Samuel B Frost

2 Jan 1810 - 27 Jun 1888

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Samuel B Frost

2 Jan 1810 - 27 Jun 1888
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On his endowment record, Samuel said he was born January 2, 1810 in Wake County, North Carolina. Samuel was the first child of his parents, McCaslin and Penina Smith Frost. The other children were Nancy, Isabelle, Fereba, James, Martha, Mary Ann and Margaret. Before Samuel was six years of age, his

Life Information

Samuel B Frost

Born:
Died:

Antimony Cemetery

Highway 22
Antimony, Garfield, Utah
United States
Transcriber

finnsh

June 6, 2013
Photographer

GuyBlack

September 30, 2012

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Samuel Buchanan Frost - Life Sketch by Janis Merrell Hardy

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

On his endowment record, Samuel said he was born January 2, 1810 in Wake County, North Carolina. Samuel was the first child of his parents, McCaslin and Penina Smith Frost. The other children were Nancy, Isabelle, Fereba, James, Martha, Mary Ann and Margaret. Before Samuel was six years of age, his parents moved to Knox County, Tennessee, a new pioneering area requiring a lot of toil and honest labor from Samuel and his family. Times were hard during that period, and when Samuel was a young man he went north to Illinois and secured work. He liked the country and the opportunity it afforded and decided to stay there. On August 7, 1834, in Hancock County, Illinois, Samuel married Rebecca Foreman. She was the youngest child of John and Hettie Horn Foreman. Her father was a drinking man and the family had trouble over it. Hettie took Rebecca and left home in the night after John had threatened her life. John wanted to get Rebecca back, even if by force. Samuel married her to keep her father from taking her. She was fourteen and Samuel was twenty four. Ten children were born to Samuel and Rebecca. The last three died in infancy, living only months, weeks, and hours respectively. In Hancock County, Samuel met Mormon missionaries who converted him. He was very enthusiastic over his new-found faith and spent the remainder of his life an ardent Latter-day Saint, so much that immediately after his baptism he went back to Tennessee to visit his family and tell them of the Gospel of Christ. He converted his people and a number of neighbors. As a result, a community of people moved in a group to Illinois to be with the Saints. Samuel was ordained an elder in Nauvoo, November 20, 1841, and later he was advanced to a seventy and appointed Second President to the Eighth Quorum of Seventies. He served a mission to Kentucky in 1844 and was there when the Prophet was martyred and for sometime after. His father and brother-in-law cared for his family in his absence. He was a local district judge and held other prominent positions in the community. By trade, he was a blacksmith, but engaged in successful farming in Iowa and later in Utah. On his farm, he owned “fine stock” horses and was wealthy enough to hire other men to do the work. This is how his daughter, Mary, met her husband, Jerome Adams. Samuel owned a farm sixty miles from Council Bluffs for about fifteen years. Tragedy came to Samuel in 1858 when his wife Rebecca died October 9th after childbirth. The baby died the day it was born, but Rebecca lived about two weeks. When the Civil War broke out, Samuel brought his three married daughters, Mary, Sarah, and Nancy, their husbands and children, his three younger children and his nephew, Abram Barger, with him from Iowa to Draper, Utah. They arrived in early 1861 and he built a home there. He was Justice of Peace of Draper in 1862 and was active in church work. In Draper there lived a young English girl, Esther Davis, Samuel hired to keep house and help with his family. She could spin, weave and sew beautifully. She made her own clothing and took in sewing for others making silk dresses, wagon covers, horse blankets and whatever was needed. Samuel and Esther were married April 17, 1864 in Draper and later endowed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Esther had seven children and was a wonderful mother, wife and pioneer woman. She died December 26, 1910 at the home of her son, Adolphe, in Marion, Cassia County, Idaho. Soon after Samuel and Esther were married, they moved to Spring City, Sanpete County, Utah. There he farmed extensively, owned a fine home, did carpenter work, blacksmithing and even some shoe repair. He was captain of the militia during the Black Hawk War and he was known to have no fear. Samuel was an intellectual man with a cheerful disposition, thoroughly democratic and always a friend to young people. All of his life he loved music and singing. He played his fiddle and did step dancing at many events. He was a popular Fourth of July speaker and could deliver an inspiring oration. Having a touch of Puritan blood in him, Samuel detested puffs and frills on women’s clothes. He thought they called unnecessary attention to a woman’s figure and that the Lord meant women to be plain. In his old age he became extremely hard of hearing. In the spring of 1888, when he was 78 years old, he fell from a hay stack and broke several ribs which never healed and made him ill most of the time. He was persuaded by a friend to move south to Garfield County and died a month later on June 27, 1888, at Coyote and was buried in a most beautiful, natural graveyard.

Life History(a few more details)

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

SAMUEL BUCHANAN FROST This is a story about Samuel Buchanan Frost that I have found out since we moved to Nauvoo, Illinois. We purchased at 350 South Fulmer Street, October 20, 1993. After we moved here we went down to the historical department and looked up the location of the holding of several of my early church ancestors the front part of our property once was part of Samuel Buchanan Frost’s holdings. There was an old brickyard here. The kiln is across the street on another property that was turned into a wine cellar by the (?) lcarians but some of the service missionaries came over and examined the cellar and told us that it was originally a kiln. There are remnants of a brick aqueduct coming from the ninety-five foot deep well in our back yard where they brought water to make the bricks with. Grandfather McCaslin Frost and Grandmother Penina Frost lived here in Nauvoo with Grandfather Samuel Buchanan Frost. Written October 29, 1996 by Margaret (Peggy) Warner Clark A story about Grandpa’s oldest daughter by Rebecca Foreman: Mary Angeline Frost, oldest daughter of Samuel B. and Rebecca Foreman Frost, was the mother of Mary Frances Adams, second wife of Charles William Merrell. Mary, as Mary Angeline called, was born March 16, 1836 in Hancock County, Illinois, first child of Samuel Buchanan Frost and Rebecca Foreman. Mary told her children in later years her first recollections as a child. Her father’s family lived in or very near Nauvoo, Illinois, and she recalls sitting on Joseph Smith’s lap or walking around the yard holding onto his hand. She said the Prophet sometimes visited her parents and borrowed their baby to take home to his wife to comfort her after she had lost an infant. Mary remembered all her life the moans and cries of Joseph’s followers when his body and that of his brother Hyrum was brought from Carthage, where they were killed in 1844. Though Mary was raised in a household of plenty, she learned to be conservative with material possessions, a habit, which was advantageous to her in her later life. When she was very young she cooked for her father’s hired hands and cared for her mother during her confinement after giving birth to Mary’s siblings. SAMUEL BUCHANAN FROST On his endowment record Samuel said he was born January 2, 1810 in Wake County, North Carolina. His father had paid poll tax in Wake County after the birth of his first two children. Samuel was the first child of his parents, McCaslin and Penina Smith Frost. The others were Nancy Ilenwood, Isabelle VanDyke, Fereba, James McCaslin, Martha McKinney, Mary Ann and Margaret Eliza. Before Samuel was six years of age, his parents moved to Knox County, Tennessee, a new pioneering country and the boy grew up knowing the weariness of toil, and the joy of honest labor and the value of home entertainment. Times were hard during that period and when he was a young man he went north to Illinois to secure work. He liked the country and the opportunity it offered and decided to remain there. On August 7, 1834 in Hancock County, Illinois, Samuel married Rebecca Foreman. She was the youngest daughter of John and Hettie Horn Foreman and was born in White County, Tennessee November 20, 1820. John was a drinking man and the family had trouble over it. Hettie took Rebecca and left home in the night after John had threatened her life. John wanted to get Rebecca back even by force. Samuel married her to keep him from taking her. She was fourteen and he was twenty-four. Ten children were born to them: Mary Angeline, Sarah Georgiana, Nancy, William Anderson, Hettie, Samuel Buchanan Jr., James McCaslin, George Washington, John Wesley and Clay Ann. The last three died in infancy, living only months, weeks and hours, respectively. The children were born in Hancock County, Illinois, Freemont County, Iowa and one in Lincoln, Nebraska. In Hancock County, Samuel met some Mormon Missionaries or members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, who converted him. He was very enthusiastic over his newfound faith and spent the rest of his life an ardent Latter Day Saint. His friend and son-in-law, Abram Acord, said he was baptized in 1838 in Tennessee. Another source says that it was in Nauvoo in 1840. Likely it was Nauvoo, but there are things that favor the earlier date. He immediately went back to his old home in Tennessee to visit his family and to tell them of the Gospel of Christ. He converted his people and a number of the neighbors. As a result, quite a community of people moved in a body to Illinois to be with the Saints. Early in the spring of 1841, Samuel went from Bear Creek, Illinois to visit family, cut a hole in the ice and baptized his parents and some of the rest of the family. Margaret was too young, Fereba was married and away and Isabelle never joined the church because of her husband. Samuel was ordained and Elder in Nauvoo November 20, 1841. Sometime soon after, he was advanced to a Seventy and appointed Second President of the Eighth Quorum of Seventies, as the Journal History of the Church March 10, 1852, mentions that his continued absence in the east made a vacancy in the Presidency of that Quorum. In 1842, three of his married sisters and some friends from Tennessee lived in Jefferson County, Iowa. On October 3, 1842, Samuel wrote the following letter to Rebecca and his daughters in Nauvoo. Oct the 3rd, 1842, Iowa-Jefferson Co. Dearly beloved, kind and affectionate companion, It is with thanksgiving that I now embrace the opportunity of dropping a line of information and I hope that of consolation. I am in the enjoyment of good health and spirit for which I feel to thank the Lord, hoping these few lines may find you and those darling little babes enjoying the same blessings with all friends and connections and brethren. I have but one thing to regret particularly. That is that I didn’t over-rule Br. Gorden so much as to what Br. Joseph said the day we started. If you think it something that would be profitable to me, I want you to give it in your first letter to me. I cannot tell you yet where to write. The connections are all well and express their desire to see all of you and Fereba says she thinks she and William will make you a visit this fall. As for the others I heard nothing of any of them coming. The subject of Willey’s would not be much in my estimation. Isabelle seems piously disposed as usual and altogether friendly and affectionate. Mother Kerr is dead and the balance of the family is kind. We have only preached three times by appointment, but have been busily engaged by the fireside in preaching to all who are and were willing to hear. We were friendly and kindly received created in general. On exception only where we stopped to get some dinner in the round prairie at Mr. Gillum’s. We have preached at Mr. Bealers, eight miles from Old Thomas Smith’s, the next time at a William Bargerts. On yesterday, which was Sunday, we preached at Skunk River at George Langleys. The particulars of which Harmon will tell when he delivers this letter. We think the prospect of doing is very flowering not withstanding persecution rages in the hearts of the people, or some of them yet. We don’t care anything about that. We know it will keep out such as won’t stand, if they were in, therefore, it rids us of trouble that’s more lasting and more fatal than its self. Under this condition we are able to rejoice amidst all, such as we have ever met without. I want you to be faithfully engaged in the discharge of your duty and pray for me, always remembering my infirmities, and my want for divine aid in order to discharge of my duty in the ministry, having left you in the hands of God and feeling that he is ever merciful to those who are under oppression of any bereavement what ever. I therefore pray God the Eternal Father in the name of Jesus Christ His Son that you may be comfortably situated, counseled and consoled in my absence. I wish to write a few lines to the little girls; Mary: father wants you to be obedient to your mother’s instructions and not forget your book. You know father wants that you should be as smart as any little girl in Nauvoo, and wants you to beat them all if you can. Mother must teach you to write so that when she writes me a letter you can write your name and age and send it to me, (turn over and then comes the instructions for Sarah) Now, Sarah, I want to told to you something. I want your curly head to be engaged in trying to beat all the little girls in Nauvoo. I want mother also to teach you to write that you may write to father your name and age in mother’s letter. Be a good little girl. Mind what your mother tells you. Be kind to little sister that you may set a good example. The same is intended for you, Mary. Rebecca, I have good news for thee, and I want your prayers in behalf of the same. Fereba this morning proffered to believe on Mormonism, and William said as to say the same last night to me. I can and do and will rejoice because of the blessing of God being and having been extended to us. I am glad I turned my course on my mission from east to north. Yea, I have reasons to thank the Lord for my prosperity in the ministry amongst those of my beloved friends according to the flesh. For this let the name of God be praised. S.B. Frost to Rebecca Frost and family. Write immediately to Fairfield and I think I shall be able to get it before I leave here. That must have been the first mission for the Journal History records that he left for a Kentucky mission on April 15, 1844. His call was published in Nauvoo May 15 following. He was in Kentucky when the Prophet was martyred and for some time after, his father and brothers-in-law cared for his family for him. Family tradition says he presided over a mission, but does not say where or when. Abram Acord said also that Samuel was a freemason before he became a member of the church, and that he was a Local District Judge and held other positions of prominence where he lived in Iowa. By trade he was a blacksmith, but engaged in successful farming in Iowa and later in Utah. On his farm he owned fine stock, horses, and was well enough off that he hired other men to do his work for him. That is how his daughter, Mary, met her husband, Jerome J. Adams, in Freemont County, Iowa in 1854. Samuel owned a farm in that county at Nisnabotna, sixty miles south of Council Bluffs, for about fifteen years, but lived in Lincoln County, Nebraska part of the time. At various times in his life he owned and successfully ran taverns. (Inns) Tragedy came to Samuel in 1858 when Rebecca died on October ninth after childbirth. The baby died the day it was born, September 25, but Rebecca lived about two weeks. While she lay ill the family dog seemed to sense that death was near and in spite of everything they could do, howled mournfully. This worried Rebecca so Samuel, sad and concerned, determined to quiet the dog, beat him until he died. Mary Adams Acord told her daughter Sadie the story and at the end Sadie said, “Why the old Devil!” The next instance she was picking herself up off the floor where her mother had slapped her saying, “I’ll have you know, you are speaking of my father.” When the Civil War broke out Samuel brought his three married daughters, Mary, Sarah and Nancy, their husbands and children, his three smaller children and his nephew, Abram Barger, with the William K. McKassock company from Freemont County, Iowa to Draper, Utah, to the home of his sister, Margaret Rawlins. They arrived in early 1861 and Samuel lived with the Rawlins until he could get a house built for himself. His daughters and their families soon found homes in other communities. The Journal History records that Samuel was a Justice of the Peace of the Draperville Precinct during 1862 and that he was active in church work there. In Draper lived a young girl, Ester Davis, who had been married as a second wife to Henry Woolicott, but Henry’s wife was unhappy over his plural marriage, so Ester took her son, Albert Henry and left to make her own way. She was the daughter of William Davis and Keziah Geers. She was born April 17, 1839 in Pauntleu, Gloucester Shire, England. She joined the church with her sister and came to the United States when she was about nineteen. They left Boston for Utah in 1861 with Captain Horn’s company. Ester walked most of the way so that her sister who was not well and had two small children could take her turn riding. She learned to spin, weave and sew beautifully. She made her own clothing and took in sewing for others and made silk dresses, wagon covers, horse blankets or what ever else there was to sew. Samuel first hired her to keep house for his family which she did with credit to herself. In those early years her own son, Albert, and Samuel’s fifteen year old James McCaslin, whom they called Ned, both died. On April 17, 1864 Samuel and Ester were married in Draper. Hettie married soon after and went away to her own home. Samuel and Ester were endowed on May 23, 1870 at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. They had seven children, Stephen, Chancy, Rebecca Penina, Adolph Lasseau, Margaret Elizra, Ivan Danzoff, and Marion. She was a wonderful mother, wife and pioneer woman. She died December 26, 1910 at the home of her son Adolph in Marian, Cassia County, Idaho. Soon after his second marriage, Samuel moved to Spring City, Sanpete County, where he farmed extensively, owned a fine home for the times. He did cabinetwork, blacksmithing and even shoe repair. He took an active part in church affairs and community life. He was a ward teacher for many years and held every political position in the county. During the Black Hawk War he was Captain of the Militia and served his community fearlessly and well with the advantage to them and credit to himself. People who knew him said he was a man without fear. In September 1886 he met with a number of sisters, grandchildren, children and relatives in the Logan Temple for the ordinance work. He was sealed to his parents and to his first four children on the 15th. The work the Frost family did at the time and the information put on record has been untold value in a genealogical way. Samuel was an intellectual man, cheerful in disposition, thoroughly democratic and was always a friend to the young people. All his life he loved music and singing, taking an active part in parties and entertainment playing his fiddle and step-dancing. He used a violin made by his grandfather, James Frost, and won by his father, McCaslin Frost, for learning to use it first among James’ seven sons. Samuel was a popular Fourth of July speaker and could deliver an inspiring oration. In his old age he became extremely hard of hearing and gave his family reverse answers to their questions… they thought intentionally. He hated the wind and would say, “Blow, dog-on you! Don’t I hate you! Blow in a man’s ear and drive him crazy!” Having a touch of Puritan blood in him, Samuel detested puffs and frills on women’s clothing. He said they looked like “Pig Guts.” He thought they called unnecessary attention to a woman’s figure and that the Lord meant woman to be plain. Like Daniel Boone, Samuel wanted elbowroom and lots of fresh air and disliked living in town. So when a friend persuaded him to move south to Coyote in Garfield County (now Antimony) he planned to do so, though he was seventy-eight years old. In the early spring of 1888 he fell from a haystack and broke several ribs, which never healed and made him ill most of the time. Never the less, he moved to Coyote, pioneering again on the 12th of May. He lived little more than a month. Samuel Buchanan Frost died June 27, 1888 at Coyote. On the East Fork of the Sevier River, he was buried in a most beautiful natural graveyard. There is a background of low hills covered with timber, to the west; the hundred foot wide Sevier River, lined with cottonwoods, curves through the hills at their feet. An ever-increasing posterity lives after him to keep his example of sturdy faithfulness to a righteous cause living in their memory so long as his blood remains on the earth. “Every person should be diligently engaged in that which pertain to their occupation. And in this way they will gain confidence and meet the approbation of their friends and surrounding acquaintances and obtain wealth and honor.” (Quote of Samuel B. Frost) The following lines are still preserved (1947) in his own writing. A composition of words I send, the feeling of my heart To children and that Bosom Friend with whom I had a part. The above is an introduction; below that which is introduced. My bosom friend, and children, too, I wish to write and say to you Who of that happy land I had to give the parting hand. You know not what my feelings were, Neither can I them all declare; To think upon that lovely land Who gave to me the parting hand, Yet duty calls me to proclaim The Gospel of Messiah’s name; And this enables me to stand And give my friends the parting hand May God draw near and cheer your hearts Whilst we are all so far apart. But still I’ll think in distant lands Of them to whom I gave the parting hand These lines I write that you might see And whilst you read them think of me Till again in Nauvoo I stand And give to you the meeting hand. (written on the back of a letter to Rebecca) SONG BALLAD OF THE GREAT LIBERTY TREE By Samuel Buchanan Frost In a chariot of light from the regions of day The Goddess of Liberty came, Ten thousand celestials directed her way And hither conducted the dame, A fair budding branch for the Garden of Love Where millions with millions agree, She brought in her hand as a pledge of her love And the branch she named Liberty Tree. The Celestial Exotic stuck it deep in the ground Like a native it flourished and bore. The fame of it’s fruit drew the nations all-round To search out our peaceable shore. Unmindful of names or distinctions they came for free men. Like brothers agree, one spirit endowed, one spirit pursued, And their Temple was Liberty Tree. Beneath this fair tree like the Patriarchs of old Our bread in contentment we ate. Ne’er vex’t with the troubles of silver and gold, The cares of the grand or the great With timber and tar we old England supplied Supported her power o’er the sea Their battles we fought without gaining a cent To the honor of the Liberty Tree. Hark! Hark! Hear ye swains, ‘Tis a tale most profane; How all the tyrannical powers, Kings, Commons and Lords United in vain to cut down this garden of ours. From the East to the West blow the trumpet of arms Thru the land let the sound of it flee, Yea far, yea near, unite with the cheer In defense of our Liberty Tree. Ye American Ladies excuse us awhile from doting on your lovely charms; The fatigues of the war, the soldier in toils , we soon shall forget in your arms, Then let us arise our foe to chastise who repines at our living so free. The laurels we reap we lay at your feet And soil that grew Liberty Tree.

Liberty Tree(song/poem he wrote)

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

SONG BALLAD OF THE GREAT LIBERTY TREE By Samuel Buchanan Frost In a chariot of light from the regions of day The Goddess of Liberty came, Ten thousand celestials directed her way And hither conducted the dame, A fair budding branch for the Garden of Love Where millions with millions agree, She brought in her hand as a pledge of her love And the branch she named Liberty Tree. The Celestial Exotic stuck it deep in the ground Like a native it flourished and bore. The fame of it’s fruit drew the nations all-round To search out our peaceable shore. Unmindful of names or distinctions they came for free men. Like brothers agree, one spirit endowed, one spirit pursued, And their Temple was Liberty Tree. Beneath this fair tree like the Patriarchs of old Our bread in contentment we ate. Ne’er vex’t with the troubles of silver and gold, The cares of the grand or the great With timber and tar we old England supplied Supported her power o’er the sea Their battles we fought without gaining a cent To the honor of the Liberty Tree. Hark! Hark! Hear ye swains, ‘Tis a tale most profane; How all the tyrannical powers, Kings, Commons and Lords United in vain to cut down this garden of ours. From the East to the West blow the trumpet of arms Thru the land let the sound of it flee, Yea far, yea near, unite with the cheer In defense of our Liberty Tree. Ye American Ladies excuse us awhile from doting on your lovely charms; The fatigues of the war, the soldier in toils , we soon shall forget in your arms, Then let us arise our foe to chastise who repines at our living so free. The laurels we reap we lay at your feet And soil that grew Liberty Tree.

Hettie Frost Allred (1845-1932)

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Hettie Frost Allred (1845-1932) Hettie Frost was born 13 November 1845 in Hancock County, Illinois, the fifth child born to Samuel Buchanan Frost and Rebecca Foreman. Hettie’s brothers and sisters were: Mary Angeline, Sarah Georgina, Nancy, William Anderson, Samuel Buchanan, Jr., James McCaslin, George Washington, John Wesley, and Clay Anne. Rebecca Foreman Frost died 9 October 1857 following the birth of Clay Anne, who also died at birth. This left young Hettie with the big responsibility of caring for the home and for her father and brothers because her older sisters were already married. Hettie came to Utah with a group of pioneers known as the Independent Immigrants, arriving in Salt Lake City, 2 June 1861. In this company were Samuel Buchanan Frost and his family: his daughters Mary and her husband, Jerome Adams; Sarah and her husband, Louis Valentine Acord (always called “Felt”); Nancy and her husband, Abraham Acord. Also in the company were James Anderson Allred, his wife, Elizabeth Parkis, and their son, Stephen Henry Allred; Jacob McKisic (McKissick) and his wife, Martha Acord, a sister of “Felt” and Abraham Acord. The McKisicks went on to Oregon and Abraham Acord and his family went to Nevada. Hettie went with her father directly to Draper, Utah. Her father married Esther Davis 17 April 1864. From then until she married, Hettie made her home with her sister Sarah. She moved with them to Spring City, Sanpete County, Utah. The James Anderson Allred family had also moved to Spring City and on 10 February 1867, Hettie married Stephen Henry Allred. This marriage was sealed 12 November 1867 in the Salt Lake Endowment House. Fifteen children were born to Hettie Frost and Stephen Henry Allred. They were: Hettie Florence, Stephen LeRoy, Charles Semore (who died at birth), James Ernest, Nellie May, Elizabeth Estelle, Rebecca Clay, Samuel Claudius, Frank Foreman, Percy Eugene, Fred Orlando, Horace LeGrand, Oscar Frost, Leo Lamont, and Kathryn (Katie) Francis. All but one of the children were raised to maturity. Most lived quite long lives. In 1871 the Allred family moved to Levan, Juab County, but returned to Spring City in 1875. Stephen Henry taught school in Spring City and Levan. In 1878 they moved to Chester. In 1879 they moved to Salina, Sevier 1 County, where they lived on a ranch seven miles east Manti Temple. In later years she was an ordained worker in the Salt Lake Temple. Her temple records show that she did endowments for over a thousand names. This opportunity and privilege she often spoke of as an answer to her prayers. Hettie loved to read, especially Church books. James E. Talmadge was one of her favorite authors. Her life had never been an easy one. During the years when her children were young, privations and hardships were many, and comforts if any were few. But she did not complain. Her home in Salina was a modest cottage, but her granddaughter Eva Allred Bullough remembered it as a peaceful, serene retreat surrounded by a fairyland of flowers. For years Hettie’s garden took first prize in the county for being the best kept and most beautiful. She worked in her garden from early morning until evening whenever other duties permitted. Weeds simply were not tolerated. There were fruit trees, a vegetable garden and a small jersey cow to be taken care of. She had two apple trees and she used the fruit just for drying. She usually dried enough apples that each of her married children got a flour sack of dried apples in the Fall. They made delicious pies. She was a good neighbor and friend to all; loved and respected by everyone. Always she was a perfect lady and a good example to her own Stephen Henry Allred of Salina in Salina Canyon. In the fall of 1880 they moved back to Salina to be near school but returned to the ranch in 1881. In 1886 they moved to Gooseberry, Sevier County (a community of ranches) to put their children in school. They repeated this process of moving back and forth several times. In 1874 Stephen Henry married Joanna Bene Petersen as a plural wife. There were eight children born to them. Stephen Henry died 3 December 1890, in Provo, Utah County, Utah, after being struck by a train at Thistle, Utah. He is buried at Spring City, Utah. In the spring of 1891 Hettie moved her family to Salina and bought a house, which she owned until her death in 1932. As soon she and her children were settled in Salina, Hettie became active in the Church, a privilege she had longed for all her married life. She was a Sunday School teacher for many years; president of the Young Women’s Mutual Improvement Association for eighteen years; and she was also a faithful member and worker in the Relief Society. As soon as family responsibilities permitted she began working in the 2 family as well as to friends and associates. She did not preach to her children but taught and advised, always setting a good example for them. Eva Bullough said that she could never remember her grandmother’s speaking ill of anyone. It seemed to be her policy not to say anything unless it was good. Her niece Ida Acord Jacoby, in writing of Hettie’s early life, described her as a beautiful, talented girl of the dainty Dresden type, with a beautiful, high soprano voice and very popular with other young people. She kept these talents throughout her life. When she crossed the plains to Utah, Hettie rode much of the time in the back of her sister Sarah’s wagon, so she could look after little Ida, because it made Sarah motion sick to ride back there. It made Hettie sleepy and she had a hard time keeping her eyes open so she gave Ida a nutmeg grinder to play with, but Ida got tired of it and threw it out. Ida preferred lifting “Auntie’s” eyelids to see it she was really asleep. Once Hettie returned from a Halloween dance while she was still living with Sarah and “Felt,” and said, “Felt, I think someone is trying to scare us.” Felt opened the door to see something all in white, waving its arms, out in the yard. He yelled, “Speak or I’ll shoot!” Nothing spoke. He fired three shots and the “visitor” fell over the fence just as Hettie said, “Why, it’s Old Lady Oldfield’s garments.” They were frozen stiff and there was just enough wind to make them move. Ida said her father never did hear the end of that. Hettie moved from Salina to Salt Lake City in 1920 to be with her daughters Clay and Katie, and where it was more convenient to continue her temple service, which she did until shortly before her death, 7 March 1932, when she was eighty-six years old. She was buried in the Pioneer Cemetery, Salina, 11 March 1932. Eva’s memories of her grandmother were more cherished because she was the only grandparent Eva knew. She had stayed with her grandmother off and on during her early childhood when she needed to stay in town to go to school. This gave her an opportunity to grow very close to her grandmother, to love her, and to know her well. Hettie had a great influence on her life. (Compiled by Eva Allred Bullough with help from Rebecca Clay Allred; from Ida Acord Jacoby’s life story; from Church and Temple records. Edited by Carolyn Bullough Condie.) 3 Obituary from Salt Lake Tribune—March 1932: Mrs. Hettie Frost Allred, 86, widow of Stephen H. Allred and for many years a resident of Salina, died Monday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. R. A. Burch [Katie], 522 Thirteenth East Street, of disabilities incident to her age. Mrs. Allred was born in Hancock County, Illinois, November 13, 1845, and came to Utah in 1861. She first lived in Sanpete County, where she married Mr. Allred. Shortly after the marriage the family moved to Salina where she lived until recent years, when she came to Salt Lake to make her home with her daughter. She was an active member of the L.D.S. church and was a teacher in the Sunday school and a Relief Society worker. Mrs. Allred is survived by the following sons and daughters: Mrs. Florence Pace, Delta; LeRoy Allred, Nevada; Mrs. James Crane, Fred and Claud Allred of Salina; Clay Allred and Mrs. Burch, Salt Lake; Frank Allred, Canada; Percy Allred, Twin Falls, Idaho; Horace Allred, Roosevelt; Oscar Allred, San Diego; thirty-five grandchildren and twenty-six great grandchildren. Funeral services and burial will be conducted at Salina Thursday. 4

Samuel Buchanan Frost (1810-1888)

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Samuel Buchanan Frost (1810-1888) On his endowment record Samuel Buchanan Frost said he was born 2 January 1810 in Wake County, North Carolina. (His obituary from newspaper says Knox County, Tennessee.) His father paid poll tax in Wake County after the birth of his first two children. Samuel was the first child of his parents, McCaslin and Peninna (also spelled Peninnah, Penima) Smith Frost. The others were Nancy Ilewood, Isabelle Van Dyke, Fereba, James McCaslin, Martha McKinney, Mary Ann, and Margaret Elzirah. Before Samuel was six his parents moved to Knox County, Tennessee, a new and pioneering country, and the boy grew up knowing the weariness of toil and the joy of honest labor and the value of home grown entertainment. Times were hard during this period, and when Samuel was a young man, he went north to Illinois and secured work. He liked the country and the opportunity it afforded, so he decided to stay there. On 7 August 1834 Samuel married Rebecca Foreman in Hancock County, Illinois. She was the youngest child of John and Hettie Horn Foreman and was born in Warren or Knox County, Tennessee, 20 November 1820. John was a drinking man and his family had trouble over it. Hettie took Rebecca and left home in the night after John had threatened her life. John wanted to get Rebecca back even by force. Samuel married her to keep John from taking her. She was fourteen and Samuel was twenty-four. Ten children were born to Samuel and Rebecca: Mary Angeline, Sarah Georgiana, Nancy, William Anderson, Hettie, Samuel Buchanan, Jr., James McCaslin, George Washington, John Wesley, and Clay Ann. The last three died in infancy, living only months, weeks, and hours, respectively, on earth. The children were born in Hancock County, Illinois; Fremont County, Iowa; and one in Lincoln, Nebraska. In Hancock County Samuel met Mormon missionaries or members of the Church who converted him. He was very enthusiastic over his newfound faith and spent the rest of his life as an ardent Latter-day Saint. Samuel’s friend and son-in-law, Abram Accord, said he was baptized in 1838 in Tennessee. Another source says it was in Nauvoo in 1840. Likely it was in Nauvoo, but there are things that favor the earlier date. Samuel immediately went back to his old home in Tennessee to visit his family and tell them about the Gospel of Christ. He converted his people 1 and a number of neighbors. As a result, a community of people moved in a body to Illinois to be with the Saints. Early in the Spring of 1841, Samuel went from Bear Creek, Illinois, to visit his family, cut a hole in two feet of ice and baptized his parents and part of the rest of his family. Margaret was too young; Fereba was married and away; and Isabelle never did join the Church because of her husband. Later, her second husband was a minister of another denomination. Samuel was ordained an elder in Nauvoo, 20 November 1841. Sometime soon afterward, he was advanced to a seventy and appointed Second President of the Eighth Quorum of Seventies because the Journal History of Church for 10 March 1852 mentions that his continued absence in the East made a vacancy in the presidency of that quorum. In 1842 three of Samuel’s married sisters and some friends from Tennessee lived in Jefferson County, Iowa. On 3 October 1842 Samuel wrote the following letter from there to Rebecca and his daughters in Nauvoo: Oct’r 3rd 1842, Iowa, Jefferson Co. Dearly beloved kind & affectionate Companion, It is with thanksgiving that I now embrace the opportunity of dropping a line of information and I hope that of consolation. I am in the enjoyment of good health & spirit for which I feel to thank the Lord, hoping these few lines may find you and those darling little Babes enjoying the same blessings with all friends and connections & Bretherin [sic]. I have but one thing to regret particularly. That is that I did not ever rule Br. Gordon so much as to bear what Br. Joseph said the day we started. If you think it something that would be profitable to me, I want you (to) give it in your 1st letter to me. I cannot tell you yet where to write it. The connections are all well and express their desires to see all of you and Fereba says she thinks she and Wm. will make you a visit this fall. As for the others I hear nothing of any of them coming. The subject of Wiley’s coming would not be much in my estimation. Isabelle seems piously disposed as usual and altogether friendly and affectionate. Mother Kerr is dead and the balance of the family is kind. We have only preached three times by appointment, but have been busily engaged by the fireside in preaching to all who are & were willing to hear. We are friendly and kindly received and treated in general. One exception only where we stopped to get some dinner in the Round Prairie at Mr. Gillum’s. We have preached at Mr. Braler’s 8 miles from old Thomas Smith’s. The next time at Wm. Barger’s. On yesterday which was Sunday, we preached on Skunk River at George Langley’s, the particulars of which Harmon will tell you when he delivers the letters. We think the prospect of doing good is very flowering notwithstanding persecution rages in the hearts of people, or some of them, yet. We don’t care anything about that. We know it (will) keep out such as won’t stand, if they were in, therefore it rids us of trouble that’s more lasting and more fatal than its self [sic]. Under this consideration we are able to rejoice amidst all, such as we have ever met with yet. I want you to be faithfully engaged in the discharge of your duty and pray for me, always remembering my infirmities and my want of divine aid in order to the discharge of my duty in the ministry, having left you in the hand of God, and feeling that he is ever merciful to those who are under the oppression of any bereavement whatever, I therefore pray God the Eternal 2 Father in the name of Jesus Christ His Son to keep you and preserve you from all harm and supply all your wants that you may be comfortably situated, counseled, and consoled in my absence. I wish to write a few lines to the little girls. Mary: Father wants you to be obedient (to) your mother’s instructions and not forget your book. You know father wants that you should be as smart as any little girl in Nauvoo and wants you to beat them all if you can. Mother must teach you to write so that when she writes me a letter you can write your name and age and send it to me. Now Sarah I want to talk to you some. I want your curly head to be engaged in trying to beat all the little girls in Nauvoo. I want mother also to teach you to write that you may write to father your name and age in mother’s letter. Be a good little girl. Mind what mother tells you. Be kind to little sister that you may set her a good example. The same is intended for you Mary. Rebecca I have good news for thee, and I want your prayers in behalf of the same. Fereby (his sister) this morning proffered to believe Mormonism, and Wm. said as much as to say the same last night to me. I can and do and will rejoice because of the blessings of God being and having been extended to us. I am glad I turned my course on my mission from East to North. Yea, I have reasons to thank the Lord for my prosperity in the ministry amongst those of my beloved friends according to the flesh. For this let the name of God be praised. S.B. Frost to Rebecca Frost and family. Write immediately to Fairfield and I think I shall be able to get it before we leave here. That must have been his first mission, for the Journal History records that he left for a Kentucky mission on 15 April 1844. His call was published in Nauvoo 15 May following. He was in Kentucky when the Prophet was martyred, and for some time after, for his father and brother-in-law cared for his family for him. Family tradition says he presided over a mission, but does not say where or when. Abram Accord said also the Samuel was a Free Mason before he became a member of the Church, and that he was a local District Judge and held other positions of prominence where he lived in Iowa. By trade he was a blacksmith, but engaged in successful farming in Iowa and later in Utah. On his farm he owned “fine stock” horses and was well off enough that he hired other men to do his work for him; which is how his daughter Mary met her husband, Jerome J. Adams, in Fremont County, Iowa, in 1854. Samuel owned a farm in that county at Nishnabotna, sixty miles south of Council Bluffs for about fifteen years, but lived in Lincoln County, Nebraska, part of that time. At various times in his life he owned and successfully ran a tavern. Tragedy came to Samuel in 1858 when Rebecca died 9 October after childbirth. The baby died the day it was born, 25 September, but Rebecca lived about two weeks. While she lay ill, the family dog seemed to sense that death was near, and in spite of everything, he howled and howled 3 mournfully. His noise worried Rebecca; so Samuel, sad and worried, determined to quiet the dog and beat him until he died. Mary A. Adams told her daughter Sadie the story, and at the end Sadie said, “Why, the old devil!” The next instant she was picking herself up off the floor where her mother had slapped her, saying, “I’ll have you know you are speaking of my father.” When the Civil War broke out, Samuel brought his three married daughters, Mary, Sarah and Nancy, their husbands and children, his three smaller children, and his nephew Abram Barger with the William F. McKessack Company from Fremont County, Iowa, to Draper, Utah, to the home of his sister, Margaret Rawlins. They arrived in early 1861, and Samuel lived with the Rawlinses until he could get a house built for himself. His daughters and their families soon found homes in other communities. The Journal History records that Samuel was Justice of the Peace of the Draperville precinct during 1862, and that he was active in church work there. In Draper lived a young English girl, Esther Davis, who had been married as a second wife to Henry Willowcott; but Henry’s wife was unhappy over his plural marriage, so Esther took her young son, Albert Henry, and left to make her own way. She was born 17 April 1839 in Pauntley, Gloucestershire, England. She was the daughter of William Davis and Keziah Geers. She joined the Church with her sister and came to the U.S. when she was about nineteen. They left Boston for Utah in 1861 with Captain Horner’s company. Esther walked most of the way so that her sister, who was not well, and had two small children, could take her turn riding. She learned to spin, weave and sew beautifully. She made her own clothing, and took in sewing for others and made silk dresses, wagon covers, horse blankets or whatever there was to sew. Samuel first hired her to keep house for his family, which she did with credit to herself. In those early years her son, Albert and Samuel’s fifteen- year-old James McCaslin, whom they called Ned, died. Hettie married soon after and went away to make her own home. (Error—Hettie married in Spring City, 10 February 1867.) On 17 April 1864 in Draper, Samuel and Esther were married. They were endowed 23 May 1870 in the Salt Lake Endowment House. Esther had seven children: Stephen, Chauncy, Rebecca Pennina, Adolphe Alsseau, Margaret Elzirah, Ivan Danzoff, and Marion. She was a wonderful mother, wife and pioneer woman. She died 26 December 1910 at the home of her son Adolphe in Marion, Cassia County, Idaho. Soon after his second marriage, Samuel moved his family to Spring City, Sanpete County, Utah. There he farmed extensively, owned a fine house for the times, did carpentry work, blacksmithing, and even shoe repair. He took an active part in Church affairs and community life. He was a Ward teacher for many years and held every political office in the county. 4 During the Black Hawk War he was a captain of the militia and served his community fearlessly and well, with advantage to them and credit to himself. People who knew him said he was a man without fear. On 15 September 1886 he met with a number of his sisters, children, grandchildren and other relatives in the Logan Temple for ordinance work. He was sealed to his parents and to his first three children. The work the Frost family did at that time and the information put on record has been of untold genealogical value. Samuel was an intellectual man, cheerful in disposition, thoroughly democratic, and always a friend to young people. All of his life he loved music and singing and took an active part in parties and entertainments, playing his “fiddle,” and step dancing. He used the old violin made by his grandfather, James Frost, and won by his father, McCaslin, for learning to use it first among James’ seven sons. Samuel was a popular Fourth of July speaker and could deliver an inspiring oration. Having a touch of Puritan blood in him, Samuel detested puffs and frills on women’s clothes. He said they looked like “pigs’ guts.” He thought they called unnecessary attention to a woman’s figure, and that the Lord meant women to be plain. In his old age he became extremely hard of hearing and gave his family perverse answers to their questions—they thought intentionally. He hated the wind and would say, “Blow, doggone you; don’t I hate you! Blow in a man’s ears and drive him crazy!” Like Daniel Boone, Samuel wanted elbow room and lots of fresh air and disliked living in town. So when a friend persuaded him to move south to Coyote in Garfield County (now Anthony), he planned to do so, though he was seventy-eight years old. In the early spring of 1888 he fell from a haystack and broke several ribs which never healed, and made him ill most of the time. He lived little more than a month. Samuel Buchanan Frost died 27 June 1888 at Coyote on the East Fork of the Sevier River, where he was buried in a most beautiful natural graveyard. There is a background of low hills covered with timber to the west; the hundred-foot wide Sevier lined with cottonwoods curves through the hills at their feet. An ever-increasing posterity lives after him to keep his example of sturdy faithfulness to a righteous cause living in their memory so long as his blood remains on the earth. From the writings of Samuel B. Frost: “Every person should be diligently engaged in that which pertains to their occupation. And in this way they will gain confidence and meet the approbation of their friends and surrounding acquaintances and obtain wealth and honor.” (The following is an introduction to a poem written on the back of a letter to his wife Rebecca.) 5 “A composition of words I send, the feelings of my heart: To children and to that Bosom Friend with whom I had to part: My bosom Friend, and children, too, I wish to write and say to you Who on that lovely happy land I had to give the parting band. You know not what my feelings were, Neither can I them all declare, To think upon that lovely band, Who gave to me the parting hand. Yet duty calls me to proclaim the Gospel of Messiah’s name; And this enables me to stand and give my friends the parting hand. May God draw near and cheer your hearts, whilst we are all so far apart, But still I’ll think in distant lands of them, To whom I gave the parting hand. These lines I write that you might see and whilst you read them Think of me till I again in Nauvoo stand and give you all the Meeting hand.” Another poem by Samuel B. Frost: BALLAD OF THE GREAT LIBERTY TREE In a chariot of light from the regions of day the goddess of liberty came, Ten thousand celestials directed her way; And hither conducted the dame. A fair budding branch from the Garden of Love where millions with millions agree, She brought in her hand as a pledge of her love And the branch she named Liberty Tree. The Celestial Exotic stuck deep in the ground, Like a native it flourished and bore. The fame of its fruit Drew the nations all-round to search out our peaceable shore. Unmindful of names or distinctions they came, for free men Like brothers agree. One spirit endowed, one spirit pursued, And their temple was Liberty Tree. Beneath this fair tree, like the patriarchs of old Our bread in contentment we did eat. Ne’er vext with the troubles of silver and gold, The cares of the grand or the great, With timber and tar we old England supplied; supported her power, O’er the sea their battles we fought without gaining a cent, To the honor of Liberty Tree. Hark, Hark, Hear ye swains, ‘tis a tale most profane, How all the tyrannical powers, Kings, Commons, and Lords United in vain to cut down this garden of ours. From the east to the west blow the trumpet to arms! Through the land Let the sound of it flee. Yea far—yea near, unite with the cheer In defense of our Liberty Tree. Ye American Ladies excuse us awhile from doting on your lovely charms, The fatigues of the war, and the soldier in toils, We soon shall forget in your arms. Then let us arise Our foe to chastise who repines at our living so free. The laurels we reap we lay at your feet And the soil that grew Liberty Tree. (Submitted to Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Archive byAloma Byington Blaylock; edited by Carolyn Condie, 2nd great granddaughter of Samuel B. and Rebecca Foreman Frost) 6 Obituary for Samuel B. Frost—no publication cited: FROST, SAMUEL BUCHANAN (son of McCaslin Frost and Penima [sic] Smith of Carolinas, Tennessee and Illinois and Fremont County, Iowa). Born Jan. 2, 1810, in Knox county, Tenn. Came to Utah 1861, William K. McKessack company. Married Rebecca Forman in Illinois (daughter of John Forman and Hetta Horre [sic] of Carolinas). She came to Utah 1861 with husband. Their children: Mary, m. Jerome Adams; Sarah m. Valentine Acord; Nancy m. Abram Acord; William Anderson, died; Hetta m. Stephen Allred; Samuel Buchanan, Jr., m. Mary Patty; James McCaslin, died; George Washington, died; John Wesley, died; Clay, died. Family resided Fremont Co., Iowa, and Spring City, Utah, after 1861. Married Ester Davis 1863 at Salt Lake City (daughter of William and Keziah Davis of Gloustershire, Eng., pioneers 1861, Joseph Horne company). She was born April 24, 1839. Their children: Stephen m. Sena Jensen; Chauncey m. Lorevia Warner; Adolph; Rebecca m. Peter Nielsen; Margaret m. Organe Warner; Iven; Marion. Missionary to southern states; ward teacher. Judge, Farmer and blacksmith. Died June 27, 1888, Coyote, Utah. 7

Samuel Buchanan Frost 2 January 1810 – 27 June 1888

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

After the American Colonies had won their independence from Great Britain, they were also granted possession of the land between the Appalachian Mountains and the Mississippi River. This territory was divided up and attached to the various states. For example, What was to become the State of Tennessee was a territory of North Carolina. Frontiersmen began pushing over the Appalachians and had settled the region. Davy Crockett was born in Greene County in Eastern Tennessee in 1786. Ten years later, Tennessee became the sixteenth state of the Union. Over the next twenty years, with the Tennessee frontier conquered and tamed, the population began to swell as more and more settlers sought land, opportunity, and growth. Before he was six years old Samuel Buchanan Frost, who was born January 2, 1810 in Wake County, North Carolina, moved with his parents and younger sister, Nancy Ilewood (11 Aug 1812), to Knox County in Eastern Tennessee. Samuel was the first child of McCaslin and Pennina Smith Frost. After settling in their new home, five more sisters and a brother were added to the family. They were: Isabelle VanDyke (14 Feb 1816), Fereba Smith (17 Sep 1818), James William (30 Aug 1820), Martha McKinney (7 Oct 1825), Mary Ann (27 Oct 1827), and Margaret Elzira (28 Apr 1830). As a boy, he grew up knowing the weariness of toil, the joy of honest labor, and the value of home grown entertainment. Times were hard during that period and when Samuel was a young man he went north to Illinois and secured work. He liked the country and the opportunity it afforded and decided to remain there. On the 7th of August 1834 in Hancock County, Illinois, Samuel married Rebecca Foreman. She was the youngest child of John and Hettie Horn Foreman and was born in White County, Tennessee November 20, 1820. John Foreman was a drinking man and the family had trouble over it. Hettie took Rebecca and left home in the night after John had threatened her life. John wanted to get Rebecca back even by force. Samuel married her to keep him from taking her. She was 14 and Samuel was 24. Their first three children were all born in Hancock County; Mary Angeline (16 Mar 1836), Sarah Georgina (19 Oct 1837), and Nancy (22 Apr 1840). By the time Nancy was born, refugees fleeing religious persecution in Missouri began streaming into Hancock County and settled in a mosquito infested swamp at Commerce along the bank of the Mississippi River. These newcomers, called Mormons, were an industrious people and set about to drain the swamp. Soon their settlement was incorporated into Commerce and the name was changed to Nauvoo, a Hebrew word meaning “beautiful city.” Navuoo began to grow as the Mormons built a thriving city. More Mormons began arriving from various parts of the country and Europe, particularly Great Britain, as their fledgling church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which had only been founded ten years earlier began to grow as result of their missionary efforts. Samuel became acquainted with members of the church and became converted himself. He and Rebecca were baptized in January of 1840. He was very enthusiastic over his new found faith and spent the rest of his life an ardent Latter-day Saint. Samuel was a Free Mason before he became a member of the Church. By trade he was a blacksmith. Samuel went back to his old home in Tennessee to visit his family and tell them of the gospel of Christ. Early in the spring of 1841 Samuel went from Bear Creek, Illinois to visit his family, He converted his people and a number of the neighbors. A hole had to be cut in two feet of ice to baptize his parents and part of the rest of the family. Margaret was too young; Fereba was married and away; and Isabella never did join the church because of her husband's objections. As a result quite a community of people moved in a body to Nauvoo to be with the Saints. Samuel was ordained an elder in Nauvoo, November 20, 1841. But soon after he was ordained a Seventy and appointed Second President of the Eighth Quorum of Seventy. The journal history of the Church for March 10, 1842 mentions that his continued absence in the East made a vacancy in the presidents of that Quorum. At the time he was serving his first mission. A letter to the editor of the Times and Seasons from John D. Lee dated March 18, 1842 reporting on the progress of missionary efforts in Tennessee included mention of Elder Samuel Frost. “Elder Samuel Frost came to my assistance a few days after I arrived here and has been laboring diligently with me ever since to remove prejudice and erroneous notions that were imbibed [to take or receive into the mind] by many in consequence of false teachings; . . .” The letter goes on to say that Elders Frost and Linzey had baptized 22 people in Knox County. After returning from this mission, Samuel and Rebecca lived in Nauvoo. In the fall 1842 he went to visit his three married sisters and some friends from Tennessee who lived in Jefferson County, Iowa, about 80 miles from Nauvoo. On October 3, 1842 Samuel wrote the following letter from there to Rebecca and his daughters in Nauvoo: October the 3rd. 1842 Iowa, Jefferson Co. Dearly Beloved kind and affectionate Companion: It is with thanksgiving that I now embrace the opportunity of dropping a line of information and I hope that of consolation. I am in the enjoyment of good health & spirits for which I feel to thank the Lord, hoping these few lines may find you and those darling little babes enjoying the same blessings with all friends and connections & brethren. I have but one regret particularly; that is that I did not over rule Bro. Gordon so much as to hear what Bro. Joseph said the day we started. If you think it something that would be profitable to me, I want you (to) give it in your first letter to me. I cannot tell you yet where to write it. The connections are all well and express their desires to see all of you and Fereba says she thinks she & William will make a visit this fall. As for the others I heard nothing of any of them coming. The subject of Wileys coming would not be much in my estimation. Isabelle seems piously disposed as usual and altogether friendly and affectionate. Mother is dead and the balance of the family is kind. We have only preached 3 times by appointment, but have been busily engaged by the fireside in preaching to all who are & were willing to hear. We were friendly and kindly received and treated in general. One exception only where we stopped to get some dinner in the round prairie at Mr. Gillum's. We have preached at Mr. Bealer's 8 miles from Old Thomas Smith's. The next time at Wm. Barber's. On yesterday, which was Sunday, we preached on Skunk River at George Langley's. The particulars of which Harmon will tell you when he delivers the letters. We think the prospect of doing good is very flowering not-with-standing persecution rages in the hearts of people, or some of them, yet. We don't care anything about that. We know it (will) out such as won't stand, if they were in, therefore it rids us of the trouble that’s more lasting and more fatal than it's self. Under this consideration we are able to rejoice amidst all, such as we have ever met with yet. I want you to be faithfully engaged in the discharge of your duty and pray for me, always remembering my infirmities, and my want of divine aid in order to the discharge of my duty in the ministry, having left you in the hand of God and feeling that He is ever merciful to those who are under the oppression of any bereavement whatever. I therefore pray God the Eternal Father in the name of Jesus Christ His Son to keep you and preserve you from all harm and supply all your wants that you may be comfortably situated, counseled and consoled in my absence. I wish to write a few lines to the little girls. Mary: Father wants you to be obedient (to) your mother's instructions and not forget your book. You know that Father wants you should be as smart as any little girl in Nauvoo, and wants you to beat them all if you can. Mother must teach you to write so that when she writes me a letter you can write your name and age and send it to me. Now Sarah I want to talk to you some. I want your curly head to be engaged in trying to beat all the little girls in Nauvoo. I want Mother also to teach you to write that you may write to Father your name and age in mother's letter. Be a good little girl. Mind what mother tells you. Be kind to little sister that you may set her a good example. The same is intended for you, Mary. Rebecca I have good news for thee, and I want your prayers in behalf of the same. Fereba this morning proffered to believe in Mormonism, and Wm. said as much as to say the same last night to me. I can and do and will rejoice because of the blessings of God being and having been extended to us. I am glad I turned my course on my mission from East to North. Yea, I have reasons to thank the Lord for my prosperity in the ministry amongst those of my beloved friends according to the flesh. For this let the name of God be praised. S. B. Frost to Rebecca Frost and family. Write immediately to Fairfield and I think I shall be able to get it before we leave here. The Frosts were personally acquainted with Joseph and Emma Smith. When the Prophet came for a visit he sat the children on his lap. Although Samuel was five years younger than Joseph, he was never able to beat him in a wrestling match. No one could. Samuel and Rebecca's first son, William Anderson, was born in Nauvoo on May 16, 1843. After the loss of yet another baby, Joseph “borrowed” Baby William to take home to comfort Emma's empty arms. Sadly, William died on August 16, 1843 in Nauvoo. Samuel left for a mission to Kentucky on the 15th of April 1844. His call was published in Nauvoo on May 15th. His father and brothers-in-law cared for his family while he was away. He was in Kentucky when the Prophet was martyred on June 27, 1844. Nauvoo Exodous After returning to Nauvoo, their fifth child, Hettie, was born on November 13, 1845. By February of 1846, persecution became so intense that the Mormons were given no choice but to abandon their city and flee to Iowa. In preparation for the exodus, Samuel being a blacksmith helped get the wagons ready. After crossing the frozen Mississippi river, the saints made there way across Iowa and regrouped at Winter Quarters (which became known as Council Bluffs, Iowa) to prepare to go on to the Rocky Mountains the following year. When the Mormon Battalion was organized to go fight in the Mexican War he spent the night mending shoes for them. Rather going on to the Utah Territory with the main body of the Church, the Frosts and others settled in Freemont County, Iowa which is about sixty miles south of Council Bluffs. They lived at the Stephen Coopers Cut-Off on the Council Bluffs-St. Joseph stage coach road, the cut-off allowed travelers to descend from the bluffs down into the Missouri River bottoms and travel a more level road along the base of the bluffs. Samuel continued his trade as blacksmith but also was a successful farmer. He owned "fine stock horses" and was well enough off that he hired other men to work for him. At various times in his life he owned and successfully ran taverns. In those days, a tavern was a place for travelers to get a meal and rest for the night. His location on the main road between Council Bluffs and St. Joesph, Missouri would have been ideal for such an business. He held positions of prominence in Freemont County, including serving as a district judge. Jerome Adams was one of those who found work on the farm of Samuel Buchanan Frost in Fremont County, Iowa. The first time he went into the Frost home to eat, he saw sixteen-year-old Mary Angeline and decided he would one day marry her. At that time he was only about eighteen years of age, and when he finally asked her to marry him the family had been snowed in for a week. He just sat by the stove under her feet the whole week and hadn’t said a word. When he finally got up courage to propose, she decided she liked him well enough to marry him and was never sorry she told him “Yes.” When they went to get married in January, 1854, the judge questioned his age, and Jerome was not sure of his birth year. His future father-in-law who had gone with them pointed to Jerome’s full beard and told the judge that should be proof enough that he was an adult, so they were allowed to marry. Five more children were born while they lived in Iowa: Samuel Buchanan, Jr (29 Mar 1849), George Washington (4 Jul 1850), James McCaslin (27 Aug 1852), John Wesley (14 Jul 1856), and Clay Annie (27 Sep 1857). Of these, George died on October 2, 1851, John only lived a short while and died in 1856, and Annie died the day she was born. For two weeks after Annie was born, Rebecca suffered from complications with the birth. While she lay ill the family dog seemed to sense that death was near and in spite of anything they could do, he kept howling mournfully. This troubled Rebecca, so Samuel, sad and worried, determined to quiet the dog, beat him until he died. Tragedy came to Samuel when Rebecca died at the age of 35 on October 9, 1857 leaving him with three young children to care for. Hettie, the oldest at 12 was able to help with the two little boys, Sam, Jr. age 8 and James age 5. The three older girls all lived in the area with their families as well. When the Civil War broke out Samuel brought his three married daughters, Mary, Sarah, and Nancy, their husbands and children, his three smaller children, Hettie, Samuel, Jr., and James, and his nephew Abram Barger with him to Utah. The wagon company started out on May 20, 1861 from the home of Samuel B. Frost in Pleasant Grove, some six miles south of Sidney. Among those who started from that place were William K. McKissick, who was captain of the company, with his family; Samuel Buchanan Frost and family, Jerome and Mary Frost Adams and family, Valentine and Sarah Frost Acord and family, Abram and Nancy Frost Acord and family, James A. Allred and family, Josh Hill, Chauncy Paine, Henry Overaker, John Freeman, James Curry, Jonathan Tipton, William Murray, Dave Murray, Ashton D. Green, and others, making up a party of about twenty five men. The thirteen wagons in the company were drawn by ox teams. About 400 head of horses and cattle were driven along with the company. The company stopped at McKissick's Island, (On the Missouri River, southwest of Hamburg, Iowa) until June 5th, and during this time a child was born to Samuel's daughter, Nancy Frost Acord. Moving on, the party followed the old Mormon train across the plains and reached Salt Lake City August 20. Some of the company went on to California. The only accident of the entire journey was the slight injury to one of the men by the accidental discharge of his own gun. Many Indians were seen but all were friendly. Altogether the trip was a fortunate and enjoyable one. Samuel's family had arrived in Utah in previous years. His sisters Martha and Margaret came in 1848 with their families. His parents crossed the plains in 1856 with his sister Nancy and her family. After arriving in the Salt Lake Valley, Samuel lived with the family of his sister, Margaret Rawlins, until he could have a house built for himself in Draper. His married daughters and their families soon found homes in other communities. Samuel was the Justice of the Peace of the Draperville precinct during 1862, and that he was active in church work there. A painting of Esther Davis Frost later in life. Samuel hired a young English girl, Esther Davis, to keep house for his family, which she did with credit to herself. Esther, had been married as a second wife to Henry Woolcoat. But Esther was unhappy in this plural marriage so she took her young son, Albert James, and left to make her own way. After coming to work for Samuel, Albert, who was just over a year old, died on March 5, 1864. On April 17, 1864 in Draper, Samuel and Esther were married. He was 54 and she was 25. She was born April 24, 1839 in Pauntley, Gloucestershire, England. Her parents joined the church when she was a child. Esther came to America when she was about 18. After living in Boston for about three years, she crossed the plains to Utah in 1861 with Captain Horne's Company. Esther walked most of the way so that her sister, who was not well and had two small children, could take her turn riding. Soon after their marriage Samuel and Esther moved to Spring City, Sanpete County, Utah. There he farmed extensively, owned a fine home for the times, did carpenter work, blacksmithing and even shoe repair. He took an active part in Church affairs and community life. He was a Ward Teacher for many years and held every political position in the county. During the Black Hawk War in Southern Utah between 1866 and 1868 he was a Captain in the Territorial Militia and served his community fearlessly and well with advantage to them and credit to himself. People who knew him said he was a man without fear. Samuel and Esther's seven children were all born in Spring City; Stephen (1 Apr 1865), Chauncy ( 8 Oct 1866), Rebecca Penninia (26 Sep 1868), Adolph Lesseau (15 Aug 1870), Margaret Elzira (30 Sep 1872), Ivan Danzoff (9 Jan 1875), and Marion (12 May 1878) During this time James McCaslin died in September 1868 at the age of 16. Samuel and Esther were sealed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City on May 23, 1870. At the same time he was also sealed to Rebecca by proxy. Samuel was an intellectual man, cheerful in disposition, thoroughly democratic and always a friend to young people. All his life he loved music and singing and took an active part at parties and entertainments playing his "fiddle", and step dancing. He used the old violin made by his grandfather James Frost, and won by his father McCaslin for learning to use it first among James' seven sons. Samuel was a popular Fourth of July speaker and could deliver an inspiring oration. Having a touch of puritan blood in him Samuel detested puffs and frills on women's clothes. He said they looked like "pigs guts." He thought they called unnecessary attention to a woman's figure and that the Lord meant women to be plain. Samuel Buchanan Frost and his sisters, Martha, Nancy, and Margaret in 1886. In his old age he became extremely hard of hearing and gave his family perverse answers to their questions - - - they thought intentionally. He hated the wind and would say, "Blow, damn you! Don't I hate you! Blow in a mans ears and drive him crazy." On September, 15 1886 he met with a number of his sisters, children, grandchildren, and other relatives in the Logan Temple for ordinance work. At that time he was sealed to his parents and to his first four children. Like Daniel Boone, Samuel wanted elbow room and lots of fresh air and disliked living in town. So when a friend persuaded him to move south to Coyote (now Antimony) in Garfield County, he planned to do so, though he was 78 years old. In the early spring of 1888 he fell from a haystack and broke several ribs, which never healed and made him ill most of the time. Nevertheless, they moved to Coyote on the 12th of May. He lived little more than a month. Samuel Buchanan Frost died June 27th, 1888 at Coyote on the east fork of the Sevier River where he was buried in a most beautiful natural graveyard. There is a background of low hills covered with timber to the west; the hundred foot wide Sevier River lined with cottonwoods curves through the hills at their feet. An ever-increasing posterity lives after him to keep his example of sturdiness, faithfulness to a righteous cause living in their memories so long as his blood remains in the earth. This story was complied from a history by Ira L. Frost, accounts from Mary Angeline Frost Adams, and Nancy Frost Acord, and The Times and seasons. ________________________________________ "Every person should be diligently engaged in that which pertains to his occupation. And in this way he will gain confidence and meet the approbation of his friends and surrounding acquaintances and obtain wealth and honor." Samuel B. Frost. The following poem was written on the back of a letter to Rebecca. A composition of words I send, the feeling of my heart to children and that Bosom Friend with whom I had to part. The above as an introduction. Below that which is introduced. My Bosom Friend, and children too I wish to write and say to you Who on that lovely, happy land I had to give the parting hand. You know not what my feelings were Neither can I them all declare. To think upon that lovely band, Who gave to me the parting hand. Yet duty calls me to proclaim The gospel of Messiah’s name And this enables me to stand And give my friends the parting hand. May God draw near and cheer your hearts Whilst we are all so far apart, But still I think in distant lands of them To whom I gave the parting hand. These lines I write that you might see And whilst you read them think of me Till again in Nauvoo stand And give you all the meeting hand. Song Ballad of the Great Liberty Tree, by Samuel B. Frost In a chariot of light from the regions of day The Goddess of Liberty came. Ten thousand celestials directed her way. And hither conducted the dame. A fair budding branch from the Garden of love Where millions with millions agree She brought in her hand as a pledge of her love And the branch she named Liberty Tree. The celestial Exotic stuck it deep in the ground Like a native it flourished and bore The fame of its fruit drew the nations all around To out our peaceable shore. Unmindful of names or distinctions they came For free men like brothers agree. One spirit endowed, one spirit pursued. And their temple was Liberty Tree. Beneath this fair tree like the Patriarchs of old Our bread in contentment we did eat, Ne’er vexed with the troubles of silver and gold, The cares of the grand or the great With timber and tar we old England supplied Supported her power o’er the sea. Their battles we fought without gaining a cent To the honor of Liberty Tree. Hark! Hark! Hear ye swains, tis a tale most profane How all the tyrannical powers Kings, Commons and Lords United in vain to cut down this garden of ours! From the East to the West blow the trumpet to arms Through the land let the sound of it flee. Yea far–yea hear unite with the cheer In defense of our Liberty Tree. Ye American ladies excuse us awhile From doting your lovely charms The fatigues of the war and the soldier in toils We soon shall forget in your arms. Then let us arise, our foe to chastise Who repines at our living so free, The laurels we reap we lay at your feet And the soil that grew the Liberty Tree. ________________________________________ Mary Angeline Frost 16 Mar 1836 - 18 Mar 1919

Two Short Facts and a Quote

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

This quote was attributed to Samuel B. Frost: "Every person should be diligently engaged in that which pertains to their occupation. And in this way, they will gain confidence and meet the approbation of their friends and acquaintances and obtain wealth and honor." * According to a note written in a Daughters of the Utah Pioneers book of history, Samuel Buchanan Frost knew Joseph Smith as a young man and the two spent time together. Another entry stated that after the Black Hawk war, the government hired Samuel to do blacksmithing for the cavalry. He was also a carpenter, shoemaker and a judge.

Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

(1810-1888) Samuel Buchanan Frost was the son of McCaslin and Peninah Smith Frost. He was born on January 2, 1810 in Wake County North Carolina. Before Samuel was 6 his parents moved to Tennessee, new pioneering country, and the boy grew up knowing the weariness of toil and the joy of honest labor and the value of home grown entertainment. As a young man Samuel went to Illinois to secure work. On August 7, 1834 he married Rebecca Foreman in Illinois. They had 10 children. Peninah, his mother, died after the birth of her last child. Samuel became a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints sometime between 1838-1840. He converted the rest of his father’s family, (except for his sister Isabelle who was married to a minister of another faith) and a number of his neighbors, they all moved west to join their fellow saints. Samuel was a blacksmith and also engaged in successful farming in Iowa and later in Utah. He raised “fine Stock” horses and was financially able to hire other men to do his work for him. When the Civil War broke out, Samuel didn’t want to have anything to do with the conflict. He gathered his 3 married daughters and his three youngest children and his nephew and they all went to Utah with the William K. McKessack Company in 1861. Samuel was justice of the Peace of the Draperville Precinct. Samuel married Esther Davis on April 17, 1864. They had 7 children. He moved his family to Spring City, Utah. There he farmed, was a blacksmith, carpenter, and shoe repairman. He was a Captain of the Militia during the Black Hawk. It appears Samuel was a competitive man. Below is a portion of letter he wrote to his wife and children who were in Nauvoo while he was visiting friends and family in Iowa (It appears he was also teaching people the gospel): “… Mary: Father wants you to be obedient to your mother’s instructions not forget your book. You know father wants that you should be as smart as any little girl in Nauvoo and wants you to beat them all if you can… Now Sarah I want to talk to you some. I want your curly head to be engaged in trying to beat all the little girls in Nauvoo….” No pressure ☺ Samuel hated the wind and would say, “Blow, dog-gone you, don’t I hate you. Blow in a man’s ears and drive him crazy.” Having a touch of puritan blood in him Samuel detested puffs and frills on women’s clothes. He said they looked like “pigs cuts.” He thought they drew unnecessary attention to a woman’s figure and that the Lord meant women to be plain. Samuel wanted elbow room and lots of fresh air and disliked living in town. Samuel’s Quote “Every person should be diligently engaged in that which pertains to their occupation. And in this way they will gain confidence and meet the approbation of their friends and surrounding acquaintances and obtain wealth and honor.” Samuel was an intellectual man, cheerful in disposition, thoroughly democratic, and was always a friend to young people. He loved music and singing, and took an active part at parties and entertainments. He was a popular Fourth of July Speaker and could deliver an inspiring oration. At the age of 78 he moved to the town of Coyote (now Antimony), Utah. Although he had not quite recovered from breaking several ribs when he fell from a haystack. A month later on 27 June 1888 he passed away and was buried in Coyote.

Life timeline of Samuel B Frost

1810
Samuel B Frost was born on 2 Jan 1810
Samuel B Frost was 16 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Samuel B Frost was 22 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Samuel B Frost was 30 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Samuel B Frost was 50 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Samuel B Frost was 53 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Samuel B Frost was 70 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Samuel B Frost died on 27 Jun 1888 at the age of 78
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Samuel B Frost (2 Jan 1810 - 27 Jun 1888), BillionGraves Record 4091028 Antimony, Garfield, Utah, United States

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