Shirley Hardman Moore

3 Jun 1928 - 2 Aug 2001

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Shirley Hardman Moore

3 Jun 1928 - 2 Aug 2001
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Grave site information of Shirley Hardman Moore (3 Jun 1928 - 2 Aug 2001) at Evergreen Memorial Park in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Shirley Hardman Moore

Born:
Died:

Evergreen Memorial Park

113-331 N Monroe Blvd
Ogden, Weber, Utah
United States
Transcriber

LinP

June 8, 2012
Transcriber

Lisbun

July 12, 2014
Photographer

MrRocketman

May 28, 2012

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Grave Site of Shirley Hardman

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Memories

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Grandpa and Mom

Contributor: Lisbun Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

One year I spent the summer working Grandpa Hardman helping him work on furnaces and air conditioners. Well, one day we arrived at a house where we were to replace their old cast iron coal furnace with a new gas one. Grandpa took me down to the basement, gave me a sledge hammer, and told me to destroy the old coal-fired stove. I was supposed to break it into small pieces so we could take it out of the basement. The space would be replaced by the new furnace. He left me alone for several hours while he went out to look at another job. I thought this sounded like great fun – just break and destroy to my little heart’s content in this little basement room. I had a great time. When Grandpa returned he broke into a gigantic laugh. I was covered from head-to-toe with soot and coal dust. He told me I looked like I had changed races. It is hard to imagine how anyone could be any dirtier than I was then. He put me in the truck and we drove to my house. On the way home he couldn’t stop laughing but told me he “was in real trouble, now” because of what would happen when my Mom would see me. He stopped the truck about 200 feet short of my house and gave me these instructions. “I’m dropping you off here so I have time to leave before your mom sees you and I get into trouble. Don’t you dare go inside the house! Knock on the door and tell your mom to come outside and see you. She’ll know what to do. Don’t take your clothes inside the house. You’ll probably need to burn them. Now go and do as you’ve been told. I’ll see you tomorrow for work.” Actually I was a little surprised how this big guy could be so afraid of his little girl. Mom was in the house when we pulled up. I knocked on the front door and yelled for mom. When mom saw me, I could see the shock on her face. “What happened to you,” she exclaimed. I explained what had happened and how much fun it was to destroy something so big. “Where’s your grandpa,” you asked. “He’s left already,” I answered. Although she didn’t say anything, I could see from her expression, she wanted to talk to him. I remember I wanted to go get cleaned up, but she wouldn’t let me in the house. She made me stand out on the front lawn. Then she turned on the garden hose and hosed me down. She sprayed me up one side and down the other, but the soot refused to come off. Next she made me take off several of my clothes so she could continue to get to the rest of my poor body. (I’m not sure whether she burned those clothes or just threw them away. It was probably the latter because with all that coal dust, they would have burned for days.) Coal dust has a way of finding its way into every possible body location. It was in my ears and up my nose. It was on my eyelids and teeth. It was so far under my fingernails that weeks later I was still finding some more. My hair looked like a newly-paved asphalt road. It even found its way to my belly button. After 20 minutes of her attempts to clean me with the hose, I felt like a three-alarm fire being put out by a company of firemen. (One of the jobs I used to do when I was a kid was to clean off the driveway. One of the easiest ways to do the job was to use the garden hose. We would start at the top and then using a right to left motion, would use the power of the hose and water to push the dirt and rocks down the driveway. Periodically, I would come across some ant or other bug on the driveway. A sadistic part of me would decide to have some fun. Using the hose I would push that little bug from one side of the driveway to the other, all the way from the top to the bottom. It would slide, turn and roll, as the force of the water controlled its every move. After the spray-down you gave me that day, I wonder if that’s how it felt to the bug.) It was a little embarrassing to have to undress on the front lawn, too. Finally, when she realized that she had done about as much as she was going to be able to do, she told me to go downstairs and take a long, very soapy shower. But she wouldn’t let me go in the front door; she told me to go around to the back door and go straight downstairs.

Shirley Bjerke Hardman

Contributor: Lisbun Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

I remember when Grandma would be knitting or crocheting in her chair. She crocheted an afghan for each of her grandchildren before she passed away. She was a very quite lady, but had such poise. She was that quiet strength.

Grandma

Contributor: Lisbun Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

I will always remember walking into Grandma's house with her knotting or crocheting.. She was a very quiet but amazing woman. I will always remember there was one time I was over there with my cousins and we were chasing each other around and I called one of my cousins a funny name but my grandma told me that young lady doesnt talk like that. I have always thought of her to remember that a young lady uses nice and kind words. I sure do miss my grandma.

Grandpa and Mom

Contributor: Kafsbf3237 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

One year I spent the summer working Grandpa Hardman helping him work on furnaces and air conditioners. Well, one day we arrived at a house where we were to replace their old cast iron coal furnace with a new gas one. Grandpa took me down to the basement, gave me a sledge hammer, and told me to destroy the old coal-fired stove. I was supposed to break it into small pieces so we could take it out of the basement. The space would be replaced by the new furnace. He left me alone for several hours while he went out to look at another job. I thought this sounded like great fun – just break and destroy to my little heart’s content in this little basement room. I had a great time. When Grandpa returned he broke into a gigantic laugh. I was covered from head-to-toe with soot and coal dust. He told me I looked like I had changed races. It is hard to imagine how anyone could be any dirtier than I was then. He put me in the truck and we drove to my house. On the way home he couldn’t stop laughing but told me he “was in real trouble, now” because of what would happen when my Mom would see me. He stopped the truck about 200 feet short of my house and gave me these instructions. “I’m dropping you off here so I have time to leave before your mom sees you and I get into trouble. Don’t you dare go inside the house! Knock on the door and tell your mom to come outside and see you. She’ll know what to do. Don’t take your clothes inside the house. You’ll probably need to burn them. Now go and do as you’ve been told. I’ll see you tomorrow for work.” Actually I was a little surprised how this big guy could be so afraid of his little girl. Mom was in the house when we pulled up. I knocked on the front door and yelled for mom. When mom saw me, I could see the shock on her face. “What happened to you,” she exclaimed. I explained what had happened and how much fun it was to destroy something so big. “Where’s your grandpa,” you asked. “He’s left already,” I answered. Although she didn’t say anything, I could see from her expression, she wanted to talk to him. I remember I wanted to go get cleaned up, but she wouldn’t let me in the house. She made me stand out on the front lawn. Then she turned on the garden hose and hosed me down. She sprayed me up one side and down the other, but the soot refused to come off. Next she made me take off several of my clothes so she could continue to get to the rest of my poor body. (I’m not sure whether she burned those clothes or just threw them away. It was probably the latter because with all that coal dust, they would have burned for days.) Coal dust has a way of finding its way into every possible body location. It was in my ears and up my nose. It was on my eyelids and teeth. It was so far under my fingernails that weeks later I was still finding some more. My hair looked like a newly-paved asphalt road. It even found its way to my belly button. After 20 minutes of her attempts to clean me with the hose, I felt like a three-alarm fire being put out by a company of firemen. (One of the jobs I used to do when I was a kid was to clean off the driveway. One of the easiest ways to do the job was to use the garden hose. We would start at the top and then using a right to left motion, would use the power of the hose and water to push the dirt and rocks down the driveway. Periodically, I would come across some ant or other bug on the driveway. A sadistic part of me would decide to have some fun. Using the hose I would push that little bug from one side of the driveway to the other, all the way from the top to the bottom. It would slide, turn and roll, as the force of the water controlled its every move. After the spray-down you gave me that day, I wonder if that’s how it felt to the bug.) It was a little embarrassing to have to undress on the front lawn, too. Finally, when she realized that she had done about as much as she was going to be able to do, she told me to go downstairs and take a long, very soapy shower. But she wouldn’t let me go in the front door; she told me to go around to the back door and go straight downstairs.

Shirley Bjerke Hardman

Contributor: Kafsbf3237 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

I remember when Grandma would be knitting or crocheting in her chair. She crocheted an afghan for each of her grandchildren before she passed away. She was a very quite lady, but had such poise. She was that quiet strength.

Grandma

Contributor: Kafsbf3237 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

I will always remember walking into Grandma's house with her knotting or crocheting.. She was a very quiet but amazing woman. I will always remember there was one time I was over there with my cousins and we were chasing each other around and I called one of my cousins a funny name but my grandma told me that young lady doesnt talk like that. I have always thought of her to remember that a young lady uses nice and kind words. I sure do miss my grandma.

Life timeline of Shirley Hardman Moore

Shirley Hardman Moore was born on 3 Jun 1928
Shirley Hardman Moore was 11 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
Shirley Hardman Moore was 17 years old when World War II: Nagasaki is devastated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, is dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. Thirty-five thousand people are killed outright, including 23,200-28,200 Japanese war workers, 2,000 Korean forced workers, and 150 Japanese soldiers. Nagasaki is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan. The city's name, 長崎, means "long cape" in Japanese. Nagasaki became a centre of colonial Portuguese and Dutch influence in the 16th through 19th centuries, and the Hidden Christian Sites in the Nagasaki Region have been recognized and included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Part of Nagasaki was home to a major Imperial Japanese Navy base during the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War.
Shirley Hardman Moore was 25 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
Shirley Hardman Moore was 36 years old when Martin Luther King Jr. received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968. Born in Atlanta, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, tactics his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi helped inspire.
1977
Shirley Hardman Moore was 49 years old when Star Wars is released in theaters. Star Wars is a 1977 American epic space opera film written and directed by George Lucas. It is the first film in the original Star Wars trilogy and the beginning of the Star Wars franchise. Starring Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Peter Cushing, Alec Guinness, David Prowse, James Earl Jones, Anthony Daniels, Kenny Baker, and Peter Mayhew, the film focuses on the Rebel Alliance, led by Princess Leia (Fisher), and its attempt to destroy the Galactic Empire's space station, the Death Star.
Shirley Hardman Moore was 58 years old when Space Shuttle program: STS-51-L mission: Space Shuttle Challenger disintegrates after liftoff, killing all seven astronauts on board. The Space Shuttle program was the fourth human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which accomplished routine transportation for Earth-to-orbit crew and cargo from 1981 to 2011. Its official name, Space Transportation System (STS), was taken from a 1969 plan for a system of reusable spacecraft of which it was the only item funded for development.
Shirley Hardman Moore was 63 years old when The World Wide Web is opened to the public. The World Wide Web (WWW), also called the Web, is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and accessible via the Internet. English scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989. He wrote the first web browser in 1990 while employed at CERN in Switzerland. The browser was released outside CERN in 1991, first to other research institutions starting in January 1991 and to the general public on the Internet in August 1991.
Shirley Hardman Moore died on 2 Aug 2001 at the age of 73
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Shirley Hardman Moore (3 Jun 1928 - 2 Aug 2001), BillionGraves Record 1377777 Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States

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