Stanley K Ott

23 Aug 1925 - 5 Dec 1997

Change Your Language

close

You can change the language of the BillionGraves website by changing the default language of your browser.

Learn More
English
Register

Stanley K Ott

23 Aug 1925 - 5 Dec 1997
edit Edit Record
photo Add Images
group_add Add Family
description Add a memory

Grave site information of Stanley K Ott (23 Aug 1925 - 5 Dec 1997) at Georgetown Cemetery in Cannonville, Garfield, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Stanley K Ott

Born:
Married: 29 Jun 1956
Died:

Georgetown Cemetery

about 3 miles south of Cannonville on Kodacrome Way (a few hundred yards to the west)
Cannonville, Garfield, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Father; Mother; Their children, He Saved Soles, In His Will Is Our Peace, Married Sep 14, 1935; sealed Sept 27, 1952, Wife of Seth Johnson Peace Perfect Peace A Loving Wife, A Mother Dear, A friend to all, Lies Buried Here, Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta G Johnson, married June 29, 1956; children Clara S, A. True, Marilyn K., Richard W., Joyce F, A Devoted Husband and a Loving Father a True Latter Day Saint, Beloved Father

Headstone Description

Father - Joseph Edward
Mother - Susan J
Children: Joseph E, Alfred D, Karma J, US ARMY WORLD WAR II, says and Baby, Children: Saundra, Ronald Lee, Sheila, Nila, Sue Ellen, Children: Billy, Sherman, Gwen, Deane, David, Dimion, Karen, Rebecca, Mother
Father, Sealed Sept 27, 1952
Children: Larry W - Ladona - Myrna L - Alma D - Ramona J - Joseph D, Son of Adelbert & Mary J Heaps, Children of Nephi & Zina Johnson, Children of Irving A & Daisie C Johnson, Utah
Cpl 12 Infantry
World War II BSM-PH, Married Irving A Johnson Sept 5, 1923, A loving wife & mother...
A friend to all..., Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta C. Johnson, Wife: Shana
Daughter: Kori Lee, Sealed June 28, 1939, US ARMY
WORLD WAR II, DEAN: US ARMY WORLD WAR II, UTAH CPL 1050 BASE UNIT AAF
WORLD WAR II, PFC US ARMY
WORLD WAR I, Children: Clara S - A True - Marilyn K - Richard W - Joyce F, Wife of Cyrus Mangum, Daugh of Marion..., Son of R. W. & Clara E Pinney, Magleby Mortuary, Husband of Sarah A Dutton, Daughter of Richard C & Susanah D. Pinney
Transcriber

Amy Robbins-Tjaden

April 28, 2019
Transcriber

DdraigGoch

April 26, 2019
Transcriber

R and N Englestead

April 27, 2019
Transcriber

KRobDFW

April 26, 2019
Transcriber

Ron Haymore

June 6, 2013
Transcriber

grave hunter

May 12, 2019
Transcriber

kristen_murray

May 15, 2019
Transcriber

anybody

June 6, 2013
Transcriber

speedy1935

June 5, 2013
Transcriber

vpoor

June 6, 2013
Transcriber

beahelper

June 4, 2013
Transcriber

greatgranny

April 27, 2019
Transcriber

DONTHOMAS10

May 10, 2019
Transcriber

vcorn49

May 1, 2019
Transcriber

chfgunsmoke

April 26, 2019
Transcriber

PatM

April 25, 2019
Transcriber

Mary Hennig

April 29, 2019
Transcriber

Wayne

April 29, 2019
Transcriber

josephryanlaird

May 16, 2019
Transcriber

Jondrae

May 3, 2019
Transcriber

jbbj24

April 28, 2019
Transcriber

dmsantamaria

April 26, 2019
Transcriber

joanb

April 26, 2019
Transcriber

Davidsdig

May 1, 2019
Transcriber

shirley tauer

April 25, 2019
Transcriber

Marge

April 28, 2019
Transcriber

qplady0831

April 24, 2019
Transcriber

F D Dennis

April 29, 2019
Transcriber

DocuQuinn

May 14, 2019
Photographer

Ron Haymore

June 2, 2013

Nearby Graves

See more nearby graves
Upgrade to BG+

Family

Relationships on the headstone

add

Relationships added by users

add

Grave Site of Stanley K

edit

Stanley K Ott is buried in the Georgetown Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

Memories of a son

Contributor: Ron Haymore Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

Many of my memories of my dad are of his temper. I never was really afraid of dad but he always seemed angry. There were some really funny times like when we were trying to make a family tape to send to Uncle Kenneth Heywood and Uncle Fred Heywood. We all got laughing so hard I don't know if we ever got the tape done. Or when he would be walking down the hall in his under garments and do his heal click jump to make us laugh. But mostly I remember a grumpy man. It wasn't till I grew older and realized what his life was like that I understood and appreciated this man. He never talked about it but from talking to members of his family I could piece together what happened that night to change his life's course. The visible wounds of the accident were obvious. His left arm hanging limp to his side. A bright mind with a love for geology he would never go back to school. Opportunity lost. Again he never spoke about it to me but after his death I found out he spent about a year in the VA hospital recovering from the accident. He made paper poppies with one hand (probably as part of his rehab). He did talk about meeting Jimmy Durante while he was there and getting to touch the "old schnozzola". Sometime, after the accident he met mom in Panguitch where she was a waitress in a cafe. Not many options for work in those days for someone with a handicap. He was able to find work at an ammunition depot in Hawthorne Nevada. For the next 28 years he separated the different metals from the scrapped ammunition. After 28 years he had enough sick time accrued that he was able to retire with a full 30 years. Twenty eight years and never took a sick day? He worked with brass and steel in the hot Nevada sun for 28 years and never took a sick day? After he retired we moved back to Tropic Utah. He and Mom decided to build a house. There was a company called Capp Homes, They supplied you with all the materials and you had to supply the labor to finish it. Oh and it had to be completed in 1 year in order to get the financing. It evidently was a less expensive way to go. For the next year I was Dad's left hand. The house got finished and I learned a ton about building a house. The workmanship wasn't

Memories of a son (part 2)

Contributor: Ron Haymore Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

Growing up I knew dad drank alcohol. This was taboo in our religion and living in small towns it wasn't a well kept secret. Except for one instance dad's drinking didn't really affect me much. Moving back to Tropic he fell back into his farm life. He spent countless hours at his farm at Yellowcreek. Farming the way he did when he was young. He out worked me so many days out there I often found reasons to not be available. Dad seemed to keep to himself more and was a quiet drunk. When I started my professional life and understood addiction I started to put my dad's life in perspective. He was visibly handicapped but when you got to know him and his ingenuity you realized that he wasn't really incapable of anything. He fashioned fishing gear, he loved to bowl, watching him drive a nail was a mystery to me. A terrible accident changed his life. He endured so much to keep a roof over his family's head and live up to being a provider for his family. The hot Nevada sun searing off the scrap metal in the days before SPF 50 caused him to lose half his face to skin cancer via countless surgeries. In the end the hepatitis he got from the transfusions after the accident combined with a lifelong battle with alcohol left him with liver cancer that took his life. I wasn't around much during this battle but every time we spoke he never complained. He endured so much in his life and dealt with so much silently. As I look back I realize how well he actually dealt with it all. Before he was diagnosed with cancer we had a talk about his alcoholism. He committed to me that he would stop drinking in order to be around long enough to see my children. He never drank again. He worked so hard and had so much integrity I can only hope some of it rubbed off. When I put it all together this man became a hero to me. That anger I remember now is a strange inspiration to me. Love ya Dad!!

Memories of a son

Contributor: vcorn49 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

Many of my memories of my dad are of his temper. I never was really afraid of dad but he always seemed angry. There were some really funny times like when we were trying to make a family tape to send to Uncle Kenneth Heywood and Uncle Fred Heywood. We all got laughing so hard I don't know if we ever got the tape done. Or when he would be walking down the hall in his under garments and do his heal click jump to make us laugh. But mostly I remember a grumpy man. It wasn't till I grew older and realized what his life was like that I understood and appreciated this man. He never talked about it but from talking to members of his family I could piece together what happened that night to change his life's course. The visible wounds of the accident were obvious. His left arm hanging limp to his side. A bright mind with a love for geology he would never go back to school. Opportunity lost. Again he never spoke about it to me but after his death I found out he spent about a year in the VA hospital recovering from the accident. He made paper poppies with one hand (probably as part of his rehab). He did talk about meeting Jimmy Durante while he was there and getting to touch the "old schnozzola". Sometime, after the accident he met mom in Panguitch where she was a waitress in a cafe. Not many options for work in those days for someone with a handicap. He was able to find work at an ammunition depot in Hawthorne Nevada. For the next 28 years he separated the different metals from the scrapped ammunition. After 28 years he had enough sick time accrued that he was able to retire with a full 30 years. Twenty eight years and never took a sick day? He worked with brass and steel in the hot Nevada sun for 28 years and never took a sick day? After he retired we moved back to Tropic Utah. He and Mom decided to build a house. There was a company called Capp Homes, They supplied you with all the materials and you had to supply the labor to finish it. Oh and it had to be completed in 1 year in order to get the financing. It evidently was a less expensive way to go. For the next year I was Dad's left hand. The house got finished and I learned a ton about building a house. The workmanship wasn't

Memories of a son (part 2)

Contributor: vcorn49 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

Growing up I knew dad drank alcohol. This was taboo in our religion and living in small towns it wasn't a well kept secret. Except for one instance dad's drinking didn't really affect me much. Moving back to Tropic he fell back into his farm life. He spent countless hours at his farm at Yellowcreek. Farming the way he did when he was young. He out worked me so many days out there I often found reasons to not be available. Dad seemed to keep to himself more and was a quiet drunk. When I started my professional life and understood addiction I started to put my dad's life in perspective. He was visibly handicapped but when you got to know him and his ingenuity you realized that he wasn't really incapable of anything. He fashioned fishing gear, he loved to bowl, watching him drive a nail was a mystery to me. A terrible accident changed his life. He endured so much to keep a roof over his family's head and live up to being a provider for his family. The hot Nevada sun searing off the scrap metal in the days before SPF 50 caused him to lose half his face to skin cancer via countless surgeries. In the end the hepatitis he got from the transfusions after the accident combined with a lifelong battle with alcohol left him with liver cancer that took his life. I wasn't around much during this battle but every time we spoke he never complained. He endured so much in his life and dealt with so much silently. As I look back I realize how well he actually dealt with it all. Before he was diagnosed with cancer we had a talk about his alcoholism. He committed to me that he would stop drinking in order to be around long enough to see my children. He never drank again. He worked so hard and had so much integrity I can only hope some of it rubbed off. When I put it all together this man became a hero to me. That anger I remember now is a strange inspiration to me. Love ya Dad!!

Stanley K Ott

Contributor: vcorn49 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

My great-grandfather also died before I was born.

Memories of a son

Contributor: josephryanlaird Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 month ago

Many of my memories of my dad are of his temper. I never was really afraid of dad but he always seemed angry. There were some really funny times like when we were trying to make a family tape to send to Uncle Kenneth Heywood and Uncle Fred Heywood. We all got laughing so hard I don't know if we ever got the tape done. Or when he would be walking down the hall in his under garments and do his heal click jump to make us laugh. But mostly I remember a grumpy man. It wasn't till I grew older and realized what his life was like that I understood and appreciated this man. He never talked about it but from talking to members of his family I could piece together what happened that night to change his life's course. The visible wounds of the accident were obvious. His left arm hanging limp to his side. A bright mind with a love for geology he would never go back to school. Opportunity lost. Again he never spoke about it to me but after his death I found out he spent about a year in the VA hospital recovering from the accident. He made paper poppies with one hand (probably as part of his rehab). He did talk about meeting Jimmy Durante while he was there and getting to touch the "old schnozzola". Sometime, after the accident he met mom in Panguitch where she was a waitress in a cafe. Not many options for work in those days for someone with a handicap. He was able to find work at an ammunition depot in Hawthorne Nevada. For the next 28 years he separated the different metals from the scrapped ammunition. After 28 years he had enough sick time accrued that he was able to retire with a full 30 years. Twenty eight years and never took a sick day? He worked with brass and steel in the hot Nevada sun for 28 years and never took a sick day? After he retired we moved back to Tropic Utah. He and Mom decided to build a house. There was a company called Capp Homes, They supplied you with all the materials and you had to supply the labor to finish it. Oh and it had to be completed in 1 year in order to get the financing. It evidently was a less expensive way to go. For the next year I was Dad's left hand. The house got finished and I learned a ton about building a house. The workmanship wasn't

Memories of a son (part 2)

Contributor: josephryanlaird Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 month ago

Growing up I knew dad drank alcohol. This was taboo in our religion and living in small towns it wasn't a well kept secret. Except for one instance dad's drinking didn't really affect me much. Moving back to Tropic he fell back into his farm life. He spent countless hours at his farm at Yellowcreek. Farming the way he did when he was young. He out worked me so many days out there I often found reasons to not be available. Dad seemed to keep to himself more and was a quiet drunk. When I started my professional life and understood addiction I started to put my dad's life in perspective. He was visibly handicapped but when you got to know him and his ingenuity you realized that he wasn't really incapable of anything. He fashioned fishing gear, he loved to bowl, watching him drive a nail was a mystery to me. A terrible accident changed his life. He endured so much to keep a roof over his family's head and live up to being a provider for his family. The hot Nevada sun searing off the scrap metal in the days before SPF 50 caused him to lose half his face to skin cancer via countless surgeries. In the end the hepatitis he got from the transfusions after the accident combined with a lifelong battle with alcohol left him with liver cancer that took his life. I wasn't around much during this battle but every time we spoke he never complained. He endured so much in his life and dealt with so much silently. As I look back I realize how well he actually dealt with it all. Before he was diagnosed with cancer we had a talk about his alcoholism. He committed to me that he would stop drinking in order to be around long enough to see my children. He never drank again. He worked so hard and had so much integrity I can only hope some of it rubbed off. When I put it all together this man became a hero to me. That anger I remember now is a strange inspiration to me. Love ya Dad!!

Stanley K Ott

Contributor: josephryanlaird Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 month ago

My great-grandfather also died before I was born.

Memories of a son

Contributor: GlacierSiren Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

Many of my memories of my dad are of his temper. I never was really afraid of dad but he always seemed angry. There were some really funny times like when we were trying to make a family tape to send to Uncle Kenneth Heywood and Uncle Fred Heywood. We all got laughing so hard I don't know if we ever got the tape done. Or when he would be walking down the hall in his under garments and do his heal click jump to make us laugh. But mostly I remember a grumpy man. It wasn't till I grew older and realized what his life was like that I understood and appreciated this man. He never talked about it but from talking to members of his family I could piece together what happened that night to change his life's course. The visible wounds of the accident were obvious. His left arm hanging limp to his side. A bright mind with a love for geology he would never go back to school. Opportunity lost. Again he never spoke about it to me but after his death I found out he spent about a year in the VA hospital recovering from the accident. He made paper poppies with one hand (probably as part of his rehab). He did talk about meeting Jimmy Durante while he was there and getting to touch the "old schnozzola". Sometime, after the accident he met mom in Panguitch where she was a waitress in a cafe. Not many options for work in those days for someone with a handicap. He was able to find work at an ammunition depot in Hawthorne Nevada. For the next 28 years he separated the different metals from the scrapped ammunition. After 28 years he had enough sick time accrued that he was able to retire with a full 30 years. Twenty eight years and never took a sick day? He worked with brass and steel in the hot Nevada sun for 28 years and never took a sick day? After he retired we moved back to Tropic Utah. He and Mom decided to build a house. There was a company called Capp Homes, They supplied you with all the materials and you had to supply the labor to finish it. Oh and it had to be completed in 1 year in order to get the financing. It evidently was a less expensive way to go. For the next year I was Dad's left hand. The house got finished and I learned a ton about building a house. The workmanship wasn't

Memories of a son (part 2)

Contributor: GlacierSiren Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

Growing up I knew dad drank alcohol. This was taboo in our religion and living in small towns it wasn't a well kept secret. Except for one instance dad's drinking didn't really affect me much. Moving back to Tropic he fell back into his farm life. He spent countless hours at his farm at Yellowcreek. Farming the way he did when he was young. He out worked me so many days out there I often found reasons to not be available. Dad seemed to keep to himself more and was a quiet drunk. When I started my professional life and understood addiction I started to put my dad's life in perspective. He was visibly handicapped but when you got to know him and his ingenuity you realized that he wasn't really incapable of anything. He fashioned fishing gear, he loved to bowl, watching him drive a nail was a mystery to me. A terrible accident changed his life. He endured so much to keep a roof over his family's head and live up to being a provider for his family. The hot Nevada sun searing off the scrap metal in the days before SPF 50 caused him to lose half his face to skin cancer via countless surgeries. In the end the hepatitis he got from the transfusions after the accident combined with a lifelong battle with alcohol left him with liver cancer that took his life. I wasn't around much during this battle but every time we spoke he never complained. He endured so much in his life and dealt with so much silently. As I look back I realize how well he actually dealt with it all. Before he was diagnosed with cancer we had a talk about his alcoholism. He committed to me that he would stop drinking in order to be around long enough to see my children. He never drank again. He worked so hard and had so much integrity I can only hope some of it rubbed off. When I put it all together this man became a hero to me. That anger I remember now is a strange inspiration to me. Love ya Dad!!

Stanley K Ott

Contributor: GlacierSiren Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

My great-grandfather also died before I was born.

Life timeline of Stanley K Ott

Stanley K Ott was born on 23 Aug 1925
Stanley K Ott was 14 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Stanley K Ott was 20 years old when World War II: Combat ends in the Pacific Theater: The Japanese Instrument of Surrender is signed by Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and accepted aboard the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. The Pacific War, sometimes called the Asia-Pacific War, was the theater of World War II that was fought in the Pacific and Asia. It was fought over a vast area that included the Pacific Ocean and islands, the South West Pacific, South-East Asia, and in China.
Stanley K Ott was 30 years old when Disneyland Hotel opens to the public in Anaheim, California. The Disneyland Hotel is a resort hotel located at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, owned by the Walt Disney Company and operated through its Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products division. Opened on October 5, 1955, as a motor inn owned and operated by Jack Wrather under an agreement with Walt Disney, the hotel was the first to officially bear the Disney name. Under Wrather's ownership, the hotel underwent several expansions and renovations over the years before being acquired by Disney in 1988. The hotel was downsized to its present capacity in 1999 as part of the Disneyland Resort expansion.
Stanley K Ott was 38 years old when The Beatles make their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, performing before a "record-busting" audience of 73 million viewers across the USA. The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. With members John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, they became widely regarded as the foremost and most influential music band in history. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later experimented with several musical styles, ranging from pop ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock, often incorporating classical elements and unconventional recording techniques in innovative ways. In 1963, their enormous popularity first emerged as "Beatlemania"; as the group's music grew in sophistication, led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the band were integral to pop music's evolution into an art form and to the development of the counterculture of the 1960s.
Stanley K Ott was 48 years old when Vietnam War: The last United States combat soldiers leave South Vietnam. The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and the government of South Vietnam. The North Vietnamese army was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; the South Vietnamese army was supported by the United States, South Korea, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war is considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some US perspectives. The majority of Americans believe the war was unjustified. The war would last roughly 19 years and would also form the Laotian Civil War as well as the Cambodian Civil War, which also saw all three countries become communist states in 1975.
Stanley K Ott was 56 years old when The first launch of a Space Shuttle (Columbia) takes place: The STS-1 mission. The Space Shuttle was a partially reusable low Earth orbital spacecraft system operated by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), as part of the Space Shuttle program. Its official program name was Space Transportation System (STS), taken from a 1969 plan for a system of reusable spacecraft of which it was the only item funded for development. The first of four orbital test flights occurred in 1981, leading to operational flights beginning in 1982. In addition to the prototype whose completion was cancelled, five complete Shuttle systems were built and used on a total of 135 missions from 1981 to 2011, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Operational missions launched numerous satellites, interplanetary probes, and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST); conducted science experiments in orbit; and participated in construction and servicing of the International Space Station. The Shuttle fleet's total mission time was 1322 days, 19 hours, 21 minutes and 23 seconds.
Stanley K Ott died on 5 Dec 1997 at the age of 72
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Stanley K Ott (23 Aug 1925 - 5 Dec 1997), BillionGraves Record 31158538 Cannonville, Garfield, Utah, United States

Loading