Shadrach Montgomery Richardson

11 Mar 1848 - 5 Mar 1928

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Shadrach Montgomery Richardson

11 Mar 1848 - 5 Mar 1928
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History - SHADRACH MONTGOMERY RICHARDSON Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was born in Keg Creek, Pottawattamie Co. Iowa March 11, 1848. He was the son of Shadrach Richardson and Lavina Stewart. He came to Utah with his parents and one brother, Willshire, arriving at Payosn in September 1852. His mothe
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Life Information

Shadrach Montgomery Richardson

Born:
Died:

Benjamin Cemetery

8435 S 3200 W
Benjamin, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Shadrach Richardson and Katurah Hand - parents of 1) Shadrach @ - 1876; 2) George - 1877-1881; 3) James - 1880-1881; 4) Sarah K 1882-1883; 5) Lexia - 1891-1892 and 5 or 6 other children, who lived to adulthood. Not clear if the listed children are also buried hear but probably are, since they lived in Benjamin Utah all their married life. The infants may have been buried on their farm out from town.
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SouthPawPhilly

June 1, 2011
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chloejo

June 1, 2011

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Shadrach Montgomery Richardson

Contributor: CarolynS Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

History - SHADRACH MONTGOMERY RICHARDSON Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was born in Keg Creek, Pottawattamie Co. Iowa March 11, 1848. He was the son of Shadrach Richardson and Lavina Stewart. He came to Utah with his parents and one brother, Willshire, arriving at Payosn in September 1852. His mother died in December of the same year. I have heard him tell many time the only recollection he had of his mother was when they camped in Echo Canyon on the Pioneer trael. She walked with him up to a place called Cache Cave; he was at that time only four years old. He tells many stories about playing with his companions on what is known as the "Old Fort Wall" at Payson. He also tells one story of himself and Cohn Colvin hunting calves up in the Payson creek. there was an Indian who passed them and after he had gone by he turned around and pointed his gun at them. It frightened them so much that they ran as fast as they could go and climbed over the fort wall. When they got onver the wall they looked back at the Indian who was standing there laughing at them. As clothing and shoes at that time were hard to get the children went barefooted most of the time. Shadrach tells of going coasting barefooted using a board warmed in the oven and coasting until it would get cold and then they would run back to the house to warm both feet and board. When he was a boy in his teens he spent a great deal of his time herding stock in the Tintic Valley. He helped haul rock from Cottonwood Canyon for the building of the Salt Lake Temple. He was one of the home guards during the Black Howk War in the year 1886. At the age of twenty one Shadrach with his father and brothers moved to Benjamin, Utah. He always enjoyed a joke and had one to tell for every occasion. On May 30th, 1875 he was married to Keturah Hand at Benjamin; Uncle Franklin Stewart performing the ceremony, two weeks later going through the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. They lived with Grandfather Richardson while Shadrach was building their home. When their home was finished it was used for a school house and church; as well as a home unntil these buildings were built. Shadrach built the school house and a number of other houses in Benjamin. At that time these houses were built of adobe instead of logs as most of the houses were then. Shadrach was a school trustee for twelve years, spending much time for the bettering of educational conditions during that time. He learned surveying from his Uncle Andrew Jackson Stewart, having had no chance to attend school very much when he was young. He was appointed Deputy United States Surveyor in 1883 which positon he held for five years. During this time he surveyed and made mapes of Benjamin. Lake Shore, Palmyra, Spanish Fork and some in Payson. He regretted taht he was unable to do surveying until his boys were old enough to learn it from him. He surveryed and made a plat of Benjamin Cemetery and acted as sexton as long as he was able. He was never too busy to stop his work to help anyone who needed his help in anyway, never thinking of himself. When the Danish and Swedish emigrantes came to Benjamin some people tried to take advantage of them in business due to their ignorance of the language but Shadrach was their refuge. They came to him with their problems knowing that what Brother Richardson told them was the truth. Shadrach in his prime was very large and strong, having great power of endurance. One incident to veryify this happened a few days before the 24th of July. The little community of Benjamin was very desirous of celebrating this day and making it a very special occasion. there was very little money for food available for such an occasion. Shadrach had the opportunity to cut some grain. He cut five acres of grean, in on day with a scythe or cradle, getting enough money for the celebration. He was Justice of the Peace for twelve years, also Constable for a number of years. During all his public work he received very little or not recompense for his labors; but it did not stop him from spending all the time he could for community welfare. He was one who believed and lived the commandment, "Love thy Neigbor as theyself." When Benjamin Ward was organized he was chosen second Counselor to Bishop A J B Stewart, later becoming first Counselor, when uncle Orange Warner moved away. Shadrach held this office until 1900. During that time a church was built, he with others; spending their time and means to build it almost deprived their families of the necessities to do so. it was never too cold for him, Bish Stewart and Uncle Orange to go to Provo to their Priesthood meetings, often walking when no other way was available. When Nebo Stake was organized he was chosen one of the alternate High Council Men holding this position as long as his health permitted. He also acted as home missionary during that time. One of Shadrach's greatest qualities was his self control. An example of this was shown when in his work as a surveyor he had spent several painstaking weeks drawing a plot map of a very difficult section of land. When it was completed he called his wife in to see it, but he had forgotten to put the cork in the ink bottle and in moving the map so she could get a better view upset the ink ruining the map. He sat down without uttering a word, perspiration dripping form his face. Keturah being alarmed looked at him for a few monents then said, "Why don't you say something Shadrach, don't just sit there like that, say ****** if you can't say anyting else!" Swearing was foreign to her nature but this seemed a great catastrophe. After a few moments of pained silence he cleaned the ink from the table, took another clean sheet and started over again. A second example of this concerned a cousin who lived near him. This cousin had no passsture for his forses and was in the habit of turning them out at night in Shadrach's fields. The horses destroyed more crops by trampling than by what they ate. This happened for several nights. Shadrach informed him of this but his cousin said, "I don't know how this could happen because I make sure the horses are corralled each night" Shadrach said no more, not wishing to cause any hard feelings. That same night he put out the lamp and shut the gate. This went on for several nights; the horses being let out and Shadrach driving them back in without a work being spoken. Needless to say after a few nights of this it ended the horse excapade. He was very energetic and studious, always reading when not working. He did not care to go out evenings, preferring to take his recreation with his books. He always made sure his family had the best of books in their home. He was respected by all who know him, for his honesty and integrity. He worked on his farm as long as he was able to do anything. In January 1917 he was stricken with paralysis. In 1919 they moved back to Payson where they lived the remaining parts of their lives. Shadrach died on the 5th of March 1928, six days before his 80th birthday. He is buried in the Benjamin Cemetery. Taken from Histories written by his Daughters Shadrach M. Richardson and Keturah Hand had 12 Children-they were: Shadrach Born 13 Apr 1876 Died 13 Apr 1876 George Montgomery " 12 Dec 1877 " 30 Oct 1881 James Irving " 26 Jan 1880 " 20 Oct 1881 Sarah Keturah " 7 Jun 1882 " 30 Oct 1883 Adeline " 12 Aug 1884 " 19 Apr 1958 Nellie " 6 Feb 1887 " Ivy " 7 May 1889 " 3 Nov 1958 Lexie " 16 Nov 1891 " 2 May 1892 Delilah " 18 Mar 1893 Joseph Woodruff " 26 Aug 1896 Teresa (Theressa) " 22 Jun 1899 Orion Franklin " 7 Nov 1901 Five children did not survive to adulthood.

Shadrach Montgomery Richardson Family biography

Contributor: CarolynS Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

http://richardsonfamily.homestead.com/ShadrachM.html Shadrach Montgomery Richardson Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was born March 11, 1848, in Keg Creek, Iowa. He was the son of Shadrach and Lavina Stewart Richardson. He came to Utah with his parents and one brother William Wilshire Richardson, arriving in Payson, Utah, in September, 1852. His mother died in December of the same year and her grave was about the first in Payson City cemetery. About the only recollection he had of his mother was when they were camped in Echo canyon on the Pioneer trail she walked with him up to a place called Echo cave. He was then only four years old. He grew to early manhood in Payson, played with his companions, herded cattle in the canyons and had many interesting experiences. He had to go barefooted most of the time, as did the other children. He tells the story of going coasting barefooted, using a board and coasting until it would get cold and then running home to warm the board and his feet again. When he was in his teens he spent a great deal of time herding stock in the Tintic Valley with Ammon Nebeker. He helped haul the rock from Cottonwood Canyon for the building of the Salt Lake Temple. He was one of the home guards in the Black Hawk Indian War in 1866. At the age of 21 he moved with his father and brothers to Benjamin. On May 30, 1875, he was married to Keturah Hand at Benjamin, his uncle Franklin Stewart performing the ceremony. Two weeks later they went to the Endowment House in Salt Lake City and had their endowments and were sealed for time and eternity. They lived with his father until their little home was completed. Their home was used for a school house and church for a number of years. He helped to build the first school house and a number of other buildings in Benjamin at that time. These buildings were all made of adobe. He was school trustee for twelve years, spending much time in improving educational conditions during that time. Later he learned surveying from his Uncle Andrew Jackson Stewart. Having had no chance to attend school very much when he was young, he made use of every opportunity of learning through books and his association with other people. He was appointed Deputy U. S. Surveyor in 1883 which position he held for five years. He surveyed and made maps of Garfield and Millard counties. He also surveyed most of the land in Benjamin, Lake Shore, Palmyra, Spanish Fork and Payson in Utah. Due to ill health he was not able to continue surveying until his sons were old enough to learn the profession and take over his work, a thing which he regretted very much. He was never too busy to stop his work and help anyone who needed his help in any way. He surveyed and made a plat of Benjamin cemetery and and acted as sexton as long as he was able. He was Justice of the Peace for twelve years and Constable for a number of years. During all his public work he received little or no recompense for his labors but that did not stop him from spending all the time he could for community welfare. He was one who believed and lived the commandment, "Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself." He always enjoyed a good joke and always had a good story to tell to fit every occasion. He was always congenial and made friends wherever he was. When the Benjamin ward was organized he was chosen second counselor to Bishop A. J. B. Stewart, later first counselor when Orange Warner moved away, holding that office until 1900. During that time a church was built and he with others spent much of their time and means in completing the building, almost depriving their families of the necessities of life to do so. It was never too cold in the winter or too hot in the summer for him and Bishop Stewart and Orange Warner to go to Provo, a distance of 20 miles, to attend their Priesthood meetings, often walking when no other way was available. When Nebo Stake was organized he was chosen as a High Counselman which position he held as long as his health permitted. He also acted as home missionary during this time. He was very energetic and studious, always reading when not working. He did not care to go out evenings, prefering to take his recreation with his books. He was a subscriber to all the church magazines. He was loved and respected by all who knew him for his honesty and integrity. In January, 1917, he was Stricken with paralysis which left him unable to work. They sold their farm and moved to Payson. Shadrach passed away on March 5, 1928, and was buried in the Benjamin cemetery on March 8, 1928. His wife, Keturah Hand Richardson, died October 26, 1926, and was buried in the Benjamin cemetery. This worthy couple left seven living children, five having died in childhood. Their names and addresses are as follows: Adaline R. Hone, husband William Hone, Pleasant Grove, Utah; Delilah R. Fugal, husband C. A. Fugal, Pleasant Grove, Utah; Nellie Schaerrer, husband John H. Schaerrer, Payson, Utah; Ivy R. Francom, husband J. A. Francom, Payson, Utah; Joseph W. Richardson, wife Ruby Sabin, Payson, Utah; Teressa R. Loveless, husband M. H. Loveless, Payson, Utah; Orion F. Richardson, wife Beatrice Corbell, Payson, Utah. On February 1, 1940, their descendants numbered 39 grandchildren and 33 great grandchildren. Shadrach Montgomery and Keturah H. Richardson. Shadrach Montgomery Richardson Family. Front row, Joseph W. Richardson, Adaline R. Hone, Orion F. Richardson; back row, Nellie R. Schaerrer, Delilah R. Fugal, Teressa R. Loveless, Ivy R. Francom. -----o0o----- Richardson, Shadrach M. (son of Shadrach Richardson and Lavina Stewart). Born March 11, 1848, in Mills Co., Iowa. Married Keturah Hand June 14, 1875, Salt Lake city (daughter of James Hand and Sarah Simpkins). Born Dec. 11, 1858, Yorkshire, Eng. Their children: Shadrach W., b. April 13, 1876; george M. b. Dec 12, 1877; James I. b. Jan 26, 1880; Sarah K. b. June 7, 1882; Adaline b. Aug. 12, 1884, J.H. Schaerrer Feb. 14, 1906; Ivy b. May 7, 1889, m. J. A. Francorm March 15, 1911; Lexia b. Nov. 16, 1891; Delilah b. March 18, 1893, m. C. A. Fugal June 21, 1911; Joseph Woodruff b. Aug 26, 1896; Teresa b. June 22, 1899; Orion Franklin b. Nov. 5, 1901. Family home Benjamin, Utah. Elder 1875; high priest; alternate high councilor, Nebo stake. Constable Benjamin precinct, Utah county, one term; justice of peace three terms; appointed U.S. deputy surveyor June 15, 1883. --Frank Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1913, p.1131

An Account of the Life of Shadrach Montgomery Richardson by his daughter Nellie Richardson Schaerrer

Contributor: CarolynS Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Let us imagine we are looking at a large screen in some drive-in or a picture show. The scene will take us back over one hundred years ago to the fall of the year. We see a covered wagon drawn by oxen in Echo Canyon, on the old Pioneer trail. Holding the hand of a sturdy little fellow of four years is a woman, his mother. They are climbing to a cave not far distant up the mountain called Echo Cave. They had stopped for their noon rest. Years later, when grown to manhood, he with others visited Echo Canyon and he remembered the place perfectly. This little boy was our father, Shadrach Montgomery Richardson. A long name for such a little fellow. One more letter by actual count than all the letters in the alphabet. His life proved the old adage, "What's in a name." It proved that one could grow as large as their name especially in every phase of human character. Some of these characteristics should be recorded that down through the years his posterity could read and know what a rich heritage he left us, not in property or stocks or bonds, but by example as well as precept. Truly did he follow the teachings of the Master by obeying the first and great commandment, "Love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, might, mind, and soul, and thy neighbor as thyself". One of these examples of loving ones neighbors I distinctly remember. Father at one time lived neighbor to his cousin, having no pasture of his own, his cousin would turn his horses out of the corral at night after father went to bed to feed in father's fields, destroying the crops and doing more damage to the crops by trampling through them than by what they ate. This happened for several nights. Father went to him about it. The neighbor said he did not know how this could have happened, since when he went to bed they were in the corral and the bars were up. Father said no more, not wishing to have trouble. That night he put out the lamp, sitting in the darkness until the light in the neighbor's house went out. Then father went out and drove the neighbor's horses back into their corral and put the bars back up and then went to bed. This went on for several nights, the neighbor turning the horses out, father driving them in again. Then the game ended without a word spoken by either. Needless to say there was no more trouble about the horses getting out of their corral. Another example of self-control I shall never forget. Father was by profession a surveyor, doing surveying for many people. One particular piece of ground he surveyed was very difficult to make a plot of, why I do not understand. It being late in the season and his farm work done, he worked for weeks to complete the plot. One afternoon, having finished it, he was very happy about a task well done and called mother to come and see it. Alas, he had forgotten to put the cork in the ink bottle and in moving the blue prints for mother to get a better look, upset the ink all over it, destroying it completely. Weeks of difficult work was ruined. Father sat down in a chair, never saying a word, the perspiration dripping from his face. Mother becoming alarmed, watched his face for a few minutes, then said, "Shadrach, say something. Don't sit there like that, say "damn it". If you can't say anything else." Father answered "What good would that do?" After a few minutes he got up out of the chair, cleaned up the ink and getting more paper started all over again. He was taught surveying by his uncle, Andrew Jackson Stewart. Having little chance to attend school, he made use of every opportunity by reading instructive books, studying by night, many times reading by the light from the fireplace as well as campfires when away from home. He was appointed Deputy U.S. Surveyor in 1883, holding this position for five years. He surveyed and made maps of Garfield and Millard Counties, as well as other government lands. He also surveyed most of the land in Benjamin, Lake Shore, Palmyra, Payson and Spanish Fork, Utah. He followed this profession as long as his health permitted and was never too busy to stop work and help anyone in need. Quite a number of Swedish and Danish Converts came to make their homes in Benjamin. Some of the townspeople tried to take advantage of them in their business dealings, they being ignorant of the language. Father was their refuge, they always came to him with their problems. They knew that what Brother Richardson told them was the truth. He was Justice of the Peace of the Benjamin precinct for twelve years and was Constable for a number of years. He surveyed and made a plot of the Benjamin cemetery and acted as sexton until he was unable to do so because of ill health. He also served twelve years as school trustee, spending much of his time and money improving educational conditions at that time. During all this public work he received little or no recompense for his labors but this did not deter him from spending time or money for community welfare. At the organization of the Benjamin Ward, he was chosen second counselor to Bishop A.J.B. Stewart and Orange Warner was first counselor. After Uncle Orange Warner moved from Benjamin, father was sustained first counselor and held that office until 1900. During this time a church house was built. He with others, spent much of their time and money completing the building, almost depriving their families of the real necessities to do so. Never was it too hot in summer or too cold in winter for father and Bishop Stewart to go to Provo, a distance of twenty miles, to attend their priesthood meetings, often walking when no other way was available. At the organization of the Nebo Stake, father was chosen as an alternate to the high council, holding that position as long as he was able. To raise funds for building each of the new Benjamin Ward chapel and the Nebo Stake house, everyone donated the eggs that their chickens laid on Sundays. Father was born March 11, 1848 in Keg Creek, Mills County, Iowa, son of Shadrach and Lavina Stewart Richardson. Leaving their home in Iowa, they started for the gold fields of California. Grandmother, having two brothers in Payson, Utah, Benjamin Franklin and Andrew Jackson Stewart, decided to visit them before continuing their journey. Arriving in Payson in September of 1852, they decided to remain through the winter and continue their journey to California in the spring because of the lateness of the season and the ill health of Grandmother. In December, Grandmother passed away in childbirth. The baby died too. Her grave was the first in the Payson cemetery. After the death of Grandmother, Grandfather joined the Church and remained in Payson. There father played with his companions, herded cattle and endured all the hardships incident to pioneer life. He tells the story of going barefoot in winter, wrapping rags around his feet and coasting down Peeteeneet Hill on boards. When their feet became cold they would run home, warm the boards and coast again. Father was one of the home guards in the Black Hawk Indian War. He was stationed in Fillmore, Millard County, Utah. He also hauled granite rock from Cottonwood Canyon to help build the Salt Lake Temple. In 1866, at the age of twenty-one years, grandfather moved to Benjamin. His uncles, Benjamin Franklin and Andrew Jackson Stewart, had moved there some time previous. The town of Benjamin was named after his Uncle Benjamin Franklin Stewart. Here his father, Uncle Shade, as everyone called him, was known for his kindness and hospitality. Romance came into his life at the age of twenty-seven. A very beautiful little English girl with an abundance of dark brown hair and deep blue eyes, came to Benjamin to make her home. She was the one and only sweetheart father ever had. He was the envy of more than one young man in Benjamin. One Sunday when out walking, they accidently met his cousin Sarah, on their way. She asked them when they were going to be married. Father answered, "We are on our way now to be married." Sarah just laughed and went on. Father said to Mother, "Let's play a joke on Sarah and get married." So off they went to his Uncle Franklin's as he was the presiding elder of the Benjamin branch of the church, and they were married. Two weeks later they were sealed for time and eternity in the Old Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Sarah never forgave them for the joke they played on her. When father built an adobe home for his bride, it was used for a school house and meeting place of the church members for a number of years. He assisted in building the first school house and a number of other homes in Benjamin, some of them are still in use today. He was very energetic and studious, always reading when not working. He cared little for sports and other forms of recreation, but always enjoyed a good clean joke and told many of them. I never remember hearing father laugh, but when something unusually funny happened he always looked so amused we laughed as much to see him as we did at the incident. Some of his jokes we remember. One of these was an incident that happened when he and his boyhood friend, Ammon Nebeker were looking for some cattle one hot summer day. Becoming very thirsty they began looking for water and meeting an old Indian, Ammon began asking him by sign language where they could find water and after a short time the Indian, becoming tired of all this going through motions and fussing around said, "Oh, hell, heap water over there." There was a spring some distance away. One day while working for his Uncle Jackson Stewart, Uncle Jackson's wife and two daughters wanted to go shopping (trading it was called in those days). The girls were very proud and insisted they be allowed to take the horses for their trip. The men were very busy harvesting their hay crop and could not let them have the horses. The ladies still persisted. However, the men won the contest. Father yoked two of the laziest oxen to the wagon they had on the ranch. The ladies started to town, which was Payson, on this very hot June day. They went by the meadow road and had gone part way when the oxen went on a sit-down strike. No amount of persuasion or whipping could get the oxen to get up. They had ideas of their own, one of which was definitely not traveling on this hot day. Just about sundown, the oxen thinking it was time for supper, got up, turned around, and leisurely wended their way back home. You may imagine the state the ladies were in on returning home. Father made himself scarce and went supperless to bed. His one remedy for all ailments was wild sage tea, later the garden sage. One afternoon cousin Sarah was taking some quinine and making quite a fuss about it. At the same time, father was drinking some very strong wild sage tea. They were both suffering with colds. Father said to Sarah, she was always very gullible, "If you take some of this tea Sarah, it will take the quinine taste out of your mouth". So Sarah took a large mouth full of the tea. You know the result if you have ever tasted wild sage tea. Needless to say they were not on speaking terms for several days. Many more incidents like this could be related if time permitted. Father in his prime was very large and strong, having great powers of endurance. A few days before one twenty-fourth of July when Benjamin was first settled, the community was very desirous of celebrating this day with something special, a banquet and sports. But alas, there was very little money to buy food, some of the folks had no money at all. Father had a chance to cut some grain. In those days there was no binders or combines. Grain was cut with a scythe or a cradle. Father tells of cutting five acres of grain in one day, getting money for the banquet. Mother substantiates this story. Father always provided his family with the best books and magazines, subscribing to all the church magazines. He took the Juvenile Instructor from the very first edition up until 1901. He was a reader of the Deseret News for as long as I can remember. He was loved and respected by all and was respected by all who knew him for his honesty and integrity. His life was an example to every one with whom he came in contact and if followed would make this world of strife and conflict, a world of peace. Truly he left us a rich heritage. May we as his posterity follow in his footsteps. In January 1917, father was stricken with paralysis. Selling their farm in Benjamin, they moved to Payson. He passed away on March 5, 1928 and was buried in the Benjamin Cemetery. Had he lived until the 11th of March, he would have been eighty years of age. Mother proceeded him in death by nearly two years. The poem following was written by his daughter Nellie Richardson Schaerrer expresses the love and appreciation they have for him and his ideals and the example he set to his children both living and dead. Thanks to our Father for our wonderful heritage, Shadrach Adaline Delilah George Montgomery Nellie Joseph Woodruff James Irving Ivy Teresa Sarah Keturah Lexie Orion Franklin TO MY FATHER by Nellie Richardson Schaerrer Father, what a world of tenderness and love That word brings to me sitting here. We read of ode's to the Mothers of heroes and others, But no odes to the Father's we hear. I long for the pen of a poet To tell of his goodness and love. For my Father, if you did but know it, Was considered a man among men. Of his willing unselfish devotion To those whom he loved best, Has awakened in my heart an emotion I cannot find words to express. Oft times when I've been in great trouble And longed for a good friend indeed, His wise loving council was double That of any good friend in my need. Oh! that I could erase from his memory, The heartaches, the trouble and care And place instead of those dark thoughts, Thoughts more loving, more tender and fair. He believed in the words of the Master, "As ye judge, ye also are judged", Like Nathaniel of old, an apostle, In whom no guile could be found. For the weak and oppressed he was ever, A bulwark on whom they could lean. Nothing in all his long life, Was ever little or petty or mean. His wisdom, justice and mercy, Was known to all far and wide. Young, old, high and low came to him for advice, Of his council kind and impartial Willingly they did ever abide. Here like Job of old were his trials Beyond human endurance would seem, Accepting with patience his suffering Ever on the Lord did he lean. I long for the pen of a poet, To tell of his goodness and love. For my father, if you did but know it, Was considered a man among men. When the roll is called over yonder, The roll for the children of men. They will not have to study of ponder For a man by the name of S.M. P.S. Because we thought it too important to be left out, we are adding this little postscript to Father's history which Delilah remembers him telling of his memories of crossing the plains when he was only four years old. He said that all he could remember was of his Father giving him a pocket knife one day and of the wagon train having to stop to let a huge herd of buffalo pass and of their stopping at Echo Cave. May all his posterity, which is numerous, bless and revere his name and memory.

HISTORY SKETCH OF SHADRACH RICHARDSON II

Contributor: CarolynS Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

I include a life sketch told by my grandmother, Adeline Richardson Hone, about her great grandfather, Shadrach Richardson II 1781-1892. The arithmetic says he lived to be 111 years old which seems extraordinary, but there it is. It is a tender story of a grand daughter for her grandpa. The old gentleman is buried in the Benjamin cemetery a few miles from Spanish Fork from where I now live. Willis Hone Brimhall HISTORY SKETCH OF SHADRACH RICHARDSON II, (1781-1892) GRANDFATHER OF ADELINE RICHARDSON HONE Great grandfather Shadrach Richardson was born about 1781. He was married to Mary Elizabeth Garrett about year 1809. They had four children, namely, Comfort, Delilah, Montillion and Shadrach who is my grandfather and the subject of this sketch. Shadrach was born 21 November 1816 in Cumberland County, Kentucky. In 1836 he moved with the rest of the family to Iowa, settling at Keg Creek, Mills County. The pioneer spirit seemed to prevail at that time, moving people to explore farther west, Iowa being at that time the extreme western frontier. He worked with his father clearing land and building a home. He also helped with all the work connected with pioneer life. At one time when they were digging a well a large rock fell on his back, injuring him so severely that he had to use a cane the rest of his life. In about the year 1839 he was married to Lavina Stewart, daughter of Philander and Sarah Scott Stewart. Her father died in Ohio, and her mother was a pioneer of 1850. Seven children were born to them, five of them died. Before leaving Iowa the two surviving were Shadrach Montgomery and William Willshire. They left Iowa with the intention of going to California. But the delicate condition of grandmother they decided to come to Payson, Utah, and stay until spring as my grandmother's two brothers, Andrew Jackson and Benjamin Franklin Stewart were settled in Payson at that time. They arrived in Payson in September 1852. The trials and hardships incident to their journey across the plains and mountains proved too much for my grandmother's strength, and she died in December of the same year from childbirth. After her death grandfather decided to remain in Payson. He embraced the gospel after coming here and was baptized 19 December 1857. The same year he was mustered in the Utah Militia that was held in readiness for the coming of Johnson's army. In the year 1860 he was married to Sarah Haskell. She was the daughter of James Niles Haskell and Sarah Haskell. Her father came to Utah with a contingent of the Mormon Battalion. Four children were born to them. Thomas, born 2 Feb 1861, married Eunice Hickman in 1884, and died 20 October 1923. Richard, born 18 August 1862, died in July 1925. Lovina, born 16 August 1864, married Isaac Hansen, and died 22 December 1899. David, born in April 1866, married Eliza Betts. They moved to Raymond, Alberta, Canada where she died. Grandfather, while living in Payson, lived on a lot owned by Earnest Oberhansel, son of Ferdinand Oberhansel. He also owned the lot joining that where my sister, Nellie and husband, John Schaerer now lives. Grandfather lived in Payson seventeen years, and then moved to Benjamin in 1869. A year previously he buried his second wife. After moving to Benjamin they cleared the ground of greasewoods and sage brush, and built a home for himself and his children. He was known everywhere as Uncle Shade. He was loved by everyone, especially by the young people of the community. His home was a gathering place for them. They were always welcome to the things he had. He used to raise a great many watermelons, and gave them freely to the people of the town and to those who were passing by. After his children were married he lived most of the time with his son Thomas and with my father, Shadrach. He was living with my father at the time of his death in June 1892. He was stricken with a paralytic stroke and passed away. He held the office of Seventy in the Church. As a grandchild I thought a great deal of my grandfather. He was the only grandparent I ever knew. He would hold me on his knees and sing me to sleep. Also when he was sick just before he died I was standing by his bed. He could not talk to me, except he said a few words to me when I was giving him some chicken broth. I remember he said that was good and that I was a nice girl to feed him, for he was very independent when he was well to help himself. I was eight years old at that time, and I felt proud to help feed him.

Life timeline of Shadrach Montgomery Richardson

Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was born on 11 Mar 1848
Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was 12 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was 13 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was 27 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was 41 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was 46 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was 58 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Shadrach Montgomery Richardson was 69 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Shadrach Montgomery Richardson died on 5 Mar 1928 at the age of 80
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Shadrach Montgomery Richardson (11 Mar 1848 - 5 Mar 1928), BillionGraves Record 6611 Benjamin, Utah, Utah, United States

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