Sidney Jay Wood

21 Aug 1914 - 24 Sep 1990

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Sidney Jay Wood

21 Aug 1914 - 24 Sep 1990
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Sidney Jay Wood was born in Crawford, Delta, Colorado on the 21st day of August 1914. He was the third son and fourth child of Will J Wood and Mae Isabelle McGregor Wood. His sister and oldest brother had both died before Sid was born. He grew up in the Crawford area as a typical youth in early 20th
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Life Information

Sidney Jay Wood

Born:
Died:

Orem Cemetery

770 Murdock Canal Trail
Orem, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Gone Fishin' 3:05 pm (under Lola) Tee Time 1:16 P.M. (under Sidney)
Transcriber

Dieselbeetle

May 31, 2011
Photographer

Budwood

May 30, 2011

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Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: Budwood Created: 5 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Sidney Jay Wood was born in Crawford, Delta, Colorado on the 21st day of August 1914. He was the third son and fourth child of Will J Wood and Mae Isabelle McGregor Wood. His sister and oldest brother had both died before Sid was born. He grew up in the Crawford area as a typical youth in early 20th Century western Colorado. At a young age, he suffered Rhumatic Fever which left him weak for a considerable period of time. Shortly before his 13th birthday, Sid's father, Will, was killed in an automobile accident. His mother, Mae, was appointed postmaster in lieu of her husband and she also ran the local store. Sid's brother, Scott, assisted their mother in these responsibilities, and Sid assumed responsibility for care of the family home. Sid played saxophone in the Crawford High School band and graduated from Crawford High School at the age of 16 in 1931. Upon graduation, Sid moved to California, living with a family friend, C Arthur Cline and attended Woodbury Business College for one year. He completed the course work for a business degree, but because the fishing season was opening in Colorado, Sid returned home. Inasmuch as he failed to attend graduation ceremonies, the College withheld his degree, which was, in later years, a source of much regret. Sid met Lola M Garrett of Delta, Colorado in a restaurant in Crawford in 1934, as she was visiting some friends. They courted and were married one day before Lola's 18th birthday, on September 9, 1934 in Delta. The young couple moved to California, settling in the Los Angeles area, and were soon joined there by Sid's brother, Scott and by his mother, Mae, who ended up marrying Arthur Cline. Sid and Lola's first child, a daughter named Beverly, was born on May 28, 1937, and Sid supported his family by working as a commercial photographer - a trade that Art had taught him. At the outbreak of World War II in December, 1941, Sid had his own photo studio in Burbank, California and was the police crime photographer. He signed up for the draft, but was never called up. Curious as to why, he asked the Burbank Police Chief, who was chairman of the local Draft Board, as to why and was always told, "it will happen. Just be patient." Toward the end of the war, after the death of the police chief, he went to the Draft Board and found out the Chief had marked his draft registration card as "Deceased." Apparently, the Chief wanted to keep his crime photographer! As the war progressed, Sid went to work as a personnel officer at Lockheed Aircraft in addition to continuing his work at the photo studio. His office was on the 2nd floor in the aircraft assembly building overlooking two lines of P-38 fighters being built as fast as the company could turn them out. Following the war, Sid went to work for the State of California in the Department of Employment. On January 19, 1947, at 9:16AM, the last member of the family, a son named Lewis Jay (Bud) , was born. That afternoon, at 3:00PM Sid's mother, Mae, passed away at the home of Sid's brother, Scott, in Henderson, Nevada. The telegrams telling of the birth and the death passed en route to their destinations. Sid later remarked, "It was the happiest, saddest day of my life." Sid left his employment with the State and began working as the personnel manager for Luer Meat Packing Company. He remained there for approximately four years and was then laid off. He and Lola then moved their family (Bev was married by now) to Lodi, California where they purchased the Mode O' Day dress shop. Sid worked temporarily for Hires Root Beer Bottling Company and then returned to employment with the State, this time in the Employment Office in Stockton, California. In 1964, Bud graduated from high school and enrolled at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. The following February, he joined the LDS Church. Sid and Lola followed, being baptized on April 11, 1967 in Stockton, California. Shortly thereafter, Beverly and her husband, Jack Norton, were also baptized bringing the whole family into the Church. Following his mission to Mexico, Bud married Elaine Hansen and continued his education at BYU. Beverly and her family also moved to Utah. Deciding there was no real reason to remain in California, Sid and Lola moved to Utah in 1968 and Sid secured employment with the Utah State Department of Employment. He eventually retired from that position in 1980. Sid loved the game of golf and was pretty good at it. In his life, he had five holes-in-one, scoring two of them within two days. He played a round on a Saturday afternoon and aced the 17th hole, a par 3. Sunday morning he played again and was only about a foot away from the pin on his tee shot on the same hole. After lunch, he played a third round and once again scored a hole-in-one on the 17th hole! Needless to say, this feat made the newspapers! Following retirement, Sid worked as a course marshall and in the pro shops of several golf courses in the Utah Valley area. On September 13, 1990, he played a final round and then, the next morning drove himself to Utah Valley Regional Medical Center for some tests on his heart. During the tests, he had two heart attacks and was rushed into surgery that afternoon for open heart surgery. He spent ten days in the hospital and finally succumbed from the effects of Sepsis on September 24, 1990 at the age of 76. Lola outlived her husband by nine years, dying on September 6, 1999. They are buried side-by-side in the Orem City Cemetery in Orem, Utah, Utah.

Will J Wood (1873 - 1927)

Contributor: Dieselbeetle Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

Will Wood was born on Monday, February 3, 1873 in Bloomfield, Benton County, Arkansas, the oldest child of William Thomas Wood and Margaret Frances Albright. The 1880 US Federal Census shows Will, with his parents, living in Round Prairie, (just a mile out of Bloomfield) and attending school. When Will was nine, his younger sister Elizabeth Jane was born in Bloomfield. According to family lore, Will participated in the Oklahoma Land Rush on April 22, 1889, but no record has been found of his staking a claim. Virtually nothing is known about Will’s life from 1880 until 1896. Sometime before the turn of the century his family had moved to Texas, where his father later died, but there is no indication that he was with them. Will’s obituary indicates he came to Colorado in 1896 and worked in a printing office for two years. By the summer of 1897, Will was living and working in Gunnison, Mineral County, Colorado and there he met Mae Isabelle McGregor. Mae had recently moved to Gunnison and had obtained employment at the La Veta Hotel there. After a whirlwind courtship lasting just two weeks, Will and Mae were married in Gunnison on August 10, 1897, by the Reverend R. A. Chase. In the Spring of 1898, Will and Mae moved from Gunnison to Creede, Mineral County, Colorado. Within a few weeks he engaged in the mercantile business and also obtained the appointment as postmaster at the Teller Post Office, where Mae served as his assistant. The 1900 census shows they were living in Bachelor, with Will running the newspaper in Creede. Also living in Creede was Will’s maternal grandmother, Elizabeth Bullock Albright Belcher Thompson. She ran a boarding house in the town until she passed away on February 1, 1901. On January 31, 1904, Mae was delivered of a little girl, who lived but just a few hours or who may have been stillborn. The baby was buried next to her great-grandmother Elizabeth in the Creede Cemetery. On February 11, 1906, Mae and Will became parents of a son, who they named William Stuart. However, this baby lived only seven months and passed away on September 18, 1906. He was buried next to his sister, in the plot of his great-grandmother in the local cemetery. Within a couple of weeks of their son’s death, Will sold his business and moved himself and his wife away from the place that had been the scene of such sorrow for the couple. They moved to Paonia, Delta County, Colorado, where Will again engaged in the mercantile business for the next four years. He sold his business in 1910, and accepted a position as water commissioner. June 28, 1912 found the couple living in Cedaredge, Delta County, Colorado when they became parents of their third child, who they named William Scott. This son, who they called by his middle name, would live to maturity. In the fall of 1912, the family moved to Crawford, Delta County, Colorado and Will, with a partner, bought and edited the Crawford Chronicle newspaper. He remained as editor for a period of ten years. For the third time, he again opened a mercantile business, and also accepted another appointment as postmaster, under the administration of President Warren G Harding. He was re-appointed by President Calvin Coolidge. Mae was once again Will’s assistant. On August 21, 1914, while living in Crawford, Will and Mae welcomed the birth of their fourth and final child, another son who they named Sidney Jay. This son would also live to maturity. Will was well known over the county and was always identified with the business and political life of the community. He was a state delegate to the Republican Party Convention held in Denver in 1920. Will was well known as an expert marksman and in more than one community turkey-shoot, when he walked up to enter, they simply gave him the turkey without his firing a shot! Will homesteaded 640 acres of property outside of Crawford at Poison Springs on the Black Canyon of the Gunnison River. A favorite story was often told about how one evening after dark when the family was in bed, a rat crawled over the rafters of the cabin. Mae told Will to get rid of the rat and, without even getting out of bed, Will reached for his revolver and shot the rat dead. The next morning he patched the hole in the side of the cabin with a sardine can lid. Will also trained hunting dogs. One, in particular, named Spot, was widely recognized as one of the best bird dogs in the state. In 1924 Will was offered a new Ford automobile, a new shotgun, and $500 in cash for Spot. He turned the potential buyer down cold! Will was fascinated with cars, having grown up without that modern convenience. In the summer of 1927, he purchased a new car, which was delivered to him in Crawford. On Tuesday, July 19, 1927, Will took four of Crawford’s leading citizens with him on an automobile ride outside of town. With Will driving, the car hit some gravel on the shoulder of the road and began to fishtail on a curve. At this time all cars were equipped with the emergency brake located on the floor between the passenger’s seat and the driver. Panicking, the other man in the front seat pulled on the emergency brake, causing the car to spin out of control and hit a large tree. This resulted in the immediate death of one of the passengers in the back seat and the injury of two others. Will died the following Friday, on July 22, 1927 as the result of a crushed chest sustained when he was slammed into the steering wheel. He was just 54 years old. Will was buried in Crawford’s little cemetery, behind the church just a block and a half from his home. Mae sent to Minnesota and had two pine trees brought in to plant at the gravesite and a lovely headstone was erected. Several years later when Spot, Will’s dog, died, Will’s sons Scott and Jay crept into the graveyard at night and buried the dog at the foot of their father's grave.

May Isabelle McGregor (1876 - 1947)

Contributor: Dieselbeetle Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

On July 4, 1876, Daniel and Isabelle Kennedy McGregor welcomed the birth of their fifth daughter. A centennial baby, born in Port Hope, Huron, Michigan, on the day their new country celebrated its 100th birthday, she was to be the only native-born American in the family. [The rest of the family was from Canada, having immigrated in 1874.] She was named May Isabelle and she joined a family of five other children, four girls and one boy. May remembered that in 1881, there was a large fire that swept over the thumb area of Michigan. Many towns and much of the forests were, if not completely destroyed, at least heavily damaged. As the flames approached Bloomfield where the family was living, the men of the village dug trenches near the river. They placed the women and children in these ditches and then covered them with large wooden planks and carpets, which had been taken from their houses. The men then took turns running out to the river and throwing buckets of water on the carpets to keep them from burning. It must have been a real steam bath for the women and children. When May was sixteen years old she developed a school-girl crush on her teacher. The young man was probably little older than she and exactly how serious this crush was, or whether the teacher reciprocated it, no one now seems to know. May’s father, Daniel, however, must have considered it to be very serious because he sent her to live with her older sister, Jeannette Getty, the wife of Heman Getty, also of Bloomfield. The Getty’s, however, were now living in Gunnison, Colorado. This must have seemed very harsh to the young girl, and as time went on, it became even worse. Never again was she to see either of her parents alive. Her mother died [a] few years later, and her sister, Lillian, who was just older than she, was shuttled off to an insane asylum, without May’s knowledge, when her father Daniel married a young woman little older than May herself. Lillian was not insane, but merely an epileptic who had managed very well at home until her father’s re-marriage. Lillian was never again seen by May and it was more than fifty years before [May] was to see the majority of her siblings again. While working in Gunnison, May met young William James Wood. He was known to everyone as Will and had come to Colorado from Oklahoma where he had participated in the Oklahoma land rush some time before. Within two weeks of meeting, Will and May were married [on 10 August 1897]. Will and his new wife moved from Gunnison to Bachelor or Creede, Colorado. The 1900 census shows they were living in Bachelor, but Will was running the newspaper in Creede with a friend that he had known in Arkansas. On January 31, 1904, May was delivered of a little girl. Whether she lived only a few hours or if she were stillborn is in question, but her mother was naturally very upset at her death. February 11, 1906 saw May and Will with a new baby. However, this son, whom they named William Stuart was only to live for seven months, until September 18, 1906. The reason for his death is unknown. In the summer of 1906, Will and May moved to Paonia, Colorado leaving behind the two small graves of their children. Will and May apparently stayed in Paonia only a few years because June of 1912 saw them in Cedaredge, Colorado with a new son whom they had named William Scott. On August 21, 1914, another son, Sidney Jay, was born to May and Will in Crawford, Colorado. These two sons lived to maturity. In the town of Crawford, for the second time in her life, May faced fire. The reason for the fire is not known, but it burned a large part of the town before the volunteer fire department could get it under control. It must have been a forceful reminder to May of the fire she had lived through as a child. As the fire raged, it appeared that it would soon reach the Wood’s house and the post office where Will was postmaster. May hastily packed an old trunk with the boys’ clothes and the important papers from the post office and the store Will also owned. Since all the men were busy fighting the fire, she and Jay, who was about ten, carried the trunk down by the river, which ran a few blocks from their house. Fortunately, both the store and post office escaped damage. The next day, when the fire was finally out, Will went to get the trunk back from the banks of the river. It took all the efforts of two grown men to bring it back to the house. Adrenalin must have indeed been running high in both May and Jay the night before. On July 19, 1927, Will was involved in a tragic automobile accident, which resulted in his death three days later. May assumed his responsibilities in the family store and was appointed postmaster in his stead. Six years later, on August 6, 1933, May married a family friend, Charles Arthur Cline in Los Angeles, California. She and Art lived in California the rest of her life. Jay and his wife, Lola, lived there and Scott and his wife, Emma, lived not too far away in Henderson, Nevada. May enjoyed her two grandchildren, Scott Wood, Jr., and Beverly Wood, Jay’s daughter. In August 1946, Scott and Emma added a third grandchild, Alfred Arthur Wood, to the family. Five months later, at 9:16AM on Sunday, January 19, 1947, in Los Angeles, Jay and Lola added the last grandchild to the family, a son whom they named Lewis Jay (Bud) Wood. However, May was extremely ill and lay in a coma at Scott and Emma’s home in Henderson, Nevada. About six hours after Bud’s birth, May roused from her coma. [She] told Art that Lola had had a son and that both she and the baby were fine so she wasn’t needed any more. She said, “I’ll see you.” closed her eyes and quietly slipped away. May was cremated and interred in the Great Mausoleum at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Glendale, California. She was 70 years old. This story was excerpted from "The Wood Family of Crawford Country", a privately published history of Will J Wood and May I McGregor, written by Beverly Joyce Wood Norton.

Sidney Jay Wood (1914-1990)

Contributor: Dieselbeetle Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

Sidney Jay Wood was born in Crawford, Delta, Colorado on the 21st day of August 1914. He was the third son and fourth child of Will J Wood and Mae Isabelle McGregor Wood. His sister and oldest brother had both died before Sid was born. He grew up in the Crawford area as a typical youth in early 20th Century western Colorado. At a young age, he suffered Rhumatic Fever which left him weak for a considerable period of time. Shortly before his 13th birthday, Sid's father, Will, was killed in an automobile accident. His mother, Mae, was appointed postmaster in lieu of her husband and she also ran the local store. Sid's brother, Scott, assisted their mother in these responsibilities, and Sid assumed responsibility for care of the family home. Sid played saxophone in the Crawford High School band and graduated from Crawford High School at the age of 16 in 1931. Upon graduation, Sid moved to California, living with a family friend, C Arthur Cline and attended Woodbury Business College for one year. He completed the course work for a business degree, but because the fishing season was opening in Colorado, Sid returned home. Inasmuch as he failed to attend graduation ceremonies, the College withheld his degree, which was, in later years, a source of much regret. Sid met Lola M Garrett of Delta, Colorado in a restaurant in Crawford in 1934, as she was visiting some friends. They courted and were married one day before Lola's 18th birthday, on September 9, 1934 in Delta. The young couple moved to California, settling in the Los Angeles area, and were soon joined there by Sid's brother, Scott and by his mother, Mae, who ended up marrying Arthur Cline. Sid and Lola's first child, a daughter named Beverly, was born on May 28, 1937, and Sid supported his family by working as a commercial photographer - a trade that Art had taught him. At the outbreak of World War II in December, 1941, Sid had his own photo studio in Burbank, California and was the police crime photographer. He signed up for the draft, but was never called up. Curious as to why, he asked the Burbank Police Chief, who was chairman of the local Draft Board, as to why and was always told, "it will happen. Just be patient." Toward the end of the war, after the death of the police chief, he went to the Draft Board and found out the Chief had marked his draft registration card as "Deceased." Apparently, the Chief wanted to keep his crime photographer! As the war progressed, Sid went to work as a personnel officer at Lockheed Aircraft in addition to continuing his work at the photo studio. His office was on the 2nd floor in the aircraft assembly building overlooking two lines of P-38 fighters being built as fast as the company could turn them out. Following the war, Sid went to work for the State of California in the Department of Employment. On January 19, 1947, at 9:16AM, the last member of the family, a son named Lewis Jay (Bud) , was born. That afternoon, at 3:00PM Sid's mother, Mae, passed away at the home of Sid's brother, Scott, in Henderson, Nevada. The telegrams telling of the birth and the death passed en route to their destinations. Sid later remarked, "It was the happiest, saddest day of my life." Sid left his employment with the State and began working as the personnel manager for Luer Meat Packing Company. He remained there for approximately four years and was then laid off. He and Lola then moved their family (Bev was married by now) to Lodi, California where they purchased the Mode O' Day dress shop. Sid worked temporarily for Hires Root Beer Bottling Company and then returned to employment with the State, this time in the Employment Office in Stockton, California. In 1964, Bud graduated from high school and enrolled at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. The following February, he joined the LDS Church. Sid and Lola followed, being baptized on April 11, 1967 in Stockton, California. Shortly thereafter, Beverly and her husband, Jack Norton, were also baptized bringing the whole family into the Church. Following his mission to Mexico, Bud married Elaine Hansen and continued his education at BYU. Beverly and her family also moved to Utah. Deciding there was no real reason to remain in California, Sid and Lola moved to Utah in 1968 and Sid secured employment with the Utah State Department of Employment. He eventually retired from that position in 1980. Sid loved the game of golf and was pretty good at it. In his life, he had five holes-in-one, scoring two of them within two days. He played a round on a Saturday afternoon and aced the 17th hole, a par 3. Sunday morning he played again and was only about a foot away from the pin on his tee shot on the same hole. After lunch, he played a third round and once again scored a hole-in-one on the 17th hole! Needless to say, this feat made the newspapers! Following retirement, Sid worked as a course marshall and in the pro shops of several golf courses in the Utah Valley area. On September 13, 1990, he played a final round and then, the next morning drove himself to Utah Valley Regional Medical Center for some tests on his heart. During the tests, he had two heart attacks and was rushed into open-heart surgery that afternoon. He spent ten days in the hospital and finally succumbed from the effects of Sepsis on September 24, 1990 at the age of 76. Lola outlived her husband by nine years, dying on September 6, 1999. They are buried side-by-side in the Orem City Cemetery in Orem, Utah, Utah.

Lola Garrett Becomes Bride of Sidney Jay Wood

Contributor: Dieselbeetle Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

At a beautiful wedding ceremony performed Sunday [September 9, 1934] afternoon at two o’clock at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Garrett, Miss Lola Garrett became the bride of Jay Wood. The marriage lines were read by Rev. A. L. Garrett, grandfather of the bride. Only relatives and a few close friends of the couple were in attendance. The bride was beautiful in a gown of royal blue chenille velvet, fashioned along princess lines, and with metallic trim. She carried a boquet of white rose buds, tiny white chrysanthemums and green foliage. Miss Dorothy Ray, who attended Miss Garrett, wore pink organdy and carried a boquet of pink rose buds and green foliage. Mr. Wood and his best man, Edmond Renfrow of Balko, Oklahoma were attired in conventional dark suits. The rooms of the Garrett home were decorated in a profusion of asters. Following the ceremony refreshments were served to the following guests: Mrs. Mae Wood and Scott Wood of Crawford, Miss Emma Carlson, Mr. and Mrs. Francis Strong, Rev. and Mrs. A. L. Garrett, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Trowbridge and son, Mrs. Amy Renfrow, Mr. and Mrs. L.W. Garrett and Miss Irene, Miss Ray, and Mr. Renfrow. Mr. and Mrs. Wood left Sunday afternoon for a short honeymoon trip, going by way of the Million Dollar Highway. Mrs. Wood, the attractive daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L.W. Garrett, has lived in Delta for most of her life, and has a wide circle of friends. Her pleasing personality and charm has made her popular with everyone. She attended the Delta grade school and high school. Mr. Wood is the youngest son of Mrs. Mae Wood of Crawford. He attended the Crawford schools, was graduated from high school there and attended college in California. He is at present employed as bookkeeper for the Garvin Produce Co., in Delta, and he and his bride will make their home in Delta, at 437 Palmer Street, on their return from their trip. --Published in the Delta Independent Newspaper

Lola M. Garrett (Wood), Autobiography

Contributor: Dieselbeetle Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

Autobiography Lola Mildred Garrett (Wood) 1916 – 1999 Lola left this biography; a hand-written document on two 8 ½ x 11 inch pieces of paper. Spelling and punctuation are Lola’s. She did not date this story, but it appears to have been written at the same time as the second of her husband, Jay’s, autobiographies in 1973, because both mention they are the grandparents of Margaret Norton. Based on the content of the story, it was definitely written before October, 1974 when Bud’s fourth child was born. Her Story: I was born Lola Mildred Garrett, Sep 10 in the year 1916 in Sharron, Oklahoma to Katie Mae (Renfrow) and Lewis William Garrett. I have a sister Alberta Leona. She is four years older than I am and a sister Irene Louise. She is four years younger. We lived in Oklahoma till I was 5 years old then we moved to Delta Colorado, where dad owned a General store. Dad & Mom were considered well off in that small community, but they tought us we were no better than any one else & to be thankful for what we had. I was sick a lot of my life and had to take it easy, but the best part was going fishing with my dad & his friend & going to the tent shows with the family. I spent a lot of my time drawing, one picture was sent to the Pueblo state fair. In Oct. of 1933, I met Jay Wood from Crawford and we started dateing, on most of those date we went to basket balls games (where he kept score), base ball games, or shows, and takeing both our mothers on drives and picknicks on the mountains. On Sep 9 – 1934 we were married in my home and my Grandfather Garrett married us. We lived in Colo for a year then moved to Los Angles, California. In 1937 our daughter Beverly Joyce was born & in 1947 our son Lewis Jay (Buddy) was born. I am proud to say that neither child gave us any trouble, They are both married now. Joyce has 8 children & Bud has 3 and so we are the grandparents of 11-swell, sweet onry grandkids. Going back a few years, I was assistant girl scout leader for Joyce’s troop then I was Den Mother for Bud’s cub scout den, then when we joined the Church, again was the Den Grandmother for a den of boys in the church, and I would love to have another den someday as I love all Kid’s but boys are my favorite. Bud went to B.Y.U. & joined the Church in Feb, 1965 & when he came home on vacation we went to church with him, then kept going and got acquainted with the missionary’s boys, and ask two of them to live with us as we missed Bud so much. Bud went on a Mexico mission & while he was there we joined the church on April 11, 1967. Then Joyce’s family joined in June of that year. Bud left in 1965 – the only member of the church & befor he came home there were 7. I was given the position of “Bee Hive” Leader then Jay & I were called to serve as stake missionaries for two years. I was ill a lot and felt like I didn’t do a good job, “God willing” the two of us will get to go on another one. We were married in the tempel – 1968. We moved to Utah in 1971 where we live about a mile from each of our kids, we are living in a mobil home, have a 15 ft. boat & are getting a 18 ft. trailer, so plan on going fishing a lot, writing poems, and having lots of fun with our two children and 11 ? [The question mark is there. I don’t know why!] grandchildren & thanking God for my many blessings. Lola M Wood, Grandmother of Margaret Norton

Jay's First Letter to Lola

Contributor: Dieselbeetle Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

Following is the text of a hand-written letter from Sidney J Wood (1914-1990) written to Lola M Garrett (1916-1999) before they were married. In the upper left corner of the first page, Lola has written, “Jay’s first letter to me.” Crawford, Colo November 10, 1933 Dear Lola, I’ll bet you are surprised to hear from me aren’t you? You probably wouldn’t even know who this was from before you finished reading it if I hadn’t put my return address on the envelope before I thought about it. I wasn’t going to put my address on the envelope but I guess it is a habit with me and I couldn’t help it. You thought I was joking when I said I would come down to see you, didn’t you? Really. I wasn’t and I would like to come down some night next week and go to the show if you will tell me what night. Will you? I saw Loeta [Shaw, a mutual friend living in Crawford] this morning and she said she was going to Delta to see you. She was the one that told me your first name. I have been trying to find it out all week so I could write but this morning was the first chance I had. I never thought about it until just now that maybe you were going “steady” with someone and wouldn’t want me to come down or even write. I hope not, for my sake, but I suppose that is about the size of it, isn’t it? If I don’t hear from you by a week from today I will know what the trouble is and won’t write any more. I do hope you will forgive me for writing this letter if that is the case. Please answer soon if you are in a position to do so and I would like very much to have a snapshot of you if you would care to give me one. Patiently waiting, Jay P.S. I do hope you can read my scribbling. J.W.

My First Golf Clubs

Contributor: Dieselbeetle Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

As a young child, I lived with my parents in Bellflower, California. My grandparents, Lewis and Katie Garrett, lived 10 miles away in Buena Park, California. To me, Lewis was “Daddy Lewis” and Katie was “Nan.” We frequently visited with them. The big draw for me wasn’t the fact they lived across the street from Knotts Berry Farm, but that my grandfather owned a horse named Dixie. When we visited my grandparents, most of my time was spent outside with Dixie, rather than inside with the adults. I would climb the fence to the pasture, call Dixie alongside me, and then slide across her back until I was mounted up. I would kick as hard as I could, but could never get her to go faster than a lope. When I fell off, she would stop and I would lead her back to the fence, climb on her back again, and then ride until I fell off. It was great fun. One day, while at my grandfather’s home, I came up to him and asked if he would buy me a horse. He looked down at me, smiled, and replied that when my parents had a place where we could keep a horse he would buy me one! I was elated. At the same time I was having fun with Dixie, my Dad and I were also playing golf every Saturday with my grandfather and a friend of his named “Daddy Hamilton.” Daddy Hamilton was 88 and I was 8. We played teams; Dad and me against Daddy Lewis and Daddy Hamilton. We almost always won, much to Daddy Lewis’ chagrin. I also remember in particular that Daddy Hamilton would get furious with me when I out-drove him on the golf course. A couple of years passed and my grandparents sold their home in Buena Park and moved back to Delta, Colorado, where they had lived previously and where my mother and her sisters were raised. I honestly don’t remember what happened to Dixie. I do remember I missed her, however, and I also missed the weekly golf games with Daddy Lewis. When I was about 10 or 11, my parents and I went on vacation to visit my grandparents in Delta. By this time two things had happened. First, I realized my parents would never own a home where I could have a horse, and second, my interest in the game of golf had risen considerably as my skills had increased. While we were in Delta, Daddy Lewis, Dad, and I drove to Grand Junction, Colorado several times to play golf. One day, as we were preparing to head to the Junction, I came up to Daddy Lewis and made a proposition. “Do you remember you promised to buy me a horse, some day”, I asked him. “I remember, but you still don’t have a place to keep him,” he replied. “I know and I don’t think my parents are going to move any time soon,” I told him. “So….I’ve been thinking.” He looked at me with a quizzical smile on his face. “What are you thinking?” “What would you think about buying me a new set of golf clubs, instead of a horse? I know where I can keep the clubs.” He paused for a second and then said, “Let me think about it.” I found out later that he wanted to get my parents approval before he bought me the clubs. We headed off to the Junction, but en route stopped at a sporting goods store. I was excited, but he still hadn’t told me he would buy me the clubs. We went into the store and walked up to the golf section. There, Daddy Lewis bought me my first set of matching irons and woods. Wow! I carried the clubs out to the car and we headed to the course. There I tried them out for the first time, but I couldn’t hit a thing. I was doing terrible and I was extremely upset. My grandfather and Dad just looked at me and then my Dad took the 2-iron from my bag. I looked at him with a question on my face. He walked over to me and suddenly buried the head of the club deep into the ground. “Here,” he said handing me the club. “Now they’re dirty.” I played fine the rest of the round. I used those clubs for several years until the death of my Dad’s aunt, Edie. With the proceeds of her estate my Dad bought me my second set.

Life timeline of Sidney Jay Wood

1914
Sidney Jay Wood was born on 21 Aug 1914
Sidney Jay Wood was 6 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
1920
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Sidney Jay Wood was 25 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1939
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Sidney Jay Wood was 30 years old when World War II: The Allied invasion of Normandy—codenamed Operation Overlord—begins with the execution of Operation Neptune (commonly referred to as D-Day), the landing of 155,000 Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy in France. The Allied soldiers quickly break through the Atlantic Wall and push inland in the largest amphibious military operation in history. The Allies of World War II, called the United Nations from the 1 January 1942 declaration, were the countries that together opposed the Axis powers during the Second World War (1939–1945). The Allies promoted the alliance as a means to control German, Japanese and Italian aggression.
1944
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Sidney Jay Wood was 41 years old when Disneyland Hotel opens to the public in Anaheim, California. The Disneyland Hotel is a resort hotel located at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, owned by the Walt Disney Company and operated through its Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products division. Opened on October 5, 1955, as a motor inn owned and operated by Jack Wrather under an agreement with Walt Disney, the hotel was the first to officially bear the Disney name. Under Wrather's ownership, the hotel underwent several expansions and renovations over the years before being acquired by Disney in 1988. The hotel was downsized to its present capacity in 1999 as part of the Disneyland Resort expansion.
1955
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Sidney Jay Wood was 50 years old when Martin Luther King Jr. received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968. Born in Atlanta, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, tactics his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi helped inspire.
1964
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Sidney Jay Wood was 58 years old when Munich massacre: Nine Israeli athletes die (along with a German policeman) at the hands of the Palestinian "Black September" terrorist group after being taken hostage at the Munich Olympic Games. Two other Israeli athletes were slain in the initial attack the previous day. The Munich massacre was an attack during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, in which the Palestinian terrorist group Black September took eleven Israeli Olympic team members hostage and killed them along with a West German police officer.
1972
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Sidney Jay Wood was 75 years old when The tanker Exxon Valdez spilled 10.8 million US gallons (260,000 bbl; 41,000 m3) of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska, causing one of the most devastating man-made maritime environmental disasters. A tanker is a ship designed to transport or store liquids or gases in bulk. Major types of tankship include the oil tanker, the chemical tanker, and gas carrier. Tankers also carry commodities such as vegetable oils, molasses and wine. In the United States Navy and Military Sealift Command, a tanker used to refuel other ships is called an oiler but many other navies use the terms tanker and replenishment tanker.
1989
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Sidney Jay Wood died on 24 Sep 1990 at the age of 76
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Sidney Jay Wood (21 Aug 1914 - 24 Sep 1990), BillionGraves Record 5807 Orem, Utah, Utah, United States

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