard then ran for and became a Utah County Commissioner. One of the public works projects undertaken while Bernard was county commissioner was the construction of a road in the American Fork Canyon. Bernard wanted the spectacular canyon accessible to families for camping and other recreational purposes. Another incident which occurred during Bernard’s term as a commissioner is revealing of Bernard’s character. An American Fork City ordinance prohibited the operation of saloons with the city limits. A group of unscrupulous men had been operating a saloon in a building north of the Chipman Mercantile and Boley Building. Bernard’s cousin, Stephen L. Chipman, in his capacity as president of the Alpine Stake said the ordinance should be enforced and the law obeyed. In response, an agent of the lawless detonated a bomb under the window of the Stephen L. Chipman home. The American Fork marshal and the city administrators were afraid to act. Bernard determined the law would be enforced. He made arrangements to do so with the Utah County sheriff. Early one morning, the sheriff and his deputies arrived in American Fork. Bernard went with them to the saloon. The sheriff and his men, guns drawn and armed with the necessary legal documents went into the saloon. The sheriff ordered them out in the name of the law. The morning was spent carrying the gaming tables and liquor bottles and kegs into the street where they were destroyed and burned. Bernard had displayed the courage which had been lacking in the city officials. About the time Bernard left the Utah County Commissioner’s office, he began working for the American Fork Branch of the Consolidated Wagon and Machine Company. The firm had farm machinery outlets in Utah and Idaho. The company headquarters were in Salt Lake City at approximately 150 South State Street. In his first years with Con Wagon, Bernard solicited business using a horse and buggy for transportation. During this period he also served as a member of the Alpine Stake Sunday School Board. The Alpine Stake then included the area from Cedar Valley on the west to Lindon on the east. Although it was a lengthy buggy ride from American Fork to Cedar Fort, Bernard would rise early and drive there in time for Sunday School. In the winter season he placed heated bricks on the buggy floor to keep his feet from freezing. Near the end of 1917 Bernard was called to the Alpine Stake High Council. He served continuously in this assignment until his death on January 21, 1940. He also continued to do some farming although his father was the mainstay on the farm. During the years that he managed the Con Wagon, Bernard also continued to operate his dairy. He arranged to ship cream daily to the Finch and Rogers Café in Salt Lake City. The cream had to be delivered to the Orem Electric train depot on Main Street in American Fork where the café would send a man to meet that train each morning. There was no refrigeration on the train, so the cream had to be cold when it was shipped and also when it arrived. Bernard’s son, Clare, was in charge of that three-gallon can delivery each day. The Orem Electric train tracks disappeared following WWII but the depot building still stands at 67 West Main Street. Bernard’s sales territory for Con Wagon reached from Fairfield and Cedar Fort on the west to Lindon and Vineyard on the east. He made his calls using a Ford Model T. Another activity Bernard was involved with was the exploration of Timpanogos Cave. Bernard , with a group of men, acted as an exploratory committee for additional caves within the Timpanogos Cave area. The first cave, Hansen Cave, had been vandalized earlier but two additional caves were still untouched. Using kerosene lanterns and binder twine, the group went into the cave. The twine was used as a road map back out. The interior rooms or caverns of these deep limestone caves were dark and had narrow passages. A financial committee was eventually founded with Bernard and his friends acting as members. These local leaders were determined to protect the new discoveries and did so until in 1922 Timpanogos Cave was made a National Monument. His love for Mount Timpanogos would last throughout his life, Bernard loved to hike to the top several times each summer; once with President Heber J. Grant. Bernard left his position at the Con Wagon in 1924 to pursue farming full time. He helped organize the Utah Poultry Growers Association as a farm cooperative. One of their products was “Utah milk-white eggs.” The Intermountain Farmers is the remnant of this organization. Bernard also loved to hunt. One October 3rd, early in the morning, he went to the lake shore duck hunting. Because it was a cold and drizzly day, he had not seen any ducks. Just as he decided to abandon his hunting, he saw three mallards winging towards him. He watched them intently and as they circled to make a landing, they were all in a line. He fired once and all three ducks tumbled out of the sky. Bernard came home a happy hunter and his wife, Maud, cooked a lovely duck dinner for his birthday. On January 21, 1940, Bernard died. The death was unexpected and shocking to the family though he had mentioned that he wasn’t feeling well before he

Stephen Chipman Story

Contributor: Celique Created: 5 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

The Chipman odyssey began in 1836, in Ontario, Canada. Stephen Chipman stopped to hear a group of Mormon missionaries sing and commented, "Men who can sing like that must be men of God." Shortly after their conversions to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Stephen Chipman and his nephews, Arza and Barnabus Adams, gathered their families and crossed the St. Lawrence River into America to join the Saints in Ohio. Stephen and Amanda Washburn Chipman both claimed Mayflower ancestors, and from the time that their eight Pilgrim progenitors stepped off the boat this roving family had not stayed in one place long enough to bury two generations. Leaving their beloved "Plum Hollow" farm, they started on a journey that would build a city and establish a prominent family. During the next nine years they oved westward with Mormon migration, and with uncanny ability the Chipmans were questioned about their faith. Amanda said, "We stay with the Saints." With four wagons, cattle, sheep and supplies they joined the Abraham O. Smoot company of pioneers crossing the plains to Utah in 1847. During the trading trip to Provo in 1850, Stephen, with his son, William Henry, and Arza Adams and his son, Nathan, camped among the cottonwoods on American Fork Creek. Nathan told his father, "I think I would like to live here," and because the meadows were abundant and the water plentiful, the men decided this would make a fine cattle ranch. With permission from Brigham Young, the Chipman, Adams and Eldredge families - all related by blood or marriage - made a survey and formed a joint stock company of their land claims. Soon afterwards the surrounding land was divided among the settlers moving into the area, but the Chipman and Adams families maintained large sections of land. With the help of his sons, Washburn, William Henry, James and Stephen D. the Chipman family became a dominating force in the building of American Fork City, They were prominent in business, banking, politics, farming and livestock raising. Washburn and Stephen D. were excellent farmers. Henry brought the first sheep into the valley and had herds of cattle and fine horses. James was a banker, businessman, and Utah's first state treasurer. They were respected members and active in all aspects of community life. Stephen Chipman's character was the very essence of the pioneer spirit. His faith, hard work, thrift, and honesty allowed him to provide for his large family as well as build the community. His generosity is well documented - always giving more than asked. Brigham Young said that because of Stephen's generous nature his posterity would be blesssed "and they would never know hunger." His ideal that "anything worth doing is worth doing right," is a Chipman standard. His patriarchal blessing promising a "posterity too numerous to count" is being fulfilled. For the first time in over 250 years, this branch of the Chipman family had permanently settled. Seven generations have now found a final resting place in this dedicated ground. Whatever Chipmans live today, the roots Stephen Chipman and his wives, Amanda and Phoebe, planted makes American Fork our home. Family links: Parents: Barnabas Lothrop Chipman (1762 - 1847) Beulah Evarts Chipman (1761 - 1830) Children: Washburn Chipman (1829 - 1926)* Sinah Ceneth Chipman Eldredge (1831 - 1895)* William Henry Chipman (1833 - 1891)* James Chipman (1839 - 1922)* Phoebe Adelaide Chipman Christensen (1852 - 1894)* Betsy Chipman (1854 - 1861)* Stephen Davis Chipman (1857 - 1951)* Milton Davis Chipman (1862 - 1863)* Olive Chipman Crandall (1864 - 1913)* Spouses: Amanda Washburn Chipman (1804 - 1872) Phoebe Davis Chipman (1828 - 1872) *Point here for explanation Burial:American Fork Cemetery American ForkUtah CountyUtah, USAPlot: B_238_8 Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?] Created by: SMSmithRecord added: Jan 28, 2009

Stephen Chipman at the Nauvoo Temple

Contributor: Celique Created: 5 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

The following paragraph is found in History of the Church, Volume 7, page 579. Great Anxiety of the Saints to Receive Endowments Tuesday December 3, 1846—Notwithstanding that I had announced that we would not attend to the administration of the ordinances, the House of the Lord was thronged all day, the anxiety being so great to receive, as if the brethren would have us stay here and continue the endowments until our way would be hedged up, and our enemies would intercept us. But I informed the brethren that this was not wise, and that we should build more Temples, and have further opportunities to receive the blessings of the Lord, as soon as the saints were prepared to receive them. In this Temple we have been abundantly rewarded, if we receive no more. I also informed the brethren that I was going to get my wagons started and be off. I walked some distance from the Temple supposing the crowd would disperse, but on returning I found the house filled to overflowing. Looking upon the multitude and knowing their anxiety, as they were thirsting and hungering for the word, we continued at work diligently in the House of the Lord. Two hundred and ninety-five persons received ordinances. Stephen Chipman was among those 295 saints in attendance at the Nauvoo Temple that day. Therefore, he was one of the last to receive their endowment before the saints were forced to abandon the temple and their homes to begin the migration west.

Information on the life of Phoebe Davis

Contributor: Celique Created: 5 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

"Phoebe Davis was a convert from England who migrated to New Orleans with her parents arriving there in April 1849. They joined with the other saints at Council Bluffs in June for the march toward the Rocky Mountains under the direction of Orson Spencer. The family located at Millcreek, where Phoebe met Stephen Chipman. She died, a widow, in her 44th year leaving four young children in the care of her oldest daughter, Phoebe Adelade, who married Niels Christensen three months later." "Stephen Chipman Pioneer," by Dean Whitaker Chipman, p. 15.

AMERICAN FORK'S FIRST SETTLERS

Contributor: Celique Created: 5 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

Almost as soon as the original band of Mormon pioneers landed in Salt Lake Valley in July, 1847, under the leadership of Brigham young, to take care of the many people that were to follow, it became the policy of the leaders of the church that settlements should not be confined to the Salt Lake Valley but should spread out over the adjacent country. This became a necessity inasmuch as farming and stock raising were the chief occupations of the people. Accordingly scouts were sent out to find new desirable places for settlement. As early as 1849 a few families were located on the Provo or Timpanogos River. The latter name was used by the Indians for the trading post which had been earlier established there. The Chipman and the Adams families were temporarily residing in Salt Lake Valley. In the early summer of 1850, Stephen Chipman and his son, William Henry, then a lad of fourteen years, with Arza Adams and his son, Nathan, were desirous of doing some trading at Fort Provo. On their way south, night overtook them and they camped on American Fork creek among the cottonwoods that grew along its banks. While the fathers were engaged in preparing supper the two boys scouted around the vicinity and upon their return. Nathan Adams exclaimed, "I think I would live to live here." At that time the lower lands toward the lake were meadows and the upper lands were covered more or less with bunch grass with an occasional patch of sagebrush. Upon their return trip they also camped on the American Fork Creek and were still more favorably impressed with the surrounding country. They had brought a few cattle and sheep to Utah with them when they crossed the plains in 1847. All were impressed with the thought that the location would not only be a fine one to make homes but would be ideal for a big pasture and cattle ranch. Upon their return to Salt Lake City, Stephen Chipman, Arza Adams and the Edlredge Brothers, Ira and John, went to Brigham Young and asked if it would be advisable to make the location. President Young replied, "Go and take up what land you want." Hebert C. Kimball, being present at the time, said, "At the time you are surveying your tract of land, I should like you to survey for me a tract adjoining yours." Accordingly, a little later on, plans were laid for making the survey. There were seven in the company interested in making it, namely, Grandfather Eldridge and his sons, Ira and John, Arza Adams, Barnabas Adams, Stephen Chipman and his son, Washburn. When on their way down to make the survey, they met Messrs. Fox and Lemmon, surveyors, near the Porter Rockwell home at the Point of the Mountain. A survey, it was learned, had just been made at Lehi and the new party established their base line from the Lehi survey. Ira Eldridge did the surveying under the direction of Mr. Fox, who was head surveyor in the Territory. The survey commenced at the northwest corner located on Spring Creek and extended east along what is now Second South Street, to what is now Second East Street, thence south to the shore of Utah Lake, thence in a westerly direction along the Lake shore to a point due south of the starting point, thence north to the place of beginning. At that time Spring Creek did not run almost due south, as it does today, but ran in a southeasterly direction and emptied into the Lake near where American Fork Creek emptied. This was known as the "Big Survey" and at first the interested parties made a joint stock company of their land claims, but soon afterwards the land was individually divided among the settlers. In accordance with the wishes of President Heber C. Kimball, a tract of land about half a mile wide and paralleling on the north for the full distance east and west of the first survey was made for him. After making the survey, which was commenced July 20, 1850 the surveying party went back to their homes in Salt Lake Valley to look after the harvesting of their crops. During the late months of 1850 and the spring of 1851, other settlers were attracted to American Fork and among the number was a man who was destined to take a prominent part in the social, civic and religious life of the community. Reference has already been made to a tract of land immediately north of the "Big Survey" being surveyed for Heber C. Kimball. Leonard E. Harrington came to American Fork as Mr. Kimball's agent or representative. The following extract is taken from Mr. Harrington's journal: "In the fall of 1850, we moved to American Fork in Utah valley, Utah County. Lived in a tent until we could build a house, which we did and moved into it about Christmas. Farmed through the summer of 1851." In the early part of 1851 several more families came here to settle; and by the end of the year, the following people, most of them with their families, had become residents of American Fork: Stephen Chipman, Washburn Chipman, James Chipman, Arza Adams, Joshua Adams, John Eldredge, Edward Robinson, Henry Mott and his four sons, Stephen, Hyrum, Israel and Squire, Solomon Thomas, Noah Guymon, James Guymon, John Cole, William Greenwood, Leonard E. Harrington, James B. Shelley and his three sons, James, John and Joseph, and some others.

Stephen Chipman (8 August 1805 – 17 February 1868)

Contributor: Celique Created: 5 months ago Updated: 5 months ago

Son of Barnabas Lathrop Chipman and Beulah Evarts Married Amanda Washburn, 23 May 1825, Leeds County, Ontario, Canada. Children - Beulah, Washburn, Sinah Ceneth, William Henry, James, Martha. Married Phoebe Davis, 20 Jan 1852, American Fork, Utah, Utah. Children - Phoebe, Betsy, Stephen Davis, Milton, Olive, Bertha. Stephen Chipman, Man of God, Utah Pioneer of 1847, and Co-founder of American Fork The Chipman odyssey began in 1836, in Ontario, Canada. Stephen Chipman stopped to hear a group of Mormon missionaries sing and commented, "Men who can sing like that must be men of God." Shortly after their conversions to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Stephen Chipman and his nephews, Arza and Barnabus Adams, gathered their families and crossed the St. Lawrence River into America to join the Saints in Ohio. Stephen and Amanda Washburn Chipman both claimed Mayflower ancestors, and from the time that their eight Pilgrim progenitors stepped off the boat this roving family had not stayed in one place long enough to bury two generations. Leaving their beloved "Plum Hollow" farm, they started on a journey that would build a city and establish a prominent family. During the next nine years they moved westward with Mormon migration, and with uncanny ability the Chipmans were questioned about their faith. Amanda said, "We stay with the Saints." With four wagons, cattle, sheep and supplies they joined the Abraham O. Smoot company of pioneers crossing the plains to Utah in 1847. During the trading trip to Provo in 1850, Stephen, with his son, William Henry, and Arza Adams and his son, Nathan, camped among the cottonwoods on American Fork Creek. Nathan told his father, "I think I would like to live here," and because the meadows were abundant and the water plentiful, the men decided this would make a fine cattle ranch. With permission from Brigham Young, the Chipman, Adams and Eldredge families - all related by blood or marriage - made a survey and formed a joint stock company of their land claims. Soon afterwards the surrounding land was divided among the settlers moving into the area, but the Chipman and Adams families maintained large sections of land. With the help of his sons, Washburn, William Henry, James and Stephen D. the Chipman family became a dominating force in the building of American Fork City, They were prominent in business, banking, politics, farming and livestock raising. Washburn and Stephen D. were excellent farmers. Henry brought the first sheep into the valley and had herds of cattle and fine horses. James was a banker, businessman, and Utah's first state treasurer. They were respected members and active in all aspects of community life. Stephen Chipman's character was the very essence of the pioneer spirit. His faith, hard work, thrift, and honesty allowed him to provide for his large family as well as build the community. His generosity is well documented - always giving more than asked. Brigham Young said that because of Stephen's generous nature his posterity would be blessed "and they would never know hunger." His ideal that "anything worth doing is worth doing right," is a Chipman standard. His patriarchal blessing promising a "posterity too numerous to count" is being fulfilled. For the first time in over 250 years, this branch of the Chipman family had permanently settled. Seven generations have now found a final resting place in this dedicated ground. Whatever Chipmans live today, the roots Stephen Chipman and his wives, Amanda and Phoebe, planted makes American Fork our home. Newspaper - In American Fork City, Feb 17th 1868 Stephen Chipman, aged 62 years, 6 months and 10 days. Deceased was a native of Johnstown, Leeds Co., Canada West, where he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October, 1836, and emigrated to Caldwell co., Mo., as the Church moved from Kirtland to Jackson.; thence he moved to Nauvoo, Ill., and at the exodus of 1847, he followed the Pioneers, arriving in Salt Lake Valley in September the same year. In the fall of 1850 he settled in American Fork, where he has since resided. He lived and died a Latter-day Saint. __________________________ "Lines to Memory of Bro. Stephen Chipman." With sorrowing hearts, we bid a last adieu, To one whom God saw fit to take from earth, Who in the walks of life was ever true, And always proved himself a man of worth. He lived respected, honored and revered, He died regretted by his many friends; To wife and children, he was soul-endeared, But now he leaves them, life's long journey ends. For him will many a bitter tear be shed, And oft' midst praises, shall his name resound. Time-honored father, sleep thou sweetly on! And with the just made perfect thou shalt rise. When from the east, the resurrection dawn, In golden tapestry adorns the skies. Robt. G. Eccles Published in the Deseret News Weekly on 11 Mar 1868; FHL US/CAN Film 0026591, item 2 (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=33341779)

Life timeline of Stephen Chipman

Stephen Chipman was born on 8 Aug 1805
Stephen Chipman was 14 years old when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founds Singapore. Sir Thomas Stamford Bingley Raffles, FRS was a British statesman, Lieutenant-Governor of British Java (1811–1815) and Governor-General of Bencoolen (1817–1822), best known for his founding of Singapore and the British Malaya.
1819
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Stephen Chipman was 20 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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Stephen Chipman was 26 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Stephen Chipman was 35 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Stephen Chipman was 54 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1859
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Stephen Chipman died on 17 Feb 1868 at the age of 62
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Stephen Chipman (8 Aug 1805 - 17 Feb 1868), BillionGraves Record 26371 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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