Ruel Barrus

11 Aug 1821 - 10 Feb 1918

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Ruel Barrus

11 Aug 1821 - 10 Feb 1918
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Ruel Barrus was born August 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautauqua County, New York. He was the youngest son and eighth child of a family of ten children (five sons and five daughters) born to Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. He came from an old American family. His mother, Betsy Stebbins, was born Ma

Life Information

Ruel Barrus

Born:
Died:

Grantsville City Cemetery

N West St
Grantsville, Tooele, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

RUEL BARRUS
UTAH
2LT MORMON BN VOLS
MEXICAN WAR MOTHER
ELLEN MARTIN BARRUS Very dim/blurry photo will do my best 2nd Leut Co. B. McR?ion Bat
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Shirley

May 6, 2013
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Fran

May 1, 2013
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imtsmith98

July 16, 2020
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LiamBirch

April 27, 2013

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HISTORY OF RUEL BARRUS 1821-1918

Contributor: Fran Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

Ruel Barrus was born August 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautauqua County, New York. He was the youngest son and eighth child of a family of ten children (five sons and five daughters) born to Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. He came from an old American family. His mother, Betsy Stebbins, was born March 17, 1787 at Monson, Hampden County, Vermont to Hesadiah Stebbins and Betsy Sessions Babcock. She was deserted by her first husband (unknown) before their first child was born. She obtained permission of the court to name her son, born March 29, 1805, Abdiel Hesadiah Stebbins. Ruel's father, Benjamin Barrus was born April 4, 1784 at Richmond, Cheshire County, New York; He was the son of Michael Barrus and Elizabeth Simmonds. Benjamin fought in the War of 1812-2.815 -and was wounded in the battle at the burning of Buffalo. He died February 2, 1864 in Silver Creek, Chautauqua County, New York. Ruel's ancestors on both sides fought in the Revolutionary War. His paternal grandfather, Michael Barrus, born July 2, 1751 in Cumberland Hill, Cumberland County, Rhode Island fought in the American Revolution as a Sergeant in Captain Capron's Company, Colonel Samuel Ashley's Regiment, New Hampshire Militia. His maternal grandfather, Hezadiah Stebbins born October 25, 1754 at Brimfield, Massachusetts, served in the American Revolution as Private in Captain Joseph Thompson's Company, Colonel- Timothy Danielson's Regiment, taking part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. Ruel's father, Benjamin Barrus and his mother Betsy Stebbins were married sometime in 1807. Ruel's mother died August 5, 1828 leaving a family of eleven children. Shortly after this, possibly in 1830 Benjamin married Anna Webb; the date of the marriage is unknown. She was born in 1783 in Connecticut. Anna Webb faithfully took care of the children until her death February 26, l86l. She was buried in the Doty Cemetery in Silver Creek, New York. She never had children of her own. Ruel was not quite seven years old when his mother died. He grew up and obtained his education in his native town of Villanova, learning there the Carpentering trade. At the age of nineteen he became interested in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. At this time he left his home in New York State and went to live for two years with his brother, Alexander, who was living in Pennsylvania. Alexander was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church and had developed an unfriendly feeling toward the Mormon Church, so Ruel moved again. In 1844 he went to stay with his older brother, Emery, who at this time was living in Nauvoo, Illinois, he having become a member of the Mormon Church. In October of l844 Ruel was baptized by Richard Sheldon and in October of 1845 he was ordained a Seventy in the Nauvoo Temple. Ruel and Emery were the only two members of the family to join the Church. They remained at Nauvoo until the Saints were driven from there in the uprising against the Mormons by the mobs of Illinois. While, the Saints were on the plains of Iowa and Nebraska, a call came from President James K. Polk of the United States for a Battalion of 500 men to be enlisted from the Mormon ranks to serve in the Mexican War. Ruel was among the first to respond to this call and enlisted in Company B with the rank of Second Lieutenant on July 16, 1846 at Council Bluffs, Iowa. At this time -Ruel had a team and wagon and 50O pounds of flour for which he had been offered $500 but instead of selling it, he gave it to the company with which he had been traveling. The Battalion left Council Bluffs, Iowa for Fort Leavenworth, Kansas on July 20, 1846. That 200 mile march was a severe ten day trial period through a country that had no roads or bridges. The route generally was along the steaming Missouri River. Swarms of mosquitoes, both day and night, miles of mud and violent nocturnal rainstorms greeted them. The none-descript-looking group had left everything they could spare behind. The men during this time had no tents or shelter of any kind as they were not outfitted until they reached Fort Leavenworth. Malaria became widespread and their beloved non-Mormon Commander, James Allen, died of malaria at Fort Leavenworth where they arrived August 1, 1846. At Fort Leavenworth they received infantry equipment and each man was paid a "uniform allowance" of $42.00. Instead of buying army uniforms, many of the men sent most of this money back to Winter Quarters and wore their rough frontier clothing. They left for the coast on August 12th and was commanded by Lt. A. J. Smith. His overpowering desire was to get them to Santa Fe as rapidly as possible and he led them hard and fast those nine hundred miles down the Santa Fe Trail. The major problem was the heat, rapid pace, sickness and a malevolent doctor who administered calomel (mercury) and arsenic for every disorder — with force if necessary. At Santa Fe Lt. Col. P. St. George Cooke took over as the permanent commander of the Battalion. The route from Santa Fe to the Pacific was for the greater part through unknown wilderness without road or trail. There were high odds against a successful journey of eleven hundred miles, short of rations through enemy territory taking 25 wagons and six cannon where no wagon train had ever rolled and led by guides who had never traversed the route. The Battalion arrived at San Diego, California January 29 1847 completing what is probably the longest march (2,000 miles) in the history of the world. The Lieutenant Colonel commanding, congratulated the Battalion on their safe arrival. "Nine-tenths of it has been through a wilderness where nothing but savages and wild beasts are found, or deserts where, from want of water, there is no living creature. There, with almost hopeless labor, we have dug deep wells which the future traveler will enjoy. Without a guide who has traversed them, we have ventured into trackless prairies where water was not found for several marches. With crowbar, pick and ax in hand, we have worked our way Over mountains which seemed to defy aught save the wide goat, and have hewed a chasm out of living rock more narrow than our wagons Thus marching half-naked and half-fed, and living upon wild animals, we have discovered and made a road of great ,value to our country. “ When the term of enlistment of one year was up the Battalion was discharged at Los Angeles July 16, 1847. A call was made for re-enlistment for one company for a period of six months, Ruel Barrus was as usual one of the first to respond to his country's call and on July 20, 1847 he again was mustered into service again receiving a commission of Second Lieutenant. This company differed from the original Battalion in one respect, uniforms. August 4th he was placed in command of a detachment and ordered to the Catholic Mission of San Luis Hey near San Diego to protect it from the Indians. He served two months overtime and was mustered out of service in March 1838. After his discharge he spent two years as a missionary in Northern California, part of the time with Elder Parley P. Pratt. Part of the time was spent in the Santa Clara Valley. He was working near Sutter's Mill when Wilford Hudson, who later settled in Grantsville, brought news of the discovery of gold at the mill. He remained in California for some time working on mining claims and came to Utah in 1847, settling in Grantsville where his brother Emery had preceded him. He was married to Ellen Martin August 10, 1859, who came to America with her parents from -England in 1851. She was born at Beeston, Bedfordshire, England December 24, 1842. Her father was Samuel Martin and her Mother, Priscilla Layton (a sister of Christopher Layton). Her Mother died in St. Louis, Missouri January 29, l852. Ruel Barrus and Ellen Martin were sealed in the Endowment House on March 17, 1865.Nine children were born to this union. The honor of being the first officer appointed in Grantsville goes to Ruel Barrus when he was given the commission of Major, in the Nauvoo Legion when it was organized in the Tooele Military District. Ruel was appointed commander of the Grantsville unit. He was known the rest of his life as Major Barrus. While living in Grantsville, Major Barrus engaged in the cattle and sheep raising business, he also followed farming to some extent and was a good farmer, In politics he was a staunch Democrat, but never gave much time to his party, as he devoted much of his time, other than that required for his business, to the Church in which he was always prominent. It was not until 1887 that he received a pension from the government of $8.00 per month. At one time he was a member of the City Council of Grantsville. Throughout his life he rendered his country and Church efficient service. He enjoyed the confidence and respect, not only from the heads of the Mormon Church but with all with whom he has been associated through many years of residence in Tooele County. He died Sunday February 10, 1918 at the home of his daughter Priscilla Barrus Shaffer at the age of ninety six and one-half. At his funeral the main (address was delivered by R. S. Collett, the special representative of Governor Simon Bamberger. Mr. Collett spoke feelingly of the splendid service Major Barrus rendered to this country as a member of the Mormon Battalion, and called attention to the fact that with his death the last officer of that organization passed away and that he was possibly the last officer of the entire Mexican War. Only one other member of the Battalion survived Major Barrus and that was Hurley Morsey of Vernal who at the time was 95 years of age. At the time of his death Major Barrus was the oldest resident of Grantsville and was probably the oldest person of Tooele County. Profuse floral offerings were received from the Daughters of Pioneers in Salt Lake.

Tina Rydalch Barrus

Contributor: Fran Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

TINA RYDALCH BARRUS By Agnes Barrus Clark Tina Rydalch, daughter of Richard Mitten Rydalch and Ellen Priscilla Barrus, was born 28 April, 1886 at Grantsville, Utah. She was born in a home that belonged to Mr. Judd at approximately 240 East Main Street. The home was later sold to Ed Roberts and then in the 1960’s it was torn down. She was reared by her grandparents Ellen Martin and Ruel Barrus. She called them Ma and Dad. They had a daughter, Essie Glee, who was just 11 months older than Tina. Ma was an excellent seamstress and sewed clothes for both of the girls and dressed them alike most of the time. When Essie was ten years old she and Monte were stricken with typhoid fever. Essie’s fever was so high they wrapped her in sheets soaked in ice water trying to cool her temperature. But she was not strong enough to survive the high fever and passed away on the 4th of July, 1895. Monte was older and stronger and he recovered from this illness. Tins received her education at the Grantsville Block School on East Main Street, and the Academy on West Main Street. Her teachers were Orlando Barrus, Edwin C. Dibble, Lillian Rowberry and Frank Hinkley. She completed the eight grade which was the highest class taught in Grantsville at that time. Mama told me that when she was ten years old, on Christmas eave she hid to surprise Santa Claus when he came with his presents. He was surprised, but she was sorry because he never came again. Tina was a beautiful girl as her pictures will testify. She was five feet two inches in height, and weighed 98 pounds when she was married. She had honey blond naturally curly hair, blue eyes, and retained her dainty ankles even in her late years. She was a fun loving person who enjoyed dancing. She loved to visit with people and made friends easily. She married Bert Barrus on the 5th of August, 1907, when she was 21 years old. They went by horse and buggy to Salt Lake City and were married in the old City and Count building by David A. Smith. William R. Judd and Percie Tanner from Grantsville were the witnesses. Another Grantsville couple, Tom McMichael and Alice Johnson were there and married at the same time. They stopped rested the horse in the old cave near Garfield on the way home. When mama and daddy returned to Grantsille a chivaree was held for them at the Shaffer home on East Main Street. Mama said she and daddy were hand-cuffed together so they couldn’t be kidnapped or separated as was customary in those days. Their first home was a two room adobe structure built on the corner of 307 East Main and Church street, just east of Uncle Marin and Aunt Lizzie Barrus’s home, on property belonging to the Barrus Brothers. When the Grantsville Ward was divided, the Church authorities selected that corner as the best location to build the new Second Ward chapel. The property was sold to the Church for $1500.00 and the check was made out to George Barrus. The corner stone of the new chapel was raised in 1915. Their first son Bert Verian, born 30 April, 1908, was 18 months old when Bert was called to serve a two year L.D.S. mission to the Southern States without purse or script (1909-1911) Tina hired out doing house work and also took in washing at this time to support herself and the baby. Tina lived with her mother who was a window with two children (Maggie and Milo Shaffer). They had chickens and sold eggs and had a vegetable garden and fruit trees. Grandma did sewing for hire and pierced and quilted many quilts for people. Grandma also received Mr. Shaffer’s government pension of $8.00. He was a veteran of the Civil War. Alma Ruel was born 4 Sep. 1912. Woodrow Chester was born 23 Aug 1914. A fourth son Henry was born 20 Oct. 1916.. His was a breech birth and he lived just a few hours. Mama said it took her a year to get her strength back after the loss of this baby. She was near death the day the baby was born and she often told of seeing Ma standing in the bedroom doorway as though waiting for the baby. Ellen Martin Barrus (Ma) had died 19 Aug. 1914, and mama was not permitted to go to her funeral as she was due to deliver her third baby at that time. She remembered this with great regret. Tina’s mother, Ellen Priscilla (Tillie) Barrus was sealed to her third husband, Zephaniah Shaffer. Two children were born to this couple, Maggie and Milo Barrus Shaffer. Tina was sealed to her mother and Mr. Shaffer on 7 Aug. 1976. (I was proxy for Ellen Priscilla, Saul was proxy for Mr. Shaffer, Eileen was proxy for Tina). Daddy was employed by Morton Salt Company at Burmester and he moved there with his young family. There was no school at Burmester and because of a lack of transportation, Verian stayed with Grandma Shaffer when the family moved to Burmester for employment. The old band wagon furnished Verian and the other students on the east end of town with a ride to school part of the time but usually he walked the long 2 ½ miles each way.

RUEL BARRUS

Contributor: Fran Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

RUEL BARRUS This biography of Ruel Barrus was printed in “The Grantsville Observer” June 1st 1923. Ruel Barrus was born August 11th 1821 at Villanova, Chautaqua County, New York, the youngest son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. His ancestors on both sides fought in the Revolutionary war, his grandfather Stebbins taking part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. His father also fought in the war of 1812 taking part in the action at the burning of the city of Buffalo New York, where he was wounded. His father died 1ne of February 1864 and his mother when he was 7 years old. He grew up in his native town learning the trade of a carpenter. At the age of 19 years he became a convert to Mormonism and moved to Pennsylvania where he took his residence with his brother Alexander who was a Methodist Episcopal minister in that state. He stayed with his brother about 2 years but he being unfriendly to the Mormons it was not a very pleasant life for Ruel. He then decided to move to Nauvoo where his brother emery resided he being the only other member of the family to join the church. He was ordained a Seventy in the Nauvoo Temple and became a member of the 4th Quorum. He remained to Nauvoo until the mob began to persecute the Saints when he with others moved west to Council Bluffs to prepare places for the people to move to. While here, President Polk of the United States on the 30th of January 1846 called upon the leaders of the Church for 4 or 5 companies of volunteers to serve for one year in the war with Mexico. Ruel Barrus was one of the first to enlist being mustered into the U.S. service July 16th 1846 and receiving a commission as a Second Lieutenant and assigned to company B of the Mormon Battalion. He was with the Battalion during the entire march to California. The Battalion left Council Bluffs July 20th 2846 for Fort Leavenworth Kansas reaching that point August 1st. This march of 200 miles was made in 10 days through a country which had no roads or bridges over the creeks and rivers, and without tents or shelter of any kind. They received their equipment and supplies at this point and on August 14th j1846 the Battalion left Fort Leavenworth for their now famous march to California, a march of infantry that has no parallel in the worlds history. They arrived at Santa Fe, New Mexico October 3rd halting there and recuperating for the final stage of the journey. Leaving Santa Fe on October 19th and crossing the great deserts of what is now New Mexico, Arizona. And California. The Battalion arrived at the San Diego January 29th j1847. They first saw the waters of the Pacific Ocean January 27th. Half the journey of 2000 miles was made through a wilderness and over trackless deserts on which of lack of water no living creature dwelt. The Battalion was discharged at Los Angeles July 16th 1847, he being mustered in again receiving a commission as a Second Lieutenant. August 4th we find him placed in command of a detachment and ordered to the Catholic Mission of San Luis Rey near San Diego to protect it from the Indians. We also find another order issued to him to proceed to the same place August 14th, 1847 for the same duty. He received his discharge March 14th, 1848 at San Diego California. After his discharge we find him in various parts of California. He spent two year as a missionary, part of the time with Elder Parley P. Pratt. One year he was in the Santa Clara valley and was at Los Angeles when gold was found at Sutter’s Mill. The balance of the time, until 1857, was spent in southern California as he came to Utah that same year. He located in Grantsille where his brother Emery had located that same years. He married Ellen Martin August 19th, 1859 at Grantsville, During trouble with Johnston’s Army we find him organizing a body of militia of which he was made Major being known the rest of his life as Major Barrus. He was a good farmer and a quite unassuming citizen and was once a member of the City Council of Grantsville. He passed away February 10th, 1918 aged 96 years and is buried in the Grantsville Cemetery. He is the father of nine children.

The Mormon Battalion

Contributor: Fran Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Mormon Battalion (Three of our ancestors were on the Mormon Battalion. Grandpa Edward Hunter is the father of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Uncle William Hyde is the brother of Rosel Hyde who is the father of Martha Ann Hyde Hunter who is the mother of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Uncle Ruel Barrus is the brother of Emery Barrus who is the father of Owen Henry Barrus who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew.) Mary Ann smoothed the jacket her husband wore and handed him the knapsack she had gathered full of food and other small items. There were tears in her eyes, but she knew that there was no other choice than to let him go. They had discussed their options several times, but in the end, they knew that he must follow the call from Pres. Brigham Young and join with the others who were joining the army. Some were calling it the Mormon Battalion, and so it was. Both Edward and Mary Ann Hunter had joined themselves with the Mormons before they were married. They had met each other in the fledgling town of Nauvoo, when it was little more than a swamp and the houses, if you had one, were little more than rude log cabins. Edward had come on his own to Nauvoo as a wide-eyed youth, writing letters back to his Uncle Edward Hunter about the potential he saw in the new community. Edward had been housed at the Whitesides home, and soon a relationship began between Edward and their lovely daughter, MaryAnn which had culminated in their marriage. Now they were the parents of a darling little girl whom they had named Sarah Ann. Edward and MaryAnn had enjoyed their life in Nauvoo, but there was rising resentment toward the Mormons, and soon Mob violence erupted. Their beloved Prophet Joseph Smith and his dear brother Hyrum had been murdered at Liberty Jail. After their deaths, the Saints had been persecuted until finally they had been forced to leave their beloved city and their Temple, which was only partially finished. Edward and MaryAnn were among the first to leave their comfortable home in Nauvoo. They had waited long enough to receive their endowments in the Temple on February 6, 1846 and then turned their backs on their beloved Nauvoo to enter the wilderness of Iowa. They had slogged through the mire of Iowa and finally joined with those gathering in Council Bluffs. Now they had begun to make plans to stay in Iowa until spring, building cabins or dugouts in the nearby bluffs. There were many of the Mormons on the trail in the wilds of Iowa, having been forced out of their homes in the beautiful city of Nauvoo the same as Edward and MaryAnn Hunter. Brigham Young had lead the beleaguered Saints west across the frozen Mississippi River to the mud of Iowa. It had been a hard spring as the Saints struggled through knee-deep mud across the Iowa trail. Late spring and early summer found the Saints scattered across parts of Illinois and much of Iowa. Brigham Young was making preparations as rapidly as possible to move the Saints West. With this preparation in mind he called Elder Jesse C. Little, who was serving a mission for the Church in New England, to go to Washington D.C. and ask the government for “any facilities for emigration to the Western coast which the they might offer.” Elder Little joined with Thomas L. Kane, son of John Kane, a prominent federal judge and political associate of President Polk. Together Little and Kane negotiated with government officials for contracts to build block houses and forts along the Oregon Trail. In 1845 the United States annexed Texas, thereby angering Mexico. There were skirmishes between the two countries and finally Congress declared war on Mexico on May 12th of 1846. The war with Mexico came precisely when the Latter-day Saints were petitioning Washington, for assistance in their move West. With Kane’s urging, Elder Little suggested in a letter to President Polk that although the Saints were loyal Americans, the government’s refusal to assist them could “compel us to be foreigners.” Polk did not want the Saints to join the British interests in the Oregon territory nor to antagonize the Missouri volunteers in the army of the West, so following conversations with Elder Little; he authorized the recruiting of five hundred Mormon volunteers. When the directive came down to Colonel Stephen W. Kearny at Fort Leavenworth, he was told to immediately enlist a Mormon Battalion. Kearny sent Captain James Allen to the Mormon encampments in southern Iowa to recruit volunteers. Brigham Young heard of Captain Allen’s intentions, and before his arrival in Council Bluffs, he met with Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards and discussed the matter. Realizing this was probably the result of Elder Little’s negotiations, they decided it was best to meet Captain Allen in the morning and raise the men wanted. The Brethren also recognized that the request for Mormon men provided an opportunity to earn desperately needed capital for the exodus and provided a reason for establishing temporary settlements on Indian lands. President Young spoke to the Saints and tried to clear their minds of prejudice against the federal government. Edward and MaryAnn Hunter were among those at Council Bluffs who listened with troubled hearts as he began to explain their position. He said “The question might be asked, is it prudent for us to enlist to defend our country? If we answer in the affirmative—all are ready to go. Suppose we were admitted to the Union as a State and the Government did not call on us, we would feel ourselves neglected. Let the ‘Mormons’ be the first men to set their feet on the soil of California. This is the best offer we have ever had from the government to benefit us. I propose that five hundred volunteers be mustered, and I will do my best to see all their families brought forward, so far as my influence can be extended and feed them when I have anything to eat myself.” When Brigham Young finished speaking, MaryAnn looked up into her husband’s eyes. There she saw the familiar determination to follow his leaders, and she knew that he would join this army. Brigham Young left the next day with Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards to cross back over the trail to Mount Pisgah and recruit more men. They sent letters back to those still in Nauvoo saying, “Now, brethren, is the time for action…This is the first time the government has stretched forth its arms to our assistance, and we receive their proffer with joy and thankfulness. We feel confident that the Battalion will have little or no fighting, and their pay will take their families to them. The Mormons will then be the older settlers and have a chance to choose the best locations.” Brigham Young gave speeches as they went, comforting the Saints in their decision with the promise that “The blessings we are looking forward to receive will be attained through sacrifice…We want to conform to the requisition made of us and we will do nothing else until we have accomplished this thing. If we want the privilege of going were we can worship God according to the dictates of our own conscience we must raise this Battalion.” Everywhere they went many able-bodied men signed up. When the call for volunteers in the Battalion came, Edward and MaryAnn discussed their situation. They knew they were in the middle of the prairie with no home, no income, and little provisions. It was a hard decision for Edward to leave his dear wife and little daughter alone for so long. What would happen in the meantime? Would she be able to stay in Council Bluffs? Could she find her way across the plains with others? There were so many questions and so few answers. It was their deep faith in the Lord and his newly restored church which had brought them this far in their quest to follow Him, and they now felt that if the Prophet of God was asking volunteers, they must obey. The Hyde family had also left their homes in Nauvoo in the early exodus. Rosel and William were brothers and joined their families along with their brother Charles. They had gathered their aging father and mother, and crossed Iowa, arriving in Council Bluffs on the 12th of July, just in time to hear of the enlistment activities for the Battalion. It was decided among the family that William would answer the call and Rosel would stay behind to take care of the families. William joined Company B, the same company which Edward Hunter had joined and took his place as second sergeant in that company. William kept a daily journal throughout the trek and entered these solemn words at the onset of the journey: “The thoughts of leaving my family at this critical time are indescribable. Far from the land which we had once called civilization, with no dwelling, save a wagon, with scorching midsummer sun to beat upon them, with the prospect of the cold December blasts finding them in the same place…After giving them my blessing, and resigning them into the hands of God, I left them and returned to the camp of the soldiers.” Before taking up the line of march, President Young, Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, John Taylor, Parley P. Pratt and Wilford Woodruff met with the officers on the banks of the river. William remembered their council: “There they gave us our last charge and blessing, with a firm promise that on condition of faithfulness on our part, our lives should be spared and our expedition result in great good, and our names be handed down in honorable remembrance to all generations. The officers were instructed to prove themselves father to the privates, and to remember their prayers and see that the name of Deity was revered…Many more instructions were given which were all calculated to encourage the officers to be faithful, and prove themselves true to their trust.” Another of interest to us on the trek was Ruel Barrus the brother of Emery Barrus. He was 20 years old and not married. He served as 2nd Lieutenant, also in Company B with Edward Hunter and William Hyde. The Church leaders promised that the families of the volunteers would be carefully provided for. He counseled the volunteers to be faithful soldiers, keep the commandments, and abide by the counsel of their leaders. He promised that if they conducted themselves properly, they would not have to fight. A farewell ball was held in honor of the Battalion on a cleared square along the Missouri River on the evening of Saturday, the 18th of July. The next morning there were many gathered to bid farewell to their departing loved ones as the army prepared to leave. MaryAnn held her husband as long as she felt she could, and then pulling herself away, lifted up their darling little daughter for a good-bye kiss from her father. She had determined to be strong, but it was so hard to let him go. Taking a deep breath, she forced a smile and, handing him the knapsack, bade Edward a fond farewell. With tears in their eyes and a prayer in their hearts, Edward turned and strode away, leaving his little family to the care of their Heavenly Father and the Saints. At noon on Tuesday, July 21st the Mormon Battalion began their historic march. Edward marched with the new soldiers two hundred miles down the East side of the Missouri River and then crossed over to Fort Leavenworth, arriving on the 1st of August 1846. Once there, Edward was happy to be outfitted with supplies, guns, and forty-two dollars per man as clothing money for the year. The paymaster at the fort was surprised when every man was able to sign his name on the payroll. Only a third of the volunteers he had paid previously could write. A portion of the money was collected by Parley P. Pratt and others sent by the Church. This was used to support the Battalion members’ families in Iowa and others. As Edward gave the bulk of his money to the Brethren, he thought of his little family on the plains of Iowa and said a little prayer for them. With a smile he knew that they were also praying for him. Edward soon learned that General Stephen W. Kearny’s regiment had already embarked in June toward Santa Fe to conquer New Mexico for the United States. The Mormon Battalion was to follow him and aid his operations if necessary. For two weeks the Battalion remained at Fort Leavenworth. Edward mopped his brow with his handkerchief, once used to hold the long gone vittles his wife had prepared for him as he was leaving her in Iowa. The weather was very hot, and many men suffered, particularly with fevers. Their commanding officer, Colonel Allen, became severely ill, and was not able to leave with them when they took up their march. Edward and the other members of the Battalion were very concerned for the welfare of their leader and many prayers ascended to heaven for his recovery. Captain Jefferson Hunt, the ranking Mormon officer, took temporary command of the Battalion. William Hyde was also down with the fever when the camp left, but he was able to rejoin his company several days later. Not too far outside of Fort Leavenworth William told of a storm that arose suddenly: “Before we had reached our place of encampment, we discovered a furious storm arising in the West, and we hastened to get all things in readiness. This was hardly done when the storm reached us. Out of upwards of one hundred tents, there were only 5 or 6 that were not blown down, and they were only kept standing by the strong arms of those inside. Three wagons were blown over, two of them heavy loaded baggage wagons and the other was a two horse carriage, the boxes and covers were badly damaged. The wagon covers were nearly all blown off and many of them torn in pieces. And thus were all exposed to the rain and hail which was blown with great fury. During the time that the storm lasted the very elements seemed at war.” About two weeks after leaving the Missouri River, Edward learned that Colonel Allen had died. This saddened the entire group because they had grown to admire this benevolent officer. The Mormon officers felt that Captain Hunt should continue as their leader and requested by letter that Pres. Polk appoint him to the position, but First Lieutenant A.J. Smith of the regular army was already en route to assume command. Edward and his comrades wondered what this new commander would be like. They felt a sense of foreboding as the time for the Colonel to arrive grew near. “The appointment of Smith, even before his character was known, caused a greater gloom throughout the command than the death of Colonel Allen had,” wrote the Battalion historian, Daniel Tyler. Lieutenant Smith set a rapid pace for the Battalion in their march to Santa Fe, hoping to overtake General Kearny before he left for California. Edward was young and strong, but even at this; the long days in the hot sun were a hardship. The strong pace wore heavily on the soldiers, and more especially on the wives and children who were allowed to travel with the Battalion. With the relentless push, the men had little rest, and often the weary fell behind, trudging into camp hours after the others. Worse than the fast travel was the ministration of the military doctor, George B. Sanderson of Missouri. He seemed to dislike the Mormons and forced the men to swallow calomel and arsenic for their ills from the same rusty spoon. The men referred to him as “mineral quack: and “Doctor Death.” William Hyde included a poem in his journal about the doctor: Our Doc., the wicked swearing fellow With calomel thought to make us mellow The boys his poison spurned to take Which made him act his father, snake! Because the sick had not obeyed He raved, and like a donkey brayed, My mind on him I’d like to free But as I’m placed I’ll let him be: Time will show his heart is rotten And sure his name will be forgotten. William L. McIntire, a good botanic physician, had been appointed assistant surgeon to the Battalion but was unable to administer to his afflicted friends in any way unless ordered by Dr. Sanderson, the Battalion surgeon. Edward felt like the others, that it was better not to report your illnesses if at all possible because the ailment may be better than the cure. On the 16th of September, at the last crossing of the Arkansas River (in present day Kansas), Lt. Smith sent Cap. Nelson Higgins and ten men to convey most of the soldiers’ families up the river to the Mexican village of Pueblo (in present day Colorado) for the winter. The men strongly protested this “division” of the Battalion because they had been promised that their families could accompany the army to California. Edward sympathized with those whose families were being sent away, for if MaryAnn were here, he was not so sure if he would have let her go. The decision proved to be wise, however, in light of the difficult trek that lay ahead. A month later at Santa Fe, a detachment of sick men and all but five of the remaining women were sent under the direction of Cap. James Brown to join the earlier group at Pueblo. On the 9th of October the weary soldiers dragged themselves into Santa Fe, the provincial capitol of New Mexico, which had some six thousand inhabitants. General Kearny had already left for California, leaving the city under the command of Col. Alexander Doniphan, a friend of the Saints from the Missouri days. Doniphan ordered a one-hundred gun salute in honor of the arrival of the Mormon Battalion. Edward enjoyed his association with Col. Alexander Doniphan whom he had known while in the Nauvoo Legion. They had much to talk about in the short time they could find to converse. In Santa Fe, Lieutenant Smith relinquished command to Lieutenant Col. Phillip St. George Cooke, whom the men came to respect as a fair but firm leader. The new commander had orders to blaze a wagon trail from Santa Fe to California. Veering South along the Rio Grande, the soldiers sometimes followed the Spanish or Mexican trails but generally cut new roads. Once again the march took its toll in sickness, and on November 10th, a third detachment of fifty-five worn and weakened men turned back toward Pueblo. Edward watched as the men stumbled along and wondered what more lay in store for them on this long march. Not only did lack of water and food plague the remaining 350 members of the Battalion, but the sandy trails were a constant challenge. Edward found that the soldiers were either pulling long ropes to help the teams get through the deep sand, or they were walking double file in front of the wagons to make firm trails for the wheels. Because the Battalion was blazing a new wagon trail to California, guides were sent out ahead of the main group to scout out the area and decide the way the group should go. On Nov. 20th near Cow Springs, the guides couldn’t find a trail westward. None of them had been on this route before. Cooke and the guides climbed to the top of a high mound and built a fire as a signal. A couple of Indians came in response to the smoke, and Cooke spoke with them about what lay in each direction. After talking with the Indians and his officers, Cooke decided to lead the Battalion south to Janos in Senora, Mexico. Levi Hancock and some of the other leaders of the men felt this was a bad decision to lead the Battalion towards enemy territory, so he and Father Pettegrew went from tent to tent asking the men to pray that Cooke would not lead them into Mexico. Edward also wondered how wise it would be to go looking for trouble, as it seemed they were doing. The next morning the camp was on the march due south when, after about two miles, Cooke stopped on a mound. He told the men that his orders from Kearny were to go to California and that was to the West. He had the bugler blow orders to turn westward and the Battalion turned its direction. The men were truly grateful and felt the hand of the Lord had been in the Colonel’s decision. That evening, Edward joined with the other men in a prayer of gratitude to the Lord for his help in the decision of the Commander. Ruel Barrus was somewhat of a hunter for the camp, and now that they had again come to some mountains, he and Captain Hunter obtained permission from Col. Cooke to go hunt. On Dec. 5th they were successful in killing two young bulls and bringing the stake back to camp sometime after dark. On the 7th he again went out, but this time they saw only older bulls whose meat was tough. They supposed the Indians had already selected the cows and calves as they were tender. About this time, Col. Cooke learned that Company B had a private wagon which carried the men’s equipment. Enraged, he ordered the men to each carry his own knapsacks and blankets. Edward and his comrades were already on cut rations, and this new order from the Colonel seamed very unrealistic, but this was the army, and there was no discussion. Near the San Pedro River, some wild bulls got in with the Battalion’s cattle and were killed by the guards. When the companies stopped at the San Pedro for water, other bulls, frightened at the smell of blood, charged into the soldiers. The rampaging bulls charged on and on causing great confusion and fear. Edward hurdled himself behind a wagon with a mighty beast headed toward him. The bulls charged men, mules, and wagons. Albert Smith was trapped between a bull’s horns. He was badly bruised and had three ribs torn from his back bones. One bull caught Amos Cox and gored his thigh before tossing him in the air. Levi Fifield had no wagon or tree for protection and threw himself flat on the ground when a bull charged him. The bull jumped over him, leaving the soldier frightened but unharmed. There was so much dust from the charging that it was difficult to see for a few minutes. When the dust cleared and the bulls had passed, three men were wounded, and three mules were gored to death. Several wagons were tipped over, and a couple were damaged from the stampede. Col. Cooke told a story of seeing “a coal black bull charge on Corporal Frost, of Company A.” Frost stood his ground while the animal rushed right on for one hundred yards. Col. Cooke was close by and believed the man in great danger to his life and called to him to run. Frost did not move but aimed his musket very deliberately and only fired when the beast was within ten paces. It fell headlong, almost at his feet. Cooke said Corporal Frost was “one of the bravest men he ever saw.” When things finally settled down, Edward climbed from behind the upturned wagon. The battle lasted only a few minutes, but ten to fifteen of the bulls were killed. The event was immortalized as the Battle of the Bulls, and was the only fight during the Battalion’s long journey. The Battalion passed without incident through Tucson, where a small Mexican garrison was stationed. Upon hearing that an army was coming, the garrison fled with most of the people, leaving behind only the aged and some children. Kearny had ordered the Battalion that they were to pass through the town and make no scene. As they marched through town, Edward noticed the worried expressions of the faces which peered at the army from behind walls and curtains. He knew they were scared to death, and he was grateful that the orders had been not to stop. The Battalion then rejoined Kearny’s route along the Gila River. Beyond the Colorado River lay over a hundred miles of trackless desert where water was obtained only by digging deep wells. There the Battalion encountered the heaviest sands, the hottest days, and the coldest nights. William Hyde told of the plight of no water saying: “Had no water through the day except a little that was fortified in two or three small mud holes. This was sipped down by the men as readily as if it had been the choicest of wine” The next day he wrote: “Had no water at this place of encampment only what we could get out of a mud hole by going three miles, but it was filthy in the extreme. We however mixed a little flour in some but the water was too thick with the mud that it would admit of but a small portion of the flour being added. We cooked some and ate it, but it was like eating clay.” In writing about this time on the Battalion march the Colonel said, “A great many of my men are wholly without shoes and use every expedient, such as rawhide moccasins and sandals, and even wrapping their feet in pieces of woolen and cotton cloth.” It had by now been three days without water while walking upwards of nineteen miles each day. Edward staggered along, wondering if he could make it the whole way. He thought of his little family so far away and pledged to himself, that if there were any way possible, he would struggle on for them. Finally after 70 miles across a barren desert, with little or no water, it was announced that ahead they had found a pond of water. The camp was given the privilege to make the best way they could to the place that they might quench their thirst. Edward hurried along as best he could, but he noticed other men who had given all they could and had collapsed on the sides of the trail. William said: “We traveled eight miles, and to our great joy we came up with the pilots, who were seated by a small pond of water. Here we laid ourselves upon the ground by the waters edge, and after drinking and resting and again drinking and resting and continuing this operation for a time, we succeeded in quenching our thirst.” As the men sat around at the pond, William commented that they looked as if they were “over ninety years old.” Edward and some of the other men were finally able to revive enough to take mules and canteens back to those who had fallen along the way. Colonel Cooke wrote, “The men arrived here, completely worn down; they staggered as they marched, as they did yesterday. Some of the men did not find strength to reach the camp before daylight this morning. I went through the companies this morning; they were eating their last four ounces of flour. I have remaining only five public wagons; there are three private property wagons.” Colonel Cooke was heard to say that he believed that any other company under like circumstances would have mutinied. He complimented the Battalion saying that notwithstanding they were worn down; they were ready to obey any orders that might be given. He further stated that had he known the situation of the desert they had just crossed, he would never have come into it. That evening, as the Colonel came to look over his troops he was again surprised at the spirit of these Battalion men in such a plight. He wrote of the camp that same evening, “The men, who this morning were prostrate, worn out, hungry, heartless, have recovered their spirits tonight, and are singing and playing the fiddle.” Edward saw the surprise in his Colonel’s eyes, but then he had been with the Mormons for many years, and he knew that these men would find joy and renewed strength through their camaraderie and the singing of songs and hymns. On the 21st December a story is told by a private Henry Bigler, a 22-two-old single young man. He said, “I was detailed to be the Colonel’s orderly for the day. On going to his tent to report myself, I found him feeding his mule some of the wheat that he had brought from Tucson. There was another mule determined to share the Colonel’s mule’s wheat. He had driven it away several times. As soon as his back was turned the mule would march boldly up for another morsel of wheat, until the colonel could endure it no longer. Turning to me, he said, ‘Orderly, is your gun loaded?’ Being answered in the negative, he said, ‘Load your gun and I’ll shoot that mule; I knew the mule and it belonged to one of our own men. The thought came to me not to permit it to be killed. At this I took from my box a cartridge, clapped it in my mouth and with my teeth, tore off the bullet and put the ball in my pocket. I then put the powder into my musket and rammed the paper in on top of it. Pretty soon he came out and, standing broadside, fired. The moment he discovered the animal was not dead, he dropped the musket and with an oath said, “You did not load that gun right’ and walked into his tent. His bugler, Mr. Guigly, and others who saw the trick fairly split their sides with laughter.” Finally near the Gila River the Battalion was met by Pima Indians who came out by the hundreds, men, women, and children. Edward thought it interesting to see the Indian tribe. He had never seen a whole tribe before this day. The Chief seemed pleased to see the army. He said the Mexicans had been to see him. The Mexicans wanted him and his men to join them and give battle, promising the Indians all the spoils. The Chief told them his men should not fight. They had never shed the blood of a white man. For that reason, he was not afraid of the coming army, and he did not believe the Battalion would hurt them. He stated that he had no objections to them passing through his towns. The Colonel purchased from the Chief 100 bushels of corn to feed the teams. The Indians brought to camp large quantities of corn, beans, meal, and pumpkin to trade for clothes, buttons, beads, needles, and thread etc. Money they refused, saying it was of no use to them. The new provisions were used to make somewhat of a Christmas feast consisting of cold beans, pancakes, and pumpkin sauce. William Hyde remembered Christmas with his family and contrasted it to the “parched lips, scalded shoulders, weary limbs, blistered feet, worn out shoes, and ragged clothes” he was experiencing at this time. Edward’s dreams could not help but go back in time in the same reminiscent way to Christmas from a more gentle time. The Battalion continued across the desert only to find in their path the rugged heart of the coastal mountains. Edward looked in awe at the mountains. He had never seen such mountains with such height that seemed to defy anything but the wild goats he saw along the ridges. He knew that they would have to somehow cut a path for them and their wagons to cross over the foreboding mountains. Col. Cooke wrote, “I came to the canyon, and found it much worse than I had been led to expect (by the guides). There were many rocks to surmount, but the worst was the narrow pass. Setting the example myself, as there was much work done on it before the wagons came; the rock was hewn with axes to increase the opening. I thought it wide enough…but when a trial was made, at the first pass, it was found too narrow by a foot of solid rock. More work was done, and several trials made. The sun was now only an hour high, and it was about seven miles to the first water. I had a wagon taken to pieces, and carried through. Meanwhile, we still hewed and hammered at the mountain side; but the best road tools had been lost. The next wagon body was lifted through, and then the running gear, by lifting one side; The work on the pass was perseveringly continued, and the last two wagons were pulled through by the mules, with loads undisturbed.” Once through the mountain passes, it was on to Warner’s Ranch where the weary, hungry, and ill clad men were able to rest. William and a few of his friends were able to pool their recourses and buy a pig which they cooked “and in company with others had a feast that revived our spirits.” The company took up their march again on the 23rd of January and hiked eighteen miles over the hills from Warner’s Ranch. It rained several hours in the afternoon, again at night, and then continued raining for twenty-four hours. It was all Edward and his weary comrades could do to keep going. “The Battalion had fallen upon the rainy season. All the tents were blown down in the night,” wrote Col. Cooke. He continued, “The ill-clad Battalion was drenched and suffered much.” Another few days’ march brought them past the deserted Catholic Mission of San Loui Rey. “One mile below the mission,” recorded Tyler, the camp historian, “we ascended a bluff, here the long looked-for great Pacific Ocean appeared plain to our view, only about three miles distant. The joy, the cheer that filled our souls, none but worn-out pilgrims nearing a haven of rest can imagine. Prior to leaving Nauvoo, we had talked about and sung of the great ‘Pacific Sea,’ and we were now upon its very borders, and its beauty far exceeded our most sanguine expectations.” This is just how Edward felt as he finally gazed upon the great Pacific Ocean. They had been through so much. They were weary, nearly exhausted, but to look out upon the Ocean, and realize that they truly had done this great thing, was the medicine needed to bolster their spirits. Down the coast they marched southward to where they were to meet Gen. Kearny. Finally on January 29, 1847, they reached Mission San Diego at the end of their 2,030-mile march. Edward was humbled and grateful to the Lord for his tender mercies in bring the men all the way through their many trials and to the end of their journey. Just five days after they arrived, Col. Cooke gathered the men together and read a bulletin which he had written concerning their march. Edward and his comrades stood shoulder to shoulder deeply moved at the Colonel’s words as he said in part, “The Lieutenant-Colonel commanding congratulates the Battalion on their safe arrival on the shore of the Pacific Ocean, and the conclusion of their march of over two thousand miles. History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry…” The bulletin was received by the Mormon volunteers with hearty cheers. Since California was already in the hands of the United States, the Battalion men served as occupation troops with garrison duty in San Diego, San Luis Rey, and Los Angeles. While in Southern California, the Saints gained the respect of the local citizens. Those in San Diego built a courthouse and houses, burned brick, and dug wells, thus contributing significantly to the building of the community. On July 16th at the end of their year’s enlistment, the Battalion members were discharged, although eighty-one men chose to reenlist for an additional six months. Ruel Barrus was among those who re-enlisted. Most of the discharged men left for northern California, intending to travel east to join the Saints in the Salt Lake Valley or back at the Missouri River. Edward Hunter joined with a large group including William Hyde who traveled North to Sutter’s Fort just on the West side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Some of the brethren concluded to stop, as it was now getting late in the season. After a mature consideration, it was thought best for a portion of the company to tarry, as the wages were good, and they could labor until spring. Edward Hunter and William Hyde both opted to continue their journey which they did with others heading over the mountains, and on the 5th of September, they reached the valley on the East side of the Sierra Nevada mountains. This day they passed the spot where several emigrants from Missouri, the ill-fated Donner Party, had perished the previous winter. It was a solemn moment for Edward and the other as they saw the remnants of these poor people. Their bones were bleached upon the ground, having not received a burial. The next morning they met Samuel Brannan who had been through San Francisco to the Salt Lake Valley, where he had met with the Presidency of the Church, together with the pioneers and the first companies of the Saints to that place. He said that Captain Brown was on his way to meet the Battalion Members and was just two or so days behind him. Edward and the group waited for Captain James Brown and were soon met by him and a small escort, direct from Salt Lake City. He conveyed a message from Brigham Young asking those men without families to stay in California to work during the winter of 1847-48. Upon hearing the information, most of the men returned to the settlements in California to labor until spring. Many spent the winter at Sutter’s Fort on the Sacramento River and assisted in the discovery of gold in January 1848 that began the California gold rush. The following summer they honorably completed their contracts with Sutter, abandoned the gold fields, and joined their families either in Salt Lake City or at the Missouri River. However, William Hyde, Edward Hunter and several others determined to continue on to their families and started out again. They traveled Northeast through Nevada and up through Fort Hall in Idaho. Edward looked around him at the lush grass covered fields of Idaho and thought it would be a good place to raise sheep. Years later he would buy a farm in Idaho and do just that. The group then headed south around the Great Salt Lake and down into the Salt Lake Valley, arriving on the 12th of October. Edward was delighted and relieved to find that his dear wife, Mary Ann, and their little daughter, now a year older, were in the valley. She had come across the plains with Edward’s uncle Edward Hunter and his family. It was a heartwarming reunion for all of them and a sweet close to the heroic journey of which Edward Hunter had been a part. MaryAnn had not dared to hope that Edward would travel to Utah that season. She had heard that many of the men were planning to stay for the winter in California, so it was a great delight to see Edward in the first group of returning Battalion Members. She brushed back his hair which was longer than usual and gazed up into his well tanned face, rugged and weather beaten. It was so good to have him back. Now they would begin a new life together in this new land they would call Zion. Though very late in the season, William Hyde felt driven to continue his journey over the Rockies and across the plains to Winter Quarters. He joined with 16 other men who started out two days later. They reached Fort Bridger before the snow fell, but camped on the Sweetwater on October 25th and at Independence Rock on the 29th. They were able to kill buffalo along the way for their meat, but it was cold and windy. By November 7th William recorded “The weather about as cold as I ever witnessed. Had to run behind our mules with ropes wrapped around us to keep from freezing.” They reached Fort Laramie and were very hospitably received and entertained. They were given a substantial supper and breakfast, and feed for their mules for which they did not have to pay. But the next morning they were on their way again. They had trouble trying to cross the river at Loup Fork. William crossed on foot to try the depth of the water. He had to swim the last part of the distance, despite the chunks of ice and cold. One of their animals was mired in the quicksand and died. They were able to cook and eat the meat as their provisions had entirely failed. They continued their journey but were becoming weaker and more susceptible to the freezing cold all the time. On the morning of November 10th, they all united in calling on the Lord to regard their situation in mercy and send food in some way that they might not perish. As they continued their journey, they found that the Lord had indeed heard their prayers, for a group of wild turkeys began to pass their camp in droves. They succeeded in getting four of the birds which was one to every four persons. Rejuvenated from the turkey meat, the emaciated men continued their journey. On the evening of the very next day, they arrived at Winter Quarters to a wonderful reception from the Saints. They were the first 16 souls to return from the Battalion after their discharge in California. The very next day, William Hyde was able to cross the Missouri River and ride to Council Point, a distance of twelve miles, where he found his family and his father’s family well. William told of his arrival in this way. “I reached home on Sunday, and as it was dusk when I arrived, the people of the little burgh had gathered for worship. The news of my arrival soon reached their place of gathering, which proved the breaking up of their meeting. All were so anxious to see me, that without ceremony they flocked out of the meeting house and gathered into my humble but happy cot which had been built by my father and brother for the benefit of my family in my absence. This was a joyful meeting.” The Mormon Battalion truly was a great endeavor and in the words of Col. Cooke, “History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry…” Edward Hunter is the father of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. William Hyde is the brother of Rosel Hyde who is the father of Martha Ann Hyde Hunter who is the mother of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Ruel Barrus is the brother of Emery Barrus who is the father of Owen Henry Barrus who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. This story was adapted from the following accounts: Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 315-326. Treasures of Pioneer History, Compiled by Kate B. Carter, 409-429 (DFH/M73-84). The Mormon Battalion, U.S. Army of the West 1846-1848, by Norma Baldwin Rickets. The Mormon Battalion, by B.H. Roberts. Five Hundred Wagons Stood Still, Mormon Battalion Wives; “Mary Ann Whitesides Hunter,” by Shirley N. Maynes, 283, (DFH/Hu21). The Private Journal of William Hyde, Part 2, (DFH/Hy43-69). Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

EMERY BARRUS

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(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) EMERY BARRUS, (son of Benjamin Barrus, born April 4, 1784, Richmand, N.H., died 1864. Chautauque, N.Y. and Betsy Stebbins, born March 21, 1787, in Massachusetts, died July 20, 1828 in New York). He was born April 8, 1809. Chautauque County, New York. Came to Utah October 9, 1853, Appleton Harmon Company. Married Huldah Abigail Nickerson (daughter of Freeman Nickerson, born Feb. 19, 1779, Dennis, Mass. and died Jan. 22, 1847, Chariton Point, Iowa, while on his way to Utah, and Huldah Chapman born 1789 in Connecticut, came to Utah 1859, died 1860, Provo, Utah). She was born April 16, 1816 in Pennsylvania. Their children: Lydia b. Oct. 22, 134, m. Festus Sprague, April 1, 1857; Betsy N. b. March 28, 1836, m. Lovina Ann Steele, Sept. 29, 1861; Emery Freeman b. March 12, 1841, died; Mary Huldah b. April 8, 1843, m. Charles Bailey; Orrin Elezar b. Sept. 14, 1845, m. Catherine Wilson; Emery Alexander b. March 27, 1848. d. Nov, 16, 1858; Ruel Michael b. Nov. 14, 1850, m. Ida Pearl Hunter; Owen Henry b. Dec. 28, 1853, m. Olive Deseret McBride Feb. 18, 1877, m. Mary Ann Hunter Dec. 21, 1892; Sarah Abigail b. April 9, 1856, m. Eleazar Freeman Nickerson; John Nickerson b. June 1, 1858, m. Alice Burton; Eliza Alvira b. Sept. 15, 1860, m. Charles Post. Married Jane Zerildah Baker (Daughter of Benjamin Baker, Pioneer 1857). She was born November 3, 1841. Their children: Emiline Abigail b. Nov. 30, 1859 m. Henry Tanner; James Baker b. Aug. 7, 1852, m. Charlotte Ann Mathews; William Taylor b. June 1, 1864, m. Matilda McBride; Thomas b. July 20, 1866; and Freeman b. Oct. 12, 1869, died; Chauncey Baker b. Jan. 15, 1872; Catherina Rozena b. Feb. 24, 1877, m. Henry Watson. Family home, Grantsville, Utah. High Priest; patriarch. Carpenter; stock raiser; farmer, Seventy. Died Oct. 5, 1899.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BARRUS

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(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BARRUS (Son of Emery Barrus and Huldah Abigail Nickerson). Born May 30, 1838, in Cataraugus County, N.Y. Came to Utah 1853, driving a herd of cattle across the plains. Married Lovina Ann Steele Sept. 29, 1861 (daughter of Samuel Steele born July 15, 1822, Plattsburg, Clinton County, N.Y., pioneer, 1851 Joshua Grant Company and Elvira Salome Thayer, born Sept. 15, 1826 in New York.) She was born Sept. 29, 1844, in Illinois. Their children: Benjamin Franklin b. Aug. 22, 1862; Samuel Leonard b. Jan. 14, 1868, died; Orrin Orland b. May 29, 1870 m. Ulysses Cline, July 26, 1893; Albert Almond b. June 1, 1875, m. Margaret Alice Millward March 4, 1896, m. Mabel Robinson Jan. 8, 1902; Elvira Chloena b. Dec. 9, 1881, died; Sylvia Ellen b. Jan. 17, 1886, died; Calvin Cleone b. Jan. 24, 1887, d. Jan. 13, 1891.

RUEL BARRUS

Contributor: Fran Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) RUEL BARRUS (son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stubbins). Born Aug. 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautaqua County, New York. Came to Utah Oct. 15, 1854 with others of the Mormon Battalion. Married Ellen Martin, Aug. 10, 1859 (daughter of Samuel Martin, pioneer Sept. 25, 1855 Richard Ballantyne Company, and Priscilla Layton, who died in St. Louis), She was born Sept. 23, 1844. Their children: Ellen P. b. Feb. 12, 1861, m. Charles Schaeffer; Betsy A. b. Nov. 11, 1862; Zeltha A. b. March 28, 1864; Fannie I. b. June 11, 1866, m. William Sanford; Lona b. Aug. 12, 1870, m. Charles Nelson; Ruel M. b. April 20, 1873, m. Angeline Anderson; Darias M. b. April 20, 1876, m. Lizzie Ratcliffe; Royal L. b. June 27, 1879; Essie Glee b. March 13, 1885. Seventy, 2nd Lieutenant Company B, Mormon Battalion; Major in Echo Canyon Campaign.

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS

Contributor: Fran Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: History written by Benjamin F. Barrus, oldest son of Benjamin Barrus who was born before the family left New York State, Genealogical data by E. B. Warner; Sent to Central Company 1 April 1964 by Emily T. Cramer; History Submitted by May Clark Barrus) Emery Barrus, son of Benjamin and Betsy Stebbins was born 1 April 1809 at Hanover, Chautauqua Co., N.Y. and died 6 Oct. 1899 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In 1833 he was working as a farm hand for Freeman Nickerson and was keeping company with his daughter, Huldah Abigail. At this time the Prophet Joseph Smith and some other Elders visited that part of New York and made their home with Freeman Nickerson for a time. Thus it happened that Freeman Nickerson and his family, consisting of several sons and daughters, some married and some single, joined the Church in 1833 and Emery Barrus, hearing the Gospel at this time was also baptized. He was the only one of his father's family to be baptized into the Church in New York. On Dec. 19, 1833, Emery married Huldah Abigail Nickerson, daughter of Freenan Nickerson. In Nov. 1839, freeman Nickerson, together with his son, Moses, his son-in-law, Emery Barrus, his daughter Caroline Hubbard and their children (altogether 17 persons) started on their journey to Missouri and arrived at Nauvoo in the spring of 1840, bought city lots and built homes, planted orchards, etc, and lived in comparative peace until about 1844 when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother, Hyrum, were assassinated in the Carthage Jail. After that date the persecution became very severe; men were whipped, houses burned and crops destroyed until 1845 when the saints agreed to vacate their beautiful homes, leaving the orchards with their fruit trees just coming into bearing. Preparations were made for that never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery Barrus had a shingle mill on an Island in the Mississippi, where his wife would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for silngles. In 1845 they moved to the Island and Emery would go into the woods and cut the timber and his wife would help saw it into suitable lengths for the different parts of the wagon, then put it up over his head in the shop to season. He made 15 wagons right from the stumps of trees. After the Prophet was killed the mob saw that Mormonism was not dead and told the people if they would drop Mormonism they could remain in their homes. Many found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track until they could find an easier way to worship God. Freeman Nickerson and his family, including Emery Barrus and family, who left New York in 1839, left Nauvoo in August, seven years later, crossed the Mississippi River and again took up the line to March. They wintered at Sheridan Point, Iowa in 1846 and 1847, their stock living on the buds and limbs of small trees felled for that purpose. They built log homes and covered them with split boards. On Jan. 22, 1847. Freeman Nickerson and his wife made the rest of the journey with her son, Levi, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1850. In the spring of 1847 they again took up the line of march westward, arriving in Winter Quarters to late to accompany the pioneers on their journey to the Salt Lake Valley. So Emery Barrus and his family again built a house and fenced a farm on which he planted and harvested considerable produce. Here they remained until the spring of 1853 when they again started on the westward journey. They traveled in Appleton Harmon's Company and Emery was appointed hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The cholera was in the wagon train in front of them and the one behind them and the captain advised that they eat as little meat as possible. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville in Oct. 1853. Their son, Owen, was born in Dec. 1853, two months after their arrival. By the spring of 1854 the inhabitants of Grantsville had become quite numerous. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in early days. They had to herd their stock on the range in the daytime and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. In those days there were no carding machines. Davenport and Wilson each had a flock of sheep. The home of mother Barrus was a regular manufacturing plant. Huldah Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls in yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. After there was a carding machine in Provo, Huldah Barrus would take the wool to Provo, driving a pair of colts they had brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of butter and cheese. Emery bought 46 head of loose stock, besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons across the plains. Not a fruit tree or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1853. Brother Sceva, John Clark and James McBride were the first to plant fruit trees. Emery Barrus made the first barns in Grantsville and some good houses. In 1855 the grasshoppers became so thick that they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. 1856 was the year of the famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour. They were without flour for months, living on segos, thistles, roots, etc. Brother John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856 and Brother William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, thrashed it with flails and cleaned it up in the wind. Each family got one half bushel of grain and ground it in coffee mills to make cake for the 4th of July dinner in 1856. This one half bushel of grain was a gift from John Cooley. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and milled and each family got a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery Barrus furnished a fat animal for beef so each family had a flour cake and a beef steak for dinner on July 24th 1856. In 1857 they heard that Johnson's Army was coming to civilize the Mormons. Every able-bodied man and boy was expected to go to Echo Canyon to hedge up the way for the Army. 1858 was the move south. It was decided to burn every building, destroy every tree and growing crops, provided the army persisted in coming in. But they did not come in until a treaty of peace was signed. Every family had the Grantsville precinct except a few faithful brethren. They were left to water the crops with orders to burn if molested by the Army. Emery Barrus was the first Mayor of Grantsville City and attended to surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charley Herman. He was a faithful worker in the temple and only came home two weeks before his death at the age of 90 years. He was ordained a patriarch in Grantsville. Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus was the first president of the Grantsville Ward Relief Society. By his first wife, Huldah Abigail Nicerson, he had the following children: Lydia, Betsy and Benjamin Franklin, all born in Hanover, N.Y,, Emery Freeman, Mary Huldah and Orrin Eleazer, born at Nauvoo, Ill., Emery Alexander and Ruel Michael born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, Owen Henry, Sarah Abigain, John Nickerson and Eliza Elvira born at Grantsville, Utah. Emery Barrus married April 5, 1857 at Grantsville Jane Ziralda Baker, daughter of Benjamin Baker and Abigail Taylor. She was born 3 Nov. 1841 at Adams, Ill., died 26 March 1895. To them were born the following children: Emiline Abigail, James Benjamin, William Taylor, Thomas Baker, Chauncy Baker and Catherine Rosina.

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS (Written by Esther Warner, Granddaughter)

Contributor: Fran Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Written by Esther Warner, Granddaughter; Myrtle Allsop, County Historian; Alice Knowlton,Camp Historian) (Made available from the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers) Emery Barrus, son of Benjamln (5), Michael (4), Ebenezer (3), Ebenezer (2), John (1), and Betsy Stebbins (7), Hesadiah (6), Abner (5), Thomas (4), Samuel (l), Thomas (2), and Rowland (1), was born Apr. 8, 1809 at Hanover, Chautauqua Co., N.Y. and died Oct. 6, 1899 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In 1833 he was working as a farm hand for Freeman Nickerson and was keeping company with his daughter Huldah Abigail. At this same time, the Prophet Joseph Smith and some other Elders, visited that part of New York and made their home with Freeman Nickerson for a time. Thus it happened Freeman Nickerson and his family, consisting of several sons and daughters, some married and some single, joined the church in 1833 and Emery Barrus hearing the gospel at this time was also baptized. He was the only one of his father's family to be baptized into the Church in New York, Major Ruel Barrus being only eleven years old at that time and subject to his father until he came of age, when he left his father's home and came to Nauvoo and joined the church and made his home with Emery. On Dec. 19, 1833 Emery married Huldah Abagail Nickerson, daughter of Freeman (6), Eleazer (5), Eleazer (4), John (3), and Nicholas (2), William (1) and Huldah Chapman (3), Eliphalet (2), Moses (1) born Apr. 11, 1816 at Springville, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania; died Aug. 22, 1872 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In Nov. 1839, Freeman Nickerson, together with his son Moses, his son-in-law Emery Barrus, his daughter Caroline Hubbard and their children (altogether 17 persons) started on their journey to Missouri, but the Ohio River being closed with ice they wintered at Jefferson City, Missouri and arrived at Nauvoo in the spring of 1840 ; bought city lots and built homes, planted orchards etc., and lived in comparative peace, until about 1844 when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were assasinated in Carthage Jail. After that date the persecution became very severe; men were whipped, houses burned and crops destroyed until 1845 when the Saints agreed to vacate their beautiful homes, leaving the orchards with their fruit trees just coming into bearing. Preparations were made for that never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery Barrus had a shingle mill on an Island in the Mississippi, where his wife would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for shingles. In 1845 they moved to the Island and Emery would go into the woods and get the timber and his wife would help saw it into suitable lengths for the different parts of the wagon, then put it up over his head In the shop to season. He made 15 wagons right from the stumps of the trees. After the Prophet was killed the mob saw that Mormonism was not dead and told the people if they would drop Mormonism they could remain in their homes. If any found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track until they could find an easier way to worship God. Freeman Nickerson and his family, including Emery Barrus and family who left New York in 1839, left Nauvoo in August, seven years later; crossed the Mississippi River and again took up the line of march. They wintered at Sheridan Point, Iowa in 1846 and 1847, their stock living on the buds and limbs of small trees felled for that purpose€. They built log houses and covered them with split boards. On Jan. 22, 1847, Freeman Nickerson died and his wife made the rest of the journey with her son Levi, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1850. In the spring of 1847, they again took up the line of march westward, arriving at Winter Quarters too late to accompany the pioneers on their journey to Salt Lake Valley. So Emery Barrus and his family again built a house and fenced a farm on which he planted and harvested Considerable produce. There they remained until the spring of 1853, when they again started on the westward journey. They traveled In Appelton Harmon's company and Emery was appointed hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The cholera was in the wagon train in front of them and the one behind them and the captain advised that they eat as little meat as possible. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville in Oct. 1853. Their son Owen was born in Dec. 1853, two months after their arrival. By the spring of 1854 the inhabitants of Grantsville had become quite numerous. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in early days. They had to herd their stock on the range in the daytime and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. In those days there were no carding machines. Davenport and Wilson each had a flock of sheep. The home of mother Barrus was a regular manufacturing plant. Huldah Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. After there was a carding machine in Provo, Huldah Barrus would take the wool to Provo, driving a pair of colts they had brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of cheese and butter. Emery brought 46 head of loose stock, besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons across the plains. Not a fruit tree or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1851. Brother Sceva, John Clark and James McBride were the first to plant fruit trees. Emery Barrus made the first barns in Grantsville and some good houses. In 1855 the grasshoppers came so thick they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. In 1856 was the year of famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour. They were without bread for months, living on segoes, thistles, roots, etc. Brother John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856 and Brother William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, threshed it with flails and cleaned it up in the wind. Each family got one-half bushel of grain and ground it in coffee mills to make cake for the 4th of July dinner in 1856. This one-half bushel of grain was a gift from John W. Cooley. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and milled and each family got a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery Barrus furnished a fat animal for beef, so each family had a flour cake and a beef steak for dinner July 24th 1856. In 1857 they heard that Johnson's army was coming to civilize the Mormons. Every able-bodied man and boy was expected to go to Echo Canyon to hedge up the way of the army. 1858 was the move South. It was decided to burn every building, destroy every tree and growing crops, provided the army persisted in coming in. But they did not come in until a treaty of peace was signed. Every family had left the Grantsville precinct a free faithful brethren They were left to water the crops with orders to burn if molested by the army. Emery Barrus was the first mayor of Grantsville City and attended to surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charley Herman. He was a faithful worker in the Temple and only came home two weeks before his death at the age of 90 years. He was ordained a patriarch in Grantsville. Huldah Abigail Nickerson was the first president of the Relief Society of Grantsville Ward. By his first wife Huldah Abigail Nickerson he had the following children: Lydiaa, Betsy, and Benjamin Franklin, all born in Hanover, New York; Emery Freeman, Mary Huldah and Orvin Eleazer born at Nauvoo, Ill.; Emery Alexander and Ruel Michael born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska; Owen Henry, Sarah Abigail, John Nickerson and Eliza Elvira born at Grantsville Utah. Emery Barrus married Apr. 5, 1857 at Grantsville Jane Zerelda Baker, daughter of Benjamin Baker and Abigail Taylor. She was born Nov. 3, 1841 at Adams, Ill. died Mar. 26, 1895. To them were born the following children: Emellne Abigail, James Benjamin, William Taylor, Thomas Baker, Herman Baker, Chauncey Baker, and Catherlne Rozina all born at Grantsville, Utah.

HISTORY OF RUEL BARRUS 1821-1918

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Ruel Barrus was born August 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautauqua County, New York. He was the youngest son and eighth child of a family of ten children (five sons and five daughters) born to Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. He came from an old American family. His mother, Betsy Stebbins, was born March 17, 1787 at Monson, Hampden County, Vermont to Hesadiah Stebbins and Betsy Sessions Babcock. She was deserted by her first husband (unknown) before their first child was born. She obtained permission of the court to name her son, born March 29, 1805, Abdiel Hesadiah Stebbins. Ruel's father, Benjamin Barrus was born April 4, 1784 at Richmond, Cheshire County, New York; He was the son of Michael Barrus and Elizabeth Simmonds. Benjamin fought in the War of 1812-2.815 -and was wounded in the battle at the burning of Buffalo. He died February 2, 1864 in Silver Creek, Chautauqua County, New York. Ruel's ancestors on both sides fought in the Revolutionary War. His paternal grandfather, Michael Barrus, born July 2, 1751 in Cumberland Hill, Cumberland County, Rhode Island fought in the American Revolution as a Sergeant in Captain Capron's Company, Colonel Samuel Ashley's Regiment, New Hampshire Militia. His maternal grandfather, Hezadiah Stebbins born October 25, 1754 at Brimfield, Massachusetts, served in the American Revolution as Private in Captain Joseph Thompson's Company, Colonel- Timothy Danielson's Regiment, taking part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. Ruel's father, Benjamin Barrus and his mother Betsy Stebbins were married sometime in 1807. Ruel's mother died August 5, 1828 leaving a family of eleven children. Shortly after this, possibly in 1830 Benjamin married Anna Webb; the date of the marriage is unknown. She was born in 1783 in Connecticut. Anna Webb faithfully took care of the children until her death February 26, l86l. She was buried in the Doty Cemetery in Silver Creek, New York. She never had children of her own. Ruel was not quite seven years old when his mother died. He grew up and obtained his education in his native town of Villanova, learning there the Carpentering trade. At the age of nineteen he became interested in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. At this time he left his home in New York State and went to live for two years with his brother, Alexander, who was living in Pennsylvania. Alexander was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church and had developed an unfriendly feeling toward the Mormon Church, so Ruel moved again. In 1844 he went to stay with his older brother, Emery, who at this time was living in Nauvoo, Illinois, he having become a member of the Mormon Church. In October of l844 Ruel was baptized by Richard Sheldon and in October of 1845 he was ordained a Seventy in the Nauvoo Temple. Ruel and Emery were the only two members of the family to join the Church. They remained at Nauvoo until the Saints were driven from there in the uprising against the Mormons by the mobs of Illinois. While, the Saints were on the plains of Iowa and Nebraska, a call came from President James K. Polk of the United States for a Battalion of 500 men to be enlisted from the Mormon ranks to serve in the Mexican War. Ruel was among the first to respond to this call and enlisted in Company B with the rank of Second Lieutenant on July 16, 1846 at Council Bluffs, Iowa. At this time -Ruel had a team and wagon and 50O pounds of flour for which he had been offered $500 but instead of selling it, he gave it to the company with which he had been traveling. The Battalion left Council Bluffs, Iowa for Fort Leavenworth, Kansas on July 20, 1846. That 200 mile march was a severe ten day trial period through a country that had no roads or bridges. The route generally was along the steaming Missouri River. Swarms of mosquitoes, both day and night, miles of mud and violent nocturnal rainstorms greeted them. The none-descript-looking group had left everything they could spare behind. The men during this time had no tents or shelter of any kind as they were not outfitted until they reached Fort Leavenworth. Malaria became widespread and their beloved non-Mormon Commander, James Allen, died of malaria at Fort Leavenworth where they arrived August 1, 1846. At Fort Leavenworth they received infantry equipment and each man was paid a "uniform allowance" of $42.00. Instead of buying army uniforms, many of the men sent most of this money back to Winter Quarters and wore their rough frontier clothing. They left for the coast on August 12th and was commanded by Lt. A. J. Smith. His overpowering desire was to get them to Santa Fe as rapidly as possible and he led them hard and fast those nine hundred miles down the Santa Fe Trail. The major problem was the heat, rapid pace, sickness and a malevolent doctor who administered calomel (mercury) and arsenic for every disorder — with force if necessary. At Santa Fe Lt. Col. P. St. George Cooke took over as the permanent commander of the Battalion. The route from Santa Fe to the Pacific was for the greater part through unknown wilderness without road or trail. There were high odds against a successful journey of eleven hundred miles, short of rations through enemy territory taking 25 wagons and six cannon where no wagon train had ever rolled and led by guides who had never traversed the route. The Battalion arrived at San Diego, California January 29 1847 completing what is probably the longest march (2,000 miles) in the history of the world. The Lieutenant Colonel commanding, congratulated the Battalion on their safe arrival. "Nine-tenths of it has been through a wilderness where nothing but savages and wild beasts are found, or deserts where, from want of water, there is no living creature. There, with almost hopeless labor, we have dug deep wells which the future traveler will enjoy. Without a guide who has traversed them, we have ventured into trackless prairies where water was not found for several marches. With crowbar, pick and ax in hand, we have worked our way Over mountains which seemed to defy aught save the wide goat, and have hewed a chasm out of living rock more narrow than our wagons Thus marching half-naked and half-fed, and living upon wild animals, we have discovered and made a road of great ,value to our country. “ When the term of enlistment of one year was up the Battalion was discharged at Los Angeles July 16, 1847. A call was made for re-enlistment for one company for a period of six months, Ruel Barrus was as usual one of the first to respond to his country's call and on July 20, 1847 he again was mustered into service again receiving a commission of Second Lieutenant. This company differed from the original Battalion in one respect, uniforms. August 4th he was placed in command of a detachment and ordered to the Catholic Mission of San Luis Hey near San Diego to protect it from the Indians. He served two months overtime and was mustered out of service in March 1838. After his discharge he spent two years as a missionary in Northern California, part of the time with Elder Parley P. Pratt. Part of the time was spent in the Santa Clara Valley. He was working near Sutter's Mill when Wilford Hudson, who later settled in Grantsville, brought news of the discovery of gold at the mill. He remained in California for some time working on mining claims and came to Utah in 1847, settling in Grantsville where his brother Emery had preceded him. He was married to Ellen Martin August 10, 1859, who came to America with her parents from -England in 1851. She was born at Beeston, Bedfordshire, England December 24, 1842. Her father was Samuel Martin and her Mother, Priscilla Layton (a sister of Christopher Layton). Her Mother died in St. Louis, Missouri January 29, l852. Ruel Barrus and Ellen Martin were sealed in the Endowment House on March 17, 1865.Nine children were born to this union. The honor of being the first officer appointed in Grantsville goes to Ruel Barrus when he was given the commission of Major, in the Nauvoo Legion when it was organized in the Tooele Military District. Ruel was appointed commander of the Grantsville unit. He was known the rest of his life as Major Barrus. While living in Grantsville, Major Barrus engaged in the cattle and sheep raising business, he also followed farming to some extent and was a good farmer, In politics he was a staunch Democrat, but never gave much time to his party, as he devoted much of his time, other than that required for his business, to the Church in which he was always prominent. It was not until 1887 that he received a pension from the government of $8.00 per month. At one time he was a member of the City Council of Grantsville. Throughout his life he rendered his country and Church efficient service. He enjoyed the confidence and respect, not only from the heads of the Mormon Church but with all with whom he has been associated through many years of residence in Tooele County. He died Sunday February 10, 1918 at the home of his daughter Priscilla Barrus Shaffer at the age of ninety six and one-half. At his funeral the main (address was delivered by R. S. Collett, the special representative of Governor Simon Bamberger. Mr. Collett spoke feelingly of the splendid service Major Barrus rendered to this country as a member of the Mormon Battalion, and called attention to the fact that with his death the last officer of that organization passed away and that he was possibly the last officer of the entire Mexican War. Only one other member of the Battalion survived Major Barrus and that was Hurley Morsey of Vernal who at the time was 95 years of age. At the time of his death Major Barrus was the oldest resident of Grantsville and was probably the oldest person of Tooele County. Profuse floral offerings were received from the Daughters of Pioneers in Salt Lake.

Tina Rydalch Barrus

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

TINA RYDALCH BARRUS By Agnes Barrus Clark Tina Rydalch, daughter of Richard Mitten Rydalch and Ellen Priscilla Barrus, was born 28 April, 1886 at Grantsville, Utah. She was born in a home that belonged to Mr. Judd at approximately 240 East Main Street. The home was later sold to Ed Roberts and then in the 1960’s it was torn down. She was reared by her grandparents Ellen Martin and Ruel Barrus. She called them Ma and Dad. They had a daughter, Essie Glee, who was just 11 months older than Tina. Ma was an excellent seamstress and sewed clothes for both of the girls and dressed them alike most of the time. When Essie was ten years old she and Monte were stricken with typhoid fever. Essie’s fever was so high they wrapped her in sheets soaked in ice water trying to cool her temperature. But she was not strong enough to survive the high fever and passed away on the 4th of July, 1895. Monte was older and stronger and he recovered from this illness. Tins received her education at the Grantsville Block School on East Main Street, and the Academy on West Main Street. Her teachers were Orlando Barrus, Edwin C. Dibble, Lillian Rowberry and Frank Hinkley. She completed the eight grade which was the highest class taught in Grantsville at that time. Mama told me that when she was ten years old, on Christmas eave she hid to surprise Santa Claus when he came with his presents. He was surprised, but she was sorry because he never came again. Tina was a beautiful girl as her pictures will testify. She was five feet two inches in height, and weighed 98 pounds when she was married. She had honey blond naturally curly hair, blue eyes, and retained her dainty ankles even in her late years. She was a fun loving person who enjoyed dancing. She loved to visit with people and made friends easily. She married Bert Barrus on the 5th of August, 1907, when she was 21 years old. They went by horse and buggy to Salt Lake City and were married in the old City and Count building by David A. Smith. William R. Judd and Percie Tanner from Grantsville were the witnesses. Another Grantsville couple, Tom McMichael and Alice Johnson were there and married at the same time. They stopped rested the horse in the old cave near Garfield on the way home. When mama and daddy returned to Grantsille a chivaree was held for them at the Shaffer home on East Main Street. Mama said she and daddy were hand-cuffed together so they couldn’t be kidnapped or separated as was customary in those days. Their first home was a two room adobe structure built on the corner of 307 East Main and Church street, just east of Uncle Marin and Aunt Lizzie Barrus’s home, on property belonging to the Barrus Brothers. When the Grantsville Ward was divided, the Church authorities selected that corner as the best location to build the new Second Ward chapel. The property was sold to the Church for $1500.00 and the check was made out to George Barrus. The corner stone of the new chapel was raised in 1915. Their first son Bert Verian, born 30 April, 1908, was 18 months old when Bert was called to serve a two year L.D.S. mission to the Southern States without purse or script (1909-1911) Tina hired out doing house work and also took in washing at this time to support herself and the baby. Tina lived with her mother who was a window with two children (Maggie and Milo Shaffer). They had chickens and sold eggs and had a vegetable garden and fruit trees. Grandma did sewing for hire and pierced and quilted many quilts for people. Grandma also received Mr. Shaffer’s government pension of $8.00. He was a veteran of the Civil War. Alma Ruel was born 4 Sep. 1912. Woodrow Chester was born 23 Aug 1914. A fourth son Henry was born 20 Oct. 1916.. His was a breech birth and he lived just a few hours. Mama said it took her a year to get her strength back after the loss of this baby. She was near death the day the baby was born and she often told of seeing Ma standing in the bedroom doorway as though waiting for the baby. Ellen Martin Barrus (Ma) had died 19 Aug. 1914, and mama was not permitted to go to her funeral as she was due to deliver her third baby at that time. She remembered this with great regret. Tina’s mother, Ellen Priscilla (Tillie) Barrus was sealed to her third husband, Zephaniah Shaffer. Two children were born to this couple, Maggie and Milo Barrus Shaffer. Tina was sealed to her mother and Mr. Shaffer on 7 Aug. 1976. (I was proxy for Ellen Priscilla, Saul was proxy for Mr. Shaffer, Eileen was proxy for Tina). Daddy was employed by Morton Salt Company at Burmester and he moved there with his young family. There was no school at Burmester and because of a lack of transportation, Verian stayed with Grandma Shaffer when the family moved to Burmester for employment. The old band wagon furnished Verian and the other students on the east end of town with a ride to school part of the time but usually he walked the long 2 ½ miles each way.

RUEL BARRUS

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

RUEL BARRUS This biography of Ruel Barrus was printed in “The Grantsville Observer” June 1st 1923. Ruel Barrus was born August 11th 1821 at Villanova, Chautaqua County, New York, the youngest son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. His ancestors on both sides fought in the Revolutionary war, his grandfather Stebbins taking part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. His father also fought in the war of 1812 taking part in the action at the burning of the city of Buffalo New York, where he was wounded. His father died 1ne of February 1864 and his mother when he was 7 years old. He grew up in his native town learning the trade of a carpenter. At the age of 19 years he became a convert to Mormonism and moved to Pennsylvania where he took his residence with his brother Alexander who was a Methodist Episcopal minister in that state. He stayed with his brother about 2 years but he being unfriendly to the Mormons it was not a very pleasant life for Ruel. He then decided to move to Nauvoo where his brother emery resided he being the only other member of the family to join the church. He was ordained a Seventy in the Nauvoo Temple and became a member of the 4th Quorum. He remained to Nauvoo until the mob began to persecute the Saints when he with others moved west to Council Bluffs to prepare places for the people to move to. While here, President Polk of the United States on the 30th of January 1846 called upon the leaders of the Church for 4 or 5 companies of volunteers to serve for one year in the war with Mexico. Ruel Barrus was one of the first to enlist being mustered into the U.S. service July 16th 1846 and receiving a commission as a Second Lieutenant and assigned to company B of the Mormon Battalion. He was with the Battalion during the entire march to California. The Battalion left Council Bluffs July 20th 2846 for Fort Leavenworth Kansas reaching that point August 1st. This march of 200 miles was made in 10 days through a country which had no roads or bridges over the creeks and rivers, and without tents or shelter of any kind. They received their equipment and supplies at this point and on August 14th j1846 the Battalion left Fort Leavenworth for their now famous march to California, a march of infantry that has no parallel in the worlds history. They arrived at Santa Fe, New Mexico October 3rd halting there and recuperating for the final stage of the journey. Leaving Santa Fe on October 19th and crossing the great deserts of what is now New Mexico, Arizona. And California. The Battalion arrived at the San Diego January 29th j1847. They first saw the waters of the Pacific Ocean January 27th. Half the journey of 2000 miles was made through a wilderness and over trackless deserts on which of lack of water no living creature dwelt. The Battalion was discharged at Los Angeles July 16th 1847, he being mustered in again receiving a commission as a Second Lieutenant. August 4th we find him placed in command of a detachment and ordered to the Catholic Mission of San Luis Rey near San Diego to protect it from the Indians. We also find another order issued to him to proceed to the same place August 14th, 1847 for the same duty. He received his discharge March 14th, 1848 at San Diego California. After his discharge we find him in various parts of California. He spent two year as a missionary, part of the time with Elder Parley P. Pratt. One year he was in the Santa Clara valley and was at Los Angeles when gold was found at Sutter’s Mill. The balance of the time, until 1857, was spent in southern California as he came to Utah that same year. He located in Grantsille where his brother Emery had located that same years. He married Ellen Martin August 19th, 1859 at Grantsville, During trouble with Johnston’s Army we find him organizing a body of militia of which he was made Major being known the rest of his life as Major Barrus. He was a good farmer and a quite unassuming citizen and was once a member of the City Council of Grantsville. He passed away February 10th, 1918 aged 96 years and is buried in the Grantsville Cemetery. He is the father of nine children.

The Mormon Battalion

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The Mormon Battalion (Three of our ancestors were on the Mormon Battalion. Grandpa Edward Hunter is the father of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Uncle William Hyde is the brother of Rosel Hyde who is the father of Martha Ann Hyde Hunter who is the mother of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Uncle Ruel Barrus is the brother of Emery Barrus who is the father of Owen Henry Barrus who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew.) Mary Ann smoothed the jacket her husband wore and handed him the knapsack she had gathered full of food and other small items. There were tears in her eyes, but she knew that there was no other choice than to let him go. They had discussed their options several times, but in the end, they knew that he must follow the call from Pres. Brigham Young and join with the others who were joining the army. Some were calling it the Mormon Battalion, and so it was. Both Edward and Mary Ann Hunter had joined themselves with the Mormons before they were married. They had met each other in the fledgling town of Nauvoo, when it was little more than a swamp and the houses, if you had one, were little more than rude log cabins. Edward had come on his own to Nauvoo as a wide-eyed youth, writing letters back to his Uncle Edward Hunter about the potential he saw in the new community. Edward had been housed at the Whitesides home, and soon a relationship began between Edward and their lovely daughter, MaryAnn which had culminated in their marriage. Now they were the parents of a darling little girl whom they had named Sarah Ann. Edward and MaryAnn had enjoyed their life in Nauvoo, but there was rising resentment toward the Mormons, and soon Mob violence erupted. Their beloved Prophet Joseph Smith and his dear brother Hyrum had been murdered at Liberty Jail. After their deaths, the Saints had been persecuted until finally they had been forced to leave their beloved city and their Temple, which was only partially finished. Edward and MaryAnn were among the first to leave their comfortable home in Nauvoo. They had waited long enough to receive their endowments in the Temple on February 6, 1846 and then turned their backs on their beloved Nauvoo to enter the wilderness of Iowa. They had slogged through the mire of Iowa and finally joined with those gathering in Council Bluffs. Now they had begun to make plans to stay in Iowa until spring, building cabins or dugouts in the nearby bluffs. There were many of the Mormons on the trail in the wilds of Iowa, having been forced out of their homes in the beautiful city of Nauvoo the same as Edward and MaryAnn Hunter. Brigham Young had lead the beleaguered Saints west across the frozen Mississippi River to the mud of Iowa. It had been a hard spring as the Saints struggled through knee-deep mud across the Iowa trail. Late spring and early summer found the Saints scattered across parts of Illinois and much of Iowa. Brigham Young was making preparations as rapidly as possible to move the Saints West. With this preparation in mind he called Elder Jesse C. Little, who was serving a mission for the Church in New England, to go to Washington D.C. and ask the government for “any facilities for emigration to the Western coast which the they might offer.” Elder Little joined with Thomas L. Kane, son of John Kane, a prominent federal judge and political associate of President Polk. Together Little and Kane negotiated with government officials for contracts to build block houses and forts along the Oregon Trail. In 1845 the United States annexed Texas, thereby angering Mexico. There were skirmishes between the two countries and finally Congress declared war on Mexico on May 12th of 1846. The war with Mexico came precisely when the Latter-day Saints were petitioning Washington, for assistance in their move West. With Kane’s urging, Elder Little suggested in a letter to President Polk that although the Saints were loyal Americans, the government’s refusal to assist them could “compel us to be foreigners.” Polk did not want the Saints to join the British interests in the Oregon territory nor to antagonize the Missouri volunteers in the army of the West, so following conversations with Elder Little; he authorized the recruiting of five hundred Mormon volunteers. When the directive came down to Colonel Stephen W. Kearny at Fort Leavenworth, he was told to immediately enlist a Mormon Battalion. Kearny sent Captain James Allen to the Mormon encampments in southern Iowa to recruit volunteers. Brigham Young heard of Captain Allen’s intentions, and before his arrival in Council Bluffs, he met with Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards and discussed the matter. Realizing this was probably the result of Elder Little’s negotiations, they decided it was best to meet Captain Allen in the morning and raise the men wanted. The Brethren also recognized that the request for Mormon men provided an opportunity to earn desperately needed capital for the exodus and provided a reason for establishing temporary settlements on Indian lands. President Young spoke to the Saints and tried to clear their minds of prejudice against the federal government. Edward and MaryAnn Hunter were among those at Council Bluffs who listened with troubled hearts as he began to explain their position. He said “The question might be asked, is it prudent for us to enlist to defend our country? If we answer in the affirmative—all are ready to go. Suppose we were admitted to the Union as a State and the Government did not call on us, we would feel ourselves neglected. Let the ‘Mormons’ be the first men to set their feet on the soil of California. This is the best offer we have ever had from the government to benefit us. I propose that five hundred volunteers be mustered, and I will do my best to see all their families brought forward, so far as my influence can be extended and feed them when I have anything to eat myself.” When Brigham Young finished speaking, MaryAnn looked up into her husband’s eyes. There she saw the familiar determination to follow his leaders, and she knew that he would join this army. Brigham Young left the next day with Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards to cross back over the trail to Mount Pisgah and recruit more men. They sent letters back to those still in Nauvoo saying, “Now, brethren, is the time for action…This is the first time the government has stretched forth its arms to our assistance, and we receive their proffer with joy and thankfulness. We feel confident that the Battalion will have little or no fighting, and their pay will take their families to them. The Mormons will then be the older settlers and have a chance to choose the best locations.” Brigham Young gave speeches as they went, comforting the Saints in their decision with the promise that “The blessings we are looking forward to receive will be attained through sacrifice…We want to conform to the requisition made of us and we will do nothing else until we have accomplished this thing. If we want the privilege of going were we can worship God according to the dictates of our own conscience we must raise this Battalion.” Everywhere they went many able-bodied men signed up. When the call for volunteers in the Battalion came, Edward and MaryAnn discussed their situation. They knew they were in the middle of the prairie with no home, no income, and little provisions. It was a hard decision for Edward to leave his dear wife and little daughter alone for so long. What would happen in the meantime? Would she be able to stay in Council Bluffs? Could she find her way across the plains with others? There were so many questions and so few answers. It was their deep faith in the Lord and his newly restored church which had brought them this far in their quest to follow Him, and they now felt that if the Prophet of God was asking volunteers, they must obey. The Hyde family had also left their homes in Nauvoo in the early exodus. Rosel and William were brothers and joined their families along with their brother Charles. They had gathered their aging father and mother, and crossed Iowa, arriving in Council Bluffs on the 12th of July, just in time to hear of the enlistment activities for the Battalion. It was decided among the family that William would answer the call and Rosel would stay behind to take care of the families. William joined Company B, the same company which Edward Hunter had joined and took his place as second sergeant in that company. William kept a daily journal throughout the trek and entered these solemn words at the onset of the journey: “The thoughts of leaving my family at this critical time are indescribable. Far from the land which we had once called civilization, with no dwelling, save a wagon, with scorching midsummer sun to beat upon them, with the prospect of the cold December blasts finding them in the same place…After giving them my blessing, and resigning them into the hands of God, I left them and returned to the camp of the soldiers.” Before taking up the line of march, President Young, Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, John Taylor, Parley P. Pratt and Wilford Woodruff met with the officers on the banks of the river. William remembered their council: “There they gave us our last charge and blessing, with a firm promise that on condition of faithfulness on our part, our lives should be spared and our expedition result in great good, and our names be handed down in honorable remembrance to all generations. The officers were instructed to prove themselves father to the privates, and to remember their prayers and see that the name of Deity was revered…Many more instructions were given which were all calculated to encourage the officers to be faithful, and prove themselves true to their trust.” Another of interest to us on the trek was Ruel Barrus the brother of Emery Barrus. He was 20 years old and not married. He served as 2nd Lieutenant, also in Company B with Edward Hunter and William Hyde. The Church leaders promised that the families of the volunteers would be carefully provided for. He counseled the volunteers to be faithful soldiers, keep the commandments, and abide by the counsel of their leaders. He promised that if they conducted themselves properly, they would not have to fight. A farewell ball was held in honor of the Battalion on a cleared square along the Missouri River on the evening of Saturday, the 18th of July. The next morning there were many gathered to bid farewell to their departing loved ones as the army prepared to leave. MaryAnn held her husband as long as she felt she could, and then pulling herself away, lifted up their darling little daughter for a good-bye kiss from her father. She had determined to be strong, but it was so hard to let him go. Taking a deep breath, she forced a smile and, handing him the knapsack, bade Edward a fond farewell. With tears in their eyes and a prayer in their hearts, Edward turned and strode away, leaving his little family to the care of their Heavenly Father and the Saints. At noon on Tuesday, July 21st the Mormon Battalion began their historic march. Edward marched with the new soldiers two hundred miles down the East side of the Missouri River and then crossed over to Fort Leavenworth, arriving on the 1st of August 1846. Once there, Edward was happy to be outfitted with supplies, guns, and forty-two dollars per man as clothing money for the year. The paymaster at the fort was surprised when every man was able to sign his name on the payroll. Only a third of the volunteers he had paid previously could write. A portion of the money was collected by Parley P. Pratt and others sent by the Church. This was used to support the Battalion members’ families in Iowa and others. As Edward gave the bulk of his money to the Brethren, he thought of his little family on the plains of Iowa and said a little prayer for them. With a smile he knew that they were also praying for him. Edward soon learned that General Stephen W. Kearny’s regiment had already embarked in June toward Santa Fe to conquer New Mexico for the United States. The Mormon Battalion was to follow him and aid his operations if necessary. For two weeks the Battalion remained at Fort Leavenworth. Edward mopped his brow with his handkerchief, once used to hold the long gone vittles his wife had prepared for him as he was leaving her in Iowa. The weather was very hot, and many men suffered, particularly with fevers. Their commanding officer, Colonel Allen, became severely ill, and was not able to leave with them when they took up their march. Edward and the other members of the Battalion were very concerned for the welfare of their leader and many prayers ascended to heaven for his recovery. Captain Jefferson Hunt, the ranking Mormon officer, took temporary command of the Battalion. William Hyde was also down with the fever when the camp left, but he was able to rejoin his company several days later. Not too far outside of Fort Leavenworth William told of a storm that arose suddenly: “Before we had reached our place of encampment, we discovered a furious storm arising in the West, and we hastened to get all things in readiness. This was hardly done when the storm reached us. Out of upwards of one hundred tents, there were only 5 or 6 that were not blown down, and they were only kept standing by the strong arms of those inside. Three wagons were blown over, two of them heavy loaded baggage wagons and the other was a two horse carriage, the boxes and covers were badly damaged. The wagon covers were nearly all blown off and many of them torn in pieces. And thus were all exposed to the rain and hail which was blown with great fury. During the time that the storm lasted the very elements seemed at war.” About two weeks after leaving the Missouri River, Edward learned that Colonel Allen had died. This saddened the entire group because they had grown to admire this benevolent officer. The Mormon officers felt that Captain Hunt should continue as their leader and requested by letter that Pres. Polk appoint him to the position, but First Lieutenant A.J. Smith of the regular army was already en route to assume command. Edward and his comrades wondered what this new commander would be like. They felt a sense of foreboding as the time for the Colonel to arrive grew near. “The appointment of Smith, even before his character was known, caused a greater gloom throughout the command than the death of Colonel Allen had,” wrote the Battalion historian, Daniel Tyler. Lieutenant Smith set a rapid pace for the Battalion in their march to Santa Fe, hoping to overtake General Kearny before he left for California. Edward was young and strong, but even at this; the long days in the hot sun were a hardship. The strong pace wore heavily on the soldiers, and more especially on the wives and children who were allowed to travel with the Battalion. With the relentless push, the men had little rest, and often the weary fell behind, trudging into camp hours after the others. Worse than the fast travel was the ministration of the military doctor, George B. Sanderson of Missouri. He seemed to dislike the Mormons and forced the men to swallow calomel and arsenic for their ills from the same rusty spoon. The men referred to him as “mineral quack: and “Doctor Death.” William Hyde included a poem in his journal about the doctor: Our Doc., the wicked swearing fellow With calomel thought to make us mellow The boys his poison spurned to take Which made him act his father, snake! Because the sick had not obeyed He raved, and like a donkey brayed, My mind on him I’d like to free But as I’m placed I’ll let him be: Time will show his heart is rotten And sure his name will be forgotten. William L. McIntire, a good botanic physician, had been appointed assistant surgeon to the Battalion but was unable to administer to his afflicted friends in any way unless ordered by Dr. Sanderson, the Battalion surgeon. Edward felt like the others, that it was better not to report your illnesses if at all possible because the ailment may be better than the cure. On the 16th of September, at the last crossing of the Arkansas River (in present day Kansas), Lt. Smith sent Cap. Nelson Higgins and ten men to convey most of the soldiers’ families up the river to the Mexican village of Pueblo (in present day Colorado) for the winter. The men strongly protested this “division” of the Battalion because they had been promised that their families could accompany the army to California. Edward sympathized with those whose families were being sent away, for if MaryAnn were here, he was not so sure if he would have let her go. The decision proved to be wise, however, in light of the difficult trek that lay ahead. A month later at Santa Fe, a detachment of sick men and all but five of the remaining women were sent under the direction of Cap. James Brown to join the earlier group at Pueblo. On the 9th of October the weary soldiers dragged themselves into Santa Fe, the provincial capitol of New Mexico, which had some six thousand inhabitants. General Kearny had already left for California, leaving the city under the command of Col. Alexander Doniphan, a friend of the Saints from the Missouri days. Doniphan ordered a one-hundred gun salute in honor of the arrival of the Mormon Battalion. Edward enjoyed his association with Col. Alexander Doniphan whom he had known while in the Nauvoo Legion. They had much to talk about in the short time they could find to converse. In Santa Fe, Lieutenant Smith relinquished command to Lieutenant Col. Phillip St. George Cooke, whom the men came to respect as a fair but firm leader. The new commander had orders to blaze a wagon trail from Santa Fe to California. Veering South along the Rio Grande, the soldiers sometimes followed the Spanish or Mexican trails but generally cut new roads. Once again the march took its toll in sickness, and on November 10th, a third detachment of fifty-five worn and weakened men turned back toward Pueblo. Edward watched as the men stumbled along and wondered what more lay in store for them on this long march. Not only did lack of water and food plague the remaining 350 members of the Battalion, but the sandy trails were a constant challenge. Edward found that the soldiers were either pulling long ropes to help the teams get through the deep sand, or they were walking double file in front of the wagons to make firm trails for the wheels. Because the Battalion was blazing a new wagon trail to California, guides were sent out ahead of the main group to scout out the area and decide the way the group should go. On Nov. 20th near Cow Springs, the guides couldn’t find a trail westward. None of them had been on this route before. Cooke and the guides climbed to the top of a high mound and built a fire as a signal. A couple of Indians came in response to the smoke, and Cooke spoke with them about what lay in each direction. After talking with the Indians and his officers, Cooke decided to lead the Battalion south to Janos in Senora, Mexico. Levi Hancock and some of the other leaders of the men felt this was a bad decision to lead the Battalion towards enemy territory, so he and Father Pettegrew went from tent to tent asking the men to pray that Cooke would not lead them into Mexico. Edward also wondered how wise it would be to go looking for trouble, as it seemed they were doing. The next morning the camp was on the march due south when, after about two miles, Cooke stopped on a mound. He told the men that his orders from Kearny were to go to California and that was to the West. He had the bugler blow orders to turn westward and the Battalion turned its direction. The men were truly grateful and felt the hand of the Lord had been in the Colonel’s decision. That evening, Edward joined with the other men in a prayer of gratitude to the Lord for his help in the decision of the Commander. Ruel Barrus was somewhat of a hunter for the camp, and now that they had again come to some mountains, he and Captain Hunter obtained permission from Col. Cooke to go hunt. On Dec. 5th they were successful in killing two young bulls and bringing the stake back to camp sometime after dark. On the 7th he again went out, but this time they saw only older bulls whose meat was tough. They supposed the Indians had already selected the cows and calves as they were tender. About this time, Col. Cooke learned that Company B had a private wagon which carried the men’s equipment. Enraged, he ordered the men to each carry his own knapsacks and blankets. Edward and his comrades were already on cut rations, and this new order from the Colonel seamed very unrealistic, but this was the army, and there was no discussion. Near the San Pedro River, some wild bulls got in with the Battalion’s cattle and were killed by the guards. When the companies stopped at the San Pedro for water, other bulls, frightened at the smell of blood, charged into the soldiers. The rampaging bulls charged on and on causing great confusion and fear. Edward hurdled himself behind a wagon with a mighty beast headed toward him. The bulls charged men, mules, and wagons. Albert Smith was trapped between a bull’s horns. He was badly bruised and had three ribs torn from his back bones. One bull caught Amos Cox and gored his thigh before tossing him in the air. Levi Fifield had no wagon or tree for protection and threw himself flat on the ground when a bull charged him. The bull jumped over him, leaving the soldier frightened but unharmed. There was so much dust from the charging that it was difficult to see for a few minutes. When the dust cleared and the bulls had passed, three men were wounded, and three mules were gored to death. Several wagons were tipped over, and a couple were damaged from the stampede. Col. Cooke told a story of seeing “a coal black bull charge on Corporal Frost, of Company A.” Frost stood his ground while the animal rushed right on for one hundred yards. Col. Cooke was close by and believed the man in great danger to his life and called to him to run. Frost did not move but aimed his musket very deliberately and only fired when the beast was within ten paces. It fell headlong, almost at his feet. Cooke said Corporal Frost was “one of the bravest men he ever saw.” When things finally settled down, Edward climbed from behind the upturned wagon. The battle lasted only a few minutes, but ten to fifteen of the bulls were killed. The event was immortalized as the Battle of the Bulls, and was the only fight during the Battalion’s long journey. The Battalion passed without incident through Tucson, where a small Mexican garrison was stationed. Upon hearing that an army was coming, the garrison fled with most of the people, leaving behind only the aged and some children. Kearny had ordered the Battalion that they were to pass through the town and make no scene. As they marched through town, Edward noticed the worried expressions of the faces which peered at the army from behind walls and curtains. He knew they were scared to death, and he was grateful that the orders had been not to stop. The Battalion then rejoined Kearny’s route along the Gila River. Beyond the Colorado River lay over a hundred miles of trackless desert where water was obtained only by digging deep wells. There the Battalion encountered the heaviest sands, the hottest days, and the coldest nights. William Hyde told of the plight of no water saying: “Had no water through the day except a little that was fortified in two or three small mud holes. This was sipped down by the men as readily as if it had been the choicest of wine” The next day he wrote: “Had no water at this place of encampment only what we could get out of a mud hole by going three miles, but it was filthy in the extreme. We however mixed a little flour in some but the water was too thick with the mud that it would admit of but a small portion of the flour being added. We cooked some and ate it, but it was like eating clay.” In writing about this time on the Battalion march the Colonel said, “A great many of my men are wholly without shoes and use every expedient, such as rawhide moccasins and sandals, and even wrapping their feet in pieces of woolen and cotton cloth.” It had by now been three days without water while walking upwards of nineteen miles each day. Edward staggered along, wondering if he could make it the whole way. He thought of his little family so far away and pledged to himself, that if there were any way possible, he would struggle on for them. Finally after 70 miles across a barren desert, with little or no water, it was announced that ahead they had found a pond of water. The camp was given the privilege to make the best way they could to the place that they might quench their thirst. Edward hurried along as best he could, but he noticed other men who had given all they could and had collapsed on the sides of the trail. William said: “We traveled eight miles, and to our great joy we came up with the pilots, who were seated by a small pond of water. Here we laid ourselves upon the ground by the waters edge, and after drinking and resting and again drinking and resting and continuing this operation for a time, we succeeded in quenching our thirst.” As the men sat around at the pond, William commented that they looked as if they were “over ninety years old.” Edward and some of the other men were finally able to revive enough to take mules and canteens back to those who had fallen along the way. Colonel Cooke wrote, “The men arrived here, completely worn down; they staggered as they marched, as they did yesterday. Some of the men did not find strength to reach the camp before daylight this morning. I went through the companies this morning; they were eating their last four ounces of flour. I have remaining only five public wagons; there are three private property wagons.” Colonel Cooke was heard to say that he believed that any other company under like circumstances would have mutinied. He complimented the Battalion saying that notwithstanding they were worn down; they were ready to obey any orders that might be given. He further stated that had he known the situation of the desert they had just crossed, he would never have come into it. That evening, as the Colonel came to look over his troops he was again surprised at the spirit of these Battalion men in such a plight. He wrote of the camp that same evening, “The men, who this morning were prostrate, worn out, hungry, heartless, have recovered their spirits tonight, and are singing and playing the fiddle.” Edward saw the surprise in his Colonel’s eyes, but then he had been with the Mormons for many years, and he knew that these men would find joy and renewed strength through their camaraderie and the singing of songs and hymns. On the 21st December a story is told by a private Henry Bigler, a 22-two-old single young man. He said, “I was detailed to be the Colonel’s orderly for the day. On going to his tent to report myself, I found him feeding his mule some of the wheat that he had brought from Tucson. There was another mule determined to share the Colonel’s mule’s wheat. He had driven it away several times. As soon as his back was turned the mule would march boldly up for another morsel of wheat, until the colonel could endure it no longer. Turning to me, he said, ‘Orderly, is your gun loaded?’ Being answered in the negative, he said, ‘Load your gun and I’ll shoot that mule; I knew the mule and it belonged to one of our own men. The thought came to me not to permit it to be killed. At this I took from my box a cartridge, clapped it in my mouth and with my teeth, tore off the bullet and put the ball in my pocket. I then put the powder into my musket and rammed the paper in on top of it. Pretty soon he came out and, standing broadside, fired. The moment he discovered the animal was not dead, he dropped the musket and with an oath said, “You did not load that gun right’ and walked into his tent. His bugler, Mr. Guigly, and others who saw the trick fairly split their sides with laughter.” Finally near the Gila River the Battalion was met by Pima Indians who came out by the hundreds, men, women, and children. Edward thought it interesting to see the Indian tribe. He had never seen a whole tribe before this day. The Chief seemed pleased to see the army. He said the Mexicans had been to see him. The Mexicans wanted him and his men to join them and give battle, promising the Indians all the spoils. The Chief told them his men should not fight. They had never shed the blood of a white man. For that reason, he was not afraid of the coming army, and he did not believe the Battalion would hurt them. He stated that he had no objections to them passing through his towns. The Colonel purchased from the Chief 100 bushels of corn to feed the teams. The Indians brought to camp large quantities of corn, beans, meal, and pumpkin to trade for clothes, buttons, beads, needles, and thread etc. Money they refused, saying it was of no use to them. The new provisions were used to make somewhat of a Christmas feast consisting of cold beans, pancakes, and pumpkin sauce. William Hyde remembered Christmas with his family and contrasted it to the “parched lips, scalded shoulders, weary limbs, blistered feet, worn out shoes, and ragged clothes” he was experiencing at this time. Edward’s dreams could not help but go back in time in the same reminiscent way to Christmas from a more gentle time. The Battalion continued across the desert only to find in their path the rugged heart of the coastal mountains. Edward looked in awe at the mountains. He had never seen such mountains with such height that seemed to defy anything but the wild goats he saw along the ridges. He knew that they would have to somehow cut a path for them and their wagons to cross over the foreboding mountains. Col. Cooke wrote, “I came to the canyon, and found it much worse than I had been led to expect (by the guides). There were many rocks to surmount, but the worst was the narrow pass. Setting the example myself, as there was much work done on it before the wagons came; the rock was hewn with axes to increase the opening. I thought it wide enough…but when a trial was made, at the first pass, it was found too narrow by a foot of solid rock. More work was done, and several trials made. The sun was now only an hour high, and it was about seven miles to the first water. I had a wagon taken to pieces, and carried through. Meanwhile, we still hewed and hammered at the mountain side; but the best road tools had been lost. The next wagon body was lifted through, and then the running gear, by lifting one side; The work on the pass was perseveringly continued, and the last two wagons were pulled through by the mules, with loads undisturbed.” Once through the mountain passes, it was on to Warner’s Ranch where the weary, hungry, and ill clad men were able to rest. William and a few of his friends were able to pool their recourses and buy a pig which they cooked “and in company with others had a feast that revived our spirits.” The company took up their march again on the 23rd of January and hiked eighteen miles over the hills from Warner’s Ranch. It rained several hours in the afternoon, again at night, and then continued raining for twenty-four hours. It was all Edward and his weary comrades could do to keep going. “The Battalion had fallen upon the rainy season. All the tents were blown down in the night,” wrote Col. Cooke. He continued, “The ill-clad Battalion was drenched and suffered much.” Another few days’ march brought them past the deserted Catholic Mission of San Loui Rey. “One mile below the mission,” recorded Tyler, the camp historian, “we ascended a bluff, here the long looked-for great Pacific Ocean appeared plain to our view, only about three miles distant. The joy, the cheer that filled our souls, none but worn-out pilgrims nearing a haven of rest can imagine. Prior to leaving Nauvoo, we had talked about and sung of the great ‘Pacific Sea,’ and we were now upon its very borders, and its beauty far exceeded our most sanguine expectations.” This is just how Edward felt as he finally gazed upon the great Pacific Ocean. They had been through so much. They were weary, nearly exhausted, but to look out upon the Ocean, and realize that they truly had done this great thing, was the medicine needed to bolster their spirits. Down the coast they marched southward to where they were to meet Gen. Kearny. Finally on January 29, 1847, they reached Mission San Diego at the end of their 2,030-mile march. Edward was humbled and grateful to the Lord for his tender mercies in bring the men all the way through their many trials and to the end of their journey. Just five days after they arrived, Col. Cooke gathered the men together and read a bulletin which he had written concerning their march. Edward and his comrades stood shoulder to shoulder deeply moved at the Colonel’s words as he said in part, “The Lieutenant-Colonel commanding congratulates the Battalion on their safe arrival on the shore of the Pacific Ocean, and the conclusion of their march of over two thousand miles. History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry…” The bulletin was received by the Mormon volunteers with hearty cheers. Since California was already in the hands of the United States, the Battalion men served as occupation troops with garrison duty in San Diego, San Luis Rey, and Los Angeles. While in Southern California, the Saints gained the respect of the local citizens. Those in San Diego built a courthouse and houses, burned brick, and dug wells, thus contributing significantly to the building of the community. On July 16th at the end of their year’s enlistment, the Battalion members were discharged, although eighty-one men chose to reenlist for an additional six months. Ruel Barrus was among those who re-enlisted. Most of the discharged men left for northern California, intending to travel east to join the Saints in the Salt Lake Valley or back at the Missouri River. Edward Hunter joined with a large group including William Hyde who traveled North to Sutter’s Fort just on the West side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Some of the brethren concluded to stop, as it was now getting late in the season. After a mature consideration, it was thought best for a portion of the company to tarry, as the wages were good, and they could labor until spring. Edward Hunter and William Hyde both opted to continue their journey which they did with others heading over the mountains, and on the 5th of September, they reached the valley on the East side of the Sierra Nevada mountains. This day they passed the spot where several emigrants from Missouri, the ill-fated Donner Party, had perished the previous winter. It was a solemn moment for Edward and the other as they saw the remnants of these poor people. Their bones were bleached upon the ground, having not received a burial. The next morning they met Samuel Brannan who had been through San Francisco to the Salt Lake Valley, where he had met with the Presidency of the Church, together with the pioneers and the first companies of the Saints to that place. He said that Captain Brown was on his way to meet the Battalion Members and was just two or so days behind him. Edward and the group waited for Captain James Brown and were soon met by him and a small escort, direct from Salt Lake City. He conveyed a message from Brigham Young asking those men without families to stay in California to work during the winter of 1847-48. Upon hearing the information, most of the men returned to the settlements in California to labor until spring. Many spent the winter at Sutter’s Fort on the Sacramento River and assisted in the discovery of gold in January 1848 that began the California gold rush. The following summer they honorably completed their contracts with Sutter, abandoned the gold fields, and joined their families either in Salt Lake City or at the Missouri River. However, William Hyde, Edward Hunter and several others determined to continue on to their families and started out again. They traveled Northeast through Nevada and up through Fort Hall in Idaho. Edward looked around him at the lush grass covered fields of Idaho and thought it would be a good place to raise sheep. Years later he would buy a farm in Idaho and do just that. The group then headed south around the Great Salt Lake and down into the Salt Lake Valley, arriving on the 12th of October. Edward was delighted and relieved to find that his dear wife, Mary Ann, and their little daughter, now a year older, were in the valley. She had come across the plains with Edward’s uncle Edward Hunter and his family. It was a heartwarming reunion for all of them and a sweet close to the heroic journey of which Edward Hunter had been a part. MaryAnn had not dared to hope that Edward would travel to Utah that season. She had heard that many of the men were planning to stay for the winter in California, so it was a great delight to see Edward in the first group of returning Battalion Members. She brushed back his hair which was longer than usual and gazed up into his well tanned face, rugged and weather beaten. It was so good to have him back. Now they would begin a new life together in this new land they would call Zion. Though very late in the season, William Hyde felt driven to continue his journey over the Rockies and across the plains to Winter Quarters. He joined with 16 other men who started out two days later. They reached Fort Bridger before the snow fell, but camped on the Sweetwater on October 25th and at Independence Rock on the 29th. They were able to kill buffalo along the way for their meat, but it was cold and windy. By November 7th William recorded “The weather about as cold as I ever witnessed. Had to run behind our mules with ropes wrapped around us to keep from freezing.” They reached Fort Laramie and were very hospitably received and entertained. They were given a substantial supper and breakfast, and feed for their mules for which they did not have to pay. But the next morning they were on their way again. They had trouble trying to cross the river at Loup Fork. William crossed on foot to try the depth of the water. He had to swim the last part of the distance, despite the chunks of ice and cold. One of their animals was mired in the quicksand and died. They were able to cook and eat the meat as their provisions had entirely failed. They continued their journey but were becoming weaker and more susceptible to the freezing cold all the time. On the morning of November 10th, they all united in calling on the Lord to regard their situation in mercy and send food in some way that they might not perish. As they continued their journey, they found that the Lord had indeed heard their prayers, for a group of wild turkeys began to pass their camp in droves. They succeeded in getting four of the birds which was one to every four persons. Rejuvenated from the turkey meat, the emaciated men continued their journey. On the evening of the very next day, they arrived at Winter Quarters to a wonderful reception from the Saints. They were the first 16 souls to return from the Battalion after their discharge in California. The very next day, William Hyde was able to cross the Missouri River and ride to Council Point, a distance of twelve miles, where he found his family and his father’s family well. William told of his arrival in this way. “I reached home on Sunday, and as it was dusk when I arrived, the people of the little burgh had gathered for worship. The news of my arrival soon reached their place of gathering, which proved the breaking up of their meeting. All were so anxious to see me, that without ceremony they flocked out of the meeting house and gathered into my humble but happy cot which had been built by my father and brother for the benefit of my family in my absence. This was a joyful meeting.” The Mormon Battalion truly was a great endeavor and in the words of Col. Cooke, “History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry…” Edward Hunter is the father of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. William Hyde is the brother of Rosel Hyde who is the father of Martha Ann Hyde Hunter who is the mother of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Ruel Barrus is the brother of Emery Barrus who is the father of Owen Henry Barrus who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. This story was adapted from the following accounts: Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 315-326. Treasures of Pioneer History, Compiled by Kate B. Carter, 409-429 (DFH/M73-84). The Mormon Battalion, U.S. Army of the West 1846-1848, by Norma Baldwin Rickets. The Mormon Battalion, by B.H. Roberts. Five Hundred Wagons Stood Still, Mormon Battalion Wives; “Mary Ann Whitesides Hunter,” by Shirley N. Maynes, 283, (DFH/Hu21). The Private Journal of William Hyde, Part 2, (DFH/Hy43-69). Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

EMERY BARRUS

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) EMERY BARRUS, (son of Benjamin Barrus, born April 4, 1784, Richmand, N.H., died 1864. Chautauque, N.Y. and Betsy Stebbins, born March 21, 1787, in Massachusetts, died July 20, 1828 in New York). He was born April 8, 1809. Chautauque County, New York. Came to Utah October 9, 1853, Appleton Harmon Company. Married Huldah Abigail Nickerson (daughter of Freeman Nickerson, born Feb. 19, 1779, Dennis, Mass. and died Jan. 22, 1847, Chariton Point, Iowa, while on his way to Utah, and Huldah Chapman born 1789 in Connecticut, came to Utah 1859, died 1860, Provo, Utah). She was born April 16, 1816 in Pennsylvania. Their children: Lydia b. Oct. 22, 134, m. Festus Sprague, April 1, 1857; Betsy N. b. March 28, 1836, m. Lovina Ann Steele, Sept. 29, 1861; Emery Freeman b. March 12, 1841, died; Mary Huldah b. April 8, 1843, m. Charles Bailey; Orrin Elezar b. Sept. 14, 1845, m. Catherine Wilson; Emery Alexander b. March 27, 1848. d. Nov, 16, 1858; Ruel Michael b. Nov. 14, 1850, m. Ida Pearl Hunter; Owen Henry b. Dec. 28, 1853, m. Olive Deseret McBride Feb. 18, 1877, m. Mary Ann Hunter Dec. 21, 1892; Sarah Abigail b. April 9, 1856, m. Eleazar Freeman Nickerson; John Nickerson b. June 1, 1858, m. Alice Burton; Eliza Alvira b. Sept. 15, 1860, m. Charles Post. Married Jane Zerildah Baker (Daughter of Benjamin Baker, Pioneer 1857). She was born November 3, 1841. Their children: Emiline Abigail b. Nov. 30, 1859 m. Henry Tanner; James Baker b. Aug. 7, 1852, m. Charlotte Ann Mathews; William Taylor b. June 1, 1864, m. Matilda McBride; Thomas b. July 20, 1866; and Freeman b. Oct. 12, 1869, died; Chauncey Baker b. Jan. 15, 1872; Catherina Rozena b. Feb. 24, 1877, m. Henry Watson. Family home, Grantsville, Utah. High Priest; patriarch. Carpenter; stock raiser; farmer, Seventy. Died Oct. 5, 1899.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BARRUS

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BARRUS (Son of Emery Barrus and Huldah Abigail Nickerson). Born May 30, 1838, in Cataraugus County, N.Y. Came to Utah 1853, driving a herd of cattle across the plains. Married Lovina Ann Steele Sept. 29, 1861 (daughter of Samuel Steele born July 15, 1822, Plattsburg, Clinton County, N.Y., pioneer, 1851 Joshua Grant Company and Elvira Salome Thayer, born Sept. 15, 1826 in New York.) She was born Sept. 29, 1844, in Illinois. Their children: Benjamin Franklin b. Aug. 22, 1862; Samuel Leonard b. Jan. 14, 1868, died; Orrin Orland b. May 29, 1870 m. Ulysses Cline, July 26, 1893; Albert Almond b. June 1, 1875, m. Margaret Alice Millward March 4, 1896, m. Mabel Robinson Jan. 8, 1902; Elvira Chloena b. Dec. 9, 1881, died; Sylvia Ellen b. Jan. 17, 1886, died; Calvin Cleone b. Jan. 24, 1887, d. Jan. 13, 1891.

RUEL BARRUS

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) RUEL BARRUS (son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stubbins). Born Aug. 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautaqua County, New York. Came to Utah Oct. 15, 1854 with others of the Mormon Battalion. Married Ellen Martin, Aug. 10, 1859 (daughter of Samuel Martin, pioneer Sept. 25, 1855 Richard Ballantyne Company, and Priscilla Layton, who died in St. Louis), She was born Sept. 23, 1844. Their children: Ellen P. b. Feb. 12, 1861, m. Charles Schaeffer; Betsy A. b. Nov. 11, 1862; Zeltha A. b. March 28, 1864; Fannie I. b. June 11, 1866, m. William Sanford; Lona b. Aug. 12, 1870, m. Charles Nelson; Ruel M. b. April 20, 1873, m. Angeline Anderson; Darias M. b. April 20, 1876, m. Lizzie Ratcliffe; Royal L. b. June 27, 1879; Essie Glee b. March 13, 1885. Seventy, 2nd Lieutenant Company B, Mormon Battalion; Major in Echo Canyon Campaign.

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

(Reference: History written by Benjamin F. Barrus, oldest son of Benjamin Barrus who was born before the family left New York State, Genealogical data by E. B. Warner; Sent to Central Company 1 April 1964 by Emily T. Cramer; History Submitted by May Clark Barrus) Emery Barrus, son of Benjamin and Betsy Stebbins was born 1 April 1809 at Hanover, Chautauqua Co., N.Y. and died 6 Oct. 1899 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In 1833 he was working as a farm hand for Freeman Nickerson and was keeping company with his daughter, Huldah Abigail. At this time the Prophet Joseph Smith and some other Elders visited that part of New York and made their home with Freeman Nickerson for a time. Thus it happened that Freeman Nickerson and his family, consisting of several sons and daughters, some married and some single, joined the Church in 1833 and Emery Barrus, hearing the Gospel at this time was also baptized. He was the only one of his father's family to be baptized into the Church in New York. On Dec. 19, 1833, Emery married Huldah Abigail Nickerson, daughter of Freenan Nickerson. In Nov. 1839, freeman Nickerson, together with his son, Moses, his son-in-law, Emery Barrus, his daughter Caroline Hubbard and their children (altogether 17 persons) started on their journey to Missouri and arrived at Nauvoo in the spring of 1840, bought city lots and built homes, planted orchards, etc, and lived in comparative peace until about 1844 when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother, Hyrum, were assassinated in the Carthage Jail. After that date the persecution became very severe; men were whipped, houses burned and crops destroyed until 1845 when the saints agreed to vacate their beautiful homes, leaving the orchards with their fruit trees just coming into bearing. Preparations were made for that never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery Barrus had a shingle mill on an Island in the Mississippi, where his wife would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for silngles. In 1845 they moved to the Island and Emery would go into the woods and cut the timber and his wife would help saw it into suitable lengths for the different parts of the wagon, then put it up over his head in the shop to season. He made 15 wagons right from the stumps of trees. After the Prophet was killed the mob saw that Mormonism was not dead and told the people if they would drop Mormonism they could remain in their homes. Many found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track until they could find an easier way to worship God. Freeman Nickerson and his family, including Emery Barrus and family, who left New York in 1839, left Nauvoo in August, seven years later, crossed the Mississippi River and again took up the line to March. They wintered at Sheridan Point, Iowa in 1846 and 1847, their stock living on the buds and limbs of small trees felled for that purpose. They built log homes and covered them with split boards. On Jan. 22, 1847. Freeman Nickerson and his wife made the rest of the journey with her son, Levi, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1850. In the spring of 1847 they again took up the line of march westward, arriving in Winter Quarters to late to accompany the pioneers on their journey to the Salt Lake Valley. So Emery Barrus and his family again built a house and fenced a farm on which he planted and harvested considerable produce. Here they remained until the spring of 1853 when they again started on the westward journey. They traveled in Appleton Harmon's Company and Emery was appointed hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The cholera was in the wagon train in front of them and the one behind them and the captain advised that they eat as little meat as possible. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville in Oct. 1853. Their son, Owen, was born in Dec. 1853, two months after their arrival. By the spring of 1854 the inhabitants of Grantsville had become quite numerous. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in early days. They had to herd their stock on the range in the daytime and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. In those days there were no carding machines. Davenport and Wilson each had a flock of sheep. The home of mother Barrus was a regular manufacturing plant. Huldah Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls in yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. After there was a carding machine in Provo, Huldah Barrus would take the wool to Provo, driving a pair of colts they had brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of butter and cheese. Emery bought 46 head of loose stock, besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons across the plains. Not a fruit tree or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1853. Brother Sceva, John Clark and James McBride were the first to plant fruit trees. Emery Barrus made the first barns in Grantsville and some good houses. In 1855 the grasshoppers became so thick that they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. 1856 was the year of the famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour. They were without flour for months, living on segos, thistles, roots, etc. Brother John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856 and Brother William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, thrashed it with flails and cleaned it up in the wind. Each family got one half bushel of grain and ground it in coffee mills to make cake for the 4th of July dinner in 1856. This one half bushel of grain was a gift from John Cooley. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and milled and each family got a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery Barrus furnished a fat animal for beef so each family had a flour cake and a beef steak for dinner on July 24th 1856. In 1857 they heard that Johnson's Army was coming to civilize the Mormons. Every able-bodied man and boy was expected to go to Echo Canyon to hedge up the way for the Army. 1858 was the move south. It was decided to burn every building, destroy every tree and growing crops, provided the army persisted in coming in. But they did not come in until a treaty of peace was signed. Every family had the Grantsville precinct except a few faithful brethren. They were left to water the crops with orders to burn if molested by the Army. Emery Barrus was the first Mayor of Grantsville City and attended to surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charley Herman. He was a faithful worker in the temple and only came home two weeks before his death at the age of 90 years. He was ordained a patriarch in Grantsville. Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus was the first president of the Grantsville Ward Relief Society. By his first wife, Huldah Abigail Nicerson, he had the following children: Lydia, Betsy and Benjamin Franklin, all born in Hanover, N.Y,, Emery Freeman, Mary Huldah and Orrin Eleazer, born at Nauvoo, Ill., Emery Alexander and Ruel Michael born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, Owen Henry, Sarah Abigain, John Nickerson and Eliza Elvira born at Grantsville, Utah. Emery Barrus married April 5, 1857 at Grantsville Jane Ziralda Baker, daughter of Benjamin Baker and Abigail Taylor. She was born 3 Nov. 1841 at Adams, Ill., died 26 March 1895. To them were born the following children: Emiline Abigail, James Benjamin, William Taylor, Thomas Baker, Chauncy Baker and Catherine Rosina.

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS (Written by Esther Warner, Granddaughter)

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

(Reference: Written by Esther Warner, Granddaughter; Myrtle Allsop, County Historian; Alice Knowlton,Camp Historian) (Made available from the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers) Emery Barrus, son of Benjamln (5), Michael (4), Ebenezer (3), Ebenezer (2), John (1), and Betsy Stebbins (7), Hesadiah (6), Abner (5), Thomas (4), Samuel (l), Thomas (2), and Rowland (1), was born Apr. 8, 1809 at Hanover, Chautauqua Co., N.Y. and died Oct. 6, 1899 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In 1833 he was working as a farm hand for Freeman Nickerson and was keeping company with his daughter Huldah Abigail. At this same time, the Prophet Joseph Smith and some other Elders, visited that part of New York and made their home with Freeman Nickerson for a time. Thus it happened Freeman Nickerson and his family, consisting of several sons and daughters, some married and some single, joined the church in 1833 and Emery Barrus hearing the gospel at this time was also baptized. He was the only one of his father's family to be baptized into the Church in New York, Major Ruel Barrus being only eleven years old at that time and subject to his father until he came of age, when he left his father's home and came to Nauvoo and joined the church and made his home with Emery. On Dec. 19, 1833 Emery married Huldah Abagail Nickerson, daughter of Freeman (6), Eleazer (5), Eleazer (4), John (3), and Nicholas (2), William (1) and Huldah Chapman (3), Eliphalet (2), Moses (1) born Apr. 11, 1816 at Springville, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania; died Aug. 22, 1872 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In Nov. 1839, Freeman Nickerson, together with his son Moses, his son-in-law Emery Barrus, his daughter Caroline Hubbard and their children (altogether 17 persons) started on their journey to Missouri, but the Ohio River being closed with ice they wintered at Jefferson City, Missouri and arrived at Nauvoo in the spring of 1840 ; bought city lots and built homes, planted orchards etc., and lived in comparative peace, until about 1844 when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were assasinated in Carthage Jail. After that date the persecution became very severe; men were whipped, houses burned and crops destroyed until 1845 when the Saints agreed to vacate their beautiful homes, leaving the orchards with their fruit trees just coming into bearing. Preparations were made for that never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery Barrus had a shingle mill on an Island in the Mississippi, where his wife would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for shingles. In 1845 they moved to the Island and Emery would go into the woods and get the timber and his wife would help saw it into suitable lengths for the different parts of the wagon, then put it up over his head In the shop to season. He made 15 wagons right from the stumps of the trees. After the Prophet was killed the mob saw that Mormonism was not dead and told the people if they would drop Mormonism they could remain in their homes. If any found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track until they could find an easier way to worship God. Freeman Nickerson and his family, including Emery Barrus and family who left New York in 1839, left Nauvoo in August, seven years later; crossed the Mississippi River and again took up the line of march. They wintered at Sheridan Point, Iowa in 1846 and 1847, their stock living on the buds and limbs of small trees felled for that purpose€. They built log houses and covered them with split boards. On Jan. 22, 1847, Freeman Nickerson died and his wife made the rest of the journey with her son Levi, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1850. In the spring of 1847, they again took up the line of march westward, arriving at Winter Quarters too late to accompany the pioneers on their journey to Salt Lake Valley. So Emery Barrus and his family again built a house and fenced a farm on which he planted and harvested Considerable produce. There they remained until the spring of 1853, when they again started on the westward journey. They traveled In Appelton Harmon's company and Emery was appointed hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The cholera was in the wagon train in front of them and the one behind them and the captain advised that they eat as little meat as possible. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville in Oct. 1853. Their son Owen was born in Dec. 1853, two months after their arrival. By the spring of 1854 the inhabitants of Grantsville had become quite numerous. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in early days. They had to herd their stock on the range in the daytime and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. In those days there were no carding machines. Davenport and Wilson each had a flock of sheep. The home of mother Barrus was a regular manufacturing plant. Huldah Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. After there was a carding machine in Provo, Huldah Barrus would take the wool to Provo, driving a pair of colts they had brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of cheese and butter. Emery brought 46 head of loose stock, besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons across the plains. Not a fruit tree or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1851. Brother Sceva, John Clark and James McBride were the first to plant fruit trees. Emery Barrus made the first barns in Grantsville and some good houses. In 1855 the grasshoppers came so thick they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. In 1856 was the year of famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour. They were without bread for months, living on segoes, thistles, roots, etc. Brother John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856 and Brother William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, threshed it with flails and cleaned it up in the wind. Each family got one-half bushel of grain and ground it in coffee mills to make cake for the 4th of July dinner in 1856. This one-half bushel of grain was a gift from John W. Cooley. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and milled and each family got a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery Barrus furnished a fat animal for beef, so each family had a flour cake and a beef steak for dinner July 24th 1856. In 1857 they heard that Johnson's army was coming to civilize the Mormons. Every able-bodied man and boy was expected to go to Echo Canyon to hedge up the way of the army. 1858 was the move South. It was decided to burn every building, destroy every tree and growing crops, provided the army persisted in coming in. But they did not come in until a treaty of peace was signed. Every family had left the Grantsville precinct a free faithful brethren They were left to water the crops with orders to burn if molested by the army. Emery Barrus was the first mayor of Grantsville City and attended to surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charley Herman. He was a faithful worker in the Temple and only came home two weeks before his death at the age of 90 years. He was ordained a patriarch in Grantsville. Huldah Abigail Nickerson was the first president of the Relief Society of Grantsville Ward. By his first wife Huldah Abigail Nickerson he had the following children: Lydiaa, Betsy, and Benjamin Franklin, all born in Hanover, New York; Emery Freeman, Mary Huldah and Orvin Eleazer born at Nauvoo, Ill.; Emery Alexander and Ruel Michael born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska; Owen Henry, Sarah Abigail, John Nickerson and Eliza Elvira born at Grantsville Utah. Emery Barrus married Apr. 5, 1857 at Grantsville Jane Zerelda Baker, daughter of Benjamin Baker and Abigail Taylor. She was born Nov. 3, 1841 at Adams, Ill. died Mar. 26, 1895. To them were born the following children: Emellne Abigail, James Benjamin, William Taylor, Thomas Baker, Herman Baker, Chauncey Baker, and Catherlne Rozina all born at Grantsville, Utah.

HISTORY OF RUEL BARRUS 1821-1918

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

Ruel Barrus was born August 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautauqua County, New York. He was the youngest son and eighth child of a family of ten children (five sons and five daughters) born to Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. He came from an old American family. His mother, Betsy Stebbins, was born March 17, 1787 at Monson, Hampden County, Vermont to Hesadiah Stebbins and Betsy Sessions Babcock. She was deserted by her first husband (unknown) before their first child was born. She obtained permission of the court to name her son, born March 29, 1805, Abdiel Hesadiah Stebbins. Ruel's father, Benjamin Barrus was born April 4, 1784 at Richmond, Cheshire County, New York; He was the son of Michael Barrus and Elizabeth Simmonds. Benjamin fought in the War of 1812-2.815 -and was wounded in the battle at the burning of Buffalo. He died February 2, 1864 in Silver Creek, Chautauqua County, New York. Ruel's ancestors on both sides fought in the Revolutionary War. His paternal grandfather, Michael Barrus, born July 2, 1751 in Cumberland Hill, Cumberland County, Rhode Island fought in the American Revolution as a Sergeant in Captain Capron's Company, Colonel Samuel Ashley's Regiment, New Hampshire Militia. His maternal grandfather, Hezadiah Stebbins born October 25, 1754 at Brimfield, Massachusetts, served in the American Revolution as Private in Captain Joseph Thompson's Company, Colonel- Timothy Danielson's Regiment, taking part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. Ruel's father, Benjamin Barrus and his mother Betsy Stebbins were married sometime in 1807. Ruel's mother died August 5, 1828 leaving a family of eleven children. Shortly after this, possibly in 1830 Benjamin married Anna Webb; the date of the marriage is unknown. She was born in 1783 in Connecticut. Anna Webb faithfully took care of the children until her death February 26, l86l. She was buried in the Doty Cemetery in Silver Creek, New York. She never had children of her own. Ruel was not quite seven years old when his mother died. He grew up and obtained his education in his native town of Villanova, learning there the Carpentering trade. At the age of nineteen he became interested in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. At this time he left his home in New York State and went to live for two years with his brother, Alexander, who was living in Pennsylvania. Alexander was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church and had developed an unfriendly feeling toward the Mormon Church, so Ruel moved again. In 1844 he went to stay with his older brother, Emery, who at this time was living in Nauvoo, Illinois, he having become a member of the Mormon Church. In October of l844 Ruel was baptized by Richard Sheldon and in October of 1845 he was ordained a Seventy in the Nauvoo Temple. Ruel and Emery were the only two members of the family to join the Church. They remained at Nauvoo until the Saints were driven from there in the uprising against the Mormons by the mobs of Illinois. While, the Saints were on the plains of Iowa and Nebraska, a call came from President James K. Polk of the United States for a Battalion of 500 men to be enlisted from the Mormon ranks to serve in the Mexican War. Ruel was among the first to respond to this call and enlisted in Company B with the rank of Second Lieutenant on July 16, 1846 at Council Bluffs, Iowa. At this time -Ruel had a team and wagon and 50O pounds of flour for which he had been offered $500 but instead of selling it, he gave it to the company with which he had been traveling. The Battalion left Council Bluffs, Iowa for Fort Leavenworth, Kansas on July 20, 1846. That 200 mile march was a severe ten day trial period through a country that had no roads or bridges. The route generally was along the steaming Missouri River. Swarms of mosquitoes, both day and night, miles of mud and violent nocturnal rainstorms greeted them. The none-descript-looking group had left everything they could spare behind. The men during this time had no tents or shelter of any kind as they were not outfitted until they reached Fort Leavenworth. Malaria became widespread and their beloved non-Mormon Commander, James Allen, died of malaria at Fort Leavenworth where they arrived August 1, 1846. At Fort Leavenworth they received infantry equipment and each man was paid a "uniform allowance" of $42.00. Instead of buying army uniforms, many of the men sent most of this money back to Winter Quarters and wore their rough frontier clothing. They left for the coast on August 12th and was commanded by Lt. A. J. Smith. His overpowering desire was to get them to Santa Fe as rapidly as possible and he led them hard and fast those nine hundred miles down the Santa Fe Trail. The major problem was the heat, rapid pace, sickness and a malevolent doctor who administered calomel (mercury) and arsenic for every disorder — with force if necessary. At Santa Fe Lt. Col. P. St. George Cooke took over as the permanent commander of the Battalion. The route from Santa Fe to the Pacific was for the greater part through unknown wilderness without road or trail. There were high odds against a successful journey of eleven hundred miles, short of rations through enemy territory taking 25 wagons and six cannon where no wagon train had ever rolled and led by guides who had never traversed the route. The Battalion arrived at San Diego, California January 29 1847 completing what is probably the longest march (2,000 miles) in the history of the world. The Lieutenant Colonel commanding, congratulated the Battalion on their safe arrival. "Nine-tenths of it has been through a wilderness where nothing but savages and wild beasts are found, or deserts where, from want of water, there is no living creature. There, with almost hopeless labor, we have dug deep wells which the future traveler will enjoy. Without a guide who has traversed them, we have ventured into trackless prairies where water was not found for several marches. With crowbar, pick and ax in hand, we have worked our way Over mountains which seemed to defy aught save the wide goat, and have hewed a chasm out of living rock more narrow than our wagons Thus marching half-naked and half-fed, and living upon wild animals, we have discovered and made a road of great ,value to our country. “ When the term of enlistment of one year was up the Battalion was discharged at Los Angeles July 16, 1847. A call was made for re-enlistment for one company for a period of six months, Ruel Barrus was as usual one of the first to respond to his country's call and on July 20, 1847 he again was mustered into service again receiving a commission of Second Lieutenant. This company differed from the original Battalion in one respect, uniforms. August 4th he was placed in command of a detachment and ordered to the Catholic Mission of San Luis Hey near San Diego to protect it from the Indians. He served two months overtime and was mustered out of service in March 1838. After his discharge he spent two years as a missionary in Northern California, part of the time with Elder Parley P. Pratt. Part of the time was spent in the Santa Clara Valley. He was working near Sutter's Mill when Wilford Hudson, who later settled in Grantsville, brought news of the discovery of gold at the mill. He remained in California for some time working on mining claims and came to Utah in 1847, settling in Grantsville where his brother Emery had preceded him. He was married to Ellen Martin August 10, 1859, who came to America with her parents from -England in 1851. She was born at Beeston, Bedfordshire, England December 24, 1842. Her father was Samuel Martin and her Mother, Priscilla Layton (a sister of Christopher Layton). Her Mother died in St. Louis, Missouri January 29, l852. Ruel Barrus and Ellen Martin were sealed in the Endowment House on March 17, 1865.Nine children were born to this union. The honor of being the first officer appointed in Grantsville goes to Ruel Barrus when he was given the commission of Major, in the Nauvoo Legion when it was organized in the Tooele Military District. Ruel was appointed commander of the Grantsville unit. He was known the rest of his life as Major Barrus. While living in Grantsville, Major Barrus engaged in the cattle and sheep raising business, he also followed farming to some extent and was a good farmer, In politics he was a staunch Democrat, but never gave much time to his party, as he devoted much of his time, other than that required for his business, to the Church in which he was always prominent. It was not until 1887 that he received a pension from the government of $8.00 per month. At one time he was a member of the City Council of Grantsville. Throughout his life he rendered his country and Church efficient service. He enjoyed the confidence and respect, not only from the heads of the Mormon Church but with all with whom he has been associated through many years of residence in Tooele County. He died Sunday February 10, 1918 at the home of his daughter Priscilla Barrus Shaffer at the age of ninety six and one-half. At his funeral the main (address was delivered by R. S. Collett, the special representative of Governor Simon Bamberger. Mr. Collett spoke feelingly of the splendid service Major Barrus rendered to this country as a member of the Mormon Battalion, and called attention to the fact that with his death the last officer of that organization passed away and that he was possibly the last officer of the entire Mexican War. Only one other member of the Battalion survived Major Barrus and that was Hurley Morsey of Vernal who at the time was 95 years of age. At the time of his death Major Barrus was the oldest resident of Grantsville and was probably the oldest person of Tooele County. Profuse floral offerings were received from the Daughters of Pioneers in Salt Lake.

Tina Rydalch Barrus

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

TINA RYDALCH BARRUS By Agnes Barrus Clark Tina Rydalch, daughter of Richard Mitten Rydalch and Ellen Priscilla Barrus, was born 28 April, 1886 at Grantsville, Utah. She was born in a home that belonged to Mr. Judd at approximately 240 East Main Street. The home was later sold to Ed Roberts and then in the 1960’s it was torn down. She was reared by her grandparents Ellen Martin and Ruel Barrus. She called them Ma and Dad. They had a daughter, Essie Glee, who was just 11 months older than Tina. Ma was an excellent seamstress and sewed clothes for both of the girls and dressed them alike most of the time. When Essie was ten years old she and Monte were stricken with typhoid fever. Essie’s fever was so high they wrapped her in sheets soaked in ice water trying to cool her temperature. But she was not strong enough to survive the high fever and passed away on the 4th of July, 1895. Monte was older and stronger and he recovered from this illness. Tins received her education at the Grantsville Block School on East Main Street, and the Academy on West Main Street. Her teachers were Orlando Barrus, Edwin C. Dibble, Lillian Rowberry and Frank Hinkley. She completed the eight grade which was the highest class taught in Grantsville at that time. Mama told me that when she was ten years old, on Christmas eave she hid to surprise Santa Claus when he came with his presents. He was surprised, but she was sorry because he never came again. Tina was a beautiful girl as her pictures will testify. She was five feet two inches in height, and weighed 98 pounds when she was married. She had honey blond naturally curly hair, blue eyes, and retained her dainty ankles even in her late years. She was a fun loving person who enjoyed dancing. She loved to visit with people and made friends easily. She married Bert Barrus on the 5th of August, 1907, when she was 21 years old. They went by horse and buggy to Salt Lake City and were married in the old City and Count building by David A. Smith. William R. Judd and Percie Tanner from Grantsville were the witnesses. Another Grantsville couple, Tom McMichael and Alice Johnson were there and married at the same time. They stopped rested the horse in the old cave near Garfield on the way home. When mama and daddy returned to Grantsille a chivaree was held for them at the Shaffer home on East Main Street. Mama said she and daddy were hand-cuffed together so they couldn’t be kidnapped or separated as was customary in those days. Their first home was a two room adobe structure built on the corner of 307 East Main and Church street, just east of Uncle Marin and Aunt Lizzie Barrus’s home, on property belonging to the Barrus Brothers. When the Grantsville Ward was divided, the Church authorities selected that corner as the best location to build the new Second Ward chapel. The property was sold to the Church for $1500.00 and the check was made out to George Barrus. The corner stone of the new chapel was raised in 1915. Their first son Bert Verian, born 30 April, 1908, was 18 months old when Bert was called to serve a two year L.D.S. mission to the Southern States without purse or script (1909-1911) Tina hired out doing house work and also took in washing at this time to support herself and the baby. Tina lived with her mother who was a window with two children (Maggie and Milo Shaffer). They had chickens and sold eggs and had a vegetable garden and fruit trees. Grandma did sewing for hire and pierced and quilted many quilts for people. Grandma also received Mr. Shaffer’s government pension of $8.00. He was a veteran of the Civil War. Alma Ruel was born 4 Sep. 1912. Woodrow Chester was born 23 Aug 1914. A fourth son Henry was born 20 Oct. 1916.. His was a breech birth and he lived just a few hours. Mama said it took her a year to get her strength back after the loss of this baby. She was near death the day the baby was born and she often told of seeing Ma standing in the bedroom doorway as though waiting for the baby. Ellen Martin Barrus (Ma) had died 19 Aug. 1914, and mama was not permitted to go to her funeral as she was due to deliver her third baby at that time. She remembered this with great regret. Tina’s mother, Ellen Priscilla (Tillie) Barrus was sealed to her third husband, Zephaniah Shaffer. Two children were born to this couple, Maggie and Milo Barrus Shaffer. Tina was sealed to her mother and Mr. Shaffer on 7 Aug. 1976. (I was proxy for Ellen Priscilla, Saul was proxy for Mr. Shaffer, Eileen was proxy for Tina). Daddy was employed by Morton Salt Company at Burmester and he moved there with his young family. There was no school at Burmester and because of a lack of transportation, Verian stayed with Grandma Shaffer when the family moved to Burmester for employment. The old band wagon furnished Verian and the other students on the east end of town with a ride to school part of the time but usually he walked the long 2 ½ miles each way.

RUEL BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

RUEL BARRUS This biography of Ruel Barrus was printed in “The Grantsville Observer” June 1st 1923. Ruel Barrus was born August 11th 1821 at Villanova, Chautaqua County, New York, the youngest son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. His ancestors on both sides fought in the Revolutionary war, his grandfather Stebbins taking part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. His father also fought in the war of 1812 taking part in the action at the burning of the city of Buffalo New York, where he was wounded. His father died 1ne of February 1864 and his mother when he was 7 years old. He grew up in his native town learning the trade of a carpenter. At the age of 19 years he became a convert to Mormonism and moved to Pennsylvania where he took his residence with his brother Alexander who was a Methodist Episcopal minister in that state. He stayed with his brother about 2 years but he being unfriendly to the Mormons it was not a very pleasant life for Ruel. He then decided to move to Nauvoo where his brother emery resided he being the only other member of the family to join the church. He was ordained a Seventy in the Nauvoo Temple and became a member of the 4th Quorum. He remained to Nauvoo until the mob began to persecute the Saints when he with others moved west to Council Bluffs to prepare places for the people to move to. While here, President Polk of the United States on the 30th of January 1846 called upon the leaders of the Church for 4 or 5 companies of volunteers to serve for one year in the war with Mexico. Ruel Barrus was one of the first to enlist being mustered into the U.S. service July 16th 1846 and receiving a commission as a Second Lieutenant and assigned to company B of the Mormon Battalion. He was with the Battalion during the entire march to California. The Battalion left Council Bluffs July 20th 2846 for Fort Leavenworth Kansas reaching that point August 1st. This march of 200 miles was made in 10 days through a country which had no roads or bridges over the creeks and rivers, and without tents or shelter of any kind. They received their equipment and supplies at this point and on August 14th j1846 the Battalion left Fort Leavenworth for their now famous march to California, a march of infantry that has no parallel in the worlds history. They arrived at Santa Fe, New Mexico October 3rd halting there and recuperating for the final stage of the journey. Leaving Santa Fe on October 19th and crossing the great deserts of what is now New Mexico, Arizona. And California. The Battalion arrived at the San Diego January 29th j1847. They first saw the waters of the Pacific Ocean January 27th. Half the journey of 2000 miles was made through a wilderness and over trackless deserts on which of lack of water no living creature dwelt. The Battalion was discharged at Los Angeles July 16th 1847, he being mustered in again receiving a commission as a Second Lieutenant. August 4th we find him placed in command of a detachment and ordered to the Catholic Mission of San Luis Rey near San Diego to protect it from the Indians. We also find another order issued to him to proceed to the same place August 14th, 1847 for the same duty. He received his discharge March 14th, 1848 at San Diego California. After his discharge we find him in various parts of California. He spent two year as a missionary, part of the time with Elder Parley P. Pratt. One year he was in the Santa Clara valley and was at Los Angeles when gold was found at Sutter’s Mill. The balance of the time, until 1857, was spent in southern California as he came to Utah that same year. He located in Grantsille where his brother Emery had located that same years. He married Ellen Martin August 19th, 1859 at Grantsville, During trouble with Johnston’s Army we find him organizing a body of militia of which he was made Major being known the rest of his life as Major Barrus. He was a good farmer and a quite unassuming citizen and was once a member of the City Council of Grantsville. He passed away February 10th, 1918 aged 96 years and is buried in the Grantsville Cemetery. He is the father of nine children.

The Mormon Battalion

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Mormon Battalion (Three of our ancestors were on the Mormon Battalion. Grandpa Edward Hunter is the father of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Uncle William Hyde is the brother of Rosel Hyde who is the father of Martha Ann Hyde Hunter who is the mother of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Uncle Ruel Barrus is the brother of Emery Barrus who is the father of Owen Henry Barrus who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew.) Mary Ann smoothed the jacket her husband wore and handed him the knapsack she had gathered full of food and other small items. There were tears in her eyes, but she knew that there was no other choice than to let him go. They had discussed their options several times, but in the end, they knew that he must follow the call from Pres. Brigham Young and join with the others who were joining the army. Some were calling it the Mormon Battalion, and so it was. Both Edward and Mary Ann Hunter had joined themselves with the Mormons before they were married. They had met each other in the fledgling town of Nauvoo, when it was little more than a swamp and the houses, if you had one, were little more than rude log cabins. Edward had come on his own to Nauvoo as a wide-eyed youth, writing letters back to his Uncle Edward Hunter about the potential he saw in the new community. Edward had been housed at the Whitesides home, and soon a relationship began between Edward and their lovely daughter, MaryAnn which had culminated in their marriage. Now they were the parents of a darling little girl whom they had named Sarah Ann. Edward and MaryAnn had enjoyed their life in Nauvoo, but there was rising resentment toward the Mormons, and soon Mob violence erupted. Their beloved Prophet Joseph Smith and his dear brother Hyrum had been murdered at Liberty Jail. After their deaths, the Saints had been persecuted until finally they had been forced to leave their beloved city and their Temple, which was only partially finished. Edward and MaryAnn were among the first to leave their comfortable home in Nauvoo. They had waited long enough to receive their endowments in the Temple on February 6, 1846 and then turned their backs on their beloved Nauvoo to enter the wilderness of Iowa. They had slogged through the mire of Iowa and finally joined with those gathering in Council Bluffs. Now they had begun to make plans to stay in Iowa until spring, building cabins or dugouts in the nearby bluffs. There were many of the Mormons on the trail in the wilds of Iowa, having been forced out of their homes in the beautiful city of Nauvoo the same as Edward and MaryAnn Hunter. Brigham Young had lead the beleaguered Saints west across the frozen Mississippi River to the mud of Iowa. It had been a hard spring as the Saints struggled through knee-deep mud across the Iowa trail. Late spring and early summer found the Saints scattered across parts of Illinois and much of Iowa. Brigham Young was making preparations as rapidly as possible to move the Saints West. With this preparation in mind he called Elder Jesse C. Little, who was serving a mission for the Church in New England, to go to Washington D.C. and ask the government for “any facilities for emigration to the Western coast which the they might offer.” Elder Little joined with Thomas L. Kane, son of John Kane, a prominent federal judge and political associate of President Polk. Together Little and Kane negotiated with government officials for contracts to build block houses and forts along the Oregon Trail. In 1845 the United States annexed Texas, thereby angering Mexico. There were skirmishes between the two countries and finally Congress declared war on Mexico on May 12th of 1846. The war with Mexico came precisely when the Latter-day Saints were petitioning Washington, for assistance in their move West. With Kane’s urging, Elder Little suggested in a letter to President Polk that although the Saints were loyal Americans, the government’s refusal to assist them could “compel us to be foreigners.” Polk did not want the Saints to join the British interests in the Oregon territory nor to antagonize the Missouri volunteers in the army of the West, so following conversations with Elder Little; he authorized the recruiting of five hundred Mormon volunteers. When the directive came down to Colonel Stephen W. Kearny at Fort Leavenworth, he was told to immediately enlist a Mormon Battalion. Kearny sent Captain James Allen to the Mormon encampments in southern Iowa to recruit volunteers. Brigham Young heard of Captain Allen’s intentions, and before his arrival in Council Bluffs, he met with Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards and discussed the matter. Realizing this was probably the result of Elder Little’s negotiations, they decided it was best to meet Captain Allen in the morning and raise the men wanted. The Brethren also recognized that the request for Mormon men provided an opportunity to earn desperately needed capital for the exodus and provided a reason for establishing temporary settlements on Indian lands. President Young spoke to the Saints and tried to clear their minds of prejudice against the federal government. Edward and MaryAnn Hunter were among those at Council Bluffs who listened with troubled hearts as he began to explain their position. He said “The question might be asked, is it prudent for us to enlist to defend our country? If we answer in the affirmative—all are ready to go. Suppose we were admitted to the Union as a State and the Government did not call on us, we would feel ourselves neglected. Let the ‘Mormons’ be the first men to set their feet on the soil of California. This is the best offer we have ever had from the government to benefit us. I propose that five hundred volunteers be mustered, and I will do my best to see all their families brought forward, so far as my influence can be extended and feed them when I have anything to eat myself.” When Brigham Young finished speaking, MaryAnn looked up into her husband’s eyes. There she saw the familiar determination to follow his leaders, and she knew that he would join this army. Brigham Young left the next day with Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards to cross back over the trail to Mount Pisgah and recruit more men. They sent letters back to those still in Nauvoo saying, “Now, brethren, is the time for action…This is the first time the government has stretched forth its arms to our assistance, and we receive their proffer with joy and thankfulness. We feel confident that the Battalion will have little or no fighting, and their pay will take their families to them. The Mormons will then be the older settlers and have a chance to choose the best locations.” Brigham Young gave speeches as they went, comforting the Saints in their decision with the promise that “The blessings we are looking forward to receive will be attained through sacrifice…We want to conform to the requisition made of us and we will do nothing else until we have accomplished this thing. If we want the privilege of going were we can worship God according to the dictates of our own conscience we must raise this Battalion.” Everywhere they went many able-bodied men signed up. When the call for volunteers in the Battalion came, Edward and MaryAnn discussed their situation. They knew they were in the middle of the prairie with no home, no income, and little provisions. It was a hard decision for Edward to leave his dear wife and little daughter alone for so long. What would happen in the meantime? Would she be able to stay in Council Bluffs? Could she find her way across the plains with others? There were so many questions and so few answers. It was their deep faith in the Lord and his newly restored church which had brought them this far in their quest to follow Him, and they now felt that if the Prophet of God was asking volunteers, they must obey. The Hyde family had also left their homes in Nauvoo in the early exodus. Rosel and William were brothers and joined their families along with their brother Charles. They had gathered their aging father and mother, and crossed Iowa, arriving in Council Bluffs on the 12th of July, just in time to hear of the enlistment activities for the Battalion. It was decided among the family that William would answer the call and Rosel would stay behind to take care of the families. William joined Company B, the same company which Edward Hunter had joined and took his place as second sergeant in that company. William kept a daily journal throughout the trek and entered these solemn words at the onset of the journey: “The thoughts of leaving my family at this critical time are indescribable. Far from the land which we had once called civilization, with no dwelling, save a wagon, with scorching midsummer sun to beat upon them, with the prospect of the cold December blasts finding them in the same place…After giving them my blessing, and resigning them into the hands of God, I left them and returned to the camp of the soldiers.” Before taking up the line of march, President Young, Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, John Taylor, Parley P. Pratt and Wilford Woodruff met with the officers on the banks of the river. William remembered their council: “There they gave us our last charge and blessing, with a firm promise that on condition of faithfulness on our part, our lives should be spared and our expedition result in great good, and our names be handed down in honorable remembrance to all generations. The officers were instructed to prove themselves father to the privates, and to remember their prayers and see that the name of Deity was revered…Many more instructions were given which were all calculated to encourage the officers to be faithful, and prove themselves true to their trust.” Another of interest to us on the trek was Ruel Barrus the brother of Emery Barrus. He was 20 years old and not married. He served as 2nd Lieutenant, also in Company B with Edward Hunter and William Hyde. The Church leaders promised that the families of the volunteers would be carefully provided for. He counseled the volunteers to be faithful soldiers, keep the commandments, and abide by the counsel of their leaders. He promised that if they conducted themselves properly, they would not have to fight. A farewell ball was held in honor of the Battalion on a cleared square along the Missouri River on the evening of Saturday, the 18th of July. The next morning there were many gathered to bid farewell to their departing loved ones as the army prepared to leave. MaryAnn held her husband as long as she felt she could, and then pulling herself away, lifted up their darling little daughter for a good-bye kiss from her father. She had determined to be strong, but it was so hard to let him go. Taking a deep breath, she forced a smile and, handing him the knapsack, bade Edward a fond farewell. With tears in their eyes and a prayer in their hearts, Edward turned and strode away, leaving his little family to the care of their Heavenly Father and the Saints. At noon on Tuesday, July 21st the Mormon Battalion began their historic march. Edward marched with the new soldiers two hundred miles down the East side of the Missouri River and then crossed over to Fort Leavenworth, arriving on the 1st of August 1846. Once there, Edward was happy to be outfitted with supplies, guns, and forty-two dollars per man as clothing money for the year. The paymaster at the fort was surprised when every man was able to sign his name on the payroll. Only a third of the volunteers he had paid previously could write. A portion of the money was collected by Parley P. Pratt and others sent by the Church. This was used to support the Battalion members’ families in Iowa and others. As Edward gave the bulk of his money to the Brethren, he thought of his little family on the plains of Iowa and said a little prayer for them. With a smile he knew that they were also praying for him. Edward soon learned that General Stephen W. Kearny’s regiment had already embarked in June toward Santa Fe to conquer New Mexico for the United States. The Mormon Battalion was to follow him and aid his operations if necessary. For two weeks the Battalion remained at Fort Leavenworth. Edward mopped his brow with his handkerchief, once used to hold the long gone vittles his wife had prepared for him as he was leaving her in Iowa. The weather was very hot, and many men suffered, particularly with fevers. Their commanding officer, Colonel Allen, became severely ill, and was not able to leave with them when they took up their march. Edward and the other members of the Battalion were very concerned for the welfare of their leader and many prayers ascended to heaven for his recovery. Captain Jefferson Hunt, the ranking Mormon officer, took temporary command of the Battalion. William Hyde was also down with the fever when the camp left, but he was able to rejoin his company several days later. Not too far outside of Fort Leavenworth William told of a storm that arose suddenly: “Before we had reached our place of encampment, we discovered a furious storm arising in the West, and we hastened to get all things in readiness. This was hardly done when the storm reached us. Out of upwards of one hundred tents, there were only 5 or 6 that were not blown down, and they were only kept standing by the strong arms of those inside. Three wagons were blown over, two of them heavy loaded baggage wagons and the other was a two horse carriage, the boxes and covers were badly damaged. The wagon covers were nearly all blown off and many of them torn in pieces. And thus were all exposed to the rain and hail which was blown with great fury. During the time that the storm lasted the very elements seemed at war.” About two weeks after leaving the Missouri River, Edward learned that Colonel Allen had died. This saddened the entire group because they had grown to admire this benevolent officer. The Mormon officers felt that Captain Hunt should continue as their leader and requested by letter that Pres. Polk appoint him to the position, but First Lieutenant A.J. Smith of the regular army was already en route to assume command. Edward and his comrades wondered what this new commander would be like. They felt a sense of foreboding as the time for the Colonel to arrive grew near. “The appointment of Smith, even before his character was known, caused a greater gloom throughout the command than the death of Colonel Allen had,” wrote the Battalion historian, Daniel Tyler. Lieutenant Smith set a rapid pace for the Battalion in their march to Santa Fe, hoping to overtake General Kearny before he left for California. Edward was young and strong, but even at this; the long days in the hot sun were a hardship. The strong pace wore heavily on the soldiers, and more especially on the wives and children who were allowed to travel with the Battalion. With the relentless push, the men had little rest, and often the weary fell behind, trudging into camp hours after the others. Worse than the fast travel was the ministration of the military doctor, George B. Sanderson of Missouri. He seemed to dislike the Mormons and forced the men to swallow calomel and arsenic for their ills from the same rusty spoon. The men referred to him as “mineral quack: and “Doctor Death.” William Hyde included a poem in his journal about the doctor: Our Doc., the wicked swearing fellow With calomel thought to make us mellow The boys his poison spurned to take Which made him act his father, snake! Because the sick had not obeyed He raved, and like a donkey brayed, My mind on him I’d like to free But as I’m placed I’ll let him be: Time will show his heart is rotten And sure his name will be forgotten. William L. McIntire, a good botanic physician, had been appointed assistant surgeon to the Battalion but was unable to administer to his afflicted friends in any way unless ordered by Dr. Sanderson, the Battalion surgeon. Edward felt like the others, that it was better not to report your illnesses if at all possible because the ailment may be better than the cure. On the 16th of September, at the last crossing of the Arkansas River (in present day Kansas), Lt. Smith sent Cap. Nelson Higgins and ten men to convey most of the soldiers’ families up the river to the Mexican village of Pueblo (in present day Colorado) for the winter. The men strongly protested this “division” of the Battalion because they had been promised that their families could accompany the army to California. Edward sympathized with those whose families were being sent away, for if MaryAnn were here, he was not so sure if he would have let her go. The decision proved to be wise, however, in light of the difficult trek that lay ahead. A month later at Santa Fe, a detachment of sick men and all but five of the remaining women were sent under the direction of Cap. James Brown to join the earlier group at Pueblo. On the 9th of October the weary soldiers dragged themselves into Santa Fe, the provincial capitol of New Mexico, which had some six thousand inhabitants. General Kearny had already left for California, leaving the city under the command of Col. Alexander Doniphan, a friend of the Saints from the Missouri days. Doniphan ordered a one-hundred gun salute in honor of the arrival of the Mormon Battalion. Edward enjoyed his association with Col. Alexander Doniphan whom he had known while in the Nauvoo Legion. They had much to talk about in the short time they could find to converse. In Santa Fe, Lieutenant Smith relinquished command to Lieutenant Col. Phillip St. George Cooke, whom the men came to respect as a fair but firm leader. The new commander had orders to blaze a wagon trail from Santa Fe to California. Veering South along the Rio Grande, the soldiers sometimes followed the Spanish or Mexican trails but generally cut new roads. Once again the march took its toll in sickness, and on November 10th, a third detachment of fifty-five worn and weakened men turned back toward Pueblo. Edward watched as the men stumbled along and wondered what more lay in store for them on this long march. Not only did lack of water and food plague the remaining 350 members of the Battalion, but the sandy trails were a constant challenge. Edward found that the soldiers were either pulling long ropes to help the teams get through the deep sand, or they were walking double file in front of the wagons to make firm trails for the wheels. Because the Battalion was blazing a new wagon trail to California, guides were sent out ahead of the main group to scout out the area and decide the way the group should go. On Nov. 20th near Cow Springs, the guides couldn’t find a trail westward. None of them had been on this route before. Cooke and the guides climbed to the top of a high mound and built a fire as a signal. A couple of Indians came in response to the smoke, and Cooke spoke with them about what lay in each direction. After talking with the Indians and his officers, Cooke decided to lead the Battalion south to Janos in Senora, Mexico. Levi Hancock and some of the other leaders of the men felt this was a bad decision to lead the Battalion towards enemy territory, so he and Father Pettegrew went from tent to tent asking the men to pray that Cooke would not lead them into Mexico. Edward also wondered how wise it would be to go looking for trouble, as it seemed they were doing. The next morning the camp was on the march due south when, after about two miles, Cooke stopped on a mound. He told the men that his orders from Kearny were to go to California and that was to the West. He had the bugler blow orders to turn westward and the Battalion turned its direction. The men were truly grateful and felt the hand of the Lord had been in the Colonel’s decision. That evening, Edward joined with the other men in a prayer of gratitude to the Lord for his help in the decision of the Commander. Ruel Barrus was somewhat of a hunter for the camp, and now that they had again come to some mountains, he and Captain Hunter obtained permission from Col. Cooke to go hunt. On Dec. 5th they were successful in killing two young bulls and bringing the stake back to camp sometime after dark. On the 7th he again went out, but this time they saw only older bulls whose meat was tough. They supposed the Indians had already selected the cows and calves as they were tender. About this time, Col. Cooke learned that Company B had a private wagon which carried the men’s equipment. Enraged, he ordered the men to each carry his own knapsacks and blankets. Edward and his comrades were already on cut rations, and this new order from the Colonel seamed very unrealistic, but this was the army, and there was no discussion. Near the San Pedro River, some wild bulls got in with the Battalion’s cattle and were killed by the guards. When the companies stopped at the San Pedro for water, other bulls, frightened at the smell of blood, charged into the soldiers. The rampaging bulls charged on and on causing great confusion and fear. Edward hurdled himself behind a wagon with a mighty beast headed toward him. The bulls charged men, mules, and wagons. Albert Smith was trapped between a bull’s horns. He was badly bruised and had three ribs torn from his back bones. One bull caught Amos Cox and gored his thigh before tossing him in the air. Levi Fifield had no wagon or tree for protection and threw himself flat on the ground when a bull charged him. The bull jumped over him, leaving the soldier frightened but unharmed. There was so much dust from the charging that it was difficult to see for a few minutes. When the dust cleared and the bulls had passed, three men were wounded, and three mules were gored to death. Several wagons were tipped over, and a couple were damaged from the stampede. Col. Cooke told a story of seeing “a coal black bull charge on Corporal Frost, of Company A.” Frost stood his ground while the animal rushed right on for one hundred yards. Col. Cooke was close by and believed the man in great danger to his life and called to him to run. Frost did not move but aimed his musket very deliberately and only fired when the beast was within ten paces. It fell headlong, almost at his feet. Cooke said Corporal Frost was “one of the bravest men he ever saw.” When things finally settled down, Edward climbed from behind the upturned wagon. The battle lasted only a few minutes, but ten to fifteen of the bulls were killed. The event was immortalized as the Battle of the Bulls, and was the only fight during the Battalion’s long journey. The Battalion passed without incident through Tucson, where a small Mexican garrison was stationed. Upon hearing that an army was coming, the garrison fled with most of the people, leaving behind only the aged and some children. Kearny had ordered the Battalion that they were to pass through the town and make no scene. As they marched through town, Edward noticed the worried expressions of the faces which peered at the army from behind walls and curtains. He knew they were scared to death, and he was grateful that the orders had been not to stop. The Battalion then rejoined Kearny’s route along the Gila River. Beyond the Colorado River lay over a hundred miles of trackless desert where water was obtained only by digging deep wells. There the Battalion encountered the heaviest sands, the hottest days, and the coldest nights. William Hyde told of the plight of no water saying: “Had no water through the day except a little that was fortified in two or three small mud holes. This was sipped down by the men as readily as if it had been the choicest of wine” The next day he wrote: “Had no water at this place of encampment only what we could get out of a mud hole by going three miles, but it was filthy in the extreme. We however mixed a little flour in some but the water was too thick with the mud that it would admit of but a small portion of the flour being added. We cooked some and ate it, but it was like eating clay.” In writing about this time on the Battalion march the Colonel said, “A great many of my men are wholly without shoes and use every expedient, such as rawhide moccasins and sandals, and even wrapping their feet in pieces of woolen and cotton cloth.” It had by now been three days without water while walking upwards of nineteen miles each day. Edward staggered along, wondering if he could make it the whole way. He thought of his little family so far away and pledged to himself, that if there were any way possible, he would struggle on for them. Finally after 70 miles across a barren desert, with little or no water, it was announced that ahead they had found a pond of water. The camp was given the privilege to make the best way they could to the place that they might quench their thirst. Edward hurried along as best he could, but he noticed other men who had given all they could and had collapsed on the sides of the trail. William said: “We traveled eight miles, and to our great joy we came up with the pilots, who were seated by a small pond of water. Here we laid ourselves upon the ground by the waters edge, and after drinking and resting and again drinking and resting and continuing this operation for a time, we succeeded in quenching our thirst.” As the men sat around at the pond, William commented that they looked as if they were “over ninety years old.” Edward and some of the other men were finally able to revive enough to take mules and canteens back to those who had fallen along the way. Colonel Cooke wrote, “The men arrived here, completely worn down; they staggered as they marched, as they did yesterday. Some of the men did not find strength to reach the camp before daylight this morning. I went through the companies this morning; they were eating their last four ounces of flour. I have remaining only five public wagons; there are three private property wagons.” Colonel Cooke was heard to say that he believed that any other company under like circumstances would have mutinied. He complimented the Battalion saying that notwithstanding they were worn down; they were ready to obey any orders that might be given. He further stated that had he known the situation of the desert they had just crossed, he would never have come into it. That evening, as the Colonel came to look over his troops he was again surprised at the spirit of these Battalion men in such a plight. He wrote of the camp that same evening, “The men, who this morning were prostrate, worn out, hungry, heartless, have recovered their spirits tonight, and are singing and playing the fiddle.” Edward saw the surprise in his Colonel’s eyes, but then he had been with the Mormons for many years, and he knew that these men would find joy and renewed strength through their camaraderie and the singing of songs and hymns. On the 21st December a story is told by a private Henry Bigler, a 22-two-old single young man. He said, “I was detailed to be the Colonel’s orderly for the day. On going to his tent to report myself, I found him feeding his mule some of the wheat that he had brought from Tucson. There was another mule determined to share the Colonel’s mule’s wheat. He had driven it away several times. As soon as his back was turned the mule would march boldly up for another morsel of wheat, until the colonel could endure it no longer. Turning to me, he said, ‘Orderly, is your gun loaded?’ Being answered in the negative, he said, ‘Load your gun and I’ll shoot that mule; I knew the mule and it belonged to one of our own men. The thought came to me not to permit it to be killed. At this I took from my box a cartridge, clapped it in my mouth and with my teeth, tore off the bullet and put the ball in my pocket. I then put the powder into my musket and rammed the paper in on top of it. Pretty soon he came out and, standing broadside, fired. The moment he discovered the animal was not dead, he dropped the musket and with an oath said, “You did not load that gun right’ and walked into his tent. His bugler, Mr. Guigly, and others who saw the trick fairly split their sides with laughter.” Finally near the Gila River the Battalion was met by Pima Indians who came out by the hundreds, men, women, and children. Edward thought it interesting to see the Indian tribe. He had never seen a whole tribe before this day. The Chief seemed pleased to see the army. He said the Mexicans had been to see him. The Mexicans wanted him and his men to join them and give battle, promising the Indians all the spoils. The Chief told them his men should not fight. They had never shed the blood of a white man. For that reason, he was not afraid of the coming army, and he did not believe the Battalion would hurt them. He stated that he had no objections to them passing through his towns. The Colonel purchased from the Chief 100 bushels of corn to feed the teams. The Indians brought to camp large quantities of corn, beans, meal, and pumpkin to trade for clothes, buttons, beads, needles, and thread etc. Money they refused, saying it was of no use to them. The new provisions were used to make somewhat of a Christmas feast consisting of cold beans, pancakes, and pumpkin sauce. William Hyde remembered Christmas with his family and contrasted it to the “parched lips, scalded shoulders, weary limbs, blistered feet, worn out shoes, and ragged clothes” he was experiencing at this time. Edward’s dreams could not help but go back in time in the same reminiscent way to Christmas from a more gentle time. The Battalion continued across the desert only to find in their path the rugged heart of the coastal mountains. Edward looked in awe at the mountains. He had never seen such mountains with such height that seemed to defy anything but the wild goats he saw along the ridges. He knew that they would have to somehow cut a path for them and their wagons to cross over the foreboding mountains. Col. Cooke wrote, “I came to the canyon, and found it much worse than I had been led to expect (by the guides). There were many rocks to surmount, but the worst was the narrow pass. Setting the example myself, as there was much work done on it before the wagons came; the rock was hewn with axes to increase the opening. I thought it wide enough…but when a trial was made, at the first pass, it was found too narrow by a foot of solid rock. More work was done, and several trials made. The sun was now only an hour high, and it was about seven miles to the first water. I had a wagon taken to pieces, and carried through. Meanwhile, we still hewed and hammered at the mountain side; but the best road tools had been lost. The next wagon body was lifted through, and then the running gear, by lifting one side; The work on the pass was perseveringly continued, and the last two wagons were pulled through by the mules, with loads undisturbed.” Once through the mountain passes, it was on to Warner’s Ranch where the weary, hungry, and ill clad men were able to rest. William and a few of his friends were able to pool their recourses and buy a pig which they cooked “and in company with others had a feast that revived our spirits.” The company took up their march again on the 23rd of January and hiked eighteen miles over the hills from Warner’s Ranch. It rained several hours in the afternoon, again at night, and then continued raining for twenty-four hours. It was all Edward and his weary comrades could do to keep going. “The Battalion had fallen upon the rainy season. All the tents were blown down in the night,” wrote Col. Cooke. He continued, “The ill-clad Battalion was drenched and suffered much.” Another few days’ march brought them past the deserted Catholic Mission of San Loui Rey. “One mile below the mission,” recorded Tyler, the camp historian, “we ascended a bluff, here the long looked-for great Pacific Ocean appeared plain to our view, only about three miles distant. The joy, the cheer that filled our souls, none but worn-out pilgrims nearing a haven of rest can imagine. Prior to leaving Nauvoo, we had talked about and sung of the great ‘Pacific Sea,’ and we were now upon its very borders, and its beauty far exceeded our most sanguine expectations.” This is just how Edward felt as he finally gazed upon the great Pacific Ocean. They had been through so much. They were weary, nearly exhausted, but to look out upon the Ocean, and realize that they truly had done this great thing, was the medicine needed to bolster their spirits. Down the coast they marched southward to where they were to meet Gen. Kearny. Finally on January 29, 1847, they reached Mission San Diego at the end of their 2,030-mile march. Edward was humbled and grateful to the Lord for his tender mercies in bring the men all the way through their many trials and to the end of their journey. Just five days after they arrived, Col. Cooke gathered the men together and read a bulletin which he had written concerning their march. Edward and his comrades stood shoulder to shoulder deeply moved at the Colonel’s words as he said in part, “The Lieutenant-Colonel commanding congratulates the Battalion on their safe arrival on the shore of the Pacific Ocean, and the conclusion of their march of over two thousand miles. History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry…” The bulletin was received by the Mormon volunteers with hearty cheers. Since California was already in the hands of the United States, the Battalion men served as occupation troops with garrison duty in San Diego, San Luis Rey, and Los Angeles. While in Southern California, the Saints gained the respect of the local citizens. Those in San Diego built a courthouse and houses, burned brick, and dug wells, thus contributing significantly to the building of the community. On July 16th at the end of their year’s enlistment, the Battalion members were discharged, although eighty-one men chose to reenlist for an additional six months. Ruel Barrus was among those who re-enlisted. Most of the discharged men left for northern California, intending to travel east to join the Saints in the Salt Lake Valley or back at the Missouri River. Edward Hunter joined with a large group including William Hyde who traveled North to Sutter’s Fort just on the West side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Some of the brethren concluded to stop, as it was now getting late in the season. After a mature consideration, it was thought best for a portion of the company to tarry, as the wages were good, and they could labor until spring. Edward Hunter and William Hyde both opted to continue their journey which they did with others heading over the mountains, and on the 5th of September, they reached the valley on the East side of the Sierra Nevada mountains. This day they passed the spot where several emigrants from Missouri, the ill-fated Donner Party, had perished the previous winter. It was a solemn moment for Edward and the other as they saw the remnants of these poor people. Their bones were bleached upon the ground, having not received a burial. The next morning they met Samuel Brannan who had been through San Francisco to the Salt Lake Valley, where he had met with the Presidency of the Church, together with the pioneers and the first companies of the Saints to that place. He said that Captain Brown was on his way to meet the Battalion Members and was just two or so days behind him. Edward and the group waited for Captain James Brown and were soon met by him and a small escort, direct from Salt Lake City. He conveyed a message from Brigham Young asking those men without families to stay in California to work during the winter of 1847-48. Upon hearing the information, most of the men returned to the settlements in California to labor until spring. Many spent the winter at Sutter’s Fort on the Sacramento River and assisted in the discovery of gold in January 1848 that began the California gold rush. The following summer they honorably completed their contracts with Sutter, abandoned the gold fields, and joined their families either in Salt Lake City or at the Missouri River. However, William Hyde, Edward Hunter and several others determined to continue on to their families and started out again. They traveled Northeast through Nevada and up through Fort Hall in Idaho. Edward looked around him at the lush grass covered fields of Idaho and thought it would be a good place to raise sheep. Years later he would buy a farm in Idaho and do just that. The group then headed south around the Great Salt Lake and down into the Salt Lake Valley, arriving on the 12th of October. Edward was delighted and relieved to find that his dear wife, Mary Ann, and their little daughter, now a year older, were in the valley. She had come across the plains with Edward’s uncle Edward Hunter and his family. It was a heartwarming reunion for all of them and a sweet close to the heroic journey of which Edward Hunter had been a part. MaryAnn had not dared to hope that Edward would travel to Utah that season. She had heard that many of the men were planning to stay for the winter in California, so it was a great delight to see Edward in the first group of returning Battalion Members. She brushed back his hair which was longer than usual and gazed up into his well tanned face, rugged and weather beaten. It was so good to have him back. Now they would begin a new life together in this new land they would call Zion. Though very late in the season, William Hyde felt driven to continue his journey over the Rockies and across the plains to Winter Quarters. He joined with 16 other men who started out two days later. They reached Fort Bridger before the snow fell, but camped on the Sweetwater on October 25th and at Independence Rock on the 29th. They were able to kill buffalo along the way for their meat, but it was cold and windy. By November 7th William recorded “The weather about as cold as I ever witnessed. Had to run behind our mules with ropes wrapped around us to keep from freezing.” They reached Fort Laramie and were very hospitably received and entertained. They were given a substantial supper and breakfast, and feed for their mules for which they did not have to pay. But the next morning they were on their way again. They had trouble trying to cross the river at Loup Fork. William crossed on foot to try the depth of the water. He had to swim the last part of the distance, despite the chunks of ice and cold. One of their animals was mired in the quicksand and died. They were able to cook and eat the meat as their provisions had entirely failed. They continued their journey but were becoming weaker and more susceptible to the freezing cold all the time. On the morning of November 10th, they all united in calling on the Lord to regard their situation in mercy and send food in some way that they might not perish. As they continued their journey, they found that the Lord had indeed heard their prayers, for a group of wild turkeys began to pass their camp in droves. They succeeded in getting four of the birds which was one to every four persons. Rejuvenated from the turkey meat, the emaciated men continued their journey. On the evening of the very next day, they arrived at Winter Quarters to a wonderful reception from the Saints. They were the first 16 souls to return from the Battalion after their discharge in California. The very next day, William Hyde was able to cross the Missouri River and ride to Council Point, a distance of twelve miles, where he found his family and his father’s family well. William told of his arrival in this way. “I reached home on Sunday, and as it was dusk when I arrived, the people of the little burgh had gathered for worship. The news of my arrival soon reached their place of gathering, which proved the breaking up of their meeting. All were so anxious to see me, that without ceremony they flocked out of the meeting house and gathered into my humble but happy cot which had been built by my father and brother for the benefit of my family in my absence. This was a joyful meeting.” The Mormon Battalion truly was a great endeavor and in the words of Col. Cooke, “History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry…” Edward Hunter is the father of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. William Hyde is the brother of Rosel Hyde who is the father of Martha Ann Hyde Hunter who is the mother of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Ruel Barrus is the brother of Emery Barrus who is the father of Owen Henry Barrus who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. This story was adapted from the following accounts: Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 315-326. Treasures of Pioneer History, Compiled by Kate B. Carter, 409-429 (DFH/M73-84). The Mormon Battalion, U.S. Army of the West 1846-1848, by Norma Baldwin Rickets. The Mormon Battalion, by B.H. Roberts. Five Hundred Wagons Stood Still, Mormon Battalion Wives; “Mary Ann Whitesides Hunter,” by Shirley N. Maynes, 283, (DFH/Hu21). The Private Journal of William Hyde, Part 2, (DFH/Hy43-69). Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

EMERY BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) EMERY BARRUS, (son of Benjamin Barrus, born April 4, 1784, Richmand, N.H., died 1864. Chautauque, N.Y. and Betsy Stebbins, born March 21, 1787, in Massachusetts, died July 20, 1828 in New York). He was born April 8, 1809. Chautauque County, New York. Came to Utah October 9, 1853, Appleton Harmon Company. Married Huldah Abigail Nickerson (daughter of Freeman Nickerson, born Feb. 19, 1779, Dennis, Mass. and died Jan. 22, 1847, Chariton Point, Iowa, while on his way to Utah, and Huldah Chapman born 1789 in Connecticut, came to Utah 1859, died 1860, Provo, Utah). She was born April 16, 1816 in Pennsylvania. Their children: Lydia b. Oct. 22, 134, m. Festus Sprague, April 1, 1857; Betsy N. b. March 28, 1836, m. Lovina Ann Steele, Sept. 29, 1861; Emery Freeman b. March 12, 1841, died; Mary Huldah b. April 8, 1843, m. Charles Bailey; Orrin Elezar b. Sept. 14, 1845, m. Catherine Wilson; Emery Alexander b. March 27, 1848. d. Nov, 16, 1858; Ruel Michael b. Nov. 14, 1850, m. Ida Pearl Hunter; Owen Henry b. Dec. 28, 1853, m. Olive Deseret McBride Feb. 18, 1877, m. Mary Ann Hunter Dec. 21, 1892; Sarah Abigail b. April 9, 1856, m. Eleazar Freeman Nickerson; John Nickerson b. June 1, 1858, m. Alice Burton; Eliza Alvira b. Sept. 15, 1860, m. Charles Post. Married Jane Zerildah Baker (Daughter of Benjamin Baker, Pioneer 1857). She was born November 3, 1841. Their children: Emiline Abigail b. Nov. 30, 1859 m. Henry Tanner; James Baker b. Aug. 7, 1852, m. Charlotte Ann Mathews; William Taylor b. June 1, 1864, m. Matilda McBride; Thomas b. July 20, 1866; and Freeman b. Oct. 12, 1869, died; Chauncey Baker b. Jan. 15, 1872; Catherina Rozena b. Feb. 24, 1877, m. Henry Watson. Family home, Grantsville, Utah. High Priest; patriarch. Carpenter; stock raiser; farmer, Seventy. Died Oct. 5, 1899.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BARRUS

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(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BARRUS (Son of Emery Barrus and Huldah Abigail Nickerson). Born May 30, 1838, in Cataraugus County, N.Y. Came to Utah 1853, driving a herd of cattle across the plains. Married Lovina Ann Steele Sept. 29, 1861 (daughter of Samuel Steele born July 15, 1822, Plattsburg, Clinton County, N.Y., pioneer, 1851 Joshua Grant Company and Elvira Salome Thayer, born Sept. 15, 1826 in New York.) She was born Sept. 29, 1844, in Illinois. Their children: Benjamin Franklin b. Aug. 22, 1862; Samuel Leonard b. Jan. 14, 1868, died; Orrin Orland b. May 29, 1870 m. Ulysses Cline, July 26, 1893; Albert Almond b. June 1, 1875, m. Margaret Alice Millward March 4, 1896, m. Mabel Robinson Jan. 8, 1902; Elvira Chloena b. Dec. 9, 1881, died; Sylvia Ellen b. Jan. 17, 1886, died; Calvin Cleone b. Jan. 24, 1887, d. Jan. 13, 1891.

RUEL BARRUS

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(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) RUEL BARRUS (son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stubbins). Born Aug. 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautaqua County, New York. Came to Utah Oct. 15, 1854 with others of the Mormon Battalion. Married Ellen Martin, Aug. 10, 1859 (daughter of Samuel Martin, pioneer Sept. 25, 1855 Richard Ballantyne Company, and Priscilla Layton, who died in St. Louis), She was born Sept. 23, 1844. Their children: Ellen P. b. Feb. 12, 1861, m. Charles Schaeffer; Betsy A. b. Nov. 11, 1862; Zeltha A. b. March 28, 1864; Fannie I. b. June 11, 1866, m. William Sanford; Lona b. Aug. 12, 1870, m. Charles Nelson; Ruel M. b. April 20, 1873, m. Angeline Anderson; Darias M. b. April 20, 1876, m. Lizzie Ratcliffe; Royal L. b. June 27, 1879; Essie Glee b. March 13, 1885. Seventy, 2nd Lieutenant Company B, Mormon Battalion; Major in Echo Canyon Campaign.

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: History written by Benjamin F. Barrus, oldest son of Benjamin Barrus who was born before the family left New York State, Genealogical data by E. B. Warner; Sent to Central Company 1 April 1964 by Emily T. Cramer; History Submitted by May Clark Barrus) Emery Barrus, son of Benjamin and Betsy Stebbins was born 1 April 1809 at Hanover, Chautauqua Co., N.Y. and died 6 Oct. 1899 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In 1833 he was working as a farm hand for Freeman Nickerson and was keeping company with his daughter, Huldah Abigail. At this time the Prophet Joseph Smith and some other Elders visited that part of New York and made their home with Freeman Nickerson for a time. Thus it happened that Freeman Nickerson and his family, consisting of several sons and daughters, some married and some single, joined the Church in 1833 and Emery Barrus, hearing the Gospel at this time was also baptized. He was the only one of his father's family to be baptized into the Church in New York. On Dec. 19, 1833, Emery married Huldah Abigail Nickerson, daughter of Freenan Nickerson. In Nov. 1839, freeman Nickerson, together with his son, Moses, his son-in-law, Emery Barrus, his daughter Caroline Hubbard and their children (altogether 17 persons) started on their journey to Missouri and arrived at Nauvoo in the spring of 1840, bought city lots and built homes, planted orchards, etc, and lived in comparative peace until about 1844 when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother, Hyrum, were assassinated in the Carthage Jail. After that date the persecution became very severe; men were whipped, houses burned and crops destroyed until 1845 when the saints agreed to vacate their beautiful homes, leaving the orchards with their fruit trees just coming into bearing. Preparations were made for that never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery Barrus had a shingle mill on an Island in the Mississippi, where his wife would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for silngles. In 1845 they moved to the Island and Emery would go into the woods and cut the timber and his wife would help saw it into suitable lengths for the different parts of the wagon, then put it up over his head in the shop to season. He made 15 wagons right from the stumps of trees. After the Prophet was killed the mob saw that Mormonism was not dead and told the people if they would drop Mormonism they could remain in their homes. Many found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track until they could find an easier way to worship God. Freeman Nickerson and his family, including Emery Barrus and family, who left New York in 1839, left Nauvoo in August, seven years later, crossed the Mississippi River and again took up the line to March. They wintered at Sheridan Point, Iowa in 1846 and 1847, their stock living on the buds and limbs of small trees felled for that purpose. They built log homes and covered them with split boards. On Jan. 22, 1847. Freeman Nickerson and his wife made the rest of the journey with her son, Levi, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1850. In the spring of 1847 they again took up the line of march westward, arriving in Winter Quarters to late to accompany the pioneers on their journey to the Salt Lake Valley. So Emery Barrus and his family again built a house and fenced a farm on which he planted and harvested considerable produce. Here they remained until the spring of 1853 when they again started on the westward journey. They traveled in Appleton Harmon's Company and Emery was appointed hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The cholera was in the wagon train in front of them and the one behind them and the captain advised that they eat as little meat as possible. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville in Oct. 1853. Their son, Owen, was born in Dec. 1853, two months after their arrival. By the spring of 1854 the inhabitants of Grantsville had become quite numerous. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in early days. They had to herd their stock on the range in the daytime and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. In those days there were no carding machines. Davenport and Wilson each had a flock of sheep. The home of mother Barrus was a regular manufacturing plant. Huldah Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls in yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. After there was a carding machine in Provo, Huldah Barrus would take the wool to Provo, driving a pair of colts they had brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of butter and cheese. Emery bought 46 head of loose stock, besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons across the plains. Not a fruit tree or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1853. Brother Sceva, John Clark and James McBride were the first to plant fruit trees. Emery Barrus made the first barns in Grantsville and some good houses. In 1855 the grasshoppers became so thick that they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. 1856 was the year of the famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour. They were without flour for months, living on segos, thistles, roots, etc. Brother John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856 and Brother William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, thrashed it with flails and cleaned it up in the wind. Each family got one half bushel of grain and ground it in coffee mills to make cake for the 4th of July dinner in 1856. This one half bushel of grain was a gift from John Cooley. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and milled and each family got a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery Barrus furnished a fat animal for beef so each family had a flour cake and a beef steak for dinner on July 24th 1856. In 1857 they heard that Johnson's Army was coming to civilize the Mormons. Every able-bodied man and boy was expected to go to Echo Canyon to hedge up the way for the Army. 1858 was the move south. It was decided to burn every building, destroy every tree and growing crops, provided the army persisted in coming in. But they did not come in until a treaty of peace was signed. Every family had the Grantsville precinct except a few faithful brethren. They were left to water the crops with orders to burn if molested by the Army. Emery Barrus was the first Mayor of Grantsville City and attended to surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charley Herman. He was a faithful worker in the temple and only came home two weeks before his death at the age of 90 years. He was ordained a patriarch in Grantsville. Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus was the first president of the Grantsville Ward Relief Society. By his first wife, Huldah Abigail Nicerson, he had the following children: Lydia, Betsy and Benjamin Franklin, all born in Hanover, N.Y,, Emery Freeman, Mary Huldah and Orrin Eleazer, born at Nauvoo, Ill., Emery Alexander and Ruel Michael born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, Owen Henry, Sarah Abigain, John Nickerson and Eliza Elvira born at Grantsville, Utah. Emery Barrus married April 5, 1857 at Grantsville Jane Ziralda Baker, daughter of Benjamin Baker and Abigail Taylor. She was born 3 Nov. 1841 at Adams, Ill., died 26 March 1895. To them were born the following children: Emiline Abigail, James Benjamin, William Taylor, Thomas Baker, Chauncy Baker and Catherine Rosina.

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS (Written by Esther Warner, Granddaughter)

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Written by Esther Warner, Granddaughter; Myrtle Allsop, County Historian; Alice Knowlton,Camp Historian) (Made available from the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers) Emery Barrus, son of Benjamln (5), Michael (4), Ebenezer (3), Ebenezer (2), John (1), and Betsy Stebbins (7), Hesadiah (6), Abner (5), Thomas (4), Samuel (l), Thomas (2), and Rowland (1), was born Apr. 8, 1809 at Hanover, Chautauqua Co., N.Y. and died Oct. 6, 1899 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In 1833 he was working as a farm hand for Freeman Nickerson and was keeping company with his daughter Huldah Abigail. At this same time, the Prophet Joseph Smith and some other Elders, visited that part of New York and made their home with Freeman Nickerson for a time. Thus it happened Freeman Nickerson and his family, consisting of several sons and daughters, some married and some single, joined the church in 1833 and Emery Barrus hearing the gospel at this time was also baptized. He was the only one of his father's family to be baptized into the Church in New York, Major Ruel Barrus being only eleven years old at that time and subject to his father until he came of age, when he left his father's home and came to Nauvoo and joined the church and made his home with Emery. On Dec. 19, 1833 Emery married Huldah Abagail Nickerson, daughter of Freeman (6), Eleazer (5), Eleazer (4), John (3), and Nicholas (2), William (1) and Huldah Chapman (3), Eliphalet (2), Moses (1) born Apr. 11, 1816 at Springville, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania; died Aug. 22, 1872 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In Nov. 1839, Freeman Nickerson, together with his son Moses, his son-in-law Emery Barrus, his daughter Caroline Hubbard and their children (altogether 17 persons) started on their journey to Missouri, but the Ohio River being closed with ice they wintered at Jefferson City, Missouri and arrived at Nauvoo in the spring of 1840 ; bought city lots and built homes, planted orchards etc., and lived in comparative peace, until about 1844 when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were assasinated in Carthage Jail. After that date the persecution became very severe; men were whipped, houses burned and crops destroyed until 1845 when the Saints agreed to vacate their beautiful homes, leaving the orchards with their fruit trees just coming into bearing. Preparations were made for that never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery Barrus had a shingle mill on an Island in the Mississippi, where his wife would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for shingles. In 1845 they moved to the Island and Emery would go into the woods and get the timber and his wife would help saw it into suitable lengths for the different parts of the wagon, then put it up over his head In the shop to season. He made 15 wagons right from the stumps of the trees. After the Prophet was killed the mob saw that Mormonism was not dead and told the people if they would drop Mormonism they could remain in their homes. If any found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track until they could find an easier way to worship God. Freeman Nickerson and his family, including Emery Barrus and family who left New York in 1839, left Nauvoo in August, seven years later; crossed the Mississippi River and again took up the line of march. They wintered at Sheridan Point, Iowa in 1846 and 1847, their stock living on the buds and limbs of small trees felled for that purpose€. They built log houses and covered them with split boards. On Jan. 22, 1847, Freeman Nickerson died and his wife made the rest of the journey with her son Levi, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1850. In the spring of 1847, they again took up the line of march westward, arriving at Winter Quarters too late to accompany the pioneers on their journey to Salt Lake Valley. So Emery Barrus and his family again built a house and fenced a farm on which he planted and harvested Considerable produce. There they remained until the spring of 1853, when they again started on the westward journey. They traveled In Appelton Harmon's company and Emery was appointed hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The cholera was in the wagon train in front of them and the one behind them and the captain advised that they eat as little meat as possible. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville in Oct. 1853. Their son Owen was born in Dec. 1853, two months after their arrival. By the spring of 1854 the inhabitants of Grantsville had become quite numerous. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in early days. They had to herd their stock on the range in the daytime and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. In those days there were no carding machines. Davenport and Wilson each had a flock of sheep. The home of mother Barrus was a regular manufacturing plant. Huldah Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. After there was a carding machine in Provo, Huldah Barrus would take the wool to Provo, driving a pair of colts they had brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of cheese and butter. Emery brought 46 head of loose stock, besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons across the plains. Not a fruit tree or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1851. Brother Sceva, John Clark and James McBride were the first to plant fruit trees. Emery Barrus made the first barns in Grantsville and some good houses. In 1855 the grasshoppers came so thick they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. In 1856 was the year of famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour. They were without bread for months, living on segoes, thistles, roots, etc. Brother John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856 and Brother William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, threshed it with flails and cleaned it up in the wind. Each family got one-half bushel of grain and ground it in coffee mills to make cake for the 4th of July dinner in 1856. This one-half bushel of grain was a gift from John W. Cooley. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and milled and each family got a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery Barrus furnished a fat animal for beef, so each family had a flour cake and a beef steak for dinner July 24th 1856. In 1857 they heard that Johnson's army was coming to civilize the Mormons. Every able-bodied man and boy was expected to go to Echo Canyon to hedge up the way of the army. 1858 was the move South. It was decided to burn every building, destroy every tree and growing crops, provided the army persisted in coming in. But they did not come in until a treaty of peace was signed. Every family had left the Grantsville precinct a free faithful brethren They were left to water the crops with orders to burn if molested by the army. Emery Barrus was the first mayor of Grantsville City and attended to surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charley Herman. He was a faithful worker in the Temple and only came home two weeks before his death at the age of 90 years. He was ordained a patriarch in Grantsville. Huldah Abigail Nickerson was the first president of the Relief Society of Grantsville Ward. By his first wife Huldah Abigail Nickerson he had the following children: Lydiaa, Betsy, and Benjamin Franklin, all born in Hanover, New York; Emery Freeman, Mary Huldah and Orvin Eleazer born at Nauvoo, Ill.; Emery Alexander and Ruel Michael born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska; Owen Henry, Sarah Abigail, John Nickerson and Eliza Elvira born at Grantsville Utah. Emery Barrus married Apr. 5, 1857 at Grantsville Jane Zerelda Baker, daughter of Benjamin Baker and Abigail Taylor. She was born Nov. 3, 1841 at Adams, Ill. died Mar. 26, 1895. To them were born the following children: Emellne Abigail, James Benjamin, William Taylor, Thomas Baker, Herman Baker, Chauncey Baker, and Catherlne Rozina all born at Grantsville, Utah.

HISTORY OF RUEL BARRUS 1821-1918

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

Ruel Barrus was born August 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautauqua County, New York. He was the youngest son and eighth child of a family of ten children (five sons and five daughters) born to Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. He came from an old American family. His mother, Betsy Stebbins, was born March 17, 1787 at Monson, Hampden County, Vermont to Hesadiah Stebbins and Betsy Sessions Babcock. She was deserted by her first husband (unknown) before their first child was born. She obtained permission of the court to name her son, born March 29, 1805, Abdiel Hesadiah Stebbins. Ruel's father, Benjamin Barrus was born April 4, 1784 at Richmond, Cheshire County, New York; He was the son of Michael Barrus and Elizabeth Simmonds. Benjamin fought in the War of 1812-2.815 -and was wounded in the battle at the burning of Buffalo. He died February 2, 1864 in Silver Creek, Chautauqua County, New York. Ruel's ancestors on both sides fought in the Revolutionary War. His paternal grandfather, Michael Barrus, born July 2, 1751 in Cumberland Hill, Cumberland County, Rhode Island fought in the American Revolution as a Sergeant in Captain Capron's Company, Colonel Samuel Ashley's Regiment, New Hampshire Militia. His maternal grandfather, Hezadiah Stebbins born October 25, 1754 at Brimfield, Massachusetts, served in the American Revolution as Private in Captain Joseph Thompson's Company, Colonel- Timothy Danielson's Regiment, taking part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. Ruel's father, Benjamin Barrus and his mother Betsy Stebbins were married sometime in 1807. Ruel's mother died August 5, 1828 leaving a family of eleven children. Shortly after this, possibly in 1830 Benjamin married Anna Webb; the date of the marriage is unknown. She was born in 1783 in Connecticut. Anna Webb faithfully took care of the children until her death February 26, l86l. She was buried in the Doty Cemetery in Silver Creek, New York. She never had children of her own. Ruel was not quite seven years old when his mother died. He grew up and obtained his education in his native town of Villanova, learning there the Carpentering trade. At the age of nineteen he became interested in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. At this time he left his home in New York State and went to live for two years with his brother, Alexander, who was living in Pennsylvania. Alexander was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church and had developed an unfriendly feeling toward the Mormon Church, so Ruel moved again. In 1844 he went to stay with his older brother, Emery, who at this time was living in Nauvoo, Illinois, he having become a member of the Mormon Church. In October of l844 Ruel was baptized by Richard Sheldon and in October of 1845 he was ordained a Seventy in the Nauvoo Temple. Ruel and Emery were the only two members of the family to join the Church. They remained at Nauvoo until the Saints were driven from there in the uprising against the Mormons by the mobs of Illinois. While, the Saints were on the plains of Iowa and Nebraska, a call came from President James K. Polk of the United States for a Battalion of 500 men to be enlisted from the Mormon ranks to serve in the Mexican War. Ruel was among the first to respond to this call and enlisted in Company B with the rank of Second Lieutenant on July 16, 1846 at Council Bluffs, Iowa. At this time -Ruel had a team and wagon and 50O pounds of flour for which he had been offered $500 but instead of selling it, he gave it to the company with which he had been traveling. The Battalion left Council Bluffs, Iowa for Fort Leavenworth, Kansas on July 20, 1846. That 200 mile march was a severe ten day trial period through a country that had no roads or bridges. The route generally was along the steaming Missouri River. Swarms of mosquitoes, both day and night, miles of mud and violent nocturnal rainstorms greeted them. The none-descript-looking group had left everything they could spare behind. The men during this time had no tents or shelter of any kind as they were not outfitted until they reached Fort Leavenworth. Malaria became widespread and their beloved non-Mormon Commander, James Allen, died of malaria at Fort Leavenworth where they arrived August 1, 1846. At Fort Leavenworth they received infantry equipment and each man was paid a "uniform allowance" of $42.00. Instead of buying army uniforms, many of the men sent most of this money back to Winter Quarters and wore their rough frontier clothing. They left for the coast on August 12th and was commanded by Lt. A. J. Smith. His overpowering desire was to get them to Santa Fe as rapidly as possible and he led them hard and fast those nine hundred miles down the Santa Fe Trail. The major problem was the heat, rapid pace, sickness and a malevolent doctor who administered calomel (mercury) and arsenic for every disorder — with force if necessary. At Santa Fe Lt. Col. P. St. George Cooke took over as the permanent commander of the Battalion. The route from Santa Fe to the Pacific was for the greater part through unknown wilderness without road or trail. There were high odds against a successful journey of eleven hundred miles, short of rations through enemy territory taking 25 wagons and six cannon where no wagon train had ever rolled and led by guides who had never traversed the route. The Battalion arrived at San Diego, California January 29 1847 completing what is probably the longest march (2,000 miles) in the history of the world. The Lieutenant Colonel commanding, congratulated the Battalion on their safe arrival. "Nine-tenths of it has been through a wilderness where nothing but savages and wild beasts are found, or deserts where, from want of water, there is no living creature. There, with almost hopeless labor, we have dug deep wells which the future traveler will enjoy. Without a guide who has traversed them, we have ventured into trackless prairies where water was not found for several marches. With crowbar, pick and ax in hand, we have worked our way Over mountains which seemed to defy aught save the wide goat, and have hewed a chasm out of living rock more narrow than our wagons Thus marching half-naked and half-fed, and living upon wild animals, we have discovered and made a road of great ,value to our country. “ When the term of enlistment of one year was up the Battalion was discharged at Los Angeles July 16, 1847. A call was made for re-enlistment for one company for a period of six months, Ruel Barrus was as usual one of the first to respond to his country's call and on July 20, 1847 he again was mustered into service again receiving a commission of Second Lieutenant. This company differed from the original Battalion in one respect, uniforms. August 4th he was placed in command of a detachment and ordered to the Catholic Mission of San Luis Hey near San Diego to protect it from the Indians. He served two months overtime and was mustered out of service in March 1838. After his discharge he spent two years as a missionary in Northern California, part of the time with Elder Parley P. Pratt. Part of the time was spent in the Santa Clara Valley. He was working near Sutter's Mill when Wilford Hudson, who later settled in Grantsville, brought news of the discovery of gold at the mill. He remained in California for some time working on mining claims and came to Utah in 1847, settling in Grantsville where his brother Emery had preceded him. He was married to Ellen Martin August 10, 1859, who came to America with her parents from -England in 1851. She was born at Beeston, Bedfordshire, England December 24, 1842. Her father was Samuel Martin and her Mother, Priscilla Layton (a sister of Christopher Layton). Her Mother died in St. Louis, Missouri January 29, l852. Ruel Barrus and Ellen Martin were sealed in the Endowment House on March 17, 1865.Nine children were born to this union. The honor of being the first officer appointed in Grantsville goes to Ruel Barrus when he was given the commission of Major, in the Nauvoo Legion when it was organized in the Tooele Military District. Ruel was appointed commander of the Grantsville unit. He was known the rest of his life as Major Barrus. While living in Grantsville, Major Barrus engaged in the cattle and sheep raising business, he also followed farming to some extent and was a good farmer, In politics he was a staunch Democrat, but never gave much time to his party, as he devoted much of his time, other than that required for his business, to the Church in which he was always prominent. It was not until 1887 that he received a pension from the government of $8.00 per month. At one time he was a member of the City Council of Grantsville. Throughout his life he rendered his country and Church efficient service. He enjoyed the confidence and respect, not only from the heads of the Mormon Church but with all with whom he has been associated through many years of residence in Tooele County. He died Sunday February 10, 1918 at the home of his daughter Priscilla Barrus Shaffer at the age of ninety six and one-half. At his funeral the main (address was delivered by R. S. Collett, the special representative of Governor Simon Bamberger. Mr. Collett spoke feelingly of the splendid service Major Barrus rendered to this country as a member of the Mormon Battalion, and called attention to the fact that with his death the last officer of that organization passed away and that he was possibly the last officer of the entire Mexican War. Only one other member of the Battalion survived Major Barrus and that was Hurley Morsey of Vernal who at the time was 95 years of age. At the time of his death Major Barrus was the oldest resident of Grantsville and was probably the oldest person of Tooele County. Profuse floral offerings were received from the Daughters of Pioneers in Salt Lake.

Tina Rydalch Barrus

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

TINA RYDALCH BARRUS By Agnes Barrus Clark Tina Rydalch, daughter of Richard Mitten Rydalch and Ellen Priscilla Barrus, was born 28 April, 1886 at Grantsville, Utah. She was born in a home that belonged to Mr. Judd at approximately 240 East Main Street. The home was later sold to Ed Roberts and then in the 1960’s it was torn down. She was reared by her grandparents Ellen Martin and Ruel Barrus. She called them Ma and Dad. They had a daughter, Essie Glee, who was just 11 months older than Tina. Ma was an excellent seamstress and sewed clothes for both of the girls and dressed them alike most of the time. When Essie was ten years old she and Monte were stricken with typhoid fever. Essie’s fever was so high they wrapped her in sheets soaked in ice water trying to cool her temperature. But she was not strong enough to survive the high fever and passed away on the 4th of July, 1895. Monte was older and stronger and he recovered from this illness. Tins received her education at the Grantsville Block School on East Main Street, and the Academy on West Main Street. Her teachers were Orlando Barrus, Edwin C. Dibble, Lillian Rowberry and Frank Hinkley. She completed the eight grade which was the highest class taught in Grantsville at that time. Mama told me that when she was ten years old, on Christmas eave she hid to surprise Santa Claus when he came with his presents. He was surprised, but she was sorry because he never came again. Tina was a beautiful girl as her pictures will testify. She was five feet two inches in height, and weighed 98 pounds when she was married. She had honey blond naturally curly hair, blue eyes, and retained her dainty ankles even in her late years. She was a fun loving person who enjoyed dancing. She loved to visit with people and made friends easily. She married Bert Barrus on the 5th of August, 1907, when she was 21 years old. They went by horse and buggy to Salt Lake City and were married in the old City and Count building by David A. Smith. William R. Judd and Percie Tanner from Grantsville were the witnesses. Another Grantsville couple, Tom McMichael and Alice Johnson were there and married at the same time. They stopped rested the horse in the old cave near Garfield on the way home. When mama and daddy returned to Grantsille a chivaree was held for them at the Shaffer home on East Main Street. Mama said she and daddy were hand-cuffed together so they couldn’t be kidnapped or separated as was customary in those days. Their first home was a two room adobe structure built on the corner of 307 East Main and Church street, just east of Uncle Marin and Aunt Lizzie Barrus’s home, on property belonging to the Barrus Brothers. When the Grantsville Ward was divided, the Church authorities selected that corner as the best location to build the new Second Ward chapel. The property was sold to the Church for $1500.00 and the check was made out to George Barrus. The corner stone of the new chapel was raised in 1915. Their first son Bert Verian, born 30 April, 1908, was 18 months old when Bert was called to serve a two year L.D.S. mission to the Southern States without purse or script (1909-1911) Tina hired out doing house work and also took in washing at this time to support herself and the baby. Tina lived with her mother who was a window with two children (Maggie and Milo Shaffer). They had chickens and sold eggs and had a vegetable garden and fruit trees. Grandma did sewing for hire and pierced and quilted many quilts for people. Grandma also received Mr. Shaffer’s government pension of $8.00. He was a veteran of the Civil War. Alma Ruel was born 4 Sep. 1912. Woodrow Chester was born 23 Aug 1914. A fourth son Henry was born 20 Oct. 1916.. His was a breech birth and he lived just a few hours. Mama said it took her a year to get her strength back after the loss of this baby. She was near death the day the baby was born and she often told of seeing Ma standing in the bedroom doorway as though waiting for the baby. Ellen Martin Barrus (Ma) had died 19 Aug. 1914, and mama was not permitted to go to her funeral as she was due to deliver her third baby at that time. She remembered this with great regret. Tina’s mother, Ellen Priscilla (Tillie) Barrus was sealed to her third husband, Zephaniah Shaffer. Two children were born to this couple, Maggie and Milo Barrus Shaffer. Tina was sealed to her mother and Mr. Shaffer on 7 Aug. 1976. (I was proxy for Ellen Priscilla, Saul was proxy for Mr. Shaffer, Eileen was proxy for Tina). Daddy was employed by Morton Salt Company at Burmester and he moved there with his young family. There was no school at Burmester and because of a lack of transportation, Verian stayed with Grandma Shaffer when the family moved to Burmester for employment. The old band wagon furnished Verian and the other students on the east end of town with a ride to school part of the time but usually he walked the long 2 ½ miles each way.

RUEL BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

RUEL BARRUS This biography of Ruel Barrus was printed in “The Grantsville Observer” June 1st 1923. Ruel Barrus was born August 11th 1821 at Villanova, Chautaqua County, New York, the youngest son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. His ancestors on both sides fought in the Revolutionary war, his grandfather Stebbins taking part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. His father also fought in the war of 1812 taking part in the action at the burning of the city of Buffalo New York, where he was wounded. His father died 1ne of February 1864 and his mother when he was 7 years old. He grew up in his native town learning the trade of a carpenter. At the age of 19 years he became a convert to Mormonism and moved to Pennsylvania where he took his residence with his brother Alexander who was a Methodist Episcopal minister in that state. He stayed with his brother about 2 years but he being unfriendly to the Mormons it was not a very pleasant life for Ruel. He then decided to move to Nauvoo where his brother emery resided he being the only other member of the family to join the church. He was ordained a Seventy in the Nauvoo Temple and became a member of the 4th Quorum. He remained to Nauvoo until the mob began to persecute the Saints when he with others moved west to Council Bluffs to prepare places for the people to move to. While here, President Polk of the United States on the 30th of January 1846 called upon the leaders of the Church for 4 or 5 companies of volunteers to serve for one year in the war with Mexico. Ruel Barrus was one of the first to enlist being mustered into the U.S. service July 16th 1846 and receiving a commission as a Second Lieutenant and assigned to company B of the Mormon Battalion. He was with the Battalion during the entire march to California. The Battalion left Council Bluffs July 20th 2846 for Fort Leavenworth Kansas reaching that point August 1st. This march of 200 miles was made in 10 days through a country which had no roads or bridges over the creeks and rivers, and without tents or shelter of any kind. They received their equipment and supplies at this point and on August 14th j1846 the Battalion left Fort Leavenworth for their now famous march to California, a march of infantry that has no parallel in the worlds history. They arrived at Santa Fe, New Mexico October 3rd halting there and recuperating for the final stage of the journey. Leaving Santa Fe on October 19th and crossing the great deserts of what is now New Mexico, Arizona. And California. The Battalion arrived at the San Diego January 29th j1847. They first saw the waters of the Pacific Ocean January 27th. Half the journey of 2000 miles was made through a wilderness and over trackless deserts on which of lack of water no living creature dwelt. The Battalion was discharged at Los Angeles July 16th 1847, he being mustered in again receiving a commission as a Second Lieutenant. August 4th we find him placed in command of a detachment and ordered to the Catholic Mission of San Luis Rey near San Diego to protect it from the Indians. We also find another order issued to him to proceed to the same place August 14th, 1847 for the same duty. He received his discharge March 14th, 1848 at San Diego California. After his discharge we find him in various parts of California. He spent two year as a missionary, part of the time with Elder Parley P. Pratt. One year he was in the Santa Clara valley and was at Los Angeles when gold was found at Sutter’s Mill. The balance of the time, until 1857, was spent in southern California as he came to Utah that same year. He located in Grantsille where his brother Emery had located that same years. He married Ellen Martin August 19th, 1859 at Grantsville, During trouble with Johnston’s Army we find him organizing a body of militia of which he was made Major being known the rest of his life as Major Barrus. He was a good farmer and a quite unassuming citizen and was once a member of the City Council of Grantsville. He passed away February 10th, 1918 aged 96 years and is buried in the Grantsville Cemetery. He is the father of nine children.

The Mormon Battalion

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Mormon Battalion (Three of our ancestors were on the Mormon Battalion. Grandpa Edward Hunter is the father of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Uncle William Hyde is the brother of Rosel Hyde who is the father of Martha Ann Hyde Hunter who is the mother of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Uncle Ruel Barrus is the brother of Emery Barrus who is the father of Owen Henry Barrus who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew.) Mary Ann smoothed the jacket her husband wore and handed him the knapsack she had gathered full of food and other small items. There were tears in her eyes, but she knew that there was no other choice than to let him go. They had discussed their options several times, but in the end, they knew that he must follow the call from Pres. Brigham Young and join with the others who were joining the army. Some were calling it the Mormon Battalion, and so it was. Both Edward and Mary Ann Hunter had joined themselves with the Mormons before they were married. They had met each other in the fledgling town of Nauvoo, when it was little more than a swamp and the houses, if you had one, were little more than rude log cabins. Edward had come on his own to Nauvoo as a wide-eyed youth, writing letters back to his Uncle Edward Hunter about the potential he saw in the new community. Edward had been housed at the Whitesides home, and soon a relationship began between Edward and their lovely daughter, MaryAnn which had culminated in their marriage. Now they were the parents of a darling little girl whom they had named Sarah Ann. Edward and MaryAnn had enjoyed their life in Nauvoo, but there was rising resentment toward the Mormons, and soon Mob violence erupted. Their beloved Prophet Joseph Smith and his dear brother Hyrum had been murdered at Liberty Jail. After their deaths, the Saints had been persecuted until finally they had been forced to leave their beloved city and their Temple, which was only partially finished. Edward and MaryAnn were among the first to leave their comfortable home in Nauvoo. They had waited long enough to receive their endowments in the Temple on February 6, 1846 and then turned their backs on their beloved Nauvoo to enter the wilderness of Iowa. They had slogged through the mire of Iowa and finally joined with those gathering in Council Bluffs. Now they had begun to make plans to stay in Iowa until spring, building cabins or dugouts in the nearby bluffs. There were many of the Mormons on the trail in the wilds of Iowa, having been forced out of their homes in the beautiful city of Nauvoo the same as Edward and MaryAnn Hunter. Brigham Young had lead the beleaguered Saints west across the frozen Mississippi River to the mud of Iowa. It had been a hard spring as the Saints struggled through knee-deep mud across the Iowa trail. Late spring and early summer found the Saints scattered across parts of Illinois and much of Iowa. Brigham Young was making preparations as rapidly as possible to move the Saints West. With this preparation in mind he called Elder Jesse C. Little, who was serving a mission for the Church in New England, to go to Washington D.C. and ask the government for “any facilities for emigration to the Western coast which the they might offer.” Elder Little joined with Thomas L. Kane, son of John Kane, a prominent federal judge and political associate of President Polk. Together Little and Kane negotiated with government officials for contracts to build block houses and forts along the Oregon Trail. In 1845 the United States annexed Texas, thereby angering Mexico. There were skirmishes between the two countries and finally Congress declared war on Mexico on May 12th of 1846. The war with Mexico came precisely when the Latter-day Saints were petitioning Washington, for assistance in their move West. With Kane’s urging, Elder Little suggested in a letter to President Polk that although the Saints were loyal Americans, the government’s refusal to assist them could “compel us to be foreigners.” Polk did not want the Saints to join the British interests in the Oregon territory nor to antagonize the Missouri volunteers in the army of the West, so following conversations with Elder Little; he authorized the recruiting of five hundred Mormon volunteers. When the directive came down to Colonel Stephen W. Kearny at Fort Leavenworth, he was told to immediately enlist a Mormon Battalion. Kearny sent Captain James Allen to the Mormon encampments in southern Iowa to recruit volunteers. Brigham Young heard of Captain Allen’s intentions, and before his arrival in Council Bluffs, he met with Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards and discussed the matter. Realizing this was probably the result of Elder Little’s negotiations, they decided it was best to meet Captain Allen in the morning and raise the men wanted. The Brethren also recognized that the request for Mormon men provided an opportunity to earn desperately needed capital for the exodus and provided a reason for establishing temporary settlements on Indian lands. President Young spoke to the Saints and tried to clear their minds of prejudice against the federal government. Edward and MaryAnn Hunter were among those at Council Bluffs who listened with troubled hearts as he began to explain their position. He said “The question might be asked, is it prudent for us to enlist to defend our country? If we answer in the affirmative—all are ready to go. Suppose we were admitted to the Union as a State and the Government did not call on us, we would feel ourselves neglected. Let the ‘Mormons’ be the first men to set their feet on the soil of California. This is the best offer we have ever had from the government to benefit us. I propose that five hundred volunteers be mustered, and I will do my best to see all their families brought forward, so far as my influence can be extended and feed them when I have anything to eat myself.” When Brigham Young finished speaking, MaryAnn looked up into her husband’s eyes. There she saw the familiar determination to follow his leaders, and she knew that he would join this army. Brigham Young left the next day with Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards to cross back over the trail to Mount Pisgah and recruit more men. They sent letters back to those still in Nauvoo saying, “Now, brethren, is the time for action…This is the first time the government has stretched forth its arms to our assistance, and we receive their proffer with joy and thankfulness. We feel confident that the Battalion will have little or no fighting, and their pay will take their families to them. The Mormons will then be the older settlers and have a chance to choose the best locations.” Brigham Young gave speeches as they went, comforting the Saints in their decision with the promise that “The blessings we are looking forward to receive will be attained through sacrifice…We want to conform to the requisition made of us and we will do nothing else until we have accomplished this thing. If we want the privilege of going were we can worship God according to the dictates of our own conscience we must raise this Battalion.” Everywhere they went many able-bodied men signed up. When the call for volunteers in the Battalion came, Edward and MaryAnn discussed their situation. They knew they were in the middle of the prairie with no home, no income, and little provisions. It was a hard decision for Edward to leave his dear wife and little daughter alone for so long. What would happen in the meantime? Would she be able to stay in Council Bluffs? Could she find her way across the plains with others? There were so many questions and so few answers. It was their deep faith in the Lord and his newly restored church which had brought them this far in their quest to follow Him, and they now felt that if the Prophet of God was asking volunteers, they must obey. The Hyde family had also left their homes in Nauvoo in the early exodus. Rosel and William were brothers and joined their families along with their brother Charles. They had gathered their aging father and mother, and crossed Iowa, arriving in Council Bluffs on the 12th of July, just in time to hear of the enlistment activities for the Battalion. It was decided among the family that William would answer the call and Rosel would stay behind to take care of the families. William joined Company B, the same company which Edward Hunter had joined and took his place as second sergeant in that company. William kept a daily journal throughout the trek and entered these solemn words at the onset of the journey: “The thoughts of leaving my family at this critical time are indescribable. Far from the land which we had once called civilization, with no dwelling, save a wagon, with scorching midsummer sun to beat upon them, with the prospect of the cold December blasts finding them in the same place…After giving them my blessing, and resigning them into the hands of God, I left them and returned to the camp of the soldiers.” Before taking up the line of march, President Young, Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, John Taylor, Parley P. Pratt and Wilford Woodruff met with the officers on the banks of the river. William remembered their council: “There they gave us our last charge and blessing, with a firm promise that on condition of faithfulness on our part, our lives should be spared and our expedition result in great good, and our names be handed down in honorable remembrance to all generations. The officers were instructed to prove themselves father to the privates, and to remember their prayers and see that the name of Deity was revered…Many more instructions were given which were all calculated to encourage the officers to be faithful, and prove themselves true to their trust.” Another of interest to us on the trek was Ruel Barrus the brother of Emery Barrus. He was 20 years old and not married. He served as 2nd Lieutenant, also in Company B with Edward Hunter and William Hyde. The Church leaders promised that the families of the volunteers would be carefully provided for. He counseled the volunteers to be faithful soldiers, keep the commandments, and abide by the counsel of their leaders. He promised that if they conducted themselves properly, they would not have to fight. A farewell ball was held in honor of the Battalion on a cleared square along the Missouri River on the evening of Saturday, the 18th of July. The next morning there were many gathered to bid farewell to their departing loved ones as the army prepared to leave. MaryAnn held her husband as long as she felt she could, and then pulling herself away, lifted up their darling little daughter for a good-bye kiss from her father. She had determined to be strong, but it was so hard to let him go. Taking a deep breath, she forced a smile and, handing him the knapsack, bade Edward a fond farewell. With tears in their eyes and a prayer in their hearts, Edward turned and strode away, leaving his little family to the care of their Heavenly Father and the Saints. At noon on Tuesday, July 21st the Mormon Battalion began their historic march. Edward marched with the new soldiers two hundred miles down the East side of the Missouri River and then crossed over to Fort Leavenworth, arriving on the 1st of August 1846. Once there, Edward was happy to be outfitted with supplies, guns, and forty-two dollars per man as clothing money for the year. The paymaster at the fort was surprised when every man was able to sign his name on the payroll. Only a third of the volunteers he had paid previously could write. A portion of the money was collected by Parley P. Pratt and others sent by the Church. This was used to support the Battalion members’ families in Iowa and others. As Edward gave the bulk of his money to the Brethren, he thought of his little family on the plains of Iowa and said a little prayer for them. With a smile he knew that they were also praying for him. Edward soon learned that General Stephen W. Kearny’s regiment had already embarked in June toward Santa Fe to conquer New Mexico for the United States. The Mormon Battalion was to follow him and aid his operations if necessary. For two weeks the Battalion remained at Fort Leavenworth. Edward mopped his brow with his handkerchief, once used to hold the long gone vittles his wife had prepared for him as he was leaving her in Iowa. The weather was very hot, and many men suffered, particularly with fevers. Their commanding officer, Colonel Allen, became severely ill, and was not able to leave with them when they took up their march. Edward and the other members of the Battalion were very concerned for the welfare of their leader and many prayers ascended to heaven for his recovery. Captain Jefferson Hunt, the ranking Mormon officer, took temporary command of the Battalion. William Hyde was also down with the fever when the camp left, but he was able to rejoin his company several days later. Not too far outside of Fort Leavenworth William told of a storm that arose suddenly: “Before we had reached our place of encampment, we discovered a furious storm arising in the West, and we hastened to get all things in readiness. This was hardly done when the storm reached us. Out of upwards of one hundred tents, there were only 5 or 6 that were not blown down, and they were only kept standing by the strong arms of those inside. Three wagons were blown over, two of them heavy loaded baggage wagons and the other was a two horse carriage, the boxes and covers were badly damaged. The wagon covers were nearly all blown off and many of them torn in pieces. And thus were all exposed to the rain and hail which was blown with great fury. During the time that the storm lasted the very elements seemed at war.” About two weeks after leaving the Missouri River, Edward learned that Colonel Allen had died. This saddened the entire group because they had grown to admire this benevolent officer. The Mormon officers felt that Captain Hunt should continue as their leader and requested by letter that Pres. Polk appoint him to the position, but First Lieutenant A.J. Smith of the regular army was already en route to assume command. Edward and his comrades wondered what this new commander would be like. They felt a sense of foreboding as the time for the Colonel to arrive grew near. “The appointment of Smith, even before his character was known, caused a greater gloom throughout the command than the death of Colonel Allen had,” wrote the Battalion historian, Daniel Tyler. Lieutenant Smith set a rapid pace for the Battalion in their march to Santa Fe, hoping to overtake General Kearny before he left for California. Edward was young and strong, but even at this; the long days in the hot sun were a hardship. The strong pace wore heavily on the soldiers, and more especially on the wives and children who were allowed to travel with the Battalion. With the relentless push, the men had little rest, and often the weary fell behind, trudging into camp hours after the others. Worse than the fast travel was the ministration of the military doctor, George B. Sanderson of Missouri. He seemed to dislike the Mormons and forced the men to swallow calomel and arsenic for their ills from the same rusty spoon. The men referred to him as “mineral quack: and “Doctor Death.” William Hyde included a poem in his journal about the doctor: Our Doc., the wicked swearing fellow With calomel thought to make us mellow The boys his poison spurned to take Which made him act his father, snake! Because the sick had not obeyed He raved, and like a donkey brayed, My mind on him I’d like to free But as I’m placed I’ll let him be: Time will show his heart is rotten And sure his name will be forgotten. William L. McIntire, a good botanic physician, had been appointed assistant surgeon to the Battalion but was unable to administer to his afflicted friends in any way unless ordered by Dr. Sanderson, the Battalion surgeon. Edward felt like the others, that it was better not to report your illnesses if at all possible because the ailment may be better than the cure. On the 16th of September, at the last crossing of the Arkansas River (in present day Kansas), Lt. Smith sent Cap. Nelson Higgins and ten men to convey most of the soldiers’ families up the river to the Mexican village of Pueblo (in present day Colorado) for the winter. The men strongly protested this “division” of the Battalion because they had been promised that their families could accompany the army to California. Edward sympathized with those whose families were being sent away, for if MaryAnn were here, he was not so sure if he would have let her go. The decision proved to be wise, however, in light of the difficult trek that lay ahead. A month later at Santa Fe, a detachment of sick men and all but five of the remaining women were sent under the direction of Cap. James Brown to join the earlier group at Pueblo. On the 9th of October the weary soldiers dragged themselves into Santa Fe, the provincial capitol of New Mexico, which had some six thousand inhabitants. General Kearny had already left for California, leaving the city under the command of Col. Alexander Doniphan, a friend of the Saints from the Missouri days. Doniphan ordered a one-hundred gun salute in honor of the arrival of the Mormon Battalion. Edward enjoyed his association with Col. Alexander Doniphan whom he had known while in the Nauvoo Legion. They had much to talk about in the short time they could find to converse. In Santa Fe, Lieutenant Smith relinquished command to Lieutenant Col. Phillip St. George Cooke, whom the men came to respect as a fair but firm leader. The new commander had orders to blaze a wagon trail from Santa Fe to California. Veering South along the Rio Grande, the soldiers sometimes followed the Spanish or Mexican trails but generally cut new roads. Once again the march took its toll in sickness, and on November 10th, a third detachment of fifty-five worn and weakened men turned back toward Pueblo. Edward watched as the men stumbled along and wondered what more lay in store for them on this long march. Not only did lack of water and food plague the remaining 350 members of the Battalion, but the sandy trails were a constant challenge. Edward found that the soldiers were either pulling long ropes to help the teams get through the deep sand, or they were walking double file in front of the wagons to make firm trails for the wheels. Because the Battalion was blazing a new wagon trail to California, guides were sent out ahead of the main group to scout out the area and decide the way the group should go. On Nov. 20th near Cow Springs, the guides couldn’t find a trail westward. None of them had been on this route before. Cooke and the guides climbed to the top of a high mound and built a fire as a signal. A couple of Indians came in response to the smoke, and Cooke spoke with them about what lay in each direction. After talking with the Indians and his officers, Cooke decided to lead the Battalion south to Janos in Senora, Mexico. Levi Hancock and some of the other leaders of the men felt this was a bad decision to lead the Battalion towards enemy territory, so he and Father Pettegrew went from tent to tent asking the men to pray that Cooke would not lead them into Mexico. Edward also wondered how wise it would be to go looking for trouble, as it seemed they were doing. The next morning the camp was on the march due south when, after about two miles, Cooke stopped on a mound. He told the men that his orders from Kearny were to go to California and that was to the West. He had the bugler blow orders to turn westward and the Battalion turned its direction. The men were truly grateful and felt the hand of the Lord had been in the Colonel’s decision. That evening, Edward joined with the other men in a prayer of gratitude to the Lord for his help in the decision of the Commander. Ruel Barrus was somewhat of a hunter for the camp, and now that they had again come to some mountains, he and Captain Hunter obtained permission from Col. Cooke to go hunt. On Dec. 5th they were successful in killing two young bulls and bringing the stake back to camp sometime after dark. On the 7th he again went out, but this time they saw only older bulls whose meat was tough. They supposed the Indians had already selected the cows and calves as they were tender. About this time, Col. Cooke learned that Company B had a private wagon which carried the men’s equipment. Enraged, he ordered the men to each carry his own knapsacks and blankets. Edward and his comrades were already on cut rations, and this new order from the Colonel seamed very unrealistic, but this was the army, and there was no discussion. Near the San Pedro River, some wild bulls got in with the Battalion’s cattle and were killed by the guards. When the companies stopped at the San Pedro for water, other bulls, frightened at the smell of blood, charged into the soldiers. The rampaging bulls charged on and on causing great confusion and fear. Edward hurdled himself behind a wagon with a mighty beast headed toward him. The bulls charged men, mules, and wagons. Albert Smith was trapped between a bull’s horns. He was badly bruised and had three ribs torn from his back bones. One bull caught Amos Cox and gored his thigh before tossing him in the air. Levi Fifield had no wagon or tree for protection and threw himself flat on the ground when a bull charged him. The bull jumped over him, leaving the soldier frightened but unharmed. There was so much dust from the charging that it was difficult to see for a few minutes. When the dust cleared and the bulls had passed, three men were wounded, and three mules were gored to death. Several wagons were tipped over, and a couple were damaged from the stampede. Col. Cooke told a story of seeing “a coal black bull charge on Corporal Frost, of Company A.” Frost stood his ground while the animal rushed right on for one hundred yards. Col. Cooke was close by and believed the man in great danger to his life and called to him to run. Frost did not move but aimed his musket very deliberately and only fired when the beast was within ten paces. It fell headlong, almost at his feet. Cooke said Corporal Frost was “one of the bravest men he ever saw.” When things finally settled down, Edward climbed from behind the upturned wagon. The battle lasted only a few minutes, but ten to fifteen of the bulls were killed. The event was immortalized as the Battle of the Bulls, and was the only fight during the Battalion’s long journey. The Battalion passed without incident through Tucson, where a small Mexican garrison was stationed. Upon hearing that an army was coming, the garrison fled with most of the people, leaving behind only the aged and some children. Kearny had ordered the Battalion that they were to pass through the town and make no scene. As they marched through town, Edward noticed the worried expressions of the faces which peered at the army from behind walls and curtains. He knew they were scared to death, and he was grateful that the orders had been not to stop. The Battalion then rejoined Kearny’s route along the Gila River. Beyond the Colorado River lay over a hundred miles of trackless desert where water was obtained only by digging deep wells. There the Battalion encountered the heaviest sands, the hottest days, and the coldest nights. William Hyde told of the plight of no water saying: “Had no water through the day except a little that was fortified in two or three small mud holes. This was sipped down by the men as readily as if it had been the choicest of wine” The next day he wrote: “Had no water at this place of encampment only what we could get out of a mud hole by going three miles, but it was filthy in the extreme. We however mixed a little flour in some but the water was too thick with the mud that it would admit of but a small portion of the flour being added. We cooked some and ate it, but it was like eating clay.” In writing about this time on the Battalion march the Colonel said, “A great many of my men are wholly without shoes and use every expedient, such as rawhide moccasins and sandals, and even wrapping their feet in pieces of woolen and cotton cloth.” It had by now been three days without water while walking upwards of nineteen miles each day. Edward staggered along, wondering if he could make it the whole way. He thought of his little family so far away and pledged to himself, that if there were any way possible, he would struggle on for them. Finally after 70 miles across a barren desert, with little or no water, it was announced that ahead they had found a pond of water. The camp was given the privilege to make the best way they could to the place that they might quench their thirst. Edward hurried along as best he could, but he noticed other men who had given all they could and had collapsed on the sides of the trail. William said: “We traveled eight miles, and to our great joy we came up with the pilots, who were seated by a small pond of water. Here we laid ourselves upon the ground by the waters edge, and after drinking and resting and again drinking and resting and continuing this operation for a time, we succeeded in quenching our thirst.” As the men sat around at the pond, William commented that they looked as if they were “over ninety years old.” Edward and some of the other men were finally able to revive enough to take mules and canteens back to those who had fallen along the way. Colonel Cooke wrote, “The men arrived here, completely worn down; they staggered as they marched, as they did yesterday. Some of the men did not find strength to reach the camp before daylight this morning. I went through the companies this morning; they were eating their last four ounces of flour. I have remaining only five public wagons; there are three private property wagons.” Colonel Cooke was heard to say that he believed that any other company under like circumstances would have mutinied. He complimented the Battalion saying that notwithstanding they were worn down; they were ready to obey any orders that might be given. He further stated that had he known the situation of the desert they had just crossed, he would never have come into it. That evening, as the Colonel came to look over his troops he was again surprised at the spirit of these Battalion men in such a plight. He wrote of the camp that same evening, “The men, who this morning were prostrate, worn out, hungry, heartless, have recovered their spirits tonight, and are singing and playing the fiddle.” Edward saw the surprise in his Colonel’s eyes, but then he had been with the Mormons for many years, and he knew that these men would find joy and renewed strength through their camaraderie and the singing of songs and hymns. On the 21st December a story is told by a private Henry Bigler, a 22-two-old single young man. He said, “I was detailed to be the Colonel’s orderly for the day. On going to his tent to report myself, I found him feeding his mule some of the wheat that he had brought from Tucson. There was another mule determined to share the Colonel’s mule’s wheat. He had driven it away several times. As soon as his back was turned the mule would march boldly up for another morsel of wheat, until the colonel could endure it no longer. Turning to me, he said, ‘Orderly, is your gun loaded?’ Being answered in the negative, he said, ‘Load your gun and I’ll shoot that mule; I knew the mule and it belonged to one of our own men. The thought came to me not to permit it to be killed. At this I took from my box a cartridge, clapped it in my mouth and with my teeth, tore off the bullet and put the ball in my pocket. I then put the powder into my musket and rammed the paper in on top of it. Pretty soon he came out and, standing broadside, fired. The moment he discovered the animal was not dead, he dropped the musket and with an oath said, “You did not load that gun right’ and walked into his tent. His bugler, Mr. Guigly, and others who saw the trick fairly split their sides with laughter.” Finally near the Gila River the Battalion was met by Pima Indians who came out by the hundreds, men, women, and children. Edward thought it interesting to see the Indian tribe. He had never seen a whole tribe before this day. The Chief seemed pleased to see the army. He said the Mexicans had been to see him. The Mexicans wanted him and his men to join them and give battle, promising the Indians all the spoils. The Chief told them his men should not fight. They had never shed the blood of a white man. For that reason, he was not afraid of the coming army, and he did not believe the Battalion would hurt them. He stated that he had no objections to them passing through his towns. The Colonel purchased from the Chief 100 bushels of corn to feed the teams. The Indians brought to camp large quantities of corn, beans, meal, and pumpkin to trade for clothes, buttons, beads, needles, and thread etc. Money they refused, saying it was of no use to them. The new provisions were used to make somewhat of a Christmas feast consisting of cold beans, pancakes, and pumpkin sauce. William Hyde remembered Christmas with his family and contrasted it to the “parched lips, scalded shoulders, weary limbs, blistered feet, worn out shoes, and ragged clothes” he was experiencing at this time. Edward’s dreams could not help but go back in time in the same reminiscent way to Christmas from a more gentle time. The Battalion continued across the desert only to find in their path the rugged heart of the coastal mountains. Edward looked in awe at the mountains. He had never seen such mountains with such height that seemed to defy anything but the wild goats he saw along the ridges. He knew that they would have to somehow cut a path for them and their wagons to cross over the foreboding mountains. Col. Cooke wrote, “I came to the canyon, and found it much worse than I had been led to expect (by the guides). There were many rocks to surmount, but the worst was the narrow pass. Setting the example myself, as there was much work done on it before the wagons came; the rock was hewn with axes to increase the opening. I thought it wide enough…but when a trial was made, at the first pass, it was found too narrow by a foot of solid rock. More work was done, and several trials made. The sun was now only an hour high, and it was about seven miles to the first water. I had a wagon taken to pieces, and carried through. Meanwhile, we still hewed and hammered at the mountain side; but the best road tools had been lost. The next wagon body was lifted through, and then the running gear, by lifting one side; The work on the pass was perseveringly continued, and the last two wagons were pulled through by the mules, with loads undisturbed.” Once through the mountain passes, it was on to Warner’s Ranch where the weary, hungry, and ill clad men were able to rest. William and a few of his friends were able to pool their recourses and buy a pig which they cooked “and in company with others had a feast that revived our spirits.” The company took up their march again on the 23rd of January and hiked eighteen miles over the hills from Warner’s Ranch. It rained several hours in the afternoon, again at night, and then continued raining for twenty-four hours. It was all Edward and his weary comrades could do to keep going. “The Battalion had fallen upon the rainy season. All the tents were blown down in the night,” wrote Col. Cooke. He continued, “The ill-clad Battalion was drenched and suffered much.” Another few days’ march brought them past the deserted Catholic Mission of San Loui Rey. “One mile below the mission,” recorded Tyler, the camp historian, “we ascended a bluff, here the long looked-for great Pacific Ocean appeared plain to our view, only about three miles distant. The joy, the cheer that filled our souls, none but worn-out pilgrims nearing a haven of rest can imagine. Prior to leaving Nauvoo, we had talked about and sung of the great ‘Pacific Sea,’ and we were now upon its very borders, and its beauty far exceeded our most sanguine expectations.” This is just how Edward felt as he finally gazed upon the great Pacific Ocean. They had been through so much. They were weary, nearly exhausted, but to look out upon the Ocean, and realize that they truly had done this great thing, was the medicine needed to bolster their spirits. Down the coast they marched southward to where they were to meet Gen. Kearny. Finally on January 29, 1847, they reached Mission San Diego at the end of their 2,030-mile march. Edward was humbled and grateful to the Lord for his tender mercies in bring the men all the way through their many trials and to the end of their journey. Just five days after they arrived, Col. Cooke gathered the men together and read a bulletin which he had written concerning their march. Edward and his comrades stood shoulder to shoulder deeply moved at the Colonel’s words as he said in part, “The Lieutenant-Colonel commanding congratulates the Battalion on their safe arrival on the shore of the Pacific Ocean, and the conclusion of their march of over two thousand miles. History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry…” The bulletin was received by the Mormon volunteers with hearty cheers. Since California was already in the hands of the United States, the Battalion men served as occupation troops with garrison duty in San Diego, San Luis Rey, and Los Angeles. While in Southern California, the Saints gained the respect of the local citizens. Those in San Diego built a courthouse and houses, burned brick, and dug wells, thus contributing significantly to the building of the community. On July 16th at the end of their year’s enlistment, the Battalion members were discharged, although eighty-one men chose to reenlist for an additional six months. Ruel Barrus was among those who re-enlisted. Most of the discharged men left for northern California, intending to travel east to join the Saints in the Salt Lake Valley or back at the Missouri River. Edward Hunter joined with a large group including William Hyde who traveled North to Sutter’s Fort just on the West side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Some of the brethren concluded to stop, as it was now getting late in the season. After a mature consideration, it was thought best for a portion of the company to tarry, as the wages were good, and they could labor until spring. Edward Hunter and William Hyde both opted to continue their journey which they did with others heading over the mountains, and on the 5th of September, they reached the valley on the East side of the Sierra Nevada mountains. This day they passed the spot where several emigrants from Missouri, the ill-fated Donner Party, had perished the previous winter. It was a solemn moment for Edward and the other as they saw the remnants of these poor people. Their bones were bleached upon the ground, having not received a burial. The next morning they met Samuel Brannan who had been through San Francisco to the Salt Lake Valley, where he had met with the Presidency of the Church, together with the pioneers and the first companies of the Saints to that place. He said that Captain Brown was on his way to meet the Battalion Members and was just two or so days behind him. Edward and the group waited for Captain James Brown and were soon met by him and a small escort, direct from Salt Lake City. He conveyed a message from Brigham Young asking those men without families to stay in California to work during the winter of 1847-48. Upon hearing the information, most of the men returned to the settlements in California to labor until spring. Many spent the winter at Sutter’s Fort on the Sacramento River and assisted in the discovery of gold in January 1848 that began the California gold rush. The following summer they honorably completed their contracts with Sutter, abandoned the gold fields, and joined their families either in Salt Lake City or at the Missouri River. However, William Hyde, Edward Hunter and several others determined to continue on to their families and started out again. They traveled Northeast through Nevada and up through Fort Hall in Idaho. Edward looked around him at the lush grass covered fields of Idaho and thought it would be a good place to raise sheep. Years later he would buy a farm in Idaho and do just that. The group then headed south around the Great Salt Lake and down into the Salt Lake Valley, arriving on the 12th of October. Edward was delighted and relieved to find that his dear wife, Mary Ann, and their little daughter, now a year older, were in the valley. She had come across the plains with Edward’s uncle Edward Hunter and his family. It was a heartwarming reunion for all of them and a sweet close to the heroic journey of which Edward Hunter had been a part. MaryAnn had not dared to hope that Edward would travel to Utah that season. She had heard that many of the men were planning to stay for the winter in California, so it was a great delight to see Edward in the first group of returning Battalion Members. She brushed back his hair which was longer than usual and gazed up into his well tanned face, rugged and weather beaten. It was so good to have him back. Now they would begin a new life together in this new land they would call Zion. Though very late in the season, William Hyde felt driven to continue his journey over the Rockies and across the plains to Winter Quarters. He joined with 16 other men who started out two days later. They reached Fort Bridger before the snow fell, but camped on the Sweetwater on October 25th and at Independence Rock on the 29th. They were able to kill buffalo along the way for their meat, but it was cold and windy. By November 7th William recorded “The weather about as cold as I ever witnessed. Had to run behind our mules with ropes wrapped around us to keep from freezing.” They reached Fort Laramie and were very hospitably received and entertained. They were given a substantial supper and breakfast, and feed for their mules for which they did not have to pay. But the next morning they were on their way again. They had trouble trying to cross the river at Loup Fork. William crossed on foot to try the depth of the water. He had to swim the last part of the distance, despite the chunks of ice and cold. One of their animals was mired in the quicksand and died. They were able to cook and eat the meat as their provisions had entirely failed. They continued their journey but were becoming weaker and more susceptible to the freezing cold all the time. On the morning of November 10th, they all united in calling on the Lord to regard their situation in mercy and send food in some way that they might not perish. As they continued their journey, they found that the Lord had indeed heard their prayers, for a group of wild turkeys began to pass their camp in droves. They succeeded in getting four of the birds which was one to every four persons. Rejuvenated from the turkey meat, the emaciated men continued their journey. On the evening of the very next day, they arrived at Winter Quarters to a wonderful reception from the Saints. They were the first 16 souls to return from the Battalion after their discharge in California. The very next day, William Hyde was able to cross the Missouri River and ride to Council Point, a distance of twelve miles, where he found his family and his father’s family well. William told of his arrival in this way. “I reached home on Sunday, and as it was dusk when I arrived, the people of the little burgh had gathered for worship. The news of my arrival soon reached their place of gathering, which proved the breaking up of their meeting. All were so anxious to see me, that without ceremony they flocked out of the meeting house and gathered into my humble but happy cot which had been built by my father and brother for the benefit of my family in my absence. This was a joyful meeting.” The Mormon Battalion truly was a great endeavor and in the words of Col. Cooke, “History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry…” Edward Hunter is the father of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. William Hyde is the brother of Rosel Hyde who is the father of Martha Ann Hyde Hunter who is the mother of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Ruel Barrus is the brother of Emery Barrus who is the father of Owen Henry Barrus who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. This story was adapted from the following accounts: Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 315-326. Treasures of Pioneer History, Compiled by Kate B. Carter, 409-429 (DFH/M73-84). The Mormon Battalion, U.S. Army of the West 1846-1848, by Norma Baldwin Rickets. The Mormon Battalion, by B.H. Roberts. Five Hundred Wagons Stood Still, Mormon Battalion Wives; “Mary Ann Whitesides Hunter,” by Shirley N. Maynes, 283, (DFH/Hu21). The Private Journal of William Hyde, Part 2, (DFH/Hy43-69). Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

EMERY BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) EMERY BARRUS, (son of Benjamin Barrus, born April 4, 1784, Richmand, N.H., died 1864. Chautauque, N.Y. and Betsy Stebbins, born March 21, 1787, in Massachusetts, died July 20, 1828 in New York). He was born April 8, 1809. Chautauque County, New York. Came to Utah October 9, 1853, Appleton Harmon Company. Married Huldah Abigail Nickerson (daughter of Freeman Nickerson, born Feb. 19, 1779, Dennis, Mass. and died Jan. 22, 1847, Chariton Point, Iowa, while on his way to Utah, and Huldah Chapman born 1789 in Connecticut, came to Utah 1859, died 1860, Provo, Utah). She was born April 16, 1816 in Pennsylvania. Their children: Lydia b. Oct. 22, 134, m. Festus Sprague, April 1, 1857; Betsy N. b. March 28, 1836, m. Lovina Ann Steele, Sept. 29, 1861; Emery Freeman b. March 12, 1841, died; Mary Huldah b. April 8, 1843, m. Charles Bailey; Orrin Elezar b. Sept. 14, 1845, m. Catherine Wilson; Emery Alexander b. March 27, 1848. d. Nov, 16, 1858; Ruel Michael b. Nov. 14, 1850, m. Ida Pearl Hunter; Owen Henry b. Dec. 28, 1853, m. Olive Deseret McBride Feb. 18, 1877, m. Mary Ann Hunter Dec. 21, 1892; Sarah Abigail b. April 9, 1856, m. Eleazar Freeman Nickerson; John Nickerson b. June 1, 1858, m. Alice Burton; Eliza Alvira b. Sept. 15, 1860, m. Charles Post. Married Jane Zerildah Baker (Daughter of Benjamin Baker, Pioneer 1857). She was born November 3, 1841. Their children: Emiline Abigail b. Nov. 30, 1859 m. Henry Tanner; James Baker b. Aug. 7, 1852, m. Charlotte Ann Mathews; William Taylor b. June 1, 1864, m. Matilda McBride; Thomas b. July 20, 1866; and Freeman b. Oct. 12, 1869, died; Chauncey Baker b. Jan. 15, 1872; Catherina Rozena b. Feb. 24, 1877, m. Henry Watson. Family home, Grantsville, Utah. High Priest; patriarch. Carpenter; stock raiser; farmer, Seventy. Died Oct. 5, 1899.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BARRUS (Son of Emery Barrus and Huldah Abigail Nickerson). Born May 30, 1838, in Cataraugus County, N.Y. Came to Utah 1853, driving a herd of cattle across the plains. Married Lovina Ann Steele Sept. 29, 1861 (daughter of Samuel Steele born July 15, 1822, Plattsburg, Clinton County, N.Y., pioneer, 1851 Joshua Grant Company and Elvira Salome Thayer, born Sept. 15, 1826 in New York.) She was born Sept. 29, 1844, in Illinois. Their children: Benjamin Franklin b. Aug. 22, 1862; Samuel Leonard b. Jan. 14, 1868, died; Orrin Orland b. May 29, 1870 m. Ulysses Cline, July 26, 1893; Albert Almond b. June 1, 1875, m. Margaret Alice Millward March 4, 1896, m. Mabel Robinson Jan. 8, 1902; Elvira Chloena b. Dec. 9, 1881, died; Sylvia Ellen b. Jan. 17, 1886, died; Calvin Cleone b. Jan. 24, 1887, d. Jan. 13, 1891.

RUEL BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) RUEL BARRUS (son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stubbins). Born Aug. 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautaqua County, New York. Came to Utah Oct. 15, 1854 with others of the Mormon Battalion. Married Ellen Martin, Aug. 10, 1859 (daughter of Samuel Martin, pioneer Sept. 25, 1855 Richard Ballantyne Company, and Priscilla Layton, who died in St. Louis), She was born Sept. 23, 1844. Their children: Ellen P. b. Feb. 12, 1861, m. Charles Schaeffer; Betsy A. b. Nov. 11, 1862; Zeltha A. b. March 28, 1864; Fannie I. b. June 11, 1866, m. William Sanford; Lona b. Aug. 12, 1870, m. Charles Nelson; Ruel M. b. April 20, 1873, m. Angeline Anderson; Darias M. b. April 20, 1876, m. Lizzie Ratcliffe; Royal L. b. June 27, 1879; Essie Glee b. March 13, 1885. Seventy, 2nd Lieutenant Company B, Mormon Battalion; Major in Echo Canyon Campaign.

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: History written by Benjamin F. Barrus, oldest son of Benjamin Barrus who was born before the family left New York State, Genealogical data by E. B. Warner; Sent to Central Company 1 April 1964 by Emily T. Cramer; History Submitted by May Clark Barrus) Emery Barrus, son of Benjamin and Betsy Stebbins was born 1 April 1809 at Hanover, Chautauqua Co., N.Y. and died 6 Oct. 1899 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In 1833 he was working as a farm hand for Freeman Nickerson and was keeping company with his daughter, Huldah Abigail. At this time the Prophet Joseph Smith and some other Elders visited that part of New York and made their home with Freeman Nickerson for a time. Thus it happened that Freeman Nickerson and his family, consisting of several sons and daughters, some married and some single, joined the Church in 1833 and Emery Barrus, hearing the Gospel at this time was also baptized. He was the only one of his father's family to be baptized into the Church in New York. On Dec. 19, 1833, Emery married Huldah Abigail Nickerson, daughter of Freenan Nickerson. In Nov. 1839, freeman Nickerson, together with his son, Moses, his son-in-law, Emery Barrus, his daughter Caroline Hubbard and their children (altogether 17 persons) started on their journey to Missouri and arrived at Nauvoo in the spring of 1840, bought city lots and built homes, planted orchards, etc, and lived in comparative peace until about 1844 when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother, Hyrum, were assassinated in the Carthage Jail. After that date the persecution became very severe; men were whipped, houses burned and crops destroyed until 1845 when the saints agreed to vacate their beautiful homes, leaving the orchards with their fruit trees just coming into bearing. Preparations were made for that never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery Barrus had a shingle mill on an Island in the Mississippi, where his wife would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for silngles. In 1845 they moved to the Island and Emery would go into the woods and cut the timber and his wife would help saw it into suitable lengths for the different parts of the wagon, then put it up over his head in the shop to season. He made 15 wagons right from the stumps of trees. After the Prophet was killed the mob saw that Mormonism was not dead and told the people if they would drop Mormonism they could remain in their homes. Many found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track until they could find an easier way to worship God. Freeman Nickerson and his family, including Emery Barrus and family, who left New York in 1839, left Nauvoo in August, seven years later, crossed the Mississippi River and again took up the line to March. They wintered at Sheridan Point, Iowa in 1846 and 1847, their stock living on the buds and limbs of small trees felled for that purpose. They built log homes and covered them with split boards. On Jan. 22, 1847. Freeman Nickerson and his wife made the rest of the journey with her son, Levi, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1850. In the spring of 1847 they again took up the line of march westward, arriving in Winter Quarters to late to accompany the pioneers on their journey to the Salt Lake Valley. So Emery Barrus and his family again built a house and fenced a farm on which he planted and harvested considerable produce. Here they remained until the spring of 1853 when they again started on the westward journey. They traveled in Appleton Harmon's Company and Emery was appointed hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The cholera was in the wagon train in front of them and the one behind them and the captain advised that they eat as little meat as possible. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville in Oct. 1853. Their son, Owen, was born in Dec. 1853, two months after their arrival. By the spring of 1854 the inhabitants of Grantsville had become quite numerous. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in early days. They had to herd their stock on the range in the daytime and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. In those days there were no carding machines. Davenport and Wilson each had a flock of sheep. The home of mother Barrus was a regular manufacturing plant. Huldah Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls in yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. After there was a carding machine in Provo, Huldah Barrus would take the wool to Provo, driving a pair of colts they had brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of butter and cheese. Emery bought 46 head of loose stock, besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons across the plains. Not a fruit tree or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1853. Brother Sceva, John Clark and James McBride were the first to plant fruit trees. Emery Barrus made the first barns in Grantsville and some good houses. In 1855 the grasshoppers became so thick that they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. 1856 was the year of the famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour. They were without flour for months, living on segos, thistles, roots, etc. Brother John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856 and Brother William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, thrashed it with flails and cleaned it up in the wind. Each family got one half bushel of grain and ground it in coffee mills to make cake for the 4th of July dinner in 1856. This one half bushel of grain was a gift from John Cooley. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and milled and each family got a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery Barrus furnished a fat animal for beef so each family had a flour cake and a beef steak for dinner on July 24th 1856. In 1857 they heard that Johnson's Army was coming to civilize the Mormons. Every able-bodied man and boy was expected to go to Echo Canyon to hedge up the way for the Army. 1858 was the move south. It was decided to burn every building, destroy every tree and growing crops, provided the army persisted in coming in. But they did not come in until a treaty of peace was signed. Every family had the Grantsville precinct except a few faithful brethren. They were left to water the crops with orders to burn if molested by the Army. Emery Barrus was the first Mayor of Grantsville City and attended to surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charley Herman. He was a faithful worker in the temple and only came home two weeks before his death at the age of 90 years. He was ordained a patriarch in Grantsville. Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus was the first president of the Grantsville Ward Relief Society. By his first wife, Huldah Abigail Nicerson, he had the following children: Lydia, Betsy and Benjamin Franklin, all born in Hanover, N.Y,, Emery Freeman, Mary Huldah and Orrin Eleazer, born at Nauvoo, Ill., Emery Alexander and Ruel Michael born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, Owen Henry, Sarah Abigain, John Nickerson and Eliza Elvira born at Grantsville, Utah. Emery Barrus married April 5, 1857 at Grantsville Jane Ziralda Baker, daughter of Benjamin Baker and Abigail Taylor. She was born 3 Nov. 1841 at Adams, Ill., died 26 March 1895. To them were born the following children: Emiline Abigail, James Benjamin, William Taylor, Thomas Baker, Chauncy Baker and Catherine Rosina.

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS (Written by Esther Warner, Granddaughter)

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Written by Esther Warner, Granddaughter; Myrtle Allsop, County Historian; Alice Knowlton,Camp Historian) (Made available from the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers) Emery Barrus, son of Benjamln (5), Michael (4), Ebenezer (3), Ebenezer (2), John (1), and Betsy Stebbins (7), Hesadiah (6), Abner (5), Thomas (4), Samuel (l), Thomas (2), and Rowland (1), was born Apr. 8, 1809 at Hanover, Chautauqua Co., N.Y. and died Oct. 6, 1899 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In 1833 he was working as a farm hand for Freeman Nickerson and was keeping company with his daughter Huldah Abigail. At this same time, the Prophet Joseph Smith and some other Elders, visited that part of New York and made their home with Freeman Nickerson for a time. Thus it happened Freeman Nickerson and his family, consisting of several sons and daughters, some married and some single, joined the church in 1833 and Emery Barrus hearing the gospel at this time was also baptized. He was the only one of his father's family to be baptized into the Church in New York, Major Ruel Barrus being only eleven years old at that time and subject to his father until he came of age, when he left his father's home and came to Nauvoo and joined the church and made his home with Emery. On Dec. 19, 1833 Emery married Huldah Abagail Nickerson, daughter of Freeman (6), Eleazer (5), Eleazer (4), John (3), and Nicholas (2), William (1) and Huldah Chapman (3), Eliphalet (2), Moses (1) born Apr. 11, 1816 at Springville, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania; died Aug. 22, 1872 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In Nov. 1839, Freeman Nickerson, together with his son Moses, his son-in-law Emery Barrus, his daughter Caroline Hubbard and their children (altogether 17 persons) started on their journey to Missouri, but the Ohio River being closed with ice they wintered at Jefferson City, Missouri and arrived at Nauvoo in the spring of 1840 ; bought city lots and built homes, planted orchards etc., and lived in comparative peace, until about 1844 when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were assasinated in Carthage Jail. After that date the persecution became very severe; men were whipped, houses burned and crops destroyed until 1845 when the Saints agreed to vacate their beautiful homes, leaving the orchards with their fruit trees just coming into bearing. Preparations were made for that never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery Barrus had a shingle mill on an Island in the Mississippi, where his wife would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for shingles. In 1845 they moved to the Island and Emery would go into the woods and get the timber and his wife would help saw it into suitable lengths for the different parts of the wagon, then put it up over his head In the shop to season. He made 15 wagons right from the stumps of the trees. After the Prophet was killed the mob saw that Mormonism was not dead and told the people if they would drop Mormonism they could remain in their homes. If any found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track until they could find an easier way to worship God. Freeman Nickerson and his family, including Emery Barrus and family who left New York in 1839, left Nauvoo in August, seven years later; crossed the Mississippi River and again took up the line of march. They wintered at Sheridan Point, Iowa in 1846 and 1847, their stock living on the buds and limbs of small trees felled for that purpose€. They built log houses and covered them with split boards. On Jan. 22, 1847, Freeman Nickerson died and his wife made the rest of the journey with her son Levi, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1850. In the spring of 1847, they again took up the line of march westward, arriving at Winter Quarters too late to accompany the pioneers on their journey to Salt Lake Valley. So Emery Barrus and his family again built a house and fenced a farm on which he planted and harvested Considerable produce. There they remained until the spring of 1853, when they again started on the westward journey. They traveled In Appelton Harmon's company and Emery was appointed hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The cholera was in the wagon train in front of them and the one behind them and the captain advised that they eat as little meat as possible. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville in Oct. 1853. Their son Owen was born in Dec. 1853, two months after their arrival. By the spring of 1854 the inhabitants of Grantsville had become quite numerous. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in early days. They had to herd their stock on the range in the daytime and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. In those days there were no carding machines. Davenport and Wilson each had a flock of sheep. The home of mother Barrus was a regular manufacturing plant. Huldah Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. After there was a carding machine in Provo, Huldah Barrus would take the wool to Provo, driving a pair of colts they had brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of cheese and butter. Emery brought 46 head of loose stock, besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons across the plains. Not a fruit tree or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1851. Brother Sceva, John Clark and James McBride were the first to plant fruit trees. Emery Barrus made the first barns in Grantsville and some good houses. In 1855 the grasshoppers came so thick they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. In 1856 was the year of famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour. They were without bread for months, living on segoes, thistles, roots, etc. Brother John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856 and Brother William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, threshed it with flails and cleaned it up in the wind. Each family got one-half bushel of grain and ground it in coffee mills to make cake for the 4th of July dinner in 1856. This one-half bushel of grain was a gift from John W. Cooley. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and milled and each family got a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery Barrus furnished a fat animal for beef, so each family had a flour cake and a beef steak for dinner July 24th 1856. In 1857 they heard that Johnson's army was coming to civilize the Mormons. Every able-bodied man and boy was expected to go to Echo Canyon to hedge up the way of the army. 1858 was the move South. It was decided to burn every building, destroy every tree and growing crops, provided the army persisted in coming in. But they did not come in until a treaty of peace was signed. Every family had left the Grantsville precinct a free faithful brethren They were left to water the crops with orders to burn if molested by the army. Emery Barrus was the first mayor of Grantsville City and attended to surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charley Herman. He was a faithful worker in the Temple and only came home two weeks before his death at the age of 90 years. He was ordained a patriarch in Grantsville. Huldah Abigail Nickerson was the first president of the Relief Society of Grantsville Ward. By his first wife Huldah Abigail Nickerson he had the following children: Lydiaa, Betsy, and Benjamin Franklin, all born in Hanover, New York; Emery Freeman, Mary Huldah and Orvin Eleazer born at Nauvoo, Ill.; Emery Alexander and Ruel Michael born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska; Owen Henry, Sarah Abigail, John Nickerson and Eliza Elvira born at Grantsville Utah. Emery Barrus married Apr. 5, 1857 at Grantsville Jane Zerelda Baker, daughter of Benjamin Baker and Abigail Taylor. She was born Nov. 3, 1841 at Adams, Ill. died Mar. 26, 1895. To them were born the following children: Emellne Abigail, James Benjamin, William Taylor, Thomas Baker, Herman Baker, Chauncey Baker, and Catherlne Rozina all born at Grantsville, Utah.

HISTORY OF RUEL BARRUS 1821-1918

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

Ruel Barrus was born August 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautauqua County, New York. He was the youngest son and eighth child of a family of ten children (five sons and five daughters) born to Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. He came from an old American family. His mother, Betsy Stebbins, was born March 17, 1787 at Monson, Hampden County, Vermont to Hesadiah Stebbins and Betsy Sessions Babcock. She was deserted by her first husband (unknown) before their first child was born. She obtained permission of the court to name her son, born March 29, 1805, Abdiel Hesadiah Stebbins. Ruel's father, Benjamin Barrus was born April 4, 1784 at Richmond, Cheshire County, New York; He was the son of Michael Barrus and Elizabeth Simmonds. Benjamin fought in the War of 1812-2.815 -and was wounded in the battle at the burning of Buffalo. He died February 2, 1864 in Silver Creek, Chautauqua County, New York. Ruel's ancestors on both sides fought in the Revolutionary War. His paternal grandfather, Michael Barrus, born July 2, 1751 in Cumberland Hill, Cumberland County, Rhode Island fought in the American Revolution as a Sergeant in Captain Capron's Company, Colonel Samuel Ashley's Regiment, New Hampshire Militia. His maternal grandfather, Hezadiah Stebbins born October 25, 1754 at Brimfield, Massachusetts, served in the American Revolution as Private in Captain Joseph Thompson's Company, Colonel- Timothy Danielson's Regiment, taking part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. Ruel's father, Benjamin Barrus and his mother Betsy Stebbins were married sometime in 1807. Ruel's mother died August 5, 1828 leaving a family of eleven children. Shortly after this, possibly in 1830 Benjamin married Anna Webb; the date of the marriage is unknown. She was born in 1783 in Connecticut. Anna Webb faithfully took care of the children until her death February 26, l86l. She was buried in the Doty Cemetery in Silver Creek, New York. She never had children of her own. Ruel was not quite seven years old when his mother died. He grew up and obtained his education in his native town of Villanova, learning there the Carpentering trade. At the age of nineteen he became interested in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. At this time he left his home in New York State and went to live for two years with his brother, Alexander, who was living in Pennsylvania. Alexander was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church and had developed an unfriendly feeling toward the Mormon Church, so Ruel moved again. In 1844 he went to stay with his older brother, Emery, who at this time was living in Nauvoo, Illinois, he having become a member of the Mormon Church. In October of l844 Ruel was baptized by Richard Sheldon and in October of 1845 he was ordained a Seventy in the Nauvoo Temple. Ruel and Emery were the only two members of the family to join the Church. They remained at Nauvoo until the Saints were driven from there in the uprising against the Mormons by the mobs of Illinois. While, the Saints were on the plains of Iowa and Nebraska, a call came from President James K. Polk of the United States for a Battalion of 500 men to be enlisted from the Mormon ranks to serve in the Mexican War. Ruel was among the first to respond to this call and enlisted in Company B with the rank of Second Lieutenant on July 16, 1846 at Council Bluffs, Iowa. At this time -Ruel had a team and wagon and 50O pounds of flour for which he had been offered $500 but instead of selling it, he gave it to the company with which he had been traveling. The Battalion left Council Bluffs, Iowa for Fort Leavenworth, Kansas on July 20, 1846. That 200 mile march was a severe ten day trial period through a country that had no roads or bridges. The route generally was along the steaming Missouri River. Swarms of mosquitoes, both day and night, miles of mud and violent nocturnal rainstorms greeted them. The none-descript-looking group had left everything they could spare behind. The men during this time had no tents or shelter of any kind as they were not outfitted until they reached Fort Leavenworth. Malaria became widespread and their beloved non-Mormon Commander, James Allen, died of malaria at Fort Leavenworth where they arrived August 1, 1846. At Fort Leavenworth they received infantry equipment and each man was paid a "uniform allowance" of $42.00. Instead of buying army uniforms, many of the men sent most of this money back to Winter Quarters and wore their rough frontier clothing. They left for the coast on August 12th and was commanded by Lt. A. J. Smith. His overpowering desire was to get them to Santa Fe as rapidly as possible and he led them hard and fast those nine hundred miles down the Santa Fe Trail. The major problem was the heat, rapid pace, sickness and a malevolent doctor who administered calomel (mercury) and arsenic for every disorder — with force if necessary. At Santa Fe Lt. Col. P. St. George Cooke took over as the permanent commander of the Battalion. The route from Santa Fe to the Pacific was for the greater part through unknown wilderness without road or trail. There were high odds against a successful journey of eleven hundred miles, short of rations through enemy territory taking 25 wagons and six cannon where no wagon train had ever rolled and led by guides who had never traversed the route. The Battalion arrived at San Diego, California January 29 1847 completing what is probably the longest march (2,000 miles) in the history of the world. The Lieutenant Colonel commanding, congratulated the Battalion on their safe arrival. "Nine-tenths of it has been through a wilderness where nothing but savages and wild beasts are found, or deserts where, from want of water, there is no living creature. There, with almost hopeless labor, we have dug deep wells which the future traveler will enjoy. Without a guide who has traversed them, we have ventured into trackless prairies where water was not found for several marches. With crowbar, pick and ax in hand, we have worked our way Over mountains which seemed to defy aught save the wide goat, and have hewed a chasm out of living rock more narrow than our wagons Thus marching half-naked and half-fed, and living upon wild animals, we have discovered and made a road of great ,value to our country. “ When the term of enlistment of one year was up the Battalion was discharged at Los Angeles July 16, 1847. A call was made for re-enlistment for one company for a period of six months, Ruel Barrus was as usual one of the first to respond to his country's call and on July 20, 1847 he again was mustered into service again receiving a commission of Second Lieutenant. This company differed from the original Battalion in one respect, uniforms. August 4th he was placed in command of a detachment and ordered to the Catholic Mission of San Luis Hey near San Diego to protect it from the Indians. He served two months overtime and was mustered out of service in March 1838. After his discharge he spent two years as a missionary in Northern California, part of the time with Elder Parley P. Pratt. Part of the time was spent in the Santa Clara Valley. He was working near Sutter's Mill when Wilford Hudson, who later settled in Grantsville, brought news of the discovery of gold at the mill. He remained in California for some time working on mining claims and came to Utah in 1847, settling in Grantsville where his brother Emery had preceded him. He was married to Ellen Martin August 10, 1859, who came to America with her parents from -England in 1851. She was born at Beeston, Bedfordshire, England December 24, 1842. Her father was Samuel Martin and her Mother, Priscilla Layton (a sister of Christopher Layton). Her Mother died in St. Louis, Missouri January 29, l852. Ruel Barrus and Ellen Martin were sealed in the Endowment House on March 17, 1865.Nine children were born to this union. The honor of being the first officer appointed in Grantsville goes to Ruel Barrus when he was given the commission of Major, in the Nauvoo Legion when it was organized in the Tooele Military District. Ruel was appointed commander of the Grantsville unit. He was known the rest of his life as Major Barrus. While living in Grantsville, Major Barrus engaged in the cattle and sheep raising business, he also followed farming to some extent and was a good farmer, In politics he was a staunch Democrat, but never gave much time to his party, as he devoted much of his time, other than that required for his business, to the Church in which he was always prominent. It was not until 1887 that he received a pension from the government of $8.00 per month. At one time he was a member of the City Council of Grantsville. Throughout his life he rendered his country and Church efficient service. He enjoyed the confidence and respect, not only from the heads of the Mormon Church but with all with whom he has been associated through many years of residence in Tooele County. He died Sunday February 10, 1918 at the home of his daughter Priscilla Barrus Shaffer at the age of ninety six and one-half. At his funeral the main (address was delivered by R. S. Collett, the special representative of Governor Simon Bamberger. Mr. Collett spoke feelingly of the splendid service Major Barrus rendered to this country as a member of the Mormon Battalion, and called attention to the fact that with his death the last officer of that organization passed away and that he was possibly the last officer of the entire Mexican War. Only one other member of the Battalion survived Major Barrus and that was Hurley Morsey of Vernal who at the time was 95 years of age. At the time of his death Major Barrus was the oldest resident of Grantsville and was probably the oldest person of Tooele County. Profuse floral offerings were received from the Daughters of Pioneers in Salt Lake.

Tina Rydalch Barrus

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

TINA RYDALCH BARRUS By Agnes Barrus Clark Tina Rydalch, daughter of Richard Mitten Rydalch and Ellen Priscilla Barrus, was born 28 April, 1886 at Grantsville, Utah. She was born in a home that belonged to Mr. Judd at approximately 240 East Main Street. The home was later sold to Ed Roberts and then in the 1960’s it was torn down. She was reared by her grandparents Ellen Martin and Ruel Barrus. She called them Ma and Dad. They had a daughter, Essie Glee, who was just 11 months older than Tina. Ma was an excellent seamstress and sewed clothes for both of the girls and dressed them alike most of the time. When Essie was ten years old she and Monte were stricken with typhoid fever. Essie’s fever was so high they wrapped her in sheets soaked in ice water trying to cool her temperature. But she was not strong enough to survive the high fever and passed away on the 4th of July, 1895. Monte was older and stronger and he recovered from this illness. Tins received her education at the Grantsville Block School on East Main Street, and the Academy on West Main Street. Her teachers were Orlando Barrus, Edwin C. Dibble, Lillian Rowberry and Frank Hinkley. She completed the eight grade which was the highest class taught in Grantsville at that time. Mama told me that when she was ten years old, on Christmas eave she hid to surprise Santa Claus when he came with his presents. He was surprised, but she was sorry because he never came again. Tina was a beautiful girl as her pictures will testify. She was five feet two inches in height, and weighed 98 pounds when she was married. She had honey blond naturally curly hair, blue eyes, and retained her dainty ankles even in her late years. She was a fun loving person who enjoyed dancing. She loved to visit with people and made friends easily. She married Bert Barrus on the 5th of August, 1907, when she was 21 years old. They went by horse and buggy to Salt Lake City and were married in the old City and Count building by David A. Smith. William R. Judd and Percie Tanner from Grantsville were the witnesses. Another Grantsville couple, Tom McMichael and Alice Johnson were there and married at the same time. They stopped rested the horse in the old cave near Garfield on the way home. When mama and daddy returned to Grantsille a chivaree was held for them at the Shaffer home on East Main Street. Mama said she and daddy were hand-cuffed together so they couldn’t be kidnapped or separated as was customary in those days. Their first home was a two room adobe structure built on the corner of 307 East Main and Church street, just east of Uncle Marin and Aunt Lizzie Barrus’s home, on property belonging to the Barrus Brothers. When the Grantsville Ward was divided, the Church authorities selected that corner as the best location to build the new Second Ward chapel. The property was sold to the Church for $1500.00 and the check was made out to George Barrus. The corner stone of the new chapel was raised in 1915. Their first son Bert Verian, born 30 April, 1908, was 18 months old when Bert was called to serve a two year L.D.S. mission to the Southern States without purse or script (1909-1911) Tina hired out doing house work and also took in washing at this time to support herself and the baby. Tina lived with her mother who was a window with two children (Maggie and Milo Shaffer). They had chickens and sold eggs and had a vegetable garden and fruit trees. Grandma did sewing for hire and pierced and quilted many quilts for people. Grandma also received Mr. Shaffer’s government pension of $8.00. He was a veteran of the Civil War. Alma Ruel was born 4 Sep. 1912. Woodrow Chester was born 23 Aug 1914. A fourth son Henry was born 20 Oct. 1916.. His was a breech birth and he lived just a few hours. Mama said it took her a year to get her strength back after the loss of this baby. She was near death the day the baby was born and she often told of seeing Ma standing in the bedroom doorway as though waiting for the baby. Ellen Martin Barrus (Ma) had died 19 Aug. 1914, and mama was not permitted to go to her funeral as she was due to deliver her third baby at that time. She remembered this with great regret. Tina’s mother, Ellen Priscilla (Tillie) Barrus was sealed to her third husband, Zephaniah Shaffer. Two children were born to this couple, Maggie and Milo Barrus Shaffer. Tina was sealed to her mother and Mr. Shaffer on 7 Aug. 1976. (I was proxy for Ellen Priscilla, Saul was proxy for Mr. Shaffer, Eileen was proxy for Tina). Daddy was employed by Morton Salt Company at Burmester and he moved there with his young family. There was no school at Burmester and because of a lack of transportation, Verian stayed with Grandma Shaffer when the family moved to Burmester for employment. The old band wagon furnished Verian and the other students on the east end of town with a ride to school part of the time but usually he walked the long 2 ½ miles each way.

RUEL BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

RUEL BARRUS This biography of Ruel Barrus was printed in “The Grantsville Observer” June 1st 1923. Ruel Barrus was born August 11th 1821 at Villanova, Chautaqua County, New York, the youngest son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins. His ancestors on both sides fought in the Revolutionary war, his grandfather Stebbins taking part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. His father also fought in the war of 1812 taking part in the action at the burning of the city of Buffalo New York, where he was wounded. His father died 1ne of February 1864 and his mother when he was 7 years old. He grew up in his native town learning the trade of a carpenter. At the age of 19 years he became a convert to Mormonism and moved to Pennsylvania where he took his residence with his brother Alexander who was a Methodist Episcopal minister in that state. He stayed with his brother about 2 years but he being unfriendly to the Mormons it was not a very pleasant life for Ruel. He then decided to move to Nauvoo where his brother emery resided he being the only other member of the family to join the church. He was ordained a Seventy in the Nauvoo Temple and became a member of the 4th Quorum. He remained to Nauvoo until the mob began to persecute the Saints when he with others moved west to Council Bluffs to prepare places for the people to move to. While here, President Polk of the United States on the 30th of January 1846 called upon the leaders of the Church for 4 or 5 companies of volunteers to serve for one year in the war with Mexico. Ruel Barrus was one of the first to enlist being mustered into the U.S. service July 16th 1846 and receiving a commission as a Second Lieutenant and assigned to company B of the Mormon Battalion. He was with the Battalion during the entire march to California. The Battalion left Council Bluffs July 20th 2846 for Fort Leavenworth Kansas reaching that point August 1st. This march of 200 miles was made in 10 days through a country which had no roads or bridges over the creeks and rivers, and without tents or shelter of any kind. They received their equipment and supplies at this point and on August 14th j1846 the Battalion left Fort Leavenworth for their now famous march to California, a march of infantry that has no parallel in the worlds history. They arrived at Santa Fe, New Mexico October 3rd halting there and recuperating for the final stage of the journey. Leaving Santa Fe on October 19th and crossing the great deserts of what is now New Mexico, Arizona. And California. The Battalion arrived at the San Diego January 29th j1847. They first saw the waters of the Pacific Ocean January 27th. Half the journey of 2000 miles was made through a wilderness and over trackless deserts on which of lack of water no living creature dwelt. The Battalion was discharged at Los Angeles July 16th 1847, he being mustered in again receiving a commission as a Second Lieutenant. August 4th we find him placed in command of a detachment and ordered to the Catholic Mission of San Luis Rey near San Diego to protect it from the Indians. We also find another order issued to him to proceed to the same place August 14th, 1847 for the same duty. He received his discharge March 14th, 1848 at San Diego California. After his discharge we find him in various parts of California. He spent two year as a missionary, part of the time with Elder Parley P. Pratt. One year he was in the Santa Clara valley and was at Los Angeles when gold was found at Sutter’s Mill. The balance of the time, until 1857, was spent in southern California as he came to Utah that same year. He located in Grantsille where his brother Emery had located that same years. He married Ellen Martin August 19th, 1859 at Grantsville, During trouble with Johnston’s Army we find him organizing a body of militia of which he was made Major being known the rest of his life as Major Barrus. He was a good farmer and a quite unassuming citizen and was once a member of the City Council of Grantsville. He passed away February 10th, 1918 aged 96 years and is buried in the Grantsville Cemetery. He is the father of nine children.

The Mormon Battalion

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Mormon Battalion (Three of our ancestors were on the Mormon Battalion. Grandpa Edward Hunter is the father of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Uncle William Hyde is the brother of Rosel Hyde who is the father of Martha Ann Hyde Hunter who is the mother of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Uncle Ruel Barrus is the brother of Emery Barrus who is the father of Owen Henry Barrus who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew.) Mary Ann smoothed the jacket her husband wore and handed him the knapsack she had gathered full of food and other small items. There were tears in her eyes, but she knew that there was no other choice than to let him go. They had discussed their options several times, but in the end, they knew that he must follow the call from Pres. Brigham Young and join with the others who were joining the army. Some were calling it the Mormon Battalion, and so it was. Both Edward and Mary Ann Hunter had joined themselves with the Mormons before they were married. They had met each other in the fledgling town of Nauvoo, when it was little more than a swamp and the houses, if you had one, were little more than rude log cabins. Edward had come on his own to Nauvoo as a wide-eyed youth, writing letters back to his Uncle Edward Hunter about the potential he saw in the new community. Edward had been housed at the Whitesides home, and soon a relationship began between Edward and their lovely daughter, MaryAnn which had culminated in their marriage. Now they were the parents of a darling little girl whom they had named Sarah Ann. Edward and MaryAnn had enjoyed their life in Nauvoo, but there was rising resentment toward the Mormons, and soon Mob violence erupted. Their beloved Prophet Joseph Smith and his dear brother Hyrum had been murdered at Liberty Jail. After their deaths, the Saints had been persecuted until finally they had been forced to leave their beloved city and their Temple, which was only partially finished. Edward and MaryAnn were among the first to leave their comfortable home in Nauvoo. They had waited long enough to receive their endowments in the Temple on February 6, 1846 and then turned their backs on their beloved Nauvoo to enter the wilderness of Iowa. They had slogged through the mire of Iowa and finally joined with those gathering in Council Bluffs. Now they had begun to make plans to stay in Iowa until spring, building cabins or dugouts in the nearby bluffs. There were many of the Mormons on the trail in the wilds of Iowa, having been forced out of their homes in the beautiful city of Nauvoo the same as Edward and MaryAnn Hunter. Brigham Young had lead the beleaguered Saints west across the frozen Mississippi River to the mud of Iowa. It had been a hard spring as the Saints struggled through knee-deep mud across the Iowa trail. Late spring and early summer found the Saints scattered across parts of Illinois and much of Iowa. Brigham Young was making preparations as rapidly as possible to move the Saints West. With this preparation in mind he called Elder Jesse C. Little, who was serving a mission for the Church in New England, to go to Washington D.C. and ask the government for “any facilities for emigration to the Western coast which the they might offer.” Elder Little joined with Thomas L. Kane, son of John Kane, a prominent federal judge and political associate of President Polk. Together Little and Kane negotiated with government officials for contracts to build block houses and forts along the Oregon Trail. In 1845 the United States annexed Texas, thereby angering Mexico. There were skirmishes between the two countries and finally Congress declared war on Mexico on May 12th of 1846. The war with Mexico came precisely when the Latter-day Saints were petitioning Washington, for assistance in their move West. With Kane’s urging, Elder Little suggested in a letter to President Polk that although the Saints were loyal Americans, the government’s refusal to assist them could “compel us to be foreigners.” Polk did not want the Saints to join the British interests in the Oregon territory nor to antagonize the Missouri volunteers in the army of the West, so following conversations with Elder Little; he authorized the recruiting of five hundred Mormon volunteers. When the directive came down to Colonel Stephen W. Kearny at Fort Leavenworth, he was told to immediately enlist a Mormon Battalion. Kearny sent Captain James Allen to the Mormon encampments in southern Iowa to recruit volunteers. Brigham Young heard of Captain Allen’s intentions, and before his arrival in Council Bluffs, he met with Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards and discussed the matter. Realizing this was probably the result of Elder Little’s negotiations, they decided it was best to meet Captain Allen in the morning and raise the men wanted. The Brethren also recognized that the request for Mormon men provided an opportunity to earn desperately needed capital for the exodus and provided a reason for establishing temporary settlements on Indian lands. President Young spoke to the Saints and tried to clear their minds of prejudice against the federal government. Edward and MaryAnn Hunter were among those at Council Bluffs who listened with troubled hearts as he began to explain their position. He said “The question might be asked, is it prudent for us to enlist to defend our country? If we answer in the affirmative—all are ready to go. Suppose we were admitted to the Union as a State and the Government did not call on us, we would feel ourselves neglected. Let the ‘Mormons’ be the first men to set their feet on the soil of California. This is the best offer we have ever had from the government to benefit us. I propose that five hundred volunteers be mustered, and I will do my best to see all their families brought forward, so far as my influence can be extended and feed them when I have anything to eat myself.” When Brigham Young finished speaking, MaryAnn looked up into her husband’s eyes. There she saw the familiar determination to follow his leaders, and she knew that he would join this army. Brigham Young left the next day with Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards to cross back over the trail to Mount Pisgah and recruit more men. They sent letters back to those still in Nauvoo saying, “Now, brethren, is the time for action…This is the first time the government has stretched forth its arms to our assistance, and we receive their proffer with joy and thankfulness. We feel confident that the Battalion will have little or no fighting, and their pay will take their families to them. The Mormons will then be the older settlers and have a chance to choose the best locations.” Brigham Young gave speeches as they went, comforting the Saints in their decision with the promise that “The blessings we are looking forward to receive will be attained through sacrifice…We want to conform to the requisition made of us and we will do nothing else until we have accomplished this thing. If we want the privilege of going were we can worship God according to the dictates of our own conscience we must raise this Battalion.” Everywhere they went many able-bodied men signed up. When the call for volunteers in the Battalion came, Edward and MaryAnn discussed their situation. They knew they were in the middle of the prairie with no home, no income, and little provisions. It was a hard decision for Edward to leave his dear wife and little daughter alone for so long. What would happen in the meantime? Would she be able to stay in Council Bluffs? Could she find her way across the plains with others? There were so many questions and so few answers. It was their deep faith in the Lord and his newly restored church which had brought them this far in their quest to follow Him, and they now felt that if the Prophet of God was asking volunteers, they must obey. The Hyde family had also left their homes in Nauvoo in the early exodus. Rosel and William were brothers and joined their families along with their brother Charles. They had gathered their aging father and mother, and crossed Iowa, arriving in Council Bluffs on the 12th of July, just in time to hear of the enlistment activities for the Battalion. It was decided among the family that William would answer the call and Rosel would stay behind to take care of the families. William joined Company B, the same company which Edward Hunter had joined and took his place as second sergeant in that company. William kept a daily journal throughout the trek and entered these solemn words at the onset of the journey: “The thoughts of leaving my family at this critical time are indescribable. Far from the land which we had once called civilization, with no dwelling, save a wagon, with scorching midsummer sun to beat upon them, with the prospect of the cold December blasts finding them in the same place…After giving them my blessing, and resigning them into the hands of God, I left them and returned to the camp of the soldiers.” Before taking up the line of march, President Young, Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, John Taylor, Parley P. Pratt and Wilford Woodruff met with the officers on the banks of the river. William remembered their council: “There they gave us our last charge and blessing, with a firm promise that on condition of faithfulness on our part, our lives should be spared and our expedition result in great good, and our names be handed down in honorable remembrance to all generations. The officers were instructed to prove themselves father to the privates, and to remember their prayers and see that the name of Deity was revered…Many more instructions were given which were all calculated to encourage the officers to be faithful, and prove themselves true to their trust.” Another of interest to us on the trek was Ruel Barrus the brother of Emery Barrus. He was 20 years old and not married. He served as 2nd Lieutenant, also in Company B with Edward Hunter and William Hyde. The Church leaders promised that the families of the volunteers would be carefully provided for. He counseled the volunteers to be faithful soldiers, keep the commandments, and abide by the counsel of their leaders. He promised that if they conducted themselves properly, they would not have to fight. A farewell ball was held in honor of the Battalion on a cleared square along the Missouri River on the evening of Saturday, the 18th of July. The next morning there were many gathered to bid farewell to their departing loved ones as the army prepared to leave. MaryAnn held her husband as long as she felt she could, and then pulling herself away, lifted up their darling little daughter for a good-bye kiss from her father. She had determined to be strong, but it was so hard to let him go. Taking a deep breath, she forced a smile and, handing him the knapsack, bade Edward a fond farewell. With tears in their eyes and a prayer in their hearts, Edward turned and strode away, leaving his little family to the care of their Heavenly Father and the Saints. At noon on Tuesday, July 21st the Mormon Battalion began their historic march. Edward marched with the new soldiers two hundred miles down the East side of the Missouri River and then crossed over to Fort Leavenworth, arriving on the 1st of August 1846. Once there, Edward was happy to be outfitted with supplies, guns, and forty-two dollars per man as clothing money for the year. The paymaster at the fort was surprised when every man was able to sign his name on the payroll. Only a third of the volunteers he had paid previously could write. A portion of the money was collected by Parley P. Pratt and others sent by the Church. This was used to support the Battalion members’ families in Iowa and others. As Edward gave the bulk of his money to the Brethren, he thought of his little family on the plains of Iowa and said a little prayer for them. With a smile he knew that they were also praying for him. Edward soon learned that General Stephen W. Kearny’s regiment had already embarked in June toward Santa Fe to conquer New Mexico for the United States. The Mormon Battalion was to follow him and aid his operations if necessary. For two weeks the Battalion remained at Fort Leavenworth. Edward mopped his brow with his handkerchief, once used to hold the long gone vittles his wife had prepared for him as he was leaving her in Iowa. The weather was very hot, and many men suffered, particularly with fevers. Their commanding officer, Colonel Allen, became severely ill, and was not able to leave with them when they took up their march. Edward and the other members of the Battalion were very concerned for the welfare of their leader and many prayers ascended to heaven for his recovery. Captain Jefferson Hunt, the ranking Mormon officer, took temporary command of the Battalion. William Hyde was also down with the fever when the camp left, but he was able to rejoin his company several days later. Not too far outside of Fort Leavenworth William told of a storm that arose suddenly: “Before we had reached our place of encampment, we discovered a furious storm arising in the West, and we hastened to get all things in readiness. This was hardly done when the storm reached us. Out of upwards of one hundred tents, there were only 5 or 6 that were not blown down, and they were only kept standing by the strong arms of those inside. Three wagons were blown over, two of them heavy loaded baggage wagons and the other was a two horse carriage, the boxes and covers were badly damaged. The wagon covers were nearly all blown off and many of them torn in pieces. And thus were all exposed to the rain and hail which was blown with great fury. During the time that the storm lasted the very elements seemed at war.” About two weeks after leaving the Missouri River, Edward learned that Colonel Allen had died. This saddened the entire group because they had grown to admire this benevolent officer. The Mormon officers felt that Captain Hunt should continue as their leader and requested by letter that Pres. Polk appoint him to the position, but First Lieutenant A.J. Smith of the regular army was already en route to assume command. Edward and his comrades wondered what this new commander would be like. They felt a sense of foreboding as the time for the Colonel to arrive grew near. “The appointment of Smith, even before his character was known, caused a greater gloom throughout the command than the death of Colonel Allen had,” wrote the Battalion historian, Daniel Tyler. Lieutenant Smith set a rapid pace for the Battalion in their march to Santa Fe, hoping to overtake General Kearny before he left for California. Edward was young and strong, but even at this; the long days in the hot sun were a hardship. The strong pace wore heavily on the soldiers, and more especially on the wives and children who were allowed to travel with the Battalion. With the relentless push, the men had little rest, and often the weary fell behind, trudging into camp hours after the others. Worse than the fast travel was the ministration of the military doctor, George B. Sanderson of Missouri. He seemed to dislike the Mormons and forced the men to swallow calomel and arsenic for their ills from the same rusty spoon. The men referred to him as “mineral quack: and “Doctor Death.” William Hyde included a poem in his journal about the doctor: Our Doc., the wicked swearing fellow With calomel thought to make us mellow The boys his poison spurned to take Which made him act his father, snake! Because the sick had not obeyed He raved, and like a donkey brayed, My mind on him I’d like to free But as I’m placed I’ll let him be: Time will show his heart is rotten And sure his name will be forgotten. William L. McIntire, a good botanic physician, had been appointed assistant surgeon to the Battalion but was unable to administer to his afflicted friends in any way unless ordered by Dr. Sanderson, the Battalion surgeon. Edward felt like the others, that it was better not to report your illnesses if at all possible because the ailment may be better than the cure. On the 16th of September, at the last crossing of the Arkansas River (in present day Kansas), Lt. Smith sent Cap. Nelson Higgins and ten men to convey most of the soldiers’ families up the river to the Mexican village of Pueblo (in present day Colorado) for the winter. The men strongly protested this “division” of the Battalion because they had been promised that their families could accompany the army to California. Edward sympathized with those whose families were being sent away, for if MaryAnn were here, he was not so sure if he would have let her go. The decision proved to be wise, however, in light of the difficult trek that lay ahead. A month later at Santa Fe, a detachment of sick men and all but five of the remaining women were sent under the direction of Cap. James Brown to join the earlier group at Pueblo. On the 9th of October the weary soldiers dragged themselves into Santa Fe, the provincial capitol of New Mexico, which had some six thousand inhabitants. General Kearny had already left for California, leaving the city under the command of Col. Alexander Doniphan, a friend of the Saints from the Missouri days. Doniphan ordered a one-hundred gun salute in honor of the arrival of the Mormon Battalion. Edward enjoyed his association with Col. Alexander Doniphan whom he had known while in the Nauvoo Legion. They had much to talk about in the short time they could find to converse. In Santa Fe, Lieutenant Smith relinquished command to Lieutenant Col. Phillip St. George Cooke, whom the men came to respect as a fair but firm leader. The new commander had orders to blaze a wagon trail from Santa Fe to California. Veering South along the Rio Grande, the soldiers sometimes followed the Spanish or Mexican trails but generally cut new roads. Once again the march took its toll in sickness, and on November 10th, a third detachment of fifty-five worn and weakened men turned back toward Pueblo. Edward watched as the men stumbled along and wondered what more lay in store for them on this long march. Not only did lack of water and food plague the remaining 350 members of the Battalion, but the sandy trails were a constant challenge. Edward found that the soldiers were either pulling long ropes to help the teams get through the deep sand, or they were walking double file in front of the wagons to make firm trails for the wheels. Because the Battalion was blazing a new wagon trail to California, guides were sent out ahead of the main group to scout out the area and decide the way the group should go. On Nov. 20th near Cow Springs, the guides couldn’t find a trail westward. None of them had been on this route before. Cooke and the guides climbed to the top of a high mound and built a fire as a signal. A couple of Indians came in response to the smoke, and Cooke spoke with them about what lay in each direction. After talking with the Indians and his officers, Cooke decided to lead the Battalion south to Janos in Senora, Mexico. Levi Hancock and some of the other leaders of the men felt this was a bad decision to lead the Battalion towards enemy territory, so he and Father Pettegrew went from tent to tent asking the men to pray that Cooke would not lead them into Mexico. Edward also wondered how wise it would be to go looking for trouble, as it seemed they were doing. The next morning the camp was on the march due south when, after about two miles, Cooke stopped on a mound. He told the men that his orders from Kearny were to go to California and that was to the West. He had the bugler blow orders to turn westward and the Battalion turned its direction. The men were truly grateful and felt the hand of the Lord had been in the Colonel’s decision. That evening, Edward joined with the other men in a prayer of gratitude to the Lord for his help in the decision of the Commander. Ruel Barrus was somewhat of a hunter for the camp, and now that they had again come to some mountains, he and Captain Hunter obtained permission from Col. Cooke to go hunt. On Dec. 5th they were successful in killing two young bulls and bringing the stake back to camp sometime after dark. On the 7th he again went out, but this time they saw only older bulls whose meat was tough. They supposed the Indians had already selected the cows and calves as they were tender. About this time, Col. Cooke learned that Company B had a private wagon which carried the men’s equipment. Enraged, he ordered the men to each carry his own knapsacks and blankets. Edward and his comrades were already on cut rations, and this new order from the Colonel seamed very unrealistic, but this was the army, and there was no discussion. Near the San Pedro River, some wild bulls got in with the Battalion’s cattle and were killed by the guards. When the companies stopped at the San Pedro for water, other bulls, frightened at the smell of blood, charged into the soldiers. The rampaging bulls charged on and on causing great confusion and fear. Edward hurdled himself behind a wagon with a mighty beast headed toward him. The bulls charged men, mules, and wagons. Albert Smith was trapped between a bull’s horns. He was badly bruised and had three ribs torn from his back bones. One bull caught Amos Cox and gored his thigh before tossing him in the air. Levi Fifield had no wagon or tree for protection and threw himself flat on the ground when a bull charged him. The bull jumped over him, leaving the soldier frightened but unharmed. There was so much dust from the charging that it was difficult to see for a few minutes. When the dust cleared and the bulls had passed, three men were wounded, and three mules were gored to death. Several wagons were tipped over, and a couple were damaged from the stampede. Col. Cooke told a story of seeing “a coal black bull charge on Corporal Frost, of Company A.” Frost stood his ground while the animal rushed right on for one hundred yards. Col. Cooke was close by and believed the man in great danger to his life and called to him to run. Frost did not move but aimed his musket very deliberately and only fired when the beast was within ten paces. It fell headlong, almost at his feet. Cooke said Corporal Frost was “one of the bravest men he ever saw.” When things finally settled down, Edward climbed from behind the upturned wagon. The battle lasted only a few minutes, but ten to fifteen of the bulls were killed. The event was immortalized as the Battle of the Bulls, and was the only fight during the Battalion’s long journey. The Battalion passed without incident through Tucson, where a small Mexican garrison was stationed. Upon hearing that an army was coming, the garrison fled with most of the people, leaving behind only the aged and some children. Kearny had ordered the Battalion that they were to pass through the town and make no scene. As they marched through town, Edward noticed the worried expressions of the faces which peered at the army from behind walls and curtains. He knew they were scared to death, and he was grateful that the orders had been not to stop. The Battalion then rejoined Kearny’s route along the Gila River. Beyond the Colorado River lay over a hundred miles of trackless desert where water was obtained only by digging deep wells. There the Battalion encountered the heaviest sands, the hottest days, and the coldest nights. William Hyde told of the plight of no water saying: “Had no water through the day except a little that was fortified in two or three small mud holes. This was sipped down by the men as readily as if it had been the choicest of wine” The next day he wrote: “Had no water at this place of encampment only what we could get out of a mud hole by going three miles, but it was filthy in the extreme. We however mixed a little flour in some but the water was too thick with the mud that it would admit of but a small portion of the flour being added. We cooked some and ate it, but it was like eating clay.” In writing about this time on the Battalion march the Colonel said, “A great many of my men are wholly without shoes and use every expedient, such as rawhide moccasins and sandals, and even wrapping their feet in pieces of woolen and cotton cloth.” It had by now been three days without water while walking upwards of nineteen miles each day. Edward staggered along, wondering if he could make it the whole way. He thought of his little family so far away and pledged to himself, that if there were any way possible, he would struggle on for them. Finally after 70 miles across a barren desert, with little or no water, it was announced that ahead they had found a pond of water. The camp was given the privilege to make the best way they could to the place that they might quench their thirst. Edward hurried along as best he could, but he noticed other men who had given all they could and had collapsed on the sides of the trail. William said: “We traveled eight miles, and to our great joy we came up with the pilots, who were seated by a small pond of water. Here we laid ourselves upon the ground by the waters edge, and after drinking and resting and again drinking and resting and continuing this operation for a time, we succeeded in quenching our thirst.” As the men sat around at the pond, William commented that they looked as if they were “over ninety years old.” Edward and some of the other men were finally able to revive enough to take mules and canteens back to those who had fallen along the way. Colonel Cooke wrote, “The men arrived here, completely worn down; they staggered as they marched, as they did yesterday. Some of the men did not find strength to reach the camp before daylight this morning. I went through the companies this morning; they were eating their last four ounces of flour. I have remaining only five public wagons; there are three private property wagons.” Colonel Cooke was heard to say that he believed that any other company under like circumstances would have mutinied. He complimented the Battalion saying that notwithstanding they were worn down; they were ready to obey any orders that might be given. He further stated that had he known the situation of the desert they had just crossed, he would never have come into it. That evening, as the Colonel came to look over his troops he was again surprised at the spirit of these Battalion men in such a plight. He wrote of the camp that same evening, “The men, who this morning were prostrate, worn out, hungry, heartless, have recovered their spirits tonight, and are singing and playing the fiddle.” Edward saw the surprise in his Colonel’s eyes, but then he had been with the Mormons for many years, and he knew that these men would find joy and renewed strength through their camaraderie and the singing of songs and hymns. On the 21st December a story is told by a private Henry Bigler, a 22-two-old single young man. He said, “I was detailed to be the Colonel’s orderly for the day. On going to his tent to report myself, I found him feeding his mule some of the wheat that he had brought from Tucson. There was another mule determined to share the Colonel’s mule’s wheat. He had driven it away several times. As soon as his back was turned the mule would march boldly up for another morsel of wheat, until the colonel could endure it no longer. Turning to me, he said, ‘Orderly, is your gun loaded?’ Being answered in the negative, he said, ‘Load your gun and I’ll shoot that mule; I knew the mule and it belonged to one of our own men. The thought came to me not to permit it to be killed. At this I took from my box a cartridge, clapped it in my mouth and with my teeth, tore off the bullet and put the ball in my pocket. I then put the powder into my musket and rammed the paper in on top of it. Pretty soon he came out and, standing broadside, fired. The moment he discovered the animal was not dead, he dropped the musket and with an oath said, “You did not load that gun right’ and walked into his tent. His bugler, Mr. Guigly, and others who saw the trick fairly split their sides with laughter.” Finally near the Gila River the Battalion was met by Pima Indians who came out by the hundreds, men, women, and children. Edward thought it interesting to see the Indian tribe. He had never seen a whole tribe before this day. The Chief seemed pleased to see the army. He said the Mexicans had been to see him. The Mexicans wanted him and his men to join them and give battle, promising the Indians all the spoils. The Chief told them his men should not fight. They had never shed the blood of a white man. For that reason, he was not afraid of the coming army, and he did not believe the Battalion would hurt them. He stated that he had no objections to them passing through his towns. The Colonel purchased from the Chief 100 bushels of corn to feed the teams. The Indians brought to camp large quantities of corn, beans, meal, and pumpkin to trade for clothes, buttons, beads, needles, and thread etc. Money they refused, saying it was of no use to them. The new provisions were used to make somewhat of a Christmas feast consisting of cold beans, pancakes, and pumpkin sauce. William Hyde remembered Christmas with his family and contrasted it to the “parched lips, scalded shoulders, weary limbs, blistered feet, worn out shoes, and ragged clothes” he was experiencing at this time. Edward’s dreams could not help but go back in time in the same reminiscent way to Christmas from a more gentle time. The Battalion continued across the desert only to find in their path the rugged heart of the coastal mountains. Edward looked in awe at the mountains. He had never seen such mountains with such height that seemed to defy anything but the wild goats he saw along the ridges. He knew that they would have to somehow cut a path for them and their wagons to cross over the foreboding mountains. Col. Cooke wrote, “I came to the canyon, and found it much worse than I had been led to expect (by the guides). There were many rocks to surmount, but the worst was the narrow pass. Setting the example myself, as there was much work done on it before the wagons came; the rock was hewn with axes to increase the opening. I thought it wide enough…but when a trial was made, at the first pass, it was found too narrow by a foot of solid rock. More work was done, and several trials made. The sun was now only an hour high, and it was about seven miles to the first water. I had a wagon taken to pieces, and carried through. Meanwhile, we still hewed and hammered at the mountain side; but the best road tools had been lost. The next wagon body was lifted through, and then the running gear, by lifting one side; The work on the pass was perseveringly continued, and the last two wagons were pulled through by the mules, with loads undisturbed.” Once through the mountain passes, it was on to Warner’s Ranch where the weary, hungry, and ill clad men were able to rest. William and a few of his friends were able to pool their recourses and buy a pig which they cooked “and in company with others had a feast that revived our spirits.” The company took up their march again on the 23rd of January and hiked eighteen miles over the hills from Warner’s Ranch. It rained several hours in the afternoon, again at night, and then continued raining for twenty-four hours. It was all Edward and his weary comrades could do to keep going. “The Battalion had fallen upon the rainy season. All the tents were blown down in the night,” wrote Col. Cooke. He continued, “The ill-clad Battalion was drenched and suffered much.” Another few days’ march brought them past the deserted Catholic Mission of San Loui Rey. “One mile below the mission,” recorded Tyler, the camp historian, “we ascended a bluff, here the long looked-for great Pacific Ocean appeared plain to our view, only about three miles distant. The joy, the cheer that filled our souls, none but worn-out pilgrims nearing a haven of rest can imagine. Prior to leaving Nauvoo, we had talked about and sung of the great ‘Pacific Sea,’ and we were now upon its very borders, and its beauty far exceeded our most sanguine expectations.” This is just how Edward felt as he finally gazed upon the great Pacific Ocean. They had been through so much. They were weary, nearly exhausted, but to look out upon the Ocean, and realize that they truly had done this great thing, was the medicine needed to bolster their spirits. Down the coast they marched southward to where they were to meet Gen. Kearny. Finally on January 29, 1847, they reached Mission San Diego at the end of their 2,030-mile march. Edward was humbled and grateful to the Lord for his tender mercies in bring the men all the way through their many trials and to the end of their journey. Just five days after they arrived, Col. Cooke gathered the men together and read a bulletin which he had written concerning their march. Edward and his comrades stood shoulder to shoulder deeply moved at the Colonel’s words as he said in part, “The Lieutenant-Colonel commanding congratulates the Battalion on their safe arrival on the shore of the Pacific Ocean, and the conclusion of their march of over two thousand miles. History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry…” The bulletin was received by the Mormon volunteers with hearty cheers. Since California was already in the hands of the United States, the Battalion men served as occupation troops with garrison duty in San Diego, San Luis Rey, and Los Angeles. While in Southern California, the Saints gained the respect of the local citizens. Those in San Diego built a courthouse and houses, burned brick, and dug wells, thus contributing significantly to the building of the community. On July 16th at the end of their year’s enlistment, the Battalion members were discharged, although eighty-one men chose to reenlist for an additional six months. Ruel Barrus was among those who re-enlisted. Most of the discharged men left for northern California, intending to travel east to join the Saints in the Salt Lake Valley or back at the Missouri River. Edward Hunter joined with a large group including William Hyde who traveled North to Sutter’s Fort just on the West side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Some of the brethren concluded to stop, as it was now getting late in the season. After a mature consideration, it was thought best for a portion of the company to tarry, as the wages were good, and they could labor until spring. Edward Hunter and William Hyde both opted to continue their journey which they did with others heading over the mountains, and on the 5th of September, they reached the valley on the East side of the Sierra Nevada mountains. This day they passed the spot where several emigrants from Missouri, the ill-fated Donner Party, had perished the previous winter. It was a solemn moment for Edward and the other as they saw the remnants of these poor people. Their bones were bleached upon the ground, having not received a burial. The next morning they met Samuel Brannan who had been through San Francisco to the Salt Lake Valley, where he had met with the Presidency of the Church, together with the pioneers and the first companies of the Saints to that place. He said that Captain Brown was on his way to meet the Battalion Members and was just two or so days behind him. Edward and the group waited for Captain James Brown and were soon met by him and a small escort, direct from Salt Lake City. He conveyed a message from Brigham Young asking those men without families to stay in California to work during the winter of 1847-48. Upon hearing the information, most of the men returned to the settlements in California to labor until spring. Many spent the winter at Sutter’s Fort on the Sacramento River and assisted in the discovery of gold in January 1848 that began the California gold rush. The following summer they honorably completed their contracts with Sutter, abandoned the gold fields, and joined their families either in Salt Lake City or at the Missouri River. However, William Hyde, Edward Hunter and several others determined to continue on to their families and started out again. They traveled Northeast through Nevada and up through Fort Hall in Idaho. Edward looked around him at the lush grass covered fields of Idaho and thought it would be a good place to raise sheep. Years later he would buy a farm in Idaho and do just that. The group then headed south around the Great Salt Lake and down into the Salt Lake Valley, arriving on the 12th of October. Edward was delighted and relieved to find that his dear wife, Mary Ann, and their little daughter, now a year older, were in the valley. She had come across the plains with Edward’s uncle Edward Hunter and his family. It was a heartwarming reunion for all of them and a sweet close to the heroic journey of which Edward Hunter had been a part. MaryAnn had not dared to hope that Edward would travel to Utah that season. She had heard that many of the men were planning to stay for the winter in California, so it was a great delight to see Edward in the first group of returning Battalion Members. She brushed back his hair which was longer than usual and gazed up into his well tanned face, rugged and weather beaten. It was so good to have him back. Now they would begin a new life together in this new land they would call Zion. Though very late in the season, William Hyde felt driven to continue his journey over the Rockies and across the plains to Winter Quarters. He joined with 16 other men who started out two days later. They reached Fort Bridger before the snow fell, but camped on the Sweetwater on October 25th and at Independence Rock on the 29th. They were able to kill buffalo along the way for their meat, but it was cold and windy. By November 7th William recorded “The weather about as cold as I ever witnessed. Had to run behind our mules with ropes wrapped around us to keep from freezing.” They reached Fort Laramie and were very hospitably received and entertained. They were given a substantial supper and breakfast, and feed for their mules for which they did not have to pay. But the next morning they were on their way again. They had trouble trying to cross the river at Loup Fork. William crossed on foot to try the depth of the water. He had to swim the last part of the distance, despite the chunks of ice and cold. One of their animals was mired in the quicksand and died. They were able to cook and eat the meat as their provisions had entirely failed. They continued their journey but were becoming weaker and more susceptible to the freezing cold all the time. On the morning of November 10th, they all united in calling on the Lord to regard their situation in mercy and send food in some way that they might not perish. As they continued their journey, they found that the Lord had indeed heard their prayers, for a group of wild turkeys began to pass their camp in droves. They succeeded in getting four of the birds which was one to every four persons. Rejuvenated from the turkey meat, the emaciated men continued their journey. On the evening of the very next day, they arrived at Winter Quarters to a wonderful reception from the Saints. They were the first 16 souls to return from the Battalion after their discharge in California. The very next day, William Hyde was able to cross the Missouri River and ride to Council Point, a distance of twelve miles, where he found his family and his father’s family well. William told of his arrival in this way. “I reached home on Sunday, and as it was dusk when I arrived, the people of the little burgh had gathered for worship. The news of my arrival soon reached their place of gathering, which proved the breaking up of their meeting. All were so anxious to see me, that without ceremony they flocked out of the meeting house and gathered into my humble but happy cot which had been built by my father and brother for the benefit of my family in my absence. This was a joyful meeting.” The Mormon Battalion truly was a great endeavor and in the words of Col. Cooke, “History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry…” Edward Hunter is the father of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. William Hyde is the brother of Rosel Hyde who is the father of Martha Ann Hyde Hunter who is the mother of Mary Ann Hunter Barrus, who is the mother of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. Ruel Barrus is the brother of Emery Barrus who is the father of Owen Henry Barrus who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus Dew who is the mother of Delores, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew. This story was adapted from the following accounts: Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 315-326. Treasures of Pioneer History, Compiled by Kate B. Carter, 409-429 (DFH/M73-84). The Mormon Battalion, U.S. Army of the West 1846-1848, by Norma Baldwin Rickets. The Mormon Battalion, by B.H. Roberts. Five Hundred Wagons Stood Still, Mormon Battalion Wives; “Mary Ann Whitesides Hunter,” by Shirley N. Maynes, 283, (DFH/Hu21). The Private Journal of William Hyde, Part 2, (DFH/Hy43-69). Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

EMERY BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) EMERY BARRUS, (son of Benjamin Barrus, born April 4, 1784, Richmand, N.H., died 1864. Chautauque, N.Y. and Betsy Stebbins, born March 21, 1787, in Massachusetts, died July 20, 1828 in New York). He was born April 8, 1809. Chautauque County, New York. Came to Utah October 9, 1853, Appleton Harmon Company. Married Huldah Abigail Nickerson (daughter of Freeman Nickerson, born Feb. 19, 1779, Dennis, Mass. and died Jan. 22, 1847, Chariton Point, Iowa, while on his way to Utah, and Huldah Chapman born 1789 in Connecticut, came to Utah 1859, died 1860, Provo, Utah). She was born April 16, 1816 in Pennsylvania. Their children: Lydia b. Oct. 22, 134, m. Festus Sprague, April 1, 1857; Betsy N. b. March 28, 1836, m. Lovina Ann Steele, Sept. 29, 1861; Emery Freeman b. March 12, 1841, died; Mary Huldah b. April 8, 1843, m. Charles Bailey; Orrin Elezar b. Sept. 14, 1845, m. Catherine Wilson; Emery Alexander b. March 27, 1848. d. Nov, 16, 1858; Ruel Michael b. Nov. 14, 1850, m. Ida Pearl Hunter; Owen Henry b. Dec. 28, 1853, m. Olive Deseret McBride Feb. 18, 1877, m. Mary Ann Hunter Dec. 21, 1892; Sarah Abigail b. April 9, 1856, m. Eleazar Freeman Nickerson; John Nickerson b. June 1, 1858, m. Alice Burton; Eliza Alvira b. Sept. 15, 1860, m. Charles Post. Married Jane Zerildah Baker (Daughter of Benjamin Baker, Pioneer 1857). She was born November 3, 1841. Their children: Emiline Abigail b. Nov. 30, 1859 m. Henry Tanner; James Baker b. Aug. 7, 1852, m. Charlotte Ann Mathews; William Taylor b. June 1, 1864, m. Matilda McBride; Thomas b. July 20, 1866; and Freeman b. Oct. 12, 1869, died; Chauncey Baker b. Jan. 15, 1872; Catherina Rozena b. Feb. 24, 1877, m. Henry Watson. Family home, Grantsville, Utah. High Priest; patriarch. Carpenter; stock raiser; farmer, Seventy. Died Oct. 5, 1899.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BARRUS

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(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BARRUS (Son of Emery Barrus and Huldah Abigail Nickerson). Born May 30, 1838, in Cataraugus County, N.Y. Came to Utah 1853, driving a herd of cattle across the plains. Married Lovina Ann Steele Sept. 29, 1861 (daughter of Samuel Steele born July 15, 1822, Plattsburg, Clinton County, N.Y., pioneer, 1851 Joshua Grant Company and Elvira Salome Thayer, born Sept. 15, 1826 in New York.) She was born Sept. 29, 1844, in Illinois. Their children: Benjamin Franklin b. Aug. 22, 1862; Samuel Leonard b. Jan. 14, 1868, died; Orrin Orland b. May 29, 1870 m. Ulysses Cline, July 26, 1893; Albert Almond b. June 1, 1875, m. Margaret Alice Millward March 4, 1896, m. Mabel Robinson Jan. 8, 1902; Elvira Chloena b. Dec. 9, 1881, died; Sylvia Ellen b. Jan. 17, 1886, died; Calvin Cleone b. Jan. 24, 1887, d. Jan. 13, 1891.

RUEL BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 73 (US/CAN 979.2 D3e 1966 Copy 3 Salt Lake City Family History Center, July 3, 2003)) RUEL BARRUS (son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stubbins). Born Aug. 11, 1821 at Villanova, Chautaqua County, New York. Came to Utah Oct. 15, 1854 with others of the Mormon Battalion. Married Ellen Martin, Aug. 10, 1859 (daughter of Samuel Martin, pioneer Sept. 25, 1855 Richard Ballantyne Company, and Priscilla Layton, who died in St. Louis), She was born Sept. 23, 1844. Their children: Ellen P. b. Feb. 12, 1861, m. Charles Schaeffer; Betsy A. b. Nov. 11, 1862; Zeltha A. b. March 28, 1864; Fannie I. b. June 11, 1866, m. William Sanford; Lona b. Aug. 12, 1870, m. Charles Nelson; Ruel M. b. April 20, 1873, m. Angeline Anderson; Darias M. b. April 20, 1876, m. Lizzie Ratcliffe; Royal L. b. June 27, 1879; Essie Glee b. March 13, 1885. Seventy, 2nd Lieutenant Company B, Mormon Battalion; Major in Echo Canyon Campaign.

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: History written by Benjamin F. Barrus, oldest son of Benjamin Barrus who was born before the family left New York State, Genealogical data by E. B. Warner; Sent to Central Company 1 April 1964 by Emily T. Cramer; History Submitted by May Clark Barrus) Emery Barrus, son of Benjamin and Betsy Stebbins was born 1 April 1809 at Hanover, Chautauqua Co., N.Y. and died 6 Oct. 1899 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In 1833 he was working as a farm hand for Freeman Nickerson and was keeping company with his daughter, Huldah Abigail. At this time the Prophet Joseph Smith and some other Elders visited that part of New York and made their home with Freeman Nickerson for a time. Thus it happened that Freeman Nickerson and his family, consisting of several sons and daughters, some married and some single, joined the Church in 1833 and Emery Barrus, hearing the Gospel at this time was also baptized. He was the only one of his father's family to be baptized into the Church in New York. On Dec. 19, 1833, Emery married Huldah Abigail Nickerson, daughter of Freenan Nickerson. In Nov. 1839, freeman Nickerson, together with his son, Moses, his son-in-law, Emery Barrus, his daughter Caroline Hubbard and their children (altogether 17 persons) started on their journey to Missouri and arrived at Nauvoo in the spring of 1840, bought city lots and built homes, planted orchards, etc, and lived in comparative peace until about 1844 when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother, Hyrum, were assassinated in the Carthage Jail. After that date the persecution became very severe; men were whipped, houses burned and crops destroyed until 1845 when the saints agreed to vacate their beautiful homes, leaving the orchards with their fruit trees just coming into bearing. Preparations were made for that never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery Barrus had a shingle mill on an Island in the Mississippi, where his wife would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for silngles. In 1845 they moved to the Island and Emery would go into the woods and cut the timber and his wife would help saw it into suitable lengths for the different parts of the wagon, then put it up over his head in the shop to season. He made 15 wagons right from the stumps of trees. After the Prophet was killed the mob saw that Mormonism was not dead and told the people if they would drop Mormonism they could remain in their homes. Many found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track until they could find an easier way to worship God. Freeman Nickerson and his family, including Emery Barrus and family, who left New York in 1839, left Nauvoo in August, seven years later, crossed the Mississippi River and again took up the line to March. They wintered at Sheridan Point, Iowa in 1846 and 1847, their stock living on the buds and limbs of small trees felled for that purpose. They built log homes and covered them with split boards. On Jan. 22, 1847. Freeman Nickerson and his wife made the rest of the journey with her son, Levi, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1850. In the spring of 1847 they again took up the line of march westward, arriving in Winter Quarters to late to accompany the pioneers on their journey to the Salt Lake Valley. So Emery Barrus and his family again built a house and fenced a farm on which he planted and harvested considerable produce. Here they remained until the spring of 1853 when they again started on the westward journey. They traveled in Appleton Harmon's Company and Emery was appointed hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The cholera was in the wagon train in front of them and the one behind them and the captain advised that they eat as little meat as possible. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville in Oct. 1853. Their son, Owen, was born in Dec. 1853, two months after their arrival. By the spring of 1854 the inhabitants of Grantsville had become quite numerous. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in early days. They had to herd their stock on the range in the daytime and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. In those days there were no carding machines. Davenport and Wilson each had a flock of sheep. The home of mother Barrus was a regular manufacturing plant. Huldah Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls in yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. After there was a carding machine in Provo, Huldah Barrus would take the wool to Provo, driving a pair of colts they had brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of butter and cheese. Emery bought 46 head of loose stock, besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons across the plains. Not a fruit tree or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1853. Brother Sceva, John Clark and James McBride were the first to plant fruit trees. Emery Barrus made the first barns in Grantsville and some good houses. In 1855 the grasshoppers became so thick that they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. 1856 was the year of the famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour. They were without flour for months, living on segos, thistles, roots, etc. Brother John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856 and Brother William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, thrashed it with flails and cleaned it up in the wind. Each family got one half bushel of grain and ground it in coffee mills to make cake for the 4th of July dinner in 1856. This one half bushel of grain was a gift from John Cooley. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and milled and each family got a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery Barrus furnished a fat animal for beef so each family had a flour cake and a beef steak for dinner on July 24th 1856. In 1857 they heard that Johnson's Army was coming to civilize the Mormons. Every able-bodied man and boy was expected to go to Echo Canyon to hedge up the way for the Army. 1858 was the move south. It was decided to burn every building, destroy every tree and growing crops, provided the army persisted in coming in. But they did not come in until a treaty of peace was signed. Every family had the Grantsville precinct except a few faithful brethren. They were left to water the crops with orders to burn if molested by the Army. Emery Barrus was the first Mayor of Grantsville City and attended to surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charley Herman. He was a faithful worker in the temple and only came home two weeks before his death at the age of 90 years. He was ordained a patriarch in Grantsville. Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus was the first president of the Grantsville Ward Relief Society. By his first wife, Huldah Abigail Nicerson, he had the following children: Lydia, Betsy and Benjamin Franklin, all born in Hanover, N.Y,, Emery Freeman, Mary Huldah and Orrin Eleazer, born at Nauvoo, Ill., Emery Alexander and Ruel Michael born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, Owen Henry, Sarah Abigain, John Nickerson and Eliza Elvira born at Grantsville, Utah. Emery Barrus married April 5, 1857 at Grantsville Jane Ziralda Baker, daughter of Benjamin Baker and Abigail Taylor. She was born 3 Nov. 1841 at Adams, Ill., died 26 March 1895. To them were born the following children: Emiline Abigail, James Benjamin, William Taylor, Thomas Baker, Chauncy Baker and Catherine Rosina.

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS (Written by Esther Warner, Granddaughter)

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

(Reference: Written by Esther Warner, Granddaughter; Myrtle Allsop, County Historian; Alice Knowlton,Camp Historian) (Made available from the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers) Emery Barrus, son of Benjamln (5), Michael (4), Ebenezer (3), Ebenezer (2), John (1), and Betsy Stebbins (7), Hesadiah (6), Abner (5), Thomas (4), Samuel (l), Thomas (2), and Rowland (1), was born Apr. 8, 1809 at Hanover, Chautauqua Co., N.Y. and died Oct. 6, 1899 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In 1833 he was working as a farm hand for Freeman Nickerson and was keeping company with his daughter Huldah Abigail. At this same time, the Prophet Joseph Smith and some other Elders, visited that part of New York and made their home with Freeman Nickerson for a time. Thus it happened Freeman Nickerson and his family, consisting of several sons and daughters, some married and some single, joined the church in 1833 and Emery Barrus hearing the gospel at this time was also baptized. He was the only one of his father's family to be baptized into the Church in New York, Major Ruel Barrus being only eleven years old at that time and subject to his father until he came of age, when he left his father's home and came to Nauvoo and joined the church and made his home with Emery. On Dec. 19, 1833 Emery married Huldah Abagail Nickerson, daughter of Freeman (6), Eleazer (5), Eleazer (4), John (3), and Nicholas (2), William (1) and Huldah Chapman (3), Eliphalet (2), Moses (1) born Apr. 11, 1816 at Springville, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania; died Aug. 22, 1872 at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In Nov. 1839, Freeman Nickerson, together with his son Moses, his son-in-law Emery Barrus, his daughter Caroline Hubbard and their children (altogether 17 persons) started on their journey to Missouri, but the Ohio River being closed with ice they wintered at Jefferson City, Missouri and arrived at Nauvoo in the spring of 1840 ; bought city lots and built homes, planted orchards etc., and lived in comparative peace, until about 1844 when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were assasinated in Carthage Jail. After that date the persecution became very severe; men were whipped, houses burned and crops destroyed until 1845 when the Saints agreed to vacate their beautiful homes, leaving the orchards with their fruit trees just coming into bearing. Preparations were made for that never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery Barrus had a shingle mill on an Island in the Mississippi, where his wife would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for shingles. In 1845 they moved to the Island and Emery would go into the woods and get the timber and his wife would help saw it into suitable lengths for the different parts of the wagon, then put it up over his head In the shop to season. He made 15 wagons right from the stumps of the trees. After the Prophet was killed the mob saw that Mormonism was not dead and told the people if they would drop Mormonism they could remain in their homes. If any found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track until they could find an easier way to worship God. Freeman Nickerson and his family, including Emery Barrus and family who left New York in 1839, left Nauvoo in August, seven years later; crossed the Mississippi River and again took up the line of march. They wintered at Sheridan Point, Iowa in 1846 and 1847, their stock living on the buds and limbs of small trees felled for that purpose€. They built log houses and covered them with split boards. On Jan. 22, 1847, Freeman Nickerson died and his wife made the rest of the journey with her son Levi, arriving in Salt Lake City in 1850. In the spring of 1847, they again took up the line of march westward, arriving at Winter Quarters too late to accompany the pioneers on their journey to Salt Lake Valley. So Emery Barrus and his family again built a house and fenced a farm on which he planted and harvested Considerable produce. There they remained until the spring of 1853, when they again started on the westward journey. They traveled In Appelton Harmon's company and Emery was appointed hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The cholera was in the wagon train in front of them and the one behind them and the captain advised that they eat as little meat as possible. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville in Oct. 1853. Their son Owen was born in Dec. 1853, two months after their arrival. By the spring of 1854 the inhabitants of Grantsville had become quite numerous. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in early days. They had to herd their stock on the range in the daytime and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. In those days there were no carding machines. Davenport and Wilson each had a flock of sheep. The home of mother Barrus was a regular manufacturing plant. Huldah Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. After there was a carding machine in Provo, Huldah Barrus would take the wool to Provo, driving a pair of colts they had brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of cheese and butter. Emery brought 46 head of loose stock, besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons across the plains. Not a fruit tree or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1851. Brother Sceva, John Clark and James McBride were the first to plant fruit trees. Emery Barrus made the first barns in Grantsville and some good houses. In 1855 the grasshoppers came so thick they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. In 1856 was the year of famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour. They were without bread for months, living on segoes, thistles, roots, etc. Brother John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856 and Brother William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, threshed it with flails and cleaned it up in the wind. Each family got one-half bushel of grain and ground it in coffee mills to make cake for the 4th of July dinner in 1856. This one-half bushel of grain was a gift from John W. Cooley. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and milled and each family got a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery Barrus furnished a fat animal for beef, so each family had a flour cake and a beef steak for dinner July 24th 1856. In 1857 they heard that Johnson's army was coming to civilize the Mormons. Every able-bodied man and boy was expected to go to Echo Canyon to hedge up the way of the army. 1858 was the move South. It was decided to burn every building, destroy every tree and growing crops, provided the army persisted in coming in. But they did not come in until a treaty of peace was signed. Every family had left the Grantsville precinct a free faithful brethren They were left to water the crops with orders to burn if molested by the army. Emery Barrus was the first mayor of Grantsville City and attended to surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charley Herman. He was a faithful worker in the Temple and only came home two weeks before his death at the age of 90 years. He was ordained a patriarch in Grantsville. Huldah Abigail Nickerson was the first president of the Relief Society of Grantsville Ward. By his first wife Huldah Abigail Nickerson he had the following children: Lydiaa, Betsy, and Benjamin Franklin, all born in Hanover, New York; Emery Freeman, Mary Huldah and Orvin Eleazer born at Nauvoo, Ill.; Emery Alexander and Ruel Michael born at Winter Quarters, Nebraska; Owen Henry, Sarah Abigail, John Nickerson and Eliza Elvira born at Grantsville Utah. Emery Barrus married Apr. 5, 1857 at Grantsville Jane Zerelda Baker, daughter of Benjamin Baker and Abigail Taylor. She was born Nov. 3, 1841 at Adams, Ill. died Mar. 26, 1895. To them were born the following children: Emellne Abigail, James Benjamin, William Taylor, Thomas Baker, Herman Baker, Chauncey Baker, and Catherlne Rozina all born at Grantsville, Utah.

Life timeline of Ruel Barrus

Ruel Barrus was born on 11 Aug 1821
Ruel Barrus was 10 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Ruel Barrus was 19 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Ruel Barrus was 38 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Ruel Barrus was 41 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Ruel Barrus was 56 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Ruel Barrus was 62 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
Ruel Barrus was 77 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
Ruel Barrus was 87 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Ruel Barrus died on 10 Feb 1918 at the age of 96
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Ruel Barrus (11 Aug 1821 - 10 Feb 1918), BillionGraves Record 3792948 Grantsville, Tooele, Utah, United States

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