Samuel Harding

23 Jul 1828 - 19 Aug 1904

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Samuel Harding

23 Jul 1828 - 19 Aug 1904
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A SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF MY GRANDPARENTS BY MRS. PHEBE HARDING JENSEN Very little is known about Samuel E. Harding and his wife, Mary Jeanette Stowe, as no journal was kept by them. Grandfather was born in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England, on July 29, 1828. He was baptized in the Church of Jesus Christ

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Samuel Harding

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Born in Trowbridge, Eng

Headstone Description

Both born in Trowbridge, Eng.
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crex

June 9, 2011
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junedraper

April 7, 2020
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teripenna

April 12, 2020
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KathyZ

April 20, 2020
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Veronica

April 17, 2020
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hrclancy72

April 14, 2020
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GeneologyHunter

June 8, 2011

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SAMUEL E. HARDING AND MARY JANETTE STOWE

Contributor: crex Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

A SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF MY GRANDPARENTS BY MRS. PHEBE HARDING JENSEN Very little is known about Samuel E. Harding and his wife, Mary Jeanette Stowe, as no journal was kept by them. Grandfather was born in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England, on July 29, 1828. He was baptized in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, March 10, 1847, by Elder William Dull, and confirmed March 14, 1847 by Elder Holiday. Grandmother Harding was born in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England, on March 27, 1827. She was blessed with a very lovely alto voice, which gift she used to advantage as a young girl in singing at the street meetings held in Trowbridge by the Mormon missionaries. She had already received a testimony of the truth of the gospel. Her father was a minister in the Non-Conformist Group and was very much opposed to her joining the Mormons, but very soon she stole away and joined the Church. At this time she was in very poor health, suffering with a very bad cough, and with the wonderful faith she had in the gospel, the blessings of our Heavenly Father rested upon her so much that she was relieved from this cough and her health was very much improved. Mary and Samuel, whose labors in the Church often put them in the company of each other, had much in common, and soon came to love each other. They were married April 4, 1849. Their first child was born July 16, 1850 and they named him Jesse E. Harding. He was my father. Although surrounded with a beautiful home and comforts of life, and loved ones, they had a great desire to go to America where they could be with the saints. They had another purpose in view, being called by the Church leaders to go to America and raise “Teasdales”, which were used at that time in the manufacturing of cloth. With a new baby soon to come into their home, they left all that they held dear in their life, and left England, never to return. What faith and courage they must have had to leave all behind, knowing full well they would never see them again. Their great desire was to go to Utah where they could be with the body of the Church. They set sail for America in February, 1852 on the Ellen Maria. This ship the year previous had brought a company of Saints safely across the Atlantic, and was again chartered by the presidency at Liverpool to bring another company to New Orleans. On February 7, 1852 she cleared, but owing to adverse winds did not put out to sea until Tuesday, the 10th of February. Her entire company was made up of Saints numbering 369 souls, one of which was born during the detention. Both mother and child were remarkably comfortable at the date of departure. Among those who sailed with this company were a number of prominent Americans and native elders who had performed efficient missionary work in the British Isles, such as James D. Rodd, Cland Rodger, Haden W. Church, J.W. Johnson, Henry Evans and Louis Robbins. These brethren had acted as presidents of conferences. Elder Isaac C. Haight an American Elder, was appointed president of the company which included 182 Perpetual Emigrating Fund emigrants. This company is noted in the history of the L.D.S. emigration as it embraced the first company of Saints ever brought out from a foreign land by means of the P.E. Fund, which subsequently helped thousands of worthy poor to the land of Zion. The company had crossed the Atlantic in the ships Kennebec and Ellen Maria. On the 16th of March 1852, Mary Jeanette and Samuel Harding had their second child. Grandmother always said, “Mary Jeanette was born in a prayer meeting.” There was only a curtain between the meeting at that time and the place where she was born. They named their second child, Mary Jeanette after her mother. We, the grandchildren, seldom stop to think of such an experience, for the comforts of life were few for them at this time. They were eight weeks on the water. After a pleasant and prosperous voyage, the Ellen Maria arrived at New Orleans on the seventh of April. There were three births, four marriages and one death during the voyage. The person who died was Sister Rolph age eighty-nine years. Captain Whitmore, a very kind and considerate man, treated the emigrants with all due respect and consideration. From New Orleans the journey was continued by a river steamer to St. Louis, Missouri, where the company was met by Abraham O. Smoot who acted as agent for the P.E. Fund company, and who purchased supplies for the overland journey. After cooperating with Elder Smoot in this connection, according to instructions, Elder Isaac C. Haight, who had led the company to St Louis, returned to England and Elder Smoot conducted the emigrants to Council Bluffs. Elder Smoot also led the first British company of P.E. Fund emigrants across the plains. This company consisted of those who had crossed the Atlantic in both the Kennebec, and the Ellen Maria. Crossing the plains and mountains to Great Salt Lake Valley, Elder Abraham O. Smoot had charge of the company which consisted of 250 souls, traveling with thirty wagons which allowed a wagon for every ten persons with a remain of a few thousand pounds of freight. This company also brought the bodies of Elder Lorenzo D. Barnes and Elder Wm. Burton from England, the first missionaries to die in a foreign land. Writing from the bank of the Platte River, south side, forty-five miles above Fort Kearney, under the date of July 7, 1852, to President Brigham Young, Captain Smoot said: “I am happy to inform you that I have thus far prosecuted my journey, and the days of our afflictions have passed by. I find my camp this evening in blooming health and prosperity, with their faces set Zionward like a flint, and feel as a general thing to make any sacrifice to further prosecute their journey Zionward. During our stay at Kansas (which was some two weeks longer than I anticipated when I arrived there, from being disappointed in the dates of the redemption of my cattle) the cholera visited that place and found its way seven miles west to our encampment, to which eleven of the emigration company fell a prey. Seven died of inflammation, measles, etc. and one drowned. “I have in my camp 220 souls sent out by the emigration fund and twenty-six who are on their personal resources. We left Kansas City encampment on the first day of June, and have slowly, but prosperously made our way thus far through the well-directed train of His kind providence who guides the steps of all His saints. I have in my train thirty-three wagons, twenty-four of which belong to the Fund; also fifty-five yoke of cattle belonging to the fund and fifty cows. My wagons are good and my cattle the finest I have brought in Missouri, and I think if the passengers continue to do as good a portion of foot service as they have hitherto done, that we shall make a quick and prosperous journey, and my cattle will be in good condition when they get in.” The company arrived in Great Salt Lake Friday September 3, 1852. Captain Smoot’s company of thirty-one wagons was escorted into this city by the First Presidency of the Church, some of the Twelve Apostles, and many of the citizens on horseback and in carriages. Captain Pitt’s band, in the carriage of the President, met the company at the mouth of Emigration Canyon, where the Saints of both sexes of nearly seventy years of age danced and sang for joy, and their hearts were made glad by a distribution of melons and cakes, after which the band came in and cheered the hearts of the weary travelers with very enlivening strains. Next in the procession came a band of pilgrims, Mary and Samuel Harding and children with the others, walking sunburned and weather-beaten, but not forlorn; their hearts were light and buoyant, which was plainly manifest by their happy countenances. Next followed the wagons. The good condition of the cattle and the general appearance of the whole train did credit to Bishop Smoot as a wise and skillful manager who was seen on horseback in all the departments of his company during their progress from the canyon to encampment. As the escort and train passed the Temple Block they were saluted with nine rounds of artillery which made the everlasting hills to shake their sides with joy, while thousands of men, women and children gathered from various parts of the city to unite in the glorious and joyful welcome. After choraling on Union Square the emigrants were called together and President Young addressed them as follows: “I have but a few words to say to the brethren and sisters at the present time. First, I will say may the Lord God of Israel bless you and comfort your hearts. We have prayed for you continually. Thousands of prayers have been offered up for you, day by day, to Him who has commanded us to father to Israel, save the children of men by the preaching of the Gospel, and prepare them for the coming of the Messiah. You have had a long, hard, and fatiguing journey across the great waters and the scorched plains, but by the distinguished favors of heaven you are here in safety. “We understand that the whole company that started under Brother Smoot’s guidance are alive and well with but a few exceptions. For tis we are very thankful to our Father in Heaven, and our hearts are filled with joy that you have faith to surmount the difficulties that have lain in your path; that you have overcome sickness and death, and are now with us to enjoy the blessings of the people of God in these peaceful valleys. You are now in the land of plenty, where, by a reasonable amount of labor, you may realize a comfortable subsistence. “You have had trials and sufferings in your journey, but your sufferings have been few compared with thousands of your brethren and sisters in these valleys. We have, a great many of us, been under the harrow for the space of twenty-one years. I trust you have enjoyed a good measure of the spirit of the Lord in the midst of your toils; and now as you have arrived here let your feelings be mild, peaceable, and easy, not framing to yourselves any particular course that you will pursue, but be patient until the way opens before you. Be very cautious that you do not watch the failings of others, and by this means expose yourselves to be caught in the snares of the devil, for the people here have the failings natural to man, the same as you have. Look well to yourselves that the enemy does not get the advantage over you; see that your own hearts are pure and filled with the Spirit of the Lord, and you will be willing to overlook the faults of others and endeavor to correct your own. “With regard to your circumstances and connections I am little acquainted, but this I can say, you are in the midst of plenty. No person here is under the necessity of begging his bread, except the natives, and they beg under more than they care for and can use. By your labor you can obtain an abundance; the soil is rich and productive. We have the best of wheat and the finest flour, and good as was ever produced in any other country in the world. We have beets, carrots, turnips, cabbage, peas, beans, melons, and I may say all kinds of garden vegetables of the best quality. The grapes that we have raised this season are doubtless as fine as were exhibited for sale in the London market. The peaches we expect will do well also. We had but few last year, this season we have more. We are under the necessity of waiting a few years before we can have much fruit, but of the staple articles of food we have a great abundance. “With regard to your obtaining habitations to shelter you in the coming winter, all of you will be able to obtain work, and by your industry you can make yourselves tolerable and comfortable in this respect before the winter sets in. All the improvements that you see around you have been made in the short space of four years. Four years ago this day there was not a rod of fence to be seen, nor a house, except the Old Fort as we call it, though it was then new. All this that you can see has been accomplished by the industry of the people, and a great deal more that you do not see, for our settlement extends 250 miles south and almost 100 miles north. We shall want some of the brethren to repair some of the other settlements, such as mechanics and farmers. No doubt they can provide themselves with teams, etc. to bear them to their destinations. Those who have acquaintances here will be able to obtain dwellings until they can make accommodations of their own. Again with regard to labor, don’t imagine unto yourselves that you are going to get rich at once by it. As for the poor, there are none here, neither are those who will be called rich, but all obtain the essential comforts of life. “Let not your eyes be greedy. When I met this afternoon I felt to say this is the company that I belong to, the poor company, as it is called, and I always expect to belong to it until I am crowned with eternal riches in the Celestial Kingdom. In this world I possess nothing, only what the Lord has given to me, and it is devoted to the building up of His Kingdom. Do not any of you suffer the thought to enter your minds that you must go to the gold mines in search for riches. That is no place for the Saints. Some have gone down there and returned; they keep going and coming but their garments are spotted almost universally. It is scarcely possible for a man to go there and come back to this place with his pure garments. Don’t any of you imagine to yourselves you get anything from the gold mines to help yourself. You must live here; this is the gathering place of the saints. The man who is trying to gain to himself the perishable treasures of the world and suffers his affections to be staid upon them, may despair of ever obtaining a crown of glory. This world is only to be used as an apartment of which the children of men may be prepared for their eternal redemption and exaltation in the presence of their Saviour, and we have but a short time allotted to us here to accomplish so great a work. I will say to this company they have had the honor of being escorted into the city by some of the most distinguished individuals of our society and a band of music, accompanied with a salutation from the cannon. Other companies have not had this mark of respect shown to them, they belong to the rich and are able to help themselves. I rejoice that you are here and that you will find yourselves in the midst of abundance of the common necessaries of life, a liberal supply of which you can easily obtain by your labor. Here is the best quality of food; you are in the best atmosphere that you ever breathed, and we have the best water that you ever drank. Make yourselves happy, and do not let your eyes be like the fool’s eyes, wandering after the things of this world; but inquire what you can do that shall be for the best interest of the Kingdom of God. “No man or woman will be hurried away from the wagons but you may have the privilege of living in them until you get homes. I hope the brethren who live nearby, or those that live at a distance will send our brethren and sisters some potatoes and melons or anything else they have, that they may be blessed and not go hungry, let them have free of charge that they may be blessed as I exhorted the people last Sabbath. “I have not anything more to saya to you at this time, as my presence is wanted in another place. I pray the Lord God of Israel to bless you and I bless you in the name of Jesus, Amen.” In the registration books for all incoming immigrants is written the names of Samuel Harding—weaver, Mary Jeanette and Jessie. Samuel and Mary were not as fortunate to obtain living quarters with a relative as Brother Young had indicated. Nor were they able to put up a log cabin before winter. So they did as many other of their brethren and sisters had done, they dug a hole in the mountainside and with a wagon and wagon cover made their home for the first winter actually in the ‘tops of the Rocky Mountains’ as they so often had sung before they sailed for Zion. One day when Grandmother was alone with her two babies, a large black bear came into the yard, going through everything in search of food. They were terribly frightened and didn’t know what to do. Grandmother had always believed in prayer, so she knelt down and prayed to the Lord to protect their lives from this animal After having tipped things over, and ransacking everything he could, the bear left without harming any of them, for which Grandmother was very thankful. They moved later on to Provo and built a home in the Provo Third Ward. They suffered many hardships, as most all pioneers did in the early days, but through it all, they remained faithful to the Church. Grandfather was a weaver in the old country, and he carried on this trade for many years in Utah. He later bought land and did some farming to help support the family. He served on the police force in Provo. Some years later, he opened a butcher shop which he operated for many years. Grandfather served as a guard in Echo canyon when Johnson’s army came through. He passed from this life on August 19, 1904 after a long illness. They reared six boys and five girls to maturity. For many years Grandmother was a Relief Society teacher, and did the work in the temple for her mother, father, and sister. She was a good neighbor, always ready to give to those in need, and she was loved by all who knew her. She died at the home of her daughter Ellen, June 27, 1909. Many grandchildren great-grandchildren and second and third generations live to bless her. During the remaining years of Grandmother Harding’s life, after Grandfather died, there were several of her descendants who made the last years of her life peaceful and happy by their love and service to her. The children of Grandmother, met and decided that her son, Edward and his wife, Maime Beckstead should have the old family home and lot and provide her with a place to live with them. Aunt Maime became ill in later years and Grandmother went to live with her daughter Ellen Harding Jones. Phebe Harding Jensen, a granddaughter relates the following as she experienced many happy times with Grandmother. When a small girl, I went to live with my grandmother Harding, who at the time was in very poor health, making it necessary to have someone with her all the time. I am grateful for the privilege I had of living and enjoying this most wonderful grandmother. It is now when I am older, that I know what a rich heritage she gave me, and all her descendants. Grandmother Harding was as dainty as a Dresden china cup, small in stature, beautiful in her old age, and we were told she was a very charming young girl, with a beautiful voice. In all the years I have known my grandmother, she was never known to go untidy or let her house become soiled. The walls were adorned with the skill of her hands, she was a gracious hostess, and one had only to slip inside of the little three-roomed home, with its staircase on the outside, to know that someone with a love for beauty lived there. I believe this characteristic was a gift to all her sons and daughters. When I look back on my life and at my grandmother’s life, I think of all the wonderful things she did with her hands. The beautiful net shawls and doilies which she never tired of making. Grandmother made me a shawl for my first baby. I learned to do many things while living with her. I have never seen her waste anything. She could always find use for everything. I remember when we children were small at home. Every Christmas she would send us a box of doll things. I can just see them now, inside that box. Scraps of cloth left over from the girls’ dresses, pretty striped silk taken from the linings of coat sleeves, bits of fur, braid, and lace ends. All this was welcome to families of girls who had so little to make doll clothes with. Grandmother told me many things about her home in England. How I wish I could remember the things she told me. Her mother called her Madge. Her people were blessed with many of the comforts of this life. In her home, her mother never baked bread or cake. One could buy a cake or pie for a twopence, and the bread was made by the baker and brought to the door. Grandmother never had a sewing machine; she did all her sewing by hand, and what a fine seam she could sew. I can just hear her say, “Run three or four stitches Phebe and then a backstitch.” Her work never came undone, and for the picture of her daughter’s clothes, she could make some lovely things. I imagine the daughters helped with them. I must relate here an incident which happened on one of her birthdays while I was staying there. All her daughters were in for tea and to spend the day with her. I have ever forgotten that incident. There was something in a gift box for grandmother. I was just as anxious as Grandmother to see what was in that box, and what do you think it was? A beautiful black straw bonnet covered with laces, ribbon and purple pansies. I was very thrilled over the bonnet. The girls had chosen it because it was beautiful, and I think they had good taste. Grandmother tried it on and she said it looked nice, and thanked them all for the lovely gift. But knowing her as I did, I felt no good was in store for that lovely bonnet. I had a sick feeling inside of me. I could see she intended to do something dreadful to it. Sure enough, when the daughters were all gone, I watched her with a sinking heart. First, the scissors and then the hat, and I just had to cry out when the first clip was made, “Grandmother, you won’t spoil that hat, it is so lovely.” She said, “Phebe, I know what I like better than you,” and clip, clip, off came the lace, off came those gorgeous pansies, and in a short time the hat was fashioned to suit her taste, minus the pansies. I was really afraid of what the girls would think when they found out about it. But after all, it was her hat to do with as she pleased. Many times I have seen her pick her dress to pieces, turn it and put it back together again, with a little bit of white lace in the neck ad sleeves to brighten it up a bit as Grandmother would say. One day she said, “Phebe, I think I will do a bit of brightening up of my carpet” which covered the one large room in the home, which was the bedroom and living room combined. It was covered with a rag carpet. She mixed up some dye in separate colors, we each took a brush, and the task of brightening up began. One green stripe, one yellow, and one black until we had covered the whole carpet. Grandmother was delighted with the effect. Nothing was ever allowed to become dull around her. Grandmother showed me how to make braided rugs so they would not curl up, for so many people could not sew them to lay flat. She also made some lovely wall plackets of pasteboard and lovely baskets of straw. She made a lovely air castle of straw which she hung in the center of her large room. It was trimmed with beds and red yarn tassels and was a work of art. Every little breeze would sway it back and forth. She was a great reader, and had read all of her neighbor’s books. I was sent many times to Taylors to see if they had a new book she could borrow. Aunty Taylor was the mother of T.N. Taylor of Provo. Grandmother had another friend whom she loved very much. She was called Aunty Taylor, or Mary Taylor, and was the mother of Uncle Joseph Taylor, who married my mother’s sister. Mary, who was not well, lived two blocks away and when she came to see her, Grandmother always said, “I’ll walk a bit with Mary.” Grandfather had a fine orchard which he had planted in earlier days and it had some very choice fruit in it. One tree of large cherries was the delight of us two girls, and of course, the most lovely cherries were in the top of the tree. The first crotch of the tree was too high for us to get our feet in it to be able to climb up, so Jen said for me to get down on my hands and knees and she said that she would step on my back, and would then be able to reach the first step. In those days we wore very high heels on our shoes and as she put her foot on my back and raised her weight onto my back, I was flattened out so quickly that her heel nearly went through my flesh and down she came on top of me. It wasn’t enough to have a hole in my back, but I had to have my breath knocked out of me too. We soon cleared out for we saw Grandfather coming our way, and he didn’t have much patience with our foolishness. Grandmother had a neighbor by the name of Mrs. Colings, and we got our milk from her. One day, she said to me, “Phebe, will you take our paper over to Mrs. Colings, borrow their paper, take her bucket back, get the milk in our bucket, and ask her if she would change a glass of plum jelly for a glass of honey. [They raised bees.] Well, I was surely sick to have to say all that before all the men whom I knew would be sitting around the stove on that winter evening. I told her I didn’t want to go, but I was told to march right along. It seemed like I was reciting a poem. What a laugh they got out of my speech when I got home. I remember I was always sent up town to do the shopping for some of Mrs. Colings’ daughters when they came to town, so they could stay with their mother to have tea. She loved to have her daughters come in to see her. Many times I have carried a box filled with shoes to be fixed at the shoemakers almost as big as myself. My mother and father were living at Clear Creek in Spanish Fork canyon where father was logging for S.S. Jones. Grandmother bought most of my aprons, and mother-hubbard dresses. We would buy one yard of cloth to make a waist apron, then take the strings off the sides so the apron wasn’t so large. As I remember, there was one thing Grandfather never had on the lot, an outdoor toilet, or better called now, a restroom. Too bad the government wasn’t in the business then or we might have had one of the 1939 models, and might have saved the thousand-and-one steps to the old red barn on the northwest corner of the lot, the home of the old buckskin mare. Grandfather’s right-hand man, the old barn, served its purpose long after the passing of the old mare. There was one there very noted characteristic in my Grandmother’s household. It was the old white cat. I don’t remember her name, or if she had one, but she was thought a lot of by everyone. She would curl up between Grandfather’s legs when he lay asleep on the old wooden couch in the kitchen. Grandfather would snore, the cat would purr, and the little teakettle on the little four-holed stove would sing loud and long. When it got too loud to be pleasant, Grandmother would say, “Father, wake up.” Grandfather owned a lot down in the Second Ward, which he farmed for years. He later sold it to M.A. Jensen, my husband’s father. Here we built our first home. Grandmother was v very religious woman. So much so that I owe much to her for the inspiring faith she had in the gospel and in the priesthood, faith in the healing of the sick. Grandmother was healed many times from terrible pain and she had received many blessings under the hands of Bishop Lewis, of the Fourth Ward, the father or our own wonderful man, W.D. Lewis, husband of Aunt Sarah Ann Harding Lewis. Bishop Evan Wride was also helpful. Grandmother would say, “Phebe, run over and get Bishop Wide.” I have seen her relieved almost instantly under his hands. These things have never left my mind. They have built a faith in me I will always have and have been a benefit to me through the many ills through which I have already passed. It was while staying with my grandparents that I had my first date. It was to a deacon’s dance in the Second Ward meetinghouse. Grandmother was very sick at that time and Cousin May Bailey was staying to help take care of her. I was away at the time. Arthur Harding, my cousin came to the door and asked if I could go out with him and May told him I could. I was so happy for I thought Cousin Arthur was very nice. But, when the time came for me to go, and Arthur was at the door, Grandmother was much worse. Grandfather said to May, “Tell him she can’t go”. I was not asked if I would stay home, but I never dared disobeyed them. While staying there with my grandparents, I had a habit of whistling many tunes, for I just loved to whistle. I was told over and over again to stop, or go outside. I always admired Grandfather’s large picture that hung in the bedroom. He was rather nice looking. Grandmother was a proud little woman. Once she was on a visit to her daughter Sarah’s who lived in Garland. I was living there at the time. One day Uncle Will brought two Indians home to dinner, and asked Aunt Sarah to set a place for them. Grandmother was very insulted. She said, “Will you surely will not ask them to eat at the table with us.” “Why, Grandmother, they are fine people.” So we all ate together. I could hardly blame her, because they smelled so badly. Grandmother was very kind to Grandfather through all his long illness. She was faithful to the end of her days. I am proud to be the Granddaughter of such fine grandparents. My one regret is the fact that they could have given me many interesting incidents pertaining to their lives if I had availed myself of the opportunity while they were yet alive, or, that I had remembered the things Grandmother told me of her former home. I will always regard them with fond rememberances. All personal sketches are contributed by a granddaughter, Mrs. Phebe Harding Jensen. Research at the Church Historian’s Office for all authentic information relating to this life history was done by Fawn Jones Petersen, granddaughter, and Rhea Ferre Bailey, great granddaughter.

SAMUEL E. HARDING AND MARY JANETTE STOWE

Contributor: crex Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

A sketch of the life of my Grandparents by Mrs. Phebe Harding Jensen Grandfather Samuel E. Harding was born in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England on 29 July 1828 and was married to Mary Janette Stowe on 4 April 1849. He died 19 August 1904. Grandmother Mary Janette Stowe Harding was born on 27 March 1827 in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England. She died on 27 June 1909. Very little is known about Samuel E. Harding and his wife, Mary Jeanette Stowe, as no journal was kept by them. Grandfather was born in Trowbridge, Wiltshire England, on 29 July 1828. He was baptized in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 10 March 1847 by Elder William Dull, and confirmed 14 March 1847, by Elder Holiday. Grandmother Harding was born in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England on 27 March 1827. She was blessed with a very lovely alto voice, which gift she used to advantage as a young girl in singing at the street meetings held in Trowbridge by the Mormon missionaries. She had already received a testimony of the truth of the gospel. Her father was a minister in the Non-Conformist Group and was very much opposed to her joining the Mormons, but very soon she stole away and joined the Church. At this time she was in very poor health, suffering with a very bad cough, and with the wonderful faith she had in the gospel, the blessings of our Heavenly Father rested upon her so much that she was relieved from this cough and her health was very much improved. Mary and Samuel, whose labors in the Church often put them in the company of each other, had much in common, and soon came to love each other. They were married 4 April,1849. Their first child was born 16 July 1850 and they named him Jesse E. Harding. He was my father. Although surrounded with a beautiful home and comforts of life, and loved ones, they had a great desire to go to America where they could be with the Saints. They had another purpose in view, being called by the Church leaders to go to America and raise "Teasdales", which were used at that time in the manufacturing of cloth. With a new baby soon to come into their home,they left all that they held dear in their life, and left England, never to return. What faith and courage they must have had to leave all behind, knowing full well they would never see them again. Their great desire was to go to Utah where they could be with the body of the Church. They set sail for America in February 1852 on the Ellen Maria. This ship the year previous had brought a company of Saints safely across the Atlantic, and was again chartered by the presidency at Liverpool to bring another company to New Orleans. On 7 February 1852 she cleared, but owing to adverse winds did not put out to sea until Tuesday, the 10th of February. Her entire company was made up of Saints numbering 369 souls, one of which was born during the detention. Both mother and child were remarkably comfortable at the date of departure. Among those who sailed with this company were a number of prominent Americans and native elders who had performed efficient missionary work in the British Isles, such as James D. Rod, Cland Rodger, Haden W. Church, J.W. Johnson, Henry Evans and Louis Robbins. These brethren had acted as presidents of conferences. Elder Isaac C. Haight an American Elder, was appointed president of the company which included 182 Perpetual Emigrating Fund emigrants. This company is noted in the history of the L.D.S. emigration as it embraced the first company of Saints ever brought out from a foreign land by means of the P.E. Fund, which subsequently helped thousands of worthy poor to the land of Zion. The company had crossed the Atlantic in the ships Kennebec and Ellen Maria. On the 16 March 1852, Mary Jeanette and Samuel Harding had their second child. Grandmother always said, "Mary Jeanette was born in a prayer meeting." There was only a curtain between the meeting at that time and the place where she was born. They named their second child, Mary Jeanette after her mother. We, the grandchildren, seldom stop to think of such an experience, for the comforts of life were few for them at this time. They were eight weeks on the water. After a pleasant and prosperous voyage, the Ellen Maria, arrived at New Orleans on 7 April. There were three births, four marriages and one death during the voyage. The person who died was Sister Rolph age 89. Captain Whitmore, a very kind and considerate man, treated the emigrants with all due respect and consideration. From New Orleans the journey was continued by a river steamer to St. Louis, Missouri, where the company was met by Abraham O. Smoot who acted as agent for the P.E. Fund company, and who purchased supplies for the overland journey. After cooperating with Elder Smoot in this connection, according to instructions, Elder Issac C. Haight, who had led the company to St. Louis, returned to England and Elder Smoot conducted the emigrants to Council Bluffs. Elder Smoot also led the first British company of P.E. Fund emigrants across the plains. This company consisted of those who had crossed the Atlantic in both the Kennebec, and the Ellen Maria. Crossing the plains and mountains to Great Salt Lake Valley, Elder Abraham O. Smoot had charge of the company which consisted of 250 souls, traveling with thirty wagons which allowed a wagon for every ten persons with a remain of a few thousand pounds of freight. This company also brought the bodies of Elder Lorenzo D. Barnes and Elder William Burton from England, the first missionaries to die in a foreign land. Writing from the bank of the Platte River, south side, forty-five miles above Fort Kearney, under the date of 7 July 1852, to President Brigham Young, Captain Smoot said: "I am happy to inform you that I have thus far prosecuted my journey, and the days of our afflictions have passed by. I find my camp this evening in blooming health and prosperity, with their faces set Zionward like a flint, and feel as a general thing to make any sacrifice to further prosecute their journey Zionward. During our stay at Kansas (which was some two weeks longer than I anticipated when I arrived there, from being disappointed in the dates of the redemption of my cattle) the cholera visited that place and found its way seven miles west to our encampment, to which eleven of the emigration company fell a prey. Seven died of inflammation, measles, etc. and one drowned. "I have in my camp 220 souls sent out by the emigration fund and twenty six who are on their personal resource. We left Kansas City encampment on the first day of June, and have slowly, but prosperously made our way thus far through the well-directed train of His kind providence who guides the steps of all His Saints. I have in my train thirty three wagons, twenty four of which belong to the Fund; also fifty five yoke of cattle belonging to the fund and fifty cows. My wagons are good and my cattle the finest I have brought in Missouri, and I think if the passengers continue to do as good a portion of foot service as they have hitherto done, that we shall make a quick and prosperous journey, and my cattle will be in good condition when they get in." The company arrived in Great Salt Lake Friday 3 September 1852. Captain Smoot's company of thiry one wagons was escorted into this city by the First Presidency of the Church, some of the Twelve Apostles, and many of the citizens on horseback and in carriages. Captain Pitt's band, in the carriage of the President, met the company at the mouth of Emigration Canyon, where the Saints of both sexes of nearly seventy years of age danced and sang for joy, and their hearts were made glad by a distributin of melons and cakes, after which the band came in and cheered the hearts of the weary travelers with very enlivening strains. Next in the procession came a band of pilgrims, Mary and Samuel Harding and children with the others, walking sunburned and weather beaten, but not forlorn; their hearts were light and bouyant, which was plainly manifest by their happy countenances. Next followed the wagons. The good conditions of the cattle and the general appearance of the whole train did credit to Bishop Smoot as a wise and skillful manager who was seen on horseback in all the departments of his company during their progress from the canyon to encampment. As the escort and train passed the Temple Block they were saluted with nine rounds of artillery which made the everlasting hills to shake their sides with joy, while thousands of men, women and children gathered from various parts of the city to unite in the glorious and joyful welcome. After choraling on Union Square the emigrants were called together and President Young addressed them as follows: "I have but a few words to say to the brethren and sisters at the present time. First, I will say may the Lord God of Israel bless you and comfort your hearts. We have prayed for you continually. Thousands of prayers have been offered up for you, day by day, to Him who has commanded us to father to Israel, save the children of men by the preaching of the Gospel, and prepare them for the coming of the Messiah. You have had a long, hard, and fatiguing journey across the great waters and scorched plains, but by the distinguished favors of heaven you are here in safety. "We understand that the whole company that started under Brother Smoot's guidance are alive and well with but a few exceptions. For this we are very thankful to our Father in Heaven, and our hearts are filled with joy that you have faith to surmount the difficulties that have lain in your path; that you have overcome sickness and death, and are now with us to enjoy the blessings of the people of God in these peaceful valleys. You are now in the land of plenty, where, by a reasonable amount of labor, you may realize a comfortable subsistence. "You have had trials and sufferings in your journey, but your sufferings have been few compared with thousands of your brethren and sisters in these valleys. We have, a great many of us, been under the harrow for the space of twenty one years. I trust you have enjoyed a good measure of the spirit of the Lord in the midst of your toils; and now as you have arrived here let your feelings be mild, peaceable, and easy, not framing to yourselves any particular course that you will pursue, but be patient until the way opens before you. "Be very cautious that you do not watch the failings of other, and by this means expose yourselves to be caught in the snares of the devil, for the people here have the failings natural to man, the same as you have. Look well to yourselves that the enemy does not get the advantage over you; see that your own hearts overlook the faults of others and endeavor to correct your own. "With regard to your circumstances and connections I am little acquainted, but this I can say, you are in the midst of plenty. No person here is under the necessity of begging his bread, except the natives, and they beg under more than they care for and can use. By your labor you can obtain an abundance; the soil is rich and productive. We have the best of wheat and the finest flour, and good as was ever produced in any other country in the world. We have beets, carrots, turnips, cabbage, peas, beans, melons, and I may say all kinds of garden vegetables of the best quality. The grapes that we have raised this season are doubtless as fine as were exhibited for sale in the London market. The peaches we expect will do well also. We had but few last year, this season we have more. We are under the necessity of waiting a few years before we can have much fruit, but of the staple articles of food we have a great abundance. "With regard to your obtaining habitations to shelter you in the coming winter, all of you will be able to obtain work, and by your industry you can make yourselves tolerable and comfortable in this respect before the winter sets in. All the improvements that you see around you have been made in the short space of four years. Four years ago this day there was not a rod of fence to be seen, nor a house, except the Old Fort as we call it, though it was then new. All this that you see has been accomplished by the industry of the people, and a great deal more that you do not see, for our settlement extends 250 miles south and almost 100 miles north. We shall want some of the brethren to repair some of the other settlements, such as mechanics and farmers. No doubt they can provide themselves with teams, etc. to bear them to their destinations. Those who have acquaintances here will be able to obtain dwellings until they can make accomodations of their own. Again with regard to labor, don't imagine unto yourselves that you are going to get rich at once by it. As for the poor, there are none here, neither are those who will be called rich, but all obtain the essential comforts of life. "Let not your eyes be greedy. When I met this afternoon I felt to say this is the company that I belong to, the poor company, as it is called, and I always expect to belong to it until I am crowned with eternal riches in the Celestial Kingdom. In this world I possess nothing, only what the Lord has given to me, and it is devoted to the building up of His Kingdom. Do not any of you suffer the thought to enter your minds that you must go to the gold mines in search for riches. That is no place for the Saints. Some have gone down there and returned; they keep going and coming but their garments are spotted almost universally. It is scarcely possible for a man to go there and come back to this place with his pure garments. Don't any of you imagine to yourselves you get anything from the gold mines to help yourself. You must live here; this is the gathering place of the Saints. The man who is trying to gain to himself the perishable treasures of the world and suffers his affections to be staid upon them, may despair of ever obtaining a crown of glory. This world is only to be used as an apartment of which the children of men may be prepared for their eternal redemption and exaltation in the presence of their Saviour, and we have but a short time allotted to us here to accomplish so great a work. "I will say to this company they have had the honor of being escorted into the city by some of the most distinguished individuals of our society and a band of music, accompanied with a salutation from the cannon. Other companies have not had this mark of respect shown to them, they belong to the rich and are able to help themselves. I rejoice that you are here and that you will find yourselves in the midst of abundance of the common necessaries of life, a liberal supply of which you can easily obtain by your labor. Here is the best quality of food; you are in the best atmosphere that you ever breathed, and we have the best water that you ever drank. Make yourselves happy, and do not let your eyes be like the fool's eyes, wandering after the things of this world; but inquire what you can do that shall be for the best interest of the Kingdom of God. "No man or woman will be hurried away from the wagons but you may have the privilege of living in them until you get homes. I hope the brethren who live nearby, or those that live at a distance will send our brethren and sisters some potatoes and melons or anything else they have, that they may be blessed and not go hungry, let them have free of charge that they may be blessed as I exhorted the people last Sabbath. "I have not anything more to say to you at this time, as my presence is wanted in another place. I pray the Lord God of Israel to bless you and I bless you in the name of Jesus, Amen." In the registration books for all incomiong immigrants is written the names of Samuel Harding--weaver, Mary Jeanette and Jessie. Samuel and Mary were not as fortunate to obtain living quarters with a relative as Brother Young had indicated. Nor were they able to put up a log cabin before winter. So they did as many other of their brethern and sisters had done, they dug a hole in the mountainside and with a wagon and wagon cover, made their home for the first winter actually in the "tops of the Rocky Mountains" as they so often had sung before they sailed for Zion. One day when Grandmother was alone with her two babies, a large black bear came into the yard, going through everything in search of food. They were terribly frightened and didn't know what to do. Grandmother had always believed in prayer, so she knelt down and prayed to the Lord to protect their lives from this animal. After having tipped things over, and ransacking everything he could, the bear left without harming any of them, for which Grandmother was very thankful. They moved later on to Provo and built a home in the Provo Third Ward. They suffered many hardships, as most all pioneers did in the early days, but through it all, they remained faithful to the Church. Grandfather was a weaver in the old country, and he carried on this trade for many years in Utah. He later bought land and did some farming to help support the family. He served on the police force in Provo. Some years later, he opened a butcher shop which he operated for many years. Grandfather served as a guard in Echo Canyon when Johnson's Army came through. He passed from this life on August 19, 1904, after a long illness. They reared six boys and five girls to maturity. For many years Grandmother was a Relief Society teacher, and did the work in the temple for her mother, father, and sister. She was a good neighbor, always ready to give to those in need, and she was loved by all who knew her. She died at the home of her daughter Ellen, June 27, 1909. Many grandchildren, great grandchildren and second and third generations live to bless her. During the remaining years of Grandmother Harding's life, after Grandfather died, there were several of her descendants who made the last years of her life peaceful and happy by their love and service to her. The childen of Grandmother met and decided that her son, Edward and his wife, Maime Beckstead, should have the old family home and lot and provide her with a place to live with her daughter Ellen Harding Jones. Phebe Harding Jensen, a granddaughter relates the following as she experienced many happy times with Grandmother: "When a small girl, I went to live with my Grandmother Harding, who at that time was in very poor health, making it necessary to have someone with her all the time. I am grateful for the privilege I had of living and enjoying this most wonderful grandmother. It is now when I am older, that I know what a rich heritage she gave me, and all her descendants. "Grandmother Harding was as dainty as a Dresden china cup, small in stature, beautiful in her old age, and we were told she was a very charming young girl, with a beautiful voice. In all the years I have known my grandmother, she was never known to go untidy or let her house become soiled. The walls were adorned with the skill of her hands, she was a gracious hostess, and one had only to slip inside of the little three roomed home, with its staircase on the outside, to know that someone with a love for beauty lived there. "I believe this characteristic was a gift to all her sons and daughters. When I look back on my life and at my grandmother's life, I think of all the wonderful things she did with her hands. The beautiful net shawls and doilies which she never tired of making. Grandmother made me a shawl for my first baby. I learned to do many things while living with her. I have never seen her waste anything. She could always find use for everything. I remember when we children were small at home. Every Christmas she would send us a box of doll things. I can just see them now, inside that box. Scraps of cloth left over from the girls' dresses, pretty striped silk taken from the linings of coat sleeves, bits of fur, braid, and lace ends. All this was welcome to families of girls who had so little to make doll clothes with. " Grandmother told me many things about her home in England. How I wish I could remember the things she told me. Her mother called her Madge. Her people were blessed with many of the comforts of this life. In her home, her mother never baked bread or cake. One could buy a cake or pie for a twopence, and the bread was made by a baker and brought to the door. Grandmother never had a sewing machine; she did all her sewing by hand, and what a fine seam she could sew. I can just hear her say, "Run three of four stitches Phebe and then a backstitch." Her work never came undone, and for the picture of her daughter's clothes, she could make some lovely things. I image the daughters helped with them. "I must relate here an incident which happened on one of her birthdays while I was staying there. All her daughters were in for tea and to spend the day with her. I have never forgotten that incident. There was something in a gift box for Grandmother. I was just as anxious as Grandmother to see what was in that box, and what do you think it was? A beautiful black straw bonnet covered with laces, ribbon and purple pansies. I was very thrilled over the bonnet. The girls had chosen it because it was beautiful, and I think they had good taste. Grandmother tried it on and she said it looked nice, and thanked them all for the lovely gift. But knowing her as I did, I felt no good was in store for that lovely bonnet. I had a sick feeling inside of me. I could see she intended to do something dreadful to it. Sure enough, when the daughters were all gone, I watched her with a sinking heart. First, the scissors and then the hat, and I just had to cry out when the first clip was made, "Grandmother, you won't spoil that hat, it is so lovely." She said, "Phebe, I know what I like better than you." and clip, clip, off came the lace, off came those gorgeous pansies, and in a short time the hat was fashioned to suit her taste, minus the pansies. I was really afraid of what the girls would think when they found out about it. But after all, it was her hat to do with as she pleased. "Many times I have seen her pick her dress to pieces, turn it and put it back together again, with a little bit of white lace in the neck and sleeves to brighten it up a bit as Grandmother would say. "One day she said, "Phebe, I think I will do a bit of brightening up of my carpet" which covered the one large room in the home, which was the bedroom and livingroom combined. It was covered with a rag carpet. She mixed up some dye in separate colors, we each took a brush, and the task of brightening up began. One green stripe, one yellow, and one black until we had covered the whole carpet. Grandmother was delighted with the effect. Nothing was ever allowed to become dull around her. Grandmother showed me how to make braided rugs so they would not curl up, for so many people could not sew them to lay flat. She also made some lovely wall plackets of pasteboard and lovely baskets of straw. She made a lovely air castle of straw which she hung in the center of her large room. It was trimmed with beads and red yarn tassels and was a work of art. Every little breeze would sway it back and forth. She was a great reader, and had read all of her neighbors books. I was sent many times to Taylors to see if they had a new book she could borrow. Aunty Taylor was the mother of T.N. Taylor of Provo. Grandmother had another friend whom she loved very much. She was called Aunty Taylor, or Mary Taylor, and was the mother of Uncle Joseph Taylor, who married my mother's sister. Mary, who was not well, lived two blocks away and when she came to see her, Grandmother always said, "I"ll walk a bit with Mary." "Grandfather had a fine orchard which he had planted in earlier days and it had some very choice fruit in it. One tree of large cherries was the delight of us two girls, and of course, the most lovely cherries were in the top of the tree. The first crotch of the tree was too high for us to get our feet in it to be able to climb up, so Jen said for me to get down on my hands and knees and she said that she would step on my back, and would then be able to reach the first step. In those days we wore very high heels on our shoes and as she put her foot on my back and raised her weight onto my back, I was flattened out so quickly that her heel nearly went through my flesh and down she came on top of me. It wasn't enough to have a hole in my back, but I had to have my breath knocked out of me too. We soon cleared out for we saw Grandfather coming our way, and he didn't have much patience with our foolishness. "Grandmother had a neighbor by the name of Mrs. Colings, and we got our milk from her. One day, she said to me, "Phebe, will you take our paper over to Mrs. Colings, borrow their paper, take her bucket back, get the milk in our bucket, and ask her if she would change a glass of plum jelly for a glass of honey." (They raised bees.) Well, I was surely sick to have to say all that before all the men who I knew would be sitting around the stove on that winter evening. I told her I didn't want to go, but I was told to march right along. It seemed like I was reciting a poem. What a laugh they got out of my speech when I got home. I remember I was sent up town to do the shopping for some of Mrs. Colings' daughters when they came to town, so they could stay with their mother to have tea. She loved to have her daughters come in to see her. "Many times I have carried a box filled with shoes to be fixed at the shoemakers almost as big as myself. My mother and father were living at Clear Creek in Spanish Fork canyon where father was logging for S.S. Jones. Grandmother bought most of my aprons, and mother-hubbard dresses. We would buy one yard of cloth to make a waist apron, then take the strings off the sides so the apron wasn't so large. "As I remember, there was one thing Grandfather never had on the lot, an outdoor toilet, or better called now, a restroom. Too bad the government wasn't in the business then or we might have had one of the 1939 models, and might have saved the thousand and one steps to the old red barn on the northwest corner of the lot, the home of the old buckskin mare. Granfather's right hand man, the old barn, served its purpose long after the passing of the old mare. "There was one other very noted characteristic in my Grandmother's household. It was the old white cat. I don't remember her name, or if she had one, but she was thought a lot of by everyone. She would curl up between Grandfather's legs when he lay asleep on the old wooden couch in the kitchen. Grandfather would snore, the cat would purr, and the little teakettle on the little four holed stove would sing loud and long. When it got too loud to be pleasant, Grandmother would say, "Father, wake up." "Grandfather owned a lot down in the Second Ward, which he farmed for years. He later sold it to M.A. Jensen, my husband's father. Here we built our first home. "Grandmother was a very religious woman. So much so that I owe much to her for the inspiring faith she had in the gospel and in the priesthood, faith in the healing of the sick. Grandmother was healed many times from terrible pain and she had received many blessings under the hands of Bishop Lewis, of the Fourth Ward, the father of our own wonderful man, W.D. Lewis, husband of Aunt Sarah Ann Harding Lewis. Bishop Evan Wride was also helpful. Grandmother would say, "Phebe, run over and get Bishop Wride." I have seen her relieved almost instantly under his hands. These things have never left my mind. They have built a faith in me I will always have and have been a benefit to me through the many ills through which I have already passed. "It was while staying with my grandparents that I had my first date. It was to a deacon's dance in the second ward meetinghouse. Grandmother was very sick at that time and cousin May Bailey was staying to help take care of her. I was away at the time. Arthur Harding, my cousin came to the door and asked if I could go out with him and May told him I could. I was so happy for I thought Cousin Arthur was very nice. But, when the time came for me to go, and Arthur was at the door, Grandmother was much worse. Grandfather said to May, "Tell him she can't go." I was not asked if I would stay home, but I never dared disobey them. "While staying there with my grandparents, I had a habit of whistling many tunes, for I just loved to whistle. I was told over and over again to stop, or go outside. "I always admired Grandfather's large picture that hung in the bedroom. He was rather nice looking. Grandmother was a proud little woman. Once she was on a visit to her daughter Sarah's who lived in Garland. I was living there at the time. One day Uncle Will brought two Indians home to dinner, and asked Aunt Sarah to set a place for them. Grandmother was very insulted. She said, "Will, you surely will not ask them to eat at the table with us." "Why, Grandmother they are fine people." So we all ate together. I could hardly blame her, because they smelled so badly. "Grandmother was very kind to Grandfather through all his long illness. She was faithful to the end of her days. "I am proud to be the Grandaughter of such fine grandparents. My one regret is the fact that they could have given me many interesting incidents pertaining to their lives if I had availed myself of the opportunity while they were yet alive, or, that I had remembered the things Grandmother told me of her former home. I will always regard them with fond rememberance." All personal sketches are contributed by a grandaughter, Mrs. Phebe Harding Jensen. Research at the Church HIstorian's office for all authentic information relating to this life history was done by Fawn Jones Petersen, grandaughter and Rhea Ferre Bailey, great grandaughter.

Samuel Harding

Contributor: crex Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Samuel was the third son born to Edward and Mary Ann Offer Harding in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England on 29 July 1828. His father, Edward, was employed as a butcher, an occupation Samuel probably learned from his father. He was baptized on 10 March 1847 in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England by William Duel at the age of 18. Samuel met Mary Jennet Stowe as they attending meetings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mary Jennet was born 27 March 1827 in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England and baptized into the Church on 6 July 1847 in Trowbridge. The couple married on 4 April 1849. Their first child, a son, Jesse E., was born 16 July 1850 in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England. Samuel and his wife Mary Jennet were the first of the Harding siblings to emigrate from England. The young family departed from Liverpool, England on 10 February 1852 sailing on the ship Ellen Maria. On 16 March 1852 Mary Jennet delivered their second child. Mary claimed, “Mary Jeanette was born in a prayer meeting. There was only a curtain between the meeting and the place where she was born.” After eight weeks at sea, the Ellen Maria arrived at New Orleans on 5 April 1852. After arriving in New Orleans, the company boarded a steamer to St. Louis, Missouri. From St. Louis they travel to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. While at Fort Leavenworth, the Hardings were assigned to be in the Philip de la Mare Company. Elder de la Mare was a young man of Wales asked by the Church to purchase and transport machinery from England for the purpose of manufacturing sugar beets in Utah. Elder de la Mare later wrote, "I left Liverpool in charge of the machinery in March, 1852. After seven weeks of sailing we landed at New Orleans. Took the river boat back to Fort Leavenworth. From there I was sent to Council Bluffs to get the company wagons with which to be loaded down with machinery. We made ready for our long and tedious journey over the Rocky Mountains and started from this point on the Fourth of July." The wagon train experienced their first severe snowstorm at Sweetwater. Elias Morris from de la Mare’s company continued the story, "Near the last crossing of Sweetwater we made camp about 9 o'clock at night. It was very dark and snowing. As we hardly had any provisions we turned in without supper. In the morning we found a foot of snow and but very little provisions in camp. Orders were given by Captain De La Ma[r]e to go and get the cattle in. We found that quite a percentage of the poorest had laid down in the brush to rest for the last time. Of those that were found dead we cut out their tongues and hearts, which were cooked and thus satisfied our own hunger. "When we gathered in all the other cattle we could find we had just about enough left to take the family wagons to Green River. At the same time the captain had set a messenger to Green River post and brought sixteen head of cattle. On the first night from Green River, they took a stampede and were either lost or stolen by the Indians. "When we left camp with the families we left six single men and supplies such as shotguns, rifles and ammunition, to hunt lost cattle, as well as game for their own support as we had no provisions to leave with them. They second day they found the cattle. They followed us the next day. As they were all strangers to the road and our tracks were covered with snow, they took the wrong road by mistake. They sent a messenger down the river to our camp for provisions as they were near starving. As we had secured provisions at the trading post we were able to supply them. "In two days more our broken camp was again united for our journey. While here President A. O. Smoot came to our rescue with teams and provisions sent out by President Young." After arriving in the Salt Lake valley on November 10, 1852, Samuel and Mary were not able to obtain living quarters with those already in the Salt Lake valley. Nor could they put up a log cabin for the winter. They did as many other Saints and dug a hole in the mountainside and with a wagon and wagon cover made their home for their first winter in Utah. Samuel and Mary Jennet later moved to Provo, Utah and built a home in the Provo Third Ward. It is recorded that Samuel was of a very quiet, retiring nature. He worked hard improving Utah County and did his share in developing and cultivating the soil and improving the conditions around him. Edward William Tullidge writes in the History of Provo that when Johnson’s army was approaching Utah, Provo leaders called upon the brethren to volunteer to go up into Echo Canyon and protect the incoming trains of immigrants and to act as a corp of observation to learn the strength and equipment of forces reported on the way to Utah. Samuel volunteered at this time as a private in company G. The group left Provo on 29 September 1857 marching in form to a brass and martial band and returned on 4 December 1857. Samuel also participated in the Black Hawk War in 1868. He went south into Sevier County where he was stationed as a guard in the canyons and took an active part in putting down the Indian troubles. Samuel and Mary Jennet parented the following children: Jesse E., Mary Jeanette, Samuel Glass, Ellen Rosina, William Henry, Maria Elizabeth, Edward Thomas, Sarah Ann, Emily Ester, Joseph James, Lydia Jane, Charles Alonzo and Alfred John Stowe. The couple was married for 55 years. Samuel died on 19 August 1904 in Provo, Utah at his home at 692 West Center Street of acute cystitis and prostatic hyperplasia. In an issue of the Improvement Era is a short obituary for Samuel Harding, “In Provo, 19th, Samuel Harding, born England, July 29, 1828, joined the Church, March 10, 1847, was married to Janet Stowe, Nov. 14, 1849, and came to Utah in October 1852. He was a policeman 30 years ago in Provo. He leaves 12 children and 108 grandchildren.” (Samuel Harding obituary, Improvement Era, vol. 7, May 1904, (Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Association) 970.) Mary Jennet died in Provo, Utah on 27 June 1909 at the age of 82. Both Samuel and Mary Jennet are buried in the Provo Utah City Cemetery.

Life timeline of Samuel Harding

1828
Samuel Harding was born on 23 Jul 1828
Samuel Harding was 3 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Samuel Harding was 12 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Samuel Harding was 31 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Samuel Harding was 32 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Samuel Harding was 49 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Samuel Harding was 55 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
Samuel Harding was 66 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
Samuel Harding died on 19 Aug 1904 at the age of 76
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Samuel Harding (23 Jul 1828 - 19 Aug 1904), BillionGraves Record 13295 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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