Robert Nelson Parsons

14 Jan 1854 - 8 Jan 1936

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Robert Nelson Parsons

14 Jan 1854 - 8 Jan 1936
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Robert Nelson Parsons Robert Nelson Parsons was born in Iowa in 1854. He was the tenth child of James and Mary Thrift Parsons. Several of his older brothers came west settling in Utah and then later in Bingham county. Robert migrated with his brother George Washington and family. Robert married Henr
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Robert Nelson Parsons

Born:
Died:

Riverside Thomas Cemetery

939-949 State Highway 39
Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho
United States
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Simini

July 25, 2013
Photographer

Will

July 22, 2013

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Robert Nelson Parsons

Contributor: Simini Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Robert Nelson Parsons Robert Nelson Parsons was born in Iowa in 1854. He was the tenth child of James and Mary Thrift Parsons. Several of his older brothers came west settling in Utah and then later in Bingham county. Robert migrated with his brother George Washington and family. Robert married Henrietta Louisa Rogers who was born in Farmington, Utah in 1854. They made their home in Brigham City, Utah and later in 1884; they came into Bingham County, where they homesteaded a 160-acre farm west of Blackfoot in the Thomas area. They were the parents of three children: Martha, Henrietta and Adrian when they came here. They first lived in a dugout and the mother and children were a little frightened of Indians, but later they found them to be quite friendly. The sagebrush was so high that grandpa James would tie a piece of red cloth on it, so he could find his way home, when he walked the ten miles to Blackfoot. When he needed more provisions, he would drive a team and wagon out the west side of town and walk in, as it cost 50 cents or a dollar to cross the Snake River toll bridge. All was not hardship for the early settlers here. They would get together for socials in their homes with their friends and neighbors. No one had more than the others, and they were all happy and thankful for what they had. Grandpa always had a fine garden and beautiful flowers, and he was the first one to grow rhubarb in the new country. I recall he sent back east for a start, which came back in a small box. There were five other children born to this family, Cora Lillian, May 13, 1886; Minnie Cathleen, Aug 11, 1888; Emma, October 9, 1889; Ana Luella, Jan 7, 1893; Helen Edna, born Nov.23, 1896. It was a tragedy for the family when Emma became ill with diphtheria and died. She was one of the first to be buried in the Thomas - Riverside cemetery, on the five acres donated by grandpa’s brother, Alf Parsons. Later many of the first graves were members of the Parsons family as several of the families had come to Bingham County to make their homes. Grandpa and Grandma Parsons raised a fine family. It was always fun for we grandchildren to go visit them and especially at Christmas time when all the families would come, and we would spend the holidays together. Reunion time was another fun time for all the family, when we would meet together, usually on or about July 31st, Grandma’s birthday. They lived a long life together, and Grandma died first, June 7, 1930 and Grandpa lived to be 82. He died Jan 8, 1936.

History of Martha Abanatha Parsons Fjeldsted, written by her daughter Grace Fjeldsted Lowe April 1959

Contributor: Simini Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

HISTORY OF MARTHA ABANATHA PARSONS FJELDSTED WRITTEN BY HER DAUGHTER, GRACE FJELDSTED LOWE, APRIL 1959 Martha Abanatha Parsons Fjeldsted was born the 21 August 1878 at Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah. She was the oldest child of Robert Nelson Parsons and Henrietta Louisa Rogers, and was known by her friends and relatives as Mattie Felsted. She was named in honor of her two grandmothers, Martha Diana Case and Mary Abanatha Thrift. Her father, Robert Nelson Parsons, was the youngest son of James Parsons and Mary Abanatha Thrift. He was born in Leon, Decatur County, Iowa, on the 14 January 1854 and lived in and around Decatur County, Iowa, until he grew to young manhood. He then left his family home and came to Brigham City, Utah, in the year 1876, where his brother George Washington Parsons and family lived, and where there was plenty of work for young men in the building of railroads throughout the territory. Her mother, Henrietta Louisa Rogers, was the daughter of Telemachus Rogers and Martha Diana Case Howland, a young widow who had lost her first husband, Henry Howland, 13 June 1852, on the banks of the Missouri River, with cholera, while on their way to Utah. Telemachus Rogers and family was in this same company of Saints coming to Utah, and he was the captain over ten wagons. Among the wagons was the young widow and her three little girls, Helen, Emma, and Martha Howland. Soon after the company arrived in Utah Martha Diana, the young widow, married Telemachus Rogers as his plural wife, however, this marriage was one that didn't last and they were separated before the birth of their child, Henrietta Louisa Rogers, on 31 July 1854. The young widow with her four little girls lived in the Second Ward in Salt Lake City and taught school there in order to make a living for herself and family. When Henrietta was about one year old the young widow married for the third time. William Adams Hickman on the 21 September l855, as his plural wife. She sold her house and lot in the Second Ward in Salt Lake City, and she and her family moved to West Jordan to live by the Hickman family. To this union were born four children, Jordan River, Avilda, Don Carlos, and Mary Rozina Hickman, however, the youngest child died when she was two years old. In February 1863 Martha Diana Hickman left her home at West Jordan and came to Franklin, Idaho, to visit her married daughter, Helen, who at this time was expecting her second child. Helen Howland had married Nephi Packer on the 4 April 1860 at West Jordan, Utah, and were among the first wagons to come to Franklin at the time of its founding during the spring of 1860. Helen and Nephi were now living in one of the little houses that formed the "Old Fort”. Martha Diana Hickman stayed with her daughter until after her baby was born, and while she was visiting with her decided that she wanted to make Franklin her future home, so she and her son-in-law, Nephi, made the long trip to West Jordan by wagon and gathered up all her belongings and her children and then returned to Franklin. She secured a cabin close by her daughter and family and settled down to pioneer life in the “Old Fort”. The little settlement of Franklin, which was located in Northern Cache Valley in Idaho Territory, was only three years old when Martha Diana Hickman brought her family to their new home. It was located on the frontier and was the last white outpost between the white man and the marauding Indians, who at this time was under Old Chief Kittemere and who welcomed the white settlers to the land, water, and timber, but he and his band were great beggars and thieves and exacted beef, flour, grain, potatoes and other provisions from the white people. The policy of the settlers was to feed and treat the Indians kindly rather than fight them, and so the Indians’ requests were complied with and at times it became extremely burdensome. The first houses were built along the side of a square, enclosing a rectangle sixty by ninety rods. The houses were all constructed with the fronts facing the inside of the square, with corrals and yards outside the fort, and each man took his turn at guarding the stock. The older children of Martha Diana Hickman had the privilege of attending school in the "Old Fort." which was located in the center of the square. The children sat on flat board benches which were very hard at times. While Henrietta attended school she also learned to crochet, knit, and piece quilts, which was considered very essential in those days. During the late summer of 1863 some of the people that were living in the Fort began to build houses on their allotted ground, Martha Diana secured a lot from the Cornish family and had a small house built upon it. She and her family were living in their house by the year 1864. It was located west of Spring Creek on the southeast side of the settlement. Martha Diana Hickman's daughter, Emma Howland, was married to Robert Nephi Comish on the 21 January 1864 and settled down in a little house that was located close to her mother's home, on the Comish property. During the spring of 1865 Nephi and Helen Packer and family left Franklin and went to Brigham City where Nephi secured work as a clerk in the Brigham City Mercantile and Manufacturing Association, a cooperative enterprise that took in several industries, which was managed under the direction of Apostle Lorenzo Snow. Martha Howland, the third daughter of Martha Diana Hickman, married Isaac Bartlett Nash as his plural wife on the 8 November 1867. She also made her home in Franklin close by her mother. After the marriage of her third daughter, Martha Diana Hickman, who had separated from Mr. Hickman and whose lot was just a little harder than the family that had the protection of a father, had four young children at home, Henrietta Louisa Rogers being thirteen years of age and the oldest. She was her mother's right hand and would do all she could toward the support of her younger brothers and sisters. Martha Diana Hickman made a living for herself and children by teaching school. The classes were held in the vestry of the Franklin meeting house and the main subjects that were taught were reading, arithmetic, crocheting, tatting, quilting, embroidery work, etc. She was usually paid in some produce that she was in need of. When Henrietta grew older she often took the place of her mother in her school classes, as her mother was not a strong woman. She also helped her mother with the soap making and the candle making, and would often go to the fields and glean the grain that was left after harvest in order to get a little extra wheat for the family food supply. ' One particular time when Martha Diana Hickman was teaching school, Henrietta took the family washing down to the edge of Spring Creek, which was only a short distance from their home, and while she was washing she heard footsteps and looking around she saw an Indian. It was old "Katoose", a bad Indian that everybody was afraid of, as he had made many threats in the past to harm different people. Henrietta was very frightened when she recognized him, but bravely spoke up, "What do you want, Katoose?” The Indian began to come towards her pointing at the soap in her hand, he said, "I want soap." Henrietta threw the bar of soap as far as she could throw it and while he was looking for it, she ran up the hill to her home. Marta Diana Hickman's health began to fail by the year 1871 and she was confined to her bed a great deal of the time, but she continued to teach school from her bed, and in the evenings by candle light she would make buckskin gloves. In this way she could keep her family together. On the 16 March 1872 the widow died, they buried her in the Franklin Cemetery. After the death of their mother, Martha, Diana Hickman, the children left the family home and went to live with their married sisters. Don, the youngest, went to the home of his sister, Martha Nash. Avilda went to live with Erma Comish, and Jordan and Henrietta went to live with their sister, Helen Packer at Brigham City, Boxelder County, Utah. When Henrietta and her brother Jordan arrived in Brigham City, during the early spring of 1872, they found a thriving busy little settlement. By this time the Brigham City Mercantile and Manufacturing Association had developed to such a point that it combined a number of very important industries, such as a woolen mill, a tannery, a shoe factory, a sheep and cattle herd, a cheese factory, a saw mill, tailor, furniture, blacksmith and wagon shop, a millinery shop, etc., a Church cooperative enterprise that was conducted as nearly as possible to benefit everyone connected with it. Under President Lorenzo Snow's direction, Brigham City thrived and developed. Many things that it produced drew the attention of the buyers from the rich placer mining districts in Montana who brought gold dust for the exchange of dairy products and other merchandise. The development of these rich mines influenced the commercial prosperity of Brigham City and the intercourse between the miners and the cooperative was a good plan in helping to make the city flourish and make the cooperative merchandising a success. Brigham City was much like Franklin, as both little towns were located in the north part of a valley, Brigham City being in Salt Lake Valley and Franklin in Cache Valley. Both valleys ran north and south adjoining each other with a high mountain range separating the two valleys. The main freight and stage roads from Salt Lake City to the placer mining districts in Montana passed through Brigham City. Both Brigham City and Franklin were the last outposts before the road went into the Bannock Indian country. The people who traveled along these dangerous routes that led directly through the Indian country had many grievances against the native red man, as the travelers were often harassed as they slowly wended their way along this route and fortunate indeed was the company, whether it be freight or emigrant that escaped the Indian treachery. However, in the year 1865 a company of soldiers under Colonel Howe was stationed on the Snake River, which was called Fort Hall, and since that time the trouble with the Indians had decreased considerably. After Henrietta had been living at the home of her sister Helen and family, the Packer family, which now consisted of six young children and the parents, decided to leave Brigham City and go to Mill Creek in Morgan County, Utah, where they were able to secure some milling property at a reasonable price. Henrietta and her brother Jordan disliked the idea of leaving Brigham City, so when the Packer family left their little home on Flower Street, Henrietta and Jordan remained in Brigham City, where they had the opportunity to find ready employment. At this particular time Henrietta was in her nineteenth year, she was a very lovely young girl who was devoted to her Church and who wanted to earn her way in life and be independent of all her relatives. She was able to secure work in the Brigham City Co-op under President Lorenzo Snow and worked in a little shop where they made beautiful artificial flowers. She was able to secure an upstairs room to live in, at the home of George Washington Parsons a friend and neighbor of the Packer family. It was while Henrietta was working at the Church Co-op that she became acquainted with several wives of President Lorenzo Snow. In 1873 President Snow was called on a special mission to go to Palestine in the Holy Land and rededicate the land to the Jews, his younger wives worked to help support themselves and families. Two of them worked at the same shop where Henrietta worked, doing fancy work, sewing, tatting, knitting and making beautiful artificial flowers of wool and wax. The flowers were used in several ways, some were made up into lovely arrangements and placed under a crystal bowl, others were put in picture frames under glass to hang on the wall, while other flowers were used for millinery purposes, etc. There was always a ready sale for these lovely artificial flowers and any person who became apt in their making was assured of employment, and Henrietta was one who became very good at this art. One of the saddest experiences in Henrietta's life came to her about this time. It was during the late fall or early winter of 1874 that her brother Jordan decided to make the long trip across the mountains to Franklin, Idaho, and spend a holiday with his sisters and brother who lived there. Jordan owned a fine riding horse and a very fancy bridle and saddle. He began the long trip by horseback across the mountains and was never heard from again. A bad snow storm came up and it was thought by most people that he lost his way and froze to death, however, his body was never located or did they find any trace of his horse or saddle. The family finally came to the conclusion that he must have met with foul play and was murdered for his fine riding pony and saddle and for what money he might have had with him at this time. During the early fall of 1876 Henrietta became acquainted with Robert Nelson Parsons, a younger brother of George Washington Parsons, who had recently come to Brigham City, Utah, to see his brother and family and to find employment which was plentiful in and around Utah and surrounding country in the construction of new railroads, etc., at that time. One day soon after Robert arrived in Brigham City, he was standing on the corner near his brother's home when he noticed a beautiful young lady coming down the street towards him. It was a raw cold winterish day and the wind was blowing, before the young Lady reached the corner where Robert was standing, a little child stopped her and began to talk to her, the young lady stooped down and felt the little girl on the face and could see that she was very cold. The young lady straightened up, putting her hands behind her back as she was trying to unhook her underskirt, then she did a little pulling and maneuvering in order to get the underskirt loose which finally dropped to the ground. Henrietta picked the skirt up and pinned it around the little girl, without noticing that she was being observed. Robert saw this little scene and as Henrietta went on her way he decided then and there he wanted to become acquainted with this beautiful young lady who had been so kind to this little child. A small boy was standing near and Robert asked him if he knew who the young lady was, the small boy said he did and that she lived nearby. Robert gave the young boy a dollar if he could introduce him to Henrietta. When Robert first met Henrietta he thought her one of the most beautiful girls he had ever seen, and often mentioned the fact to his children in later life. It didn’t take long after they became acquainted to discover that they were falling in love and that they had both found a wonderful new kind of happiness. However, there was one very important thing in Henrietta’s new found happiness that caused her a great amount of sorrow and a great amount of mental suffering, Robert Parsons did not belong to the Church, in fact he wasn’t even considered a religious man. This in itself must have been a terrible trial to Henrietta as she had been raised in the Church, and the Church and its teachings were the most important thing in her life, as at the early age of fourteen years her mother had taken her to Salt Lake City where she had received her washings and anointings in the Old Endowment House on the 3 October 1868. So in making up her mind as to whether she should marry this "outsider", as the non Mormons were called, was one of the hardest decisions that she ever made in her lifetime. They were married on the 12 April 1877 by Bishop Nichols in the same little upstairs room that Henrietta had occupied in the home of George Washington Parsons. Soon after their marriage Robert and Henrietta bought themselves a home, it was a modest little two roomed frame house located in a small peach orchard in the city of Brigham. Robert liked to work with his fruit trees and specialized in grafting, etc. At harvest time he would load up his wagon with fruit and take his product to the neighboring settlements and sell his fruit from door to door. Robert also worked for his brother, George Washington Parsons, who was called by President Lorenzo Snow to take charge of the Church Cooperative cattle herds. The cattle were pastured on land near Promontory Point and it was here that Robert and his brother George spent much of their time looking after the Church's cattle herd. Martha Abanatha Parsons, their first child, was born the 21 August 1878 at their home in Brigham City. She was a lovely little brown eyed girl with skin as fair as a lily; her hair was dark brown in color and a slight bit on the curly side. She was much like her father both in physical body make up and in temperament, being large in stature and shy and retiring in temperament. A second little girl was born to Robert and Henrietta on the 12 January 1881, just two and a half years later. They named her Henrietta Letitia in honor of Henrietta herself, and the wife of George Washington Parsons, Letitia Slack Parsons. Martha and Henrietta, or Mattie and Hettie, as they were called, were never separated very long at a time. They loved each other dearly and Mattie watched over her little sister tenderly and guarded her from danger at all times, and was her constant loving playmate from the time that little Hettie could walk until they were separated through marriage. Hettie was a pretty child also, but her biggest attraction was her alert mind and the ability to make people love her. She was quick of thought and could entertain any number of people and make them feel comfortable and at ease. Little Hettie was much like her mother, small in stature and quick of mind and body. Robert’s brother George Washington Parsons and wife Letitia had made Brigham City their home since the fall of 1864 when they were on their way to the gold fields in California, and because of Letitia's health the family was forced to stop and rest awhile in Brigham City. During the winter that they were resting, George and his young wife were converted to “Mormonism" and from that time on they never wanted to leave Brigham City. George and Letitia were both faithful members of the Church and it wasn't long before President Lorenzo Snow appointed George Parsons overseer of the Church Cooperative cattle herds. The cattle herds were pastured on the low rolling mountains west and north of Promontory Point where the grass was plentiful and there were great amounts of it. George would spend weeks at a time with the cattle and was required to be away from his family for long periods of time, as the cattle herds were of great importance and they needed his strict attention at all times. Robert helped his brother George with the cattle and he too would be away from home and family much of the time, and that was not satisfactory to Robert or his wife Henrietta. For many years, from 1830 to 1850, the people of our nation wanted a railroad built that would connect the east coast with the west coast, but the cost of the construction of such a venture was of such great amount that it was impossible at that time. The many rivers, small streams, and deep gorges had to be bridged, and the high mountains, with the deep snow of the winters, and the long dry barren plains, formed obstacles that had to be overcome if they were to build a transcontinental railroad. By 1860, during the Civil War, the nation became aware of the danger of invasion from the west coast and its inability to defend itself if this should come about, so Congress passed laws whereby the construction of such a railroad was made possible. Construction was ordered to start on one end at the Missouri River and on the other end on the Pacific coast, and continue working towards each other until they met. This junction where they met took place at Promontory Point in Northern Utah on the 10th of May 1869. A celebration was held where a golden spike was driven as a final link in this iron band, binding the east coast to the west coast. On one side of the spike was written, "The Pacific Railroad, ground broken 8 January 1863 and completed 10 May 1869." On the other side of the spike was written, "May God continue the unity of our country as this railroad unites the two great oceans of the world.” The transcontinental railroad was built as a defense measure by the government, but the government did not support the construction of side railroads which led off from the main railroad line, these roads were constructed by private companies and individuals. There were rich mines discovered in Idaho and Montana, but getting the equipment to these mines was a great problem. So men with vision and foresight began the task of building a side line to these far away mines so that their wealth could be enjoyed by all. The first railroad to enter Idaho was at Franklin, and this line was constructed by the Utah Northern Railroad Company. A company was also organized to build a railroad from Ogden, Utah, to Butte, Montana, a distance of 466 1/2 miles, this same company was to build a railroad from Brigham City to Corinne, Utah, a distance of near five miles. Work was started on the railroad to Idaho and Montana in 1871, this was a narrow gauge railroad only three feet wide. This road extended northeast from Brigham City to Cache Valley and on to Franklin, Idaho, and began operating on the 3 May 1874. The construction came to a standstill at Franklin until 1879 for several reasons, one of which was financial difficulties, there were problems of right of way, the company wanted to go north from Preston to McCammon and down the Portneuf River to the Snake River Valley, but from the Portneuf River to the Blackfoot River was the Bannock Indian Reservation and the railroad company could not obtain the right to construct a road across this territory, so consequently the company surveyed a route from Preston to Soda Springs and through the mountains down to Eagle Rock, which is now Idaho Falls, then on to Montana. While the construction was at a standstill at Franklin, the company went broke and it fell into the hands of the receivers and was sold at a foreclosure sale in Salt Lake City on May 3, 1878 to S. H. Clark who organized a new company under the name of Utah and Northern Railroad Company. Under his new management the construction was resumed with much of the road between Preston and Grace, Idaho, built and several miles of track laid. At this particular time the company was successful in obtaining the right of way across the Indian reservation, changing the route of the railroad so that it came through Pocatello and Blackfoot, then on to Idaho Falls, Idaho. It was this sudden change in the route of the railroad that founded the city of Blackfoot. Permission was granted to cross the reservation but there were to be no stops, so naturally the first stop would be after they left the Indian land and that would be just across the Blackfoot River. Some of the men who were responsible for the founding of the city of Blackfoot were Major A. E. Danilson, who was the Indian agent at that time; N. W. Shilling, a telegraph operator at the Indian Agency; John Rogers and Frank Berrymen, who were freighters from Corinne, Utah; Charles Bunting, a storekeeper at Fort Hall; and others. These men took up the land and laid out the city of Blackfoot and had it well under way when the railroad arrived on Christmas day, December 25, 1878. The construction of the railroad was pushed as fast as possible until it reached Eagle Rock (now Idaho Falls) on the 10 April 1879, Monida, in the spring of 1880, and Butte in the year 1881. During the early spring of 1881, Robert and his family left Brigham City for Butte, Montana, where Robert secured work on the railroad as a section hand. Robert worked in and around Butte, Montana, only a short time when he was transferred to Dillon, Montana, where he was made a section foreman. It was while the family was living in Dillon that Henrietta decided to cook for some railroad men, twenty to thirty in number, and if there happened to be a rush, the number of men increased to fifty or more. Henrietta had plenty of fine experienced help, which included an Irish cook by the name of Billie McGoogan, also a hired girl who took care of all the dish washing, Robert and Henrietta did very well financially with their work, money was plentiful, but like the old saying, "Easy come, easy go." Aunt Hettie often speaks about this time in her parent’s life and that her parents kept their money in a large cigar box that was stacked full of twenty dollar gold pieces, there were no banks in Montana at that time, and that one time her parents gave the two little girls a bright twenty dollar gold piece to play with and while they were playing, the twenty dollar gold piece was lost. Mattie and Hettie were very well behaved little girls, Robert just needed to move his eyes and they would run and mind him in whatever thing he wanted them to do. The railroad men who ate with the Parsons family often commented on such well behaved children. There was one old man who came to Robert and Henrietta and asked them for help. He was old and sick and could not work on the railroad. He was welcomed into the Parsons family tent and made to feel like one of the family. This old man was given food and shelter and when able, was given money and train fare to his destination. His last words to the family were, “God bless you always for such kindness.” Shortly before the birth of their third child, Robert Adrian, born 10 October 1883, Robert, Henrietta and children returned to Brigham City where they owned their home, and where Robert could get employment with his brother, George Parsons, herding the Church cattle. Note: I will add Aunt Hettie's own words concerning an incident that happened about this period of time. "Uncle George and Father worked near Corinne, Utah, herding cattle and sheep for President Snow. In fact, they worked together at this work off and on for a long time. One Sunday, Mother and we kiddies went out to see Father for a short visit, we rode out with Cousin Willie Parsons, Uncle George's son. I was a little over three years old at that time, but I well remember Father and Mother leading us children and walking along the edge of a large body of water which was the north end of Great Salt Lake. I remember we children running along the shore line, picking up the pretty little pink and white or cream colored shells while Father sang the song “Gathering Up The Shells From The Seashore”. Mother and we children thought Father so handsome with his dark eyes and his dark hair so well kept, he also had a dark mustache. I remember Mattie and I were wearing little red capes to keep us warm, suddenly a large number of cattle came slowly toward the water edge near us, as they got closer to us they all began to run, or sort of stampede, Father was quite excited and called out loudly, “The cattle are frightened of the little red capes, we had better get away from here quick.” -------------------- In the early spring of 1885, Robert and Henrietta decided they wanted to homestead some land in the Snake River country west of Blackfoot, Idaho, where a new bridge had recently been constructed, making this land available to home seekers. Robert left Brigham City in his wagon which was loaded with all the implements needed to stake out a new homestead in a new country. Joseph Parsons and family and Alph Parsons and family, two of Robert's brothers, were living in Blackfoot. Joseph Parsons had come to Blackfoot in 1878 when the little settlement was founded and by the spring of 1885, when Robert arrived, Joseph was the owner of a brick kiln. Alphes Parsons and family came to Blackfoot in the year 1881 and he had helped Joseph with his brick business. Robert arrived in Blackfoot, Idaho, after a tiresome trip, which took him about three days to make, and began at once to make preparation to stake out some choice land that could get water for irrigation and for his stock. The first step in choosing a homestead was to determine if water was on the land, as this land that was close to the Snake River was sandy and gravelly and would be useless without water. Robert, like the homesteaders before him, had this thought in mind, and in locating the land of his choice he crossed the new bridge west of the settlement of Blackfoot and then followed the river in a westerly direction until he came to a slough (known as the Watson Slough) that left the river, and like the homesteaders before him, he continued down the slough and after passing the last homesteader to locate on the slough, he continued on about three miles and filed on land that this same slough passed through. In this way the new homesteader would be assured of water for his stock and water for domestic purposes until a well could be dug. Also in choosing land in this way, it would be much easier to get water for irrigation, as the homesteaders could unite with each other extending their ditches from neighbor to neighbor. Robert chose his homestead with this in mind and after careful thought and study decided to locate in what is now known as east Thomas, seven and a half miles west of Blackfoot, and staked out a homestead claim of 160 acres, however, in a short time he took advantage of the Deseret Land Act of 1811 and secured another 160 acres of land. This homestead claim took in a half section of land directly southwest of the present Wilson School. It consisted of all the land that ran one half mile west and one mile south. Homestead Claim received on June 8, 1895 by Grover Cleveland and recorded on the 26 June 1900 in the book of deeds in Bingham County, Idaho, Application # 2042, Certificate # 1188. And so by making this claim in the spring of 1885, it gave Robert the honor of being the second settler in the Thomas district. There was not a living soul within three miles to the east, which is now in Riverside, but three and a half miles to the southwest in the lower Thomas district "Big John Watson", as he was commonly called, had located on a stock farm in 1878. This same slough that passed through Robert's homestead passed through John Watson’s land and was named in his honor. After all legal matters were taken care of, and Robert had settled on his newly acquired property, he found the country very rough with many obstacles to overcome. Besides the big sage brush growing on the sand and rocky soil there was a prickly vegetation, this in itself was a great menace. The streams were swift and dangerous to cross and it seemed to Robert, as he worked alone on his land, that the very elements were against him. There was much to be done and much to be accomplished, and at once Robert started his new home, this first home was primitive indeed and it was built in haste, however, it was a beginning of something bigger and better. The location of this first home was directly west of the present Wilson School building. Robert dug a fine cellar with straight even walls, he covered the roof with timber and then put dirt over the timber. There were no windows to let in the light, but Robert would open the heavy door that faced the east and the light would come in. It was a typical "dugout” in every sense, it was a place to live until he could secure timber and material and build a better home. Robert grubbed a small patch of brush near the dugout and planted a garden, at first this garden was watered by hauling water from the Watson slough, but as time passed by this method was improved by diverting water and using it to irrigate his growing seeds. And now the time had come for Robert to drive his faithful team "Old Pete” and "Dollie” back to Brigham City to get his wife and family and bring them to their new home. When Robert arrived in Brigham City, he found his wife and family well and happy. Henrietta and children were delighted to have their husband and father back with them again. Robert began at once to make arrangements to dispose of their home and property. Henrietta packed the belongings in heavy paper and placed them in boxes in preparation to make the long trip to their new home. There were dishes, furniture, clothing, bedding, food, etc., that all had to be packed carefully as the road was rough and long. And then the day arrived to bid dear friends and loved ones “a sad goodbye” and to start the long trip, that would take three days to make, to their new home on the Snake River in Idaho. Note: I will add here what Aunt Hettie said about their new home. "Father drove to Brigham City after us in the late summer of 1885, when we arrived at our new home in Idaho we found our fine garden all matured. We lived in the dugout until they could build our log house. Our dugout was very comfortable with just a few things in it that were needed to keep house, a small table, some kitchen chairs, some kind of shelves made of boxes for our dishes, a rag rug, two beds, and a stove. I can't remember what we did for windows, but we must have kept the door open or lit the lamp early. Well anyway, Old Pete and Dollie, our horses, were kept in our yard nearby, how home like it all began to be, the nice garden, the horses feeding nearby, the dugout, and we, three children playing by the door in the sunshine. "There was no place for us children to go on Sundays at our new home in Idaho, so we kiddies would go into the fields of sage brush and gather pretty flowers. The land where the tall sage brush grew was covered with many wild flowers, cream and yellow snowballs, bluebells, Indian paint brushes, and little pink sweet Williams that the honeybees loved so much. In sandy soil we would find the lovely sage lilies so waxy white with purple and lavender throats. We also gathered pretty rocks, little Adrian's pockets would be full of them when we returned home to our parents. We also looked for Indian arrowheads made from black obsidian, these Indian arrowheads were the greatest prize of all." --------------- The colonization of lower Snake River Valley represents the union of people from three directions. The Mormons threaded their way through the several valleys leading from Utah, easterners came with a great amount of cultural background, and the mining camps at the north and west contributed a lower level element from the Pacific coast. The southeastern Idaho pioneers were generally people of very limited means. Most of them were young folks, intent upon making homes and raising families where land, water, timber and grazing conditions were favorable. There was much promise in the soil that caused them to come willingly, although practically without capital, they threw themselves naked upon its sage covered bosom. The country was rough, encumbered by dry, prickly vegetation, the streams were swift and sometimes dangerous to cross. The daily activities of the people were a continuous hazard because of nature's undisputed sway over all the countryside. The temperature ranged from 100 degrees in the summer to 40 degrees below zero in the winter, however the air was dry and clear, making the cold less noticeable. Sometimes the frost killed the crops, other times high water flooded them out. Altogether it was an environment to try men's souls and weaken women's patience. Here people could not escape the excess cold in the winter and the excess heat in the summer. These first people knew the pangs of hunger, and food at the best was very meager. There were many stubborn elements designed to make people rough and ready, if not cruel and hard at times, and the settlers were naturally influenced greatly by their surroundings. There were few real rough characters, but more often the horny handed sons and daughters of toil were animated by high idealism, they were toiling towards a commendable goal of making life livable for themselves and families. There were bitter struggles encountered which was the nature of life and the times on the frontier. In southern Idaho the pleasure of the frontier settler centered in the home. The homestead was the pioneer's life and dream. It gave him standing, a place of security against old age. Once planted upon a section or land or a portion or land, he was established. There were children in the frontier homes, they were wanted and needed for their own sakes and for the help they would bring to the task of dominating the stubborn soil. From the start the children were trained for production. There was work for each and idleness was practically unknown, and through these responsibilities, characters were born free from such complexes such as jealousy and selfishness, and family ties and loyalties were of a very high degree. In the early settlement of Blackfoot and its surrounding country, the Mormon faith played a very small part in the beginning. From the year 1885 to 1890 (five years), Blackfoot was the hub of anti-Mormon activity and propaganda. There were religious and political issues over which intense feelings were aroused. A satisfactory adjustment of Mormon and Gentile relationship might have been achieved without turmoil, but it would have required much mutual concession and tolerance. Settlers on this frontier were naturally quick and direct, and when aggravated by factors of deep religious connections on one hand and a drive for political power on the other, great troubles were bound to come. One of the causes of Gentile distrust toward the Mormon settler was their Utah connections, and the organization of pioneer life around the Mormon Church (Example Franklin, Idaho). Its influence comprehended all the affairs of life. Indeed it was so great that the Mormon pioneer town was less a civil unit than an ecclesiastical one. The meeting house was the "town hall" and the bishop was the "mayor of the village". The bishop's court was the tribunal before which an offender was summoned, whether it be one of the brothers of the Church or a stranger within their gates. Of course the person was not required to obey the Mormon court's decisions, they could always appeal to the law of the land, but this entailed considerable expense. After all, this was the frontier and the Mormons had to live together, and all being interested in a common cause it was conventional for them to refer their problems to an authority that was well established, although not possessing actual jurisdiction in civil matters. That was the Mormon's way, but it differed greatly from the Gentile way of thinking. Another reason that the Mormons were unpopular in and around Blackfoot was their belief in polygamy. The Anti-Bigamy Law was enacted by Congress and signed by President Lincoln on the 8 July 1862. It defined plural marriage as bigamy and provided a fine of five hundred dollars and imprisonment for five years for violation of the law. On March 22, 1882 the Edmond's Act was approved, this measure made polygamy punishable by disfranchisement and a fine of not more than five hundred dollars, with imprisonment for not more than three years. Children of such unions were deemed illegitimate. It was under this act that prosecutions were started with the headquarters in Idaho, located at Blackfoot, Idaho. The Idaho anti-Mormon crusader was Fred T. Dubois. He was a graduate from Yale University who came to Blackfoot in 1880. He possessed an inclination for politics and in two years after his arrival he was successful in obtaining the appointment of United States Marshal for Idaho. He was energetic and ambitious and it soon became apparent that he was not only determined to enforce the Federal law against the Mormons to the letter, but also to destroy the Church's political influence. Mr. Dubois effected a militant organization of hard rough deputies in every Mormon district and arrests were frequent. Besides the arrests resulting from the usual activity on the part of the local deputies, special efforts were made in the form of raids that were directed by Dubois himself. Surprise attacks were organized in which a group of deputies would sweep into a community and catch the unsuspecting polygamist unawares. When a Mormon was indicted for practicing plural marriage, conviction was almost certain, because there were Gentiles living in every Mormon community who had knowledge of these plural marriages. This persecution did not cease until after the Manifesto, November 1, 1890. From the year 1888 to 1892 the anti-Mormon forces completely dominated the Idaho territorial government, but in the year 1893 the State Legislature, Idaho had then become a state, withdrew its restrictions against the Mormons and since that time they have enjoyed complete equality in all points of citizenship. ===== Contrary to popular belief a man just didn't stake out a homestead claim, build a house and then start farming. Robert and Henrietta had many obstacles to overcome before this could come to pass. This was a dry desert country and no crops could be grown without water, so water was the greatest importance. Big John S. Watson, a cattleman, was the first man to stake out a homestead claim in the Thomas district. He had brought his cattle to his homestead in the year 1880 and they grazed on a large tract of meadow land where the Watson Slough entered into the Snake River. John Watson was born in Missouri and it was thought by many of his friends and neighbors that he was part Cherokee Indian. He came west with a stage line as one of the drivers and he continued doing this kind of work for some time, traveling over many western routes. He met and married Catholine Hill, and after their marriage settled down on a cattle ranch in Marsh Valley located near Arimo, Bannock County, Idaho. While living on his ranch in Marsh Valley, Big John Watson, as he was commonly called, was made deputy sheriff of Oneida County, and at this period of time Oneida County took in all of the territory of Idaho, from the Utah line to the Canadian border. Big John had the reputation of being a man without fear and it was while he was serving as deputy sheriff of Oneida County that he became acquainted with the Mormon people. He hated the Mormons or any person who associated with them, and it pleased Big John greatly to be of service to Fred T. Duboise in wiping out polygamy. He was of the greatest importance to Mr. Duboise as he was called to plan, direct, and lead many of the raids on the polygamist families, both in Idaho and northern Utah. When Big John came to the Thomas district, he constructed a dam on the slough which is now named in his honor, the "Watson Slough", this dam was located a short distance from his property and he made some diversion ditches to irrigate his meadow land. In the spring of 1885 when the new homesteaders began to settle on the slough above him, such as Robert did and other settlers in the Riverside district, it began to cause trouble between Big John and the new settlers, this is evident by the fact of a water filing record by him dated March 6, 1888 which consisted of the full water right to all water that flowed through the Watson Slough. There are also filing records by other homesteaders including Robert Parsons under dates as listed, June 1, 1886, May 18, 1888, July 15, 1888, etc. From these original filings and the great number of farms that were later irrigated from the Watson Slough, it is apparent that Big John's right to all the water was not legal and subsequently turned down. It is quite easy to believe that Big John, using his past reputation as to being a fearless man and a man without pity, caused the new settlers a great amount of trouble especially until the year 1888 when the water trouble finally came to a head. A man by the name of Jake Hoover, a new settler in Riverside, developed a great hatred for Big John. One evening when Big John was driving home from Blackfoot in his buckboard, Mr. Hoover stepped out in the middle of the road and pointed a gun at Big John's head and fired, the bullet missed him but struck one of his horses and the horse fell dead. This particular incident in the life of Big John Watson had a sobering effect on him and from that time on, or until his death, he was not quite so fearless. It was a very common practice among the founders of a new settlement such as the settling of the northwest side of Snake River to come in groups, usually families and relatives or very close friends. There were many reasons for this, but the most important reason was in case of trouble, sickness, or disaster, there would be someone close by who cared and would be of assistance. Robert needed some members of his family near at hand, so after he and Henrietta were settled, he began to contact each of his brothers and sisters and explained to them the great possibilities of this new country and the opportunity at hand to take up a homestead claim on some of this fertile land. Robert also contacted old friends whom he had known in Brigham City, Utah, and in the railroad camps in Montana. The first of these people to come to the Thomas district was a young unmarried man by the name of John Henry Stander. He was born on the 10th of October 1863 in Brigham City, Utah, son of Henry Christian Stander and Marla Hansen. He was the oldest of three children, his mother was left a widow when he was seven years old. John's early boyhood was spent in Brigham City, Utah, where he herded sheep on the western hills in about the same locality that Robert and his brother, George Parsons, herded the Church cattle. At an early age John secured employment with the railroad in Montana and while he was working there he saved his money and bought a team and wagon. In the fall of 1885 John Stander made the trip alone to the Thomas district where Robert and Henrietta had their homestead claim, he filed on 160 acres of land directly north of Robert's land. From the very beginning Robert and John worked together and planned together; both needed each other in many ways, both men needed logs to build a house and both needed a well dug for culinary purposes, ditches needed to be-built and there was sagebrush to grub and burn before their land could be made ready to plow and plant crops. Mr. and Mrs. William Wearywick and two children, Earl and Annie, came to the Thomas district soon after John Stander arrived. They settled on a homestead directly west of Robert's land. The Wearywick family had a large herd of cattle and they pastured the cattle near the Snake River. Their son, Earl, had a mouse colored pony and he drove the cattle to feed each day, passing the little humble home of Robert and Henrietta on his way back and forth to the pasture. During the late fall of 1885 Robert and John Stander decided to go to Bannock for a week to secure logs so that Robert could build a log house during the coming Winter. This meant that Henrietta and her three little children would be left alone. Robert did not like to leave his family alone for so long a time so he went to Riverside and secured a fourteen year old girl to keep his wife company. One night while Robert was away, Henrietta heard a noise that sounded like Wearywick's cattle tramping around in their garden; she and the fourteen year old girl decided to go out and drive the stock away, they had succeeded in getting the cattle out of the garden but there was one animal that was quite stubborn and refused to move. As they looked closer it appeared to be a wild animal, this frightened Henrietta so they both hurried back into the dugout and bolted the door. The next morning they went out to where the animal was standing the night before and looked at the tracks, Henrietta was not sure what the tracks were but decided to cover them over with a bucket so that Robert could identify them when he returned home. The tracks proved to be those of an adult brown bear. During the winter of 1885 Robert succeeded in building a large one room log house for his family, it was located a short distance north of the dugout. The family moved into their new house early in the spring shortly before the birth of Cora Lillian, a beautiful little girl born the 13th of May 1886. Robert and Henrietta were greatly pleased during the spring of 1886 when three of Robert’s brothers, along with one sister and her husband and the parents of Robert, decided to come to the Snake River country west of the big bridge and take up a homestead right for themselves, however, James Parsons, father of Robert, was unable to take up land by the homestead plan as he had previously used his right on another homestead before coming to the Snake River country. Robert’s youngest brother, Alph Parsons, who had made his home in Blackfoot for several years working for Joseph Parsons who was in the business of making bricks, decided that he and his family would settle on land in south Riverside. However, this land did not prove satisfactory and in a short time they moved to a better location and took up a homestead right on land located in the Thomas district one mile due north from Robert’s homestead. William Parsons and family located on land which is now in the present Thomas town site, located one and a half miles due west from Robert’s land. Thomas Duncan and wife, Ana, Robert’s youngest sister, settled on land two miles southwest of Robert’s homestead. This land was later bought by the Williams brothers, John and Griff Williams. James and Mary Parsons, parents of Robert, lived in a small house in the present townsite of Riverside about where the present store now stands. They made this their home until both their deaths, James Parsons dying the following spring and Mary Parsons dying on the 14th of November 1894, seven years later. Alph Parsons donated land for the Thomas Riverside Cemetery and it was his father, James Parsons, who was the first person to be buried in it. --------------- Schools were of the greatest importance in the life of Robert and Henrietta and even before their own little log house was constructed, Robert and his neighbors constructed a small one room log building on property belonging to Mr. William Wearywick about where the Ted Dance home now stands. It was completed for school to start on October 1, 1885, lasting three months and then reopening in the early spring of 1886. Expenses of the school were stood by the parents of the children attending. I will add the exact words written by Aunt Hettie as she wrote it when I asked her for this information: "Later that first summer more families arrived in our community and now there were enough children to justify a school. Father and Mr. William Wearywick and Mr. John S. Watson built a one room building on the northwest corner of Mr. Wearywick's homestead; it was a pretty place with wild flowers growing all around the outside. The first teacher was a young man from Kansas by the name of Mr. Daws, and the first children to attend school under him were Dick and Henry Watson, Earl and Annie Wearywick, and Mattie and Hettie Parsons. During the early spring of the same year other children attending were Laura, Charley, and Archie Simmons and Jessie, Bruce, and Archie Acuff. The following year 1886-1887 a lovely young lady by the name of Miss Bonnie was our teacher. She was teaching when our little brother, Adrian, started to school, I believe he was her pet because she paid so much attention to him, she often sat him on the table and after we older children had brought her lovely flowers, she would put some of the pretty bluebells in each of his little fingers and then sit him up in front of the class and say, "Aren't these clean little hands of Adrian's pretty." This remark by our beloved teacher always had a way of reminding we older children to be more careful about keeping our own hands clean." ====== The Snake River School District No. 20 was organized in the fall of 1886 after a census had been taken of all children of school age within the district. The boundaries of the school district were as follows: Commencing at a point where the west side of range line 34 reaches Snake River, a little west of where the Chase Rich family home now stands, hence north to a given point, hence east along the section line between Riverside and Moreland until it reaches the Snake River about one mile from the bridge, hence south down the river to the beginning, consisting of a distance east and west near eight miles and north and south near three miles. This new country was virgin territory and didn't belong to any other school and since there was no school tax levied against the property, there was no money for school purposes. In order that this school business might be taken care of the people of the district held a meeting on January 3, 1887 at the home of J. C. Slack and elected a board of trustees to care for the school and its business. They elected Alphes Parsons for three years, J. C. Slack two years, and Robert N. Parsons for one year. On January 17, 1887 the board of trustees met and agreed that a ten mill tax should be levied on all property within the district to provide money to build a school house and operate a school. They decided that an election would be held on January 27th for the purpose of voting on the school tax. Notices were posted to that effect and the school election was held on that date, the majority of the votes were in favor of the school tax. However, it was over a year’s time before the men of the district could start to cut and haul cottonwood logs from the Snake River for the school building. Homer Lallaberty donated the ground on which the school was to be built and Emery La Roueque hewed the logs and fitted them together. School District No. 20 had been organized and the school house built but a short time, when so many new homesteaders moved into the district that the school building that had recently been constructed would not accommodate the children in the fast growing district, so a petition was presented to the county Commissioners to divide the district; this was met with some opposition, but owing to the long distance that some of the children had to travel and the crowded condition of the one room school house, the petition was met with favor and the district divided. As new settlers arrived and took up land, the meandering roads through the high sage brush were fast disappearing because the people were fencing their homesteads along the section lines so the roads were forced to follow the same. A community center was considered and Riverside, as the scattered countryside was then known, planned a town site, Mr. L. D. Wilson gave forty acres of land for the project. The school house was located one mile south of the town site so the people decided to build a new school house in the Riverside town site. ====== On August 11, 1888 another little girl came to Robert's and Henrietta's home and they named this new baby Minnie Catholine, in honor of one of Henrietta's dear friends, Mrs. Catholine Steel of Blackfoot. This little babe was always known as "Katie". The winter of 1888-l889 was a very severe winter, it was known as the winter of the “big blow" when cattle and stock died by the thousands. This severe winter was not just local, but equally as bad over most of the whole United States. I will add here what Aunt Hettie says in her own words concerning this severe cold: “The year 1888-1889 was a very hard winter, many cattle froze to death and many died because there was no hay to feed them. Father made a trip to Tilden, a distance of Fifteen miles away, and was able to secure a half ton of wild hay, this saved our family cow for which we were all very thankful. Father and Mother took us children in the sleigh to see for ourselves the great number of cattle that had frozen all over the countryside. Big John Watson, who was called the cattle king of the Snake River country, suffered the greatest loss." There was no serious Indian trouble in the Snake River country after the settlers arrived, however, at times there were Indian scares which resulted in confusion. I will let Aunt Hettie tell about one Indian scare in her own words: “One afternoon when we children were little, a man rode up to our house on horseback, he was very excited and his frightening words ran about like this, "They say the Indians are going to attack the settlement tonight. All the settlers will meet at Slack's grove where the men will stand guard, so get ready and leave at once." My Father and brother, Adrian, were at work in the field, and Mother notified them at once and they hurried to the house and began to make preparations to leave. Mother prepared the food and clothing for the family to take, while Father and my brother, Adrian, did all the outside chores, and then we started on our way, a distance of about one and a half miles east to where the Slack family lived. When we arrived at the Slack home there were about eight or nine families gathered there besides our family. The women and children went into the house in which contained two rooms. The children were put to bed on a big family bed made on the floor while the women stayed up and prepared food for the men who were on guard. The men were furnished rifles and ammunition by the U.S. government and each man had a rifle. They went out into the large grove of trees that surrounded the Slack home and prepared for the attack. The men decided to hide themselves in the tops of the tallest trees where they could see for a long distance and still keep themselves hid. About midnight the men started slipping quietly out of their hiding places, one at a time, and came to the house for food. The following day the settlers were still waiting for the Indian attack, but when evening came the settlers decided it was only another Indian scare so the men took their families and all returned back to their homes." ====== Mattie's own words concerning this time in her life; "I was getting a big girl by now and I used to help the family by doing Mother's sewing. I remember the first time I was allowed to sew, Mother cut two little waists out of cotton flannel material and I sewed them up. They were for our little brother, Adrian. After this I began to do our family sewing and later on I sewed everything that our family had. "Father had only one son so he had to work very hard, clearing land, making ditches and roads, and farming the land that had already been cleared of sagebrush. We had a few cows and chickens and several pigs and sheep. Father didn't believe in his daughters doing much farm work so he worked even harder than most men to keep his girls from doing hard work in the fields. “When Father was a young man, he used to be very affectionate, he would kiss each of us before he went to work each day and at night he always kissed us "good night.” In sickness he was our family doctor and also our nurse as Mother had very poor health at this time. Father wasn't a religious man himself, but he always helped the family to do their duty." ====== During the first part of October, 1889, Henrietta left her home and with her two youngest children, went by train to Franklin, Idaho where her two sisters lived, Martha Nash and Emma Comish. While on this trip a beautiful baby girl was born on the 9th of October at her sister Emma's home, located about two miles south of Franklin. Henrietta named this new baby after her beloved sister, Emma. While their mother was away Mattie and Hettie took care of the family and watched over the house. Soon after Henrietta returned home to her family they found their home was very crowded as they were still living in the one room and with the new baby there were six children. Robert added another room to their home the following summer. ====== I will use Mattie's own words concerning this period of times: "When baby Emma was about two years old a terrible disease struck our happy home. Some people from the east with their two children came down with diphtheria. These people lost their two little children and having a pubic funeral, it scattered throughout the community. We were one of the families that suffered from it. We lost our darling baby Emma. We were all very sick. Mother and Father were the only ones in our family that didn't get it. They nursed us through this sickness, we had few doctors at that time, but through faith and prayers we only lost one child. "I was going to school at Blackfoot at this time. I worked for my board and room. After I had completed one winter of schooling away I returned home to my family. In a short time after I returned home another lovely baby girl came to live with us January 7, 1893, we named her Ana Luella after Father's youngest sister, Ana. Mother stayed with Father's oldest brother's family (Uncle Joe and Aunt Polly Parsons) when the baby came. I was home with the family at this time and I would help with the housework and take in a little sewing on the side, together with taking care of the post office." ====== I have heard my mother speak of this period of her life many times and she always felt it was her mother's faith and prayers that saved her life. The effects of this terrible disease left her with a very bad throat as all through her girlhood and early married life she was troubled with quinsy. Her throat would start to gather as soon as she took a common cold and would usually have to be lanced before the trouble would clear up. This trouble with her throat continued until after my marriage in 1918 when she had her tonsils removed by a doctor in Salt Lake City. Robert and Henrietta were able to secure the first rhubarb (called pie plant) that was introduced into the Snake River Valley. It was the fine red strawberry type, they secured it from a seed house in the east at a cost of $2.75 for five roots. This rhubarb proved to be a great financial help to Robert and his family. They watched over it carefully and developed it where they could take a wagon load at a time and sell it in different communities. He went as far away as Pocatello and would sell his load for as high as twenty-five dollars. ====== I would like to add here some thoughts by Aunt Hettie who was the poet in the family: "Father often gathered his "helpers" together, leaving Mother help for her welfare was always his first consideration. We would go with him and Brother, which seemed like a picnic to we children. My special duty was to watch for the dinner flag, as I was the one most often that saw it first. One of our special pleasures was to go with Father to the Snake River when he went for wood. We children loved to gather wild ripe currants which we enjoyed so much. Then our walks in the fields with Father and Mother, the big bonfires made ready in the daytime were enjoyed by all in the evenings.” Mother and Dad My mother is a sweetheart, A "pal" is dear old Dad; You always give wise counsel To your daughters and your lad; I hope to heed your teaching In everything I do, And keep my cherished memories Of you, who's been so true. Thrills and Memories What pleasant memories thrill me As I recall the happy past; When we were little sisters together Happy thots that always last. I recall our happy play-days, Then our school-days come to mind; Then our dances, and our parties, Happier days you'll never find. Best of all, was our home living, Parents, brother and sisters dear; Our united, happy family, Seems like Heaven was so near. By Hettie February 27, 1944 ===== Although Blackfoot was a thriving little town at this time there was not a branch of the Church there. Those who had pioneered the settling of the town were not of this faith and anti-Mormon feeling ran high. The members of the Church who settled west of the River were considered part of Basalt Ward, but because of the distance it was impractical for members to attend the Basalt Ward so they held meetings in their own homes. By 1889 there were sufficient members of the Church to justify the organization of a branch with George Wintle as bishop. Most of the meetings were held in private homes because it was difficult to get the use of the schoolhouse for Church purposes. The membership of the Church increased quite rapidly and soon there were sufficient numbers to organize a ward. On October 15, 1893 the Riverside Ward was organized with Charles E. Lillenquist as bishop and I. H. Aldred and Hans P. Christensen as counselors. ====== I will state here what Aunt Hettie says in her life story concerning their Church activities: "Now we had been going to Riverside for Church with a fine young man, George Wintle, as bishop. Even before this we went to Iona, a distance of about thirty miles, attending Sunday School Conference. We took part in the singing sometimes. We would go in a buggy or a light wagon, Bishop Eglestrum of Basalt Ward invited us to go. Our Riverside Ward was then a branch. Mattie, Adrian and I were baptized on the 4th of July 1894 by Brother Isaac H. Aldred who took us to East Riverside near Eliza Ellen Wilson's home and baptized us in the Watson Slough. We were confirmed the following Sunday." ====== The first meeting house was built about one mile and a half north of Riverside on the Moreland town site. When the ward was divided and Moreland Ward created in 1896, the building was in Moreland Ward and the people of Riverside were back in the little log schoolhouse down by Snake River. That same summer the Riverside town site was selected and laid out and a schoolhouse built that was used as a Church house also. During the spring of 1895 a Mormon family by the name of Fjeldsted moved into the Riverside Ward. This family was a very religious family and they were active in their Church duties. They moved into the home that Robert's parents had lived in since they came to Riverside before their deaths, James Parsons died June 24, 1887 and his wife, Mary, having died November 14, 1894. This home was located in the town site just north of the present store of today. ====== It was the oldest son of Peter John and Marie Fjeldsted that attracted Mattie, she said many times that she loved him from the first time they met. He was a dashing, good looking young fellow, large in stature, with a personality that attracted all who knew him. Their first meeting was in the little log schoolhouse down by the River where the Riverside Ward was holding their Church meetings. Mattie was now a beautiful young girl of seventeen, she had blossomed into one of the prettiest young ladies in all the country. Young Pete Fjeldsted liked her from the beginning and he set out to win her from a local boy who had been watching her and trying to attract her attention, this boy was young Herbert Adams. It was this same Herbert Adams that worried young Pete during the next few years, as both boys were greatly attracted to her and wanted Mattie for his girl. Young Pete and his father, Peter John Fjeldsted, secured employment on the Peoples' Canal which was in the process of being built. ====== I will state here what John I. Watson, son of Big John, wrote in his history concerning this period: “In 1895 I filed on a homestead in what is now Thomas Ward and I was anxious to get water on it. I took my father's team and went to work on the Peoples' Canal. The ditch company paid $3.00 a day, $1.00 in cash and $2.00 in water stock. That did not work long as we could not feed our teams and ourselves on $1.00 a day. Later they gave us scrip we could take to the grocery store for our needs. We had to go miles to water our teams. We cooked our meals in a Dutch oven, slept in a tent "There we threw a fork full of hay on the ground for mattresses. Herbert and Robert Adams, twin brothers, and young Pete Fjeldsted and myself camped together. Later we took contracts to build other ditches. For sport Pete and I would get on the ditch bank with boxing gloves on and knock each other off. I worked out $700.00 worth of stock in the ditch. I can remember when the Moreland people gave a banquet for those who labored on the ditch. ========= Pete's letter will explain further about the canal and his work: 3131 C. Street Sacramento, California June 8, 1948 Mr. Art Van Orden, R.F.D. Blackfoot, Idaho. Dear Art: After viewing the break in the Peoples' Canal Sunday, May 30th, 1948, at the place where John Evans used to live, my mind went back some fifty-five years or near that time when as a young man I worked on that canal, part of the time in 1895 and 1896. I remember in 1895 John I. Watson, Herb and Bob Adams, and an older brother of John I. Watson, and myself had a contract of a distance of about three quarters of a mile beginning about a quarter of a mile above where the break occurred on Sunday, May 30th. At that time it was intended that the canal would be sixty feet from the bottom and on all fills and cuts the dirt was hauled back the sixty feet; that prevailed all along the ditch. In the winter of 1895 I worked on the big fill west of Moreland and the dirt was hauled back to a distance of sixty feet; that same method prevailed on every fill along the entire system. I worked on the fill just east of Burrow Basin, south of the road that runs along by the Thomas church house, that dirt was also dragged back sixty feet. Also I worked on a fill about a point where you take out water for the pumping system, at that fill the dirt was also drawn back a distance of sixty feet. At that time, Art, there was so much arid land and much of it untaken, that the problem of right of ways was not considered. I also carried and drove stakes for Mr. Rhode, a surveyor, who was the first engineer on that canal. Every stake was driven to conform with the sixty foot ditch. I also remember several stockholders' meetings that I attended, when the two contending figures were Dr. Cluff and Sam Rich, both of those gentlemen had taken land away down along the canal which would have been considered in the second terminal, and at those meetings it was discussed pro and con, that the first division would be sixty feet in the bottom and the second thirty feet. Now, Art, you are at liberty to use this letter any time you see fit or I will make an affidavit covering the contents of my entire letter, or I will come up and testify, if necessary. With kindest regards to you and your family and thanking you again for your kind hospitality, I am, Very truly yours, /s/ Peter C. Felsted. The above statement is true and correct. Signed J. I. Watson 6/23/1948 ====== During the month of September 1896 Robert was baptized, this was a very happy time for Henrietta and her family as she had hoped and prayed that her husband would see the beauty of the Gospel such as she did and they could go to the Temple and be sealed to one another and have their children sealed to them for time and eternity. ====== I will add here what Mattie said in her own words concerning this period: "At the time my sister, Helen Edna, was born, November 23, 1896 while Mother was still in bed with the new baby, all the children came down with German measles. We were all very sick. Father took care of us all including Mother and the baby, he was both doctor and nurse. A young man by the name of Pete Fjeldsted, whom I thought a lot of, would walk three miles every morning through snow to see how we were and to do what he could to help us out. He kept us in firewood so that we would have heat in the home for the sick family, he also did all the other outside chores that needed doing as Father was busy nursing his family. At this time I learned to truly love this young man and the next two years I kept company with him. We quarreled and he joined the American Volunteer Forces.” ====== It was during the spring of 1897, after Pete had been going with Mattie for some time, that Robert told Pete that part of his homestead, the Deseret Claim, was now ready to prove upon, but owing to the fact that he lacked the necessary money to do so, he was afraid he would have to relinquish his rights to this land to someone else. He also told Pete that Isaac H. Aldred had partly decided to take it over, but as yet he hadn't done so as he could not get the needed money. Pete told his parents about the land and they were both very interested as Peter John had used up his homestead right while living in Logan, Utah before coming to the Snake River country. This was the only way for them to secure land of their own, so after making the necessary arrangements with Robert, the Fjeldsted family took over the Deseret Homestead right which contained one hundred and twenty acres of land. Forty acres were purchased by a man named McMurdie, this same land which contained forty acres later fell into the hands of Pete and Mattie after their marriage. During the summer of 1897 Peter John Fjeldsted built a two room log house and moved his family from the little house in Riverside to their new home he had just constructed. Young Pete helped his father as much as he could, but he was still working on the Peoples' Canal and continued to work throughout the winter when the weather would permit it. It was during the early spring of 1898 that Pete and Mattie had a lover's quarrel. The quarrel continued for sometime, but when Pete saw Mattie talking to her old boy friend, Herb Adams, it made him very angry and on the spur of the moment he joined the United States Army on the 3rd of May 1898. (We were then at war with Spain.) The night before Pete left, he and Mattie had a reconciliation and the quarrel was forgotten, but it was too late as Pete had to leave the following morning for Boise where he was to train for two weeks before going directly to the Philippine Islands. He was gone to war for about eighteen months or until November 1899. (The full story of Pete's experiences in the war is written up in the Fjeldsted family history.) ====== Mattle's own words concerning this time in her life: "Pete was gone for about eighteen months and during this time I helped my family and stayed home. I wrote to my sweetheart nearly every day and when he returned we were soon married. After he arrived Pete was very sick with dysentery, but by December 6, 1899 we were married in the Logan Temple for time and eternity. We lived a short time in Pocatello after our marriage, later moving back to Thomas. "My beloved sister, Hettie, was very dear to me, she was always my pride and joy. I will always remember the fine young man she fell in love with and later married. Pete and I were having our wedding dance in Riverside at the ward hall. I was very proud of my handsome young husband, no other man could compare with him. I was so happy, I was dancing on clouds, no words could be put on paper how I felt; me in my beautiful cream colored silk wedding dress, which I had spent so many hours sewing to make it the prettiest dress in the world; my handsome young husband with his fine army manners and wearing his army uniform; my dear little sister, Hettie, and this new sweetheart she had found herself to be in love with, Trenor Fackrell was this young man's name. This was me, a bride, what a glorious night. "My dear little sister, Hettie, was married January 21, 1901 in the Logan Temple in a wedding dress I had made for her. I wanted to make it as near like my own as I could, as I wanted it for the nicest little sister in the world. Father and Mother bought the lovely cream silk material and I trimmed It in pearl beads and a water wave cream colored satin sash, which was so popular then. I also remember my dear little sister when she was Queen of May in 1900. That was the time she wore my wedding dress; she gave the May Day speech, I was so proud of her; I remember they took her picture, she looked so beautiful with her hair done up in curls, much like they wear it today. "After we returned to Thomas from Pocatello, we bought a forty acre tract of land located between my parents' farm and my husband's parents' farm. This land originally belonged to my father, but he had sold it to the McMurdie family and they were unable to make the payments on the land. This land contained a two room log house on it, we lived there until after my baby came, but before my child was born we were in need of money so my young husband went to work in the mines located in Montana. Before he left he made arrangements with a young couple by the name of Caldwell to come and live with me in one of the rooms. Mr. Caldwell would take care of the outside chores and his wife would see that I was all right while I was alone without my husband. "While Pete was away to the mines I sewed some and made a little extra money which we could put to good use. Pete came home from the mines for the baby to be born, he arrived home about a week before it came. A midwife took care of me, her name was Mrs. Crawford. A lovely little girl was born January 24, 1901 and we named her Golden Grace. I loved her so very much as she was so much like my handsome husband." ====== I will add here the contents of a letter written to me on my birthday by my father: Room 475, Veteran's Hospital Oakland, California January 23, 1952 Mr. and Mrs. Lester D. Lowe Just a few lines to my darling daughter to tell her that I have not forgotten what took place in a humble home that lacked all modern conveniences, but made up by what was lacking in luxuries with love. And, Daughter, I have not forgotten that beautiful girl wife that lay in awful pain while she gave birth to a little baby girl and when that baby was placed in her arms I can never forget that look of pride, for down in her heart she knew it was the finest of God's creations, and no other baby was as sweet as that little cherub that lay in her arms and nursed from the beautiful breasts that few women ever had. Well, Honey, I will write you in a day or two. Love to you from your father Peter C. Fjeldsted ====== Mattie' s own words concerning this period of time: "Pete had left for the mining camp that was located in Custer County, Idaho and had been working in the mines as a blaster and digger. He had been away nearly six months and he was very anxious that the baby and I join him, but my parents were planning to take a trip to Logan, Utah as soon as they could get away and have their Temple work done; they were very anxious to have this work done before I left to be with my husband as they wanted all their children sealed to them. "They were able to leave home during the month of July. They took a large three seated white top buggy with our camping equipment packed on the top of the buggy and the whole family including Father and Mother and their seven living children and my six months old baby and drove to Franklin, Idaho. We stayed in Franklin for a few days and visited with my mother's sisters and their families and then we went on to Logan where we made our camp in the front yard of my brother-in-law's home, Matease Fjeldsted. "Father received his endowments and Mother and the children were sealed on the 17th of July 1901. Laura Nash, Mother's sister's little girl went with us from Franklin and stood for our little dead Emma. We were indeed a happy family as, we left Logan and started back to our homes in Thomas. At last Mother's prayers were answered, her dreams came true, she would have her husband and beloved family for life and eternity. “Soon after I came back from Logan with my parents, where we had gone to get our Temple work done, I left for the mines where Pete was working. We lived in a little mining settlement in eastern Idaho where there were only a few people, all miners, with the exception of one other lady. I filled my time by taking care of my precious baby and doing all I could for my husband. After a short time I did a little extra work by setting tables for the cook who was a Chinaman, he used to call me Missie Pete. My husband's work was hauling ore, but it wasn't long before a tramway was built, then he worked in the mines blasting and digging. He worked there for some time and then we moved to the Daisy Black Mine near Challis, Idaho. It wasn't long before I started cooking for a few miners, but in a short time it was nine or ten miners. "I got a great deal of pleasure out of my little girl, making her things and teaching her to read and write and do things for herself. I had to take the place of her playmates as there were no other children in camp. We lived in the mining camps until my little girl was six years old. On her sixth birthday I tried to please her by cooking something special, I made a cinnamon man and some light bread doughnuts. She was so hungry for them she ate too many and they made her very sick and for several years after she couldn't eat doughnuts." ======= During the summer of 1907 Pete and Mattie returned to their homestead in Thomas. Grace, their little girl, had reached the age where she must enter school. The new schoolhouse which was constructed in 1904 was only a short way from their home, it was a two room red brick building built on the corner across the street from where Robert's first home was standing. Robert and Henrietta had constructed them a fine big rock house a quarter of a mile west of-their first little home and Robert had made many other improvements. The Fjeldsted family who lived a quarter of a mile south of Pete and Mattie had also made many improvements and had enlarged their home to meet their needs. A fine ward hall had been constructed and dedicated on the 'Thomas town site and the different Church organizations were held in it along with the recreation of the vicinity. The roads were greatly improved and many new people had moved into the settlement. Hattie and Pete were very happy to be back, with both their parents and they looked forward to a happy future. The first thing Pete and Mattie did was to start planning a new house. They had both worked hard while they were away and was able to pay for their property and make some improvements. They decided to build them a new home of black lava rock on the order of Mattie's parents' home. ====== I will add what Mattie said in her own words about this time in their lives: “We started our dear little girl to school that fall and the following spring we started our new rock house. Pete dug out the lava rock and hauled it to build our pretty new house. Our farm was a good farm and Pete worked hard on it. I was going to have a baby the following fall and I didn't feel so well, but I did all that I could towards helping. We completed our lovely house and was able to move into it before the baby came. He was born October 13, 1908 and we named him Harold Ney, That same winter, after I was well, we took in two school teachers to board and room as we lived quite close to the schoolhouse, and with my own dear family we had quite a busy year. ‘We were quite a prosperous family in our community as Pete had the ability to earn money and make us a good living. He worked on the roads as road master on the side. We had some very fine blooded horses and also had a pure bred Jersey bull that ran with our Jersey cows. He cost us a lot of money, but we always had sale for our calves. We were able to have gas lights as soon or sooner than anyone else in our community. Pete also made many improvements on our farm. "On October 23, 1910 we had a baby girl and we named her Oral Louisa, but we were unable to keep her, she died of pneumonia twelve days after she was born. In a year from the time we lost our baby girl we had a fine little boy come to our home on the 5th of December 1911 and we named him Edwin LaNey. We loved our two little boys very much and our dear little girl was the pride and joy of my life. Her grandfather, Peter John Fjeldsted, baptized her in the old Watson slough that ran through their property. September 3, 1911, she was confirmed the same day by him. On the 22nd of September 1913 we had another baby boy come to our house, we named him Ronald Parsons, but we were only able to keep this child a short time too, as he was taken from us January 13, 1914, he also died of pneumonia. I was very sad at the loss of my two children and there were times I thought I could not stand it. My beloved sisters and brother were all married by now and each one had chosen a very fine companion. We enjoyed many family "get togethers" during this period of time and it was my greatest delight to have them to my house for a big Sunday dinner or a holiday meal. My family all lived close by and we had the pleasure of their company and their many visits until we left our home in Thomas in the early spring of 1917. "We were the first family in Thomas to get an automobile, we secured a second hand one from one of the doctors in Blackfoot about 1912. “Pete started selling life insurance to make a little extra money about this time in our lives and he became an expert salesman. He was given many beautiful prizes by the company that he worked for, for selling the most policies in a given time. “Our little Grace was growing up to be a pretty young girl and in the spring of 1916 she graduated from grade school. We sent her to Blackfoot that same fall to attend school as that was the nearest high school in our part of the country. She lived with an old couple by the name of Mr. and Mrs. West and they treated her as good as if she had been their own daughter. “After Grace left for school in Blackfoot, Pete and I sold our home in Thomas and we took over a homestead right at Pingree, Idaho located about twenty miles west of Thomas. My sister, Hettie, and her husband had done the same thing and they were then living on their homestead in Pingree only a short distance from our property, however, because of a severe winter we did not move to Pingree until early spring. “Grace came home from school at Christmas time. (We were making our home temporarily with Pete's parents.) She arrived Friday evening and the next day she came down with a bad case of German measles. All three children were very sick, but recovered with no ill effects. Grace did not go back to Blackfoot to school after Christmas, but we decided to send her to the Hicks Academy at Rexburg where Pete's brother, Norman, was attending. We got her things ready and Pete accompanied Grace and Norman back to Rexburg where he helped her get situated and entered in school. At this time my husband was working in that part of the country selling life insurance. "In the early spring or as soon as the weather was fit I moved down to Pingree with my two little boys, we stayed there on that lonely ranch that spring alone, doing the best we could. Pete came home with Grace when school was out and we started to clear the brush and plant our crops. We all lived in Pingree that summer. "In the fall of 1917 we left our homestead in Pingree and moved back to Blackfoot to let our little girl continue n to school. We settled in a nice little house behind the Eccles Hotel and Pete started selling life insurance again. This was the winter of 1917-1918. Grace went back to school at the Blackfoot High school and my two little boys attended grade school. "This was during the first world war and all the young men were leaving or had gone into the service of their country. Grace was writing to a young man at Franklin, Idaho whom she had met while she and I were there on a visit. In the spring of 1918 this young man wrote and asked her if she would try to come to Franklin on a visit for the 15th of June, as he was expecting to leave for the armed forces. At this time Grace was not serious about this young man, but she thought it would be fun to go away for awhile for a short vacation. While she was in Franklin she fell in love with this young man and they were married on the 31st of July 1918, just two days before he thought that he would leave for war. Both temples were closed for reason of repair and cleaning, so as time was short they were married by Bishop John R. Williams, but by some unseen power Lester was permitted to remain home and they took his brother, Heber, instead. As soon as the temples were reopened, they went to the Salt Lake Temple and were sealed for time and eternity August 14, 1918." ====== Pete and Mattie went to the mines in the year 1901, they stayed there for six and a half years. The first mining camp that they lived in was called the Lucky Boy mine, located about thirty miles northwest of Custer, Idaho. This camp was where Mattie started to work. After staying there for over a year Pete and Mattie left and went to work for Governor McConnell at Erie Flat, which was called the Horned Silver Mine, located not too far from the Craters of the Moon in Idaho. They stayed there only a short time and Pete was offered a better job, this time as foreman over a crew of ten or twelve miners and Mattie was to do all the cooking. This mine was known as the Daisy Black Mine, located about fifteen miles from Howell, Idaho. This mining camp consisted of a large two room cabin built into the mountain much like a dugout. It had no windows in the bedroom, but the large kitchen had two front windows that had bars fastened on the outside to keep wild animals, etc., from breaking in. There were also a number of small cabins that the miners slept in. This country was very new at that time to the white man and the wild animals like cougars, mountain lions, bears, wild cats, etc., were everywhere. There was never a day went by that some miner in camp would kill a rattlesnake, if this snake was out of the ordinary they would cut off the rattles and bring them home to Mattie for little Grace to play with. The mine was located about a quarter of a mile from camp and the men would walk to the mines every morning and return at night. Mattie's work was hard. There was no way to get out of the camp except by wagon which some miner would take to Mackay to get groceries. Nearly everything Mattie used in her cooking came in cans, canned meat, canned vegetables, canned fruit, etc. There was no railroad into this country and everything had to be hauled by stage. Pete and Mattie lived at this camp for nearly five years and all the time they were there Mattie did all the cooking for the entire crew. When it came time to leave the mines Pete and Mattie had saved enough money to pay for their homestead and build themselves a nice home. Mattie had the business head in the family and it was she who carefully saved the money and kept the expenses down. She was very honest in her dealings with her fellowmen and Pete left most of that up to Mattie to take care of whenever she could. The home they built consisted of three rooms, two big bedrooms and a large living room, the following year a kitchen, pantry, and two porches were added. Pete dug the lava rock that was used to build the home, it came from a rocky hill located about two miles northwest, near the Thomas town site. James A. Cameron was the mason and Hans Peterson did the carpenter work. Mattie was very happy to be home among her loved ones. Her parents had built themselves a lovely two story home made from the same black lava rock that her own home was made of, at that time this stone was very popular. Her parents' house consisted of four rooms downstairs and four rooms upstairs with a large hall, and a stairway going upstairs. The home was the nicest building in the whole countryside and Mattie was very happy that her dear parents were so comfortable. Her sisters had grown up to be very beautiful girls, each one of them had special talents and these talents were watched and developed. Many lovely parties were held at the Parsons home as there was so much talent in the family with which to entertain. Robert himself played the violin, Catherine (Katie) was trained to play the piano and organ, Ana played the violin, and they all had lovely voices. Many times the Parsons family would hold their Christmas party at this home with the married children and their families. The Fjeldsted family also lived close by and Mattie enjoyed entertaining them as much as she did her own family. Many were the times that she prepared big dinners and had Pete's family at her home, she loved them equally as much as she did her own family. Mattie's troubles began to come when she lost her baby girl, Oral Louisa, then she lost her second little boy, Ronald Parsons. Then through some bad investments and too many new cars they were forced to sell their lovely home that she had loved so dearly and start in all over again. They were able to find some property in Pingree that was for sale, it was a homestead right two miles south of Pingree, Idaho, located in a very lonely place without any conveniences or water. The property was purchased from a man who could not get the money with which to prove upon it, so Pete and Mattie got it very reasonable. Pete and Mattie owned this property for two years and just after their daughter, Grace, was married they sold it. (That was me,) Mother and Dad prepared a lovely wedding for me on the 31st of July 1918 in their little rented house in Blackfoot. All my relatives were there including both the Fjeldsted family and the Parsons family. Our old bishop from the Thomas Ward, John R. Williams, married us and I left my parents' home with my young husband and we went to Franklin to live where we made it our future home. ========= I will add Mother's own words concerning this period of her life: “After Grace's marriage we sold our homestead at Pingree and moved to Salt Lake City where we bought some hotel property. I was very ill at that time as I had had a siege with my throat. It turned to quinsy and I had to have a doctor come and lance it. He told me I would have to have my tonsils removed. I was operated on, but I guess I had left them in too long because rheumatic fever set in and after that I had arthritis which caused my hands and feet to deform. "Pete and I did not like it in Salt Lake City, so far away from our beloved parents, our sisters and brothers, and our own dear little girl who was just married, so we sold our property and moved to Franklin, Idaho that following spring and settled in a little house not far from Grace's and Lester's. Grace was expecting a baby soon and we wanted to be near her until it was over. Her baby came the 19th of April 1919, it was a little five pound premature baby girl and they named her Grace NaDean. “The war was ended November 11, 1918 so Lester wasn't called into the service. They bought themselves a lot and continued to make their home in Franklin. "We found a good investment at Preston, Idaho located about seven miles northwest of Franklin. It was an ice cream business; we made ice cream and sold it in a confectionery which we also bought. We were in partners with a young man named Clyde Wilcox, we worked together that summer, but partnerships soon sink so we bought his part of the business. We lived in an apartment above the Peterson Jewelry Store and I worked hard as I helped out at the confectionery, besides doing my own work in the apartment and taking care of my two fine sons. "The fall of 1919 Lester was called on a mission to the Northwestern states. We asked Grace and the baby to make their home with us while Lester was away. We did the best we could by them, but after a while we found out that the business and all my extra work was very hard on us, especially me as I was in the change of life and it was going hard on me, however, we kept the business a year or so and then we were able to sell it. "We bought the old Condie home on West Oneida Street, a big fine house but badly neglected. We redecorated it and it was soon in good condition. Times were beginning to get harder, the after effects of the war boom were hitting us, they called it the war panic or the after effects of inflation. I took roomers as the home we bought was big and we had plenty of rooms. We took school girls who attended the Preston high school and men who worked at the sugar factory. “Grace was working up to town so I took care of NaDean, this was about the time she had whooping cough, she had three or four convulsions and it nearly scared Pete and I to death. NaDean was like our own child and it was hard to see her sick. She continued to have a bad cough all summer and fall. Lester returned from his mission on May 12, 1921, then Grace and NaDean left us and they went back to Franklin to live. "After Grace and NaDean left us I started taking boarders, mostly men who worked at the sugar factory. Pete had a truck and did considerable trucking around town. He worked hauling wheat for farmers and sugar beets, etc., or anything he could get as the economic condition was still bad and there was a lot of competition in the trucking business. Things got so bad with us that Pete had to leave Preston, so he went to Butte, Montana to work in the mines. It was while he was in Butte working that he found out that he was eligible to receive compensation for his services in the army. We were able to get $50.00 a month pension and it certainly helped us out a lot. "Our two little boys were growing up and I was very proud of them. They were very obedient boys, never causing me any trouble. They never quarreled like most boys of their ages do. How I loved to take the little wagon on Saturday afternoons and the three of us go shopping. They were as saving as I and they loved to shop around for the cheapest groceries. "We had a large lawn and yard with many beautiful flowers. The boys helped me by mowing the lawn and hoeing the garden, never saying "no" to anything I asked of them. We always raised a fine garden and had a raspberry and strawberry patch, I would always have enough fruit for both Grace and myself. I found much joy in my garden and canning my winter's fruit. "I never enjoyed society clubs, etc., and parties never interested me, however, I did work in the Relief Society and I would do as much as I could to help out if there was trouble or sorrow, I encouraged my boys to do their duty and it was about this time in my sons' lives that they were baptized. I will add their ordinance dates below: Harold Ney Fjeldsted: Baptized 15 August 1920 by John W. Corbridge Confirmed 5 September 1920 by Arthur W. Hart Ordained a Deacon 21 February 1921 Ordained a Teacher 9 March 1924 Ordained a Priest 7 March 1926 Edwin LaNey Fjeldsted: Baptized 15 August 1920 by John W. Corbridge Confirmed 5 September 1920 by Arthur W. Hart Ordained a Deacon 9 March 1924 "It was about this time that we had Helen Thomas come and make her home with us one Winter, she was the daughter of Martha Thomas, my husband's widowed sister. "My son, Harold Ney, graduated from grade school in 1924 and entered Preston high school the following fall. He was an outstanding athlete and played football on the first team, winning many honors. While on the Preston first team in 1927, Preston won the northern division and the West High School of Salt Lake City won the southern division. The two winning teams played for the finals, Preston being a much lighter team they lost, but in the Salt Lake Tribune it stated that Harold Ney Fjeldsted was the outstanding player of both teams. "It was in the latter part of his high school that I -could see that my boy was getting interested. in a very lovely girl. Her name was Effie Winward, she was from a good home with fine parents and had had the training of a Latter-day Saint home. She was seventeen years old when they started going together and from then on she was his one and only sweetheart. Our young son, LaNey, became interested in a fine young girl too, her name was Marjory Taylor. They both met their girls in Preston high school and continued to go together until their marriages. "Pete kept on with the trucking business and by this time conditions were improving financially for us. The boys had a nice car and they both had such nice girls, I couldn't ask for anything more. "Harold graduated from the Preston High School June 1, 1928 and in the fall he entered college at the U.S.A.C. at Logan, Utah. During the summer of 1928 both boys worked over to Kemmerer, Wyoming hauling oil along with their father. This summer work helped them enter school that fall. I rented our home in Preston and moved down to Logan where I secured a nice apartment near the college. LaNey had two more years of high school when we moved down so he completed his high school in Logan. “We bought us a beautiful home on the boulevard on the 14th of January 1928, we paid $7,500,OO for this lovely home. There was a three room apartment in the basement which we rented, and a two room apartment in the upstairs. The main floor consisted of two bedrooms, a large living room, kitchen and nook, bathroom, stairways, halls, and closets. My two boys loved this beautiful home a great deal and we were all so happy working together fixing it up. "My husband’s father died of a heart attack on the 23rd of December 192X while he was in bed apparently asleep. We all attended his funeral which was held in the Thomas Ward. He was buried in our family lot in the Thomas Riverside Cemetery. "My darling mother died of a stroke, of a fourteen day duration, June 7, 1930 at her home in Thomas. She had been standing at the window watching Father working in the flowers when it came upon her. Father found her there when he came into the house and sent immediately for the children. I went as soon as I could and never left my sick mother until her death. It was a lovely time of the year and I wondered if the beautiful flowers would ever look the same again. "After Mother's death Father was alone so he had his daughter, Ana, come and live with him. How happy I was that I had taken my dear parents the year before and brought them home to live at our house so that I could look after them during the cold Winter. That was one of the happy thoughts that I had to think of when I was mourning the loss of my dear mother. "During the summer of 1930 Pete and the boys were working at the Coeur d’ Alene Lake in northern Idaho. After Mother's death Effie Winward, Harold's sweetheart, and I drove up to see them and we rented a nice little house on the shore of Beauty Bay. We stayed there until fall and. when it was time for my boys to go back to school, we all came home together. We were all glad to get back to our beautiful home, friends, loved ones, and school. Harold was taking a hard course in college, studying to become a civil engineer, and he would study for hours every night. Once every two weeks my boys would take the week end off and drive to Preston to see their sweethearts, then on the other weekend their sweethearts would spend it with us in Logan. LaNey graduated from the Logan high school in June 1931 and entered college that fall. He also took an engineering course. “About this time I received my Patriarchal Blessing. I will include it in this history: Logan, Cache County, Utah May 20, 1931 Blessing by John E. Dalley, Patriarch, on the head of Martha Abanatha Parsons Fjeldsted, daughter of Robert Nelson Parsons and Henrietta Louisa Rogers Parsons, born at Brigham City, Box Elder county, Utah, August 21, 1878. Sister Martha Abanatha Parsons Fjeldsted, in the authority of the Holy Priesthood and by virtue of my calling as a Patriarch I lay my hands upon thy head and seal upon thee a Patriarchal or Father's blessing. Dear Sister, you are entitled to this blessing by reason of your faithfulness and thy great desire to be in harmony with His purposes and in as much as thy shall observe and keep all the requirements of the Gospel, as they are made known to thee thru holy writ and the oracles of the Lord, thy shall grow in grace and in great favor with the Lord and shall become a power of good in directing the footsteps of thy sons and daughter and of assisting of establishing them firmly in the principles of eternal truth. Thy shalt be a great comfort and support to thy husband by way of encouraging him in the labors of the Church and of assisting him to become interested therein and do a great and good work for the furtherance of the Lord's purposes in the earth. The opportunity shalt also come to thee to labor in the Church in the wards and stakes of Zion and to become efficient as a teacher with great faith and influence in directing the wayward from their downward course into channels of righteousness and purity. By faith and constant prayer thy powers for good shall increase day by day and thy zeal for the spread of righteousness shall increase upon thee as experience comes through thy labor. No duty required of thee in the service of the Lord shall be too difficult of accomplishment if thy shalt but put thy trust in the Lord as Nephi of old did in his day. Seek, therefore, day by day for ways of giving comfort, cheer and hope to those who are despondent or may be discouraged, for the Lord will put words into thy mouth that shall be balm to their souls and shall encourage them to renew diligence in the furtherance of the Lord's work. Thy shalt do a great and good work in the temples of the Lord, for thy dead kindred who have passed from the earth without the opportunities of the Gospel. The spirit of this work shall rest mightily upon thee and the Lord will make it possible for thee to accomplish all that thy heart shall desire and the more that thou work along these lines a greater beauty and importance shall be manifest unto thee. Put thy trust, therefore, in the Lord and thy shall have confidence in thyself with the assistance of His spirit to accomplish all the duties required of thee by thy brother and the approbation of the Heavenly Father. Thy art of Ephraim and art entitled to all the blessings promised to faithful Abram on conditions of thy faithfulness. I seal thee up unto eternal life to come forth on the morning of the first resurrection. In the name of Jesus Christ, Amen . “At this time Pete was building up a construction business and had a number of trucks, etc. He worked on the road at Livingston, Montana during the summer of 1932. That was the summer that Grace, Lester and NaDean came up to visit us. The boys continued to drive trucks for their father and put themselves through school, but conditions in the country were very bad as at this time the great depression of 1929 had hit us when we were doing so well. Then again bad luck stepped into our lives and we lost our business that we had built up, but we were very lucky and was able to keep our beautiful home as it was paid for at this time. Our army pension was cut from $50.00 to $15.00. We had a very hard time to make a go of it, but I started taking boarders again and we were able to put our boys through college. They had to manage without many of the things we would have liked so much to give our boys. "Harold and his sweetheart, Effie, who had been teaching school at Clifton, Idaho, decided to get married. They were married in the Logan Temple April 28, 1933. Harold kept on going to school as he still had another year left before he graduated and Effie continued to teach school at Clifton. In the spring of 1934 Harold graduated from the U.S.A.C. and received his degree in civil engineering, he had completed five years of college. I was very proud of my fine son, as he was such an outstanding boy. After he graduated he was able to get work in the A.A.A., he worked there for a short time and then quit it to go on a reclamation job on the Hyrum Dam in Cache County, Utah. After he left Hyrum Dam he went to Moon Lake, Utah. His dear wife was always beside him, helping him and encouraging him in every way possible. From Moon Lake he worked on the Spring City tunnel in Utah. "Grace and Lester and family still lived in Franklin. They had been blessed with three more fine children. When NaDean was five years old they had another little girl and they named her Betty Joyce, she was born on NaDean's birthday, five years to the day, April 19, 1924. Lester and Grace had bought themselves a lovely home two years before Betty was born and now they had things nice and comfortable. Lester had also entered the mink business and he was successful from the beginning. It would do my heart good to visit my only daughter and her family and see how happy she was with her fine husband and her two little girls. "In five years and nine days, April 28, 1929, a baby boy was born to my daughter and her husband and they named him Bruce Lester. He was a handsome little boy with golden curly hair and hazel eyes, and he was his parents' pride and joy. In four more years my daughter had her fourth child, a little girl born the 7th of April 1933, she was named Gloria Diane. "I never worried over Grace and her family as she was a good mother and Lester was more than a good father, and above all else he was so good to my beloved daughter. Lester was a very hard working man and he was able to give his family many lovely things in life. "NaDean was growing up now and Pete and I loved her like she was our own child. During the years her father was on his mission she stayed with us and I had most of her care as Grace was working up town, and at that time we got very attached to her. "We would always be with my beloved daughter and her family at Thanksgiving time as they were still in the mink business and they were pelting at Thanksgiving time and couldn't leave their home. She always prepared a big dinner for her family and insisted that we come too. How I enjoyed these lovely family dinners after my boys were gone. At Christmas time it was so much enjoyment to go to her home and spend Christmas eve watching the children open their presents, and staying over for dinner Christmas day. We never missed going to our daughter's home for these dinners from the year 1934, to 1944. "The year NaDean was a senior in high school, the fall of 1936, she came to Logan to make her home with us, she helped me too, as I was beginning to feel I wasn't so strong as I used to be. I was very busy as we were taking boarders and the depression was still effecting us, however, our pension had been raised to $37.50 a month. She graduated from the senior high school in Logan in the spring of 1937 and then left us and went home to her folks in Franklin, Idaho. Lester and Grace had sold their home and had just completed a beautiful new brick home on the outskirts of Franklin, where Lester could grow and develop in the mink business. "Lester and Grace decided when NaDean returned home it would be best to waste no time in preparing NaDean for a profession, so they prepared her things and entered her in the Collegiate School of Beauty Culture here at Logan. She returned back to us and again made her home at our house for the following year, graduating in the spring, May 10, 1938. After her graduation she again returned home to her parents at Franklin. She was able to secure work immediately with the most up-to-date shop in Preston, Idaho, located a distance of seven miles from her parents’ home in Franklin. She worked in this shop for three years and then bought it, and has been the owner of the shop ever since. “Our youngest son, LaNey, was married to his sweetheart on November 8, 1934 in Salt Lake City, Utah, he was twenty-three years old and Marjory was nineteen. LaNey continued to go to school as he had two more years after their marriage. Marjory's mother had just died unexpectedly so she thought she should stay home and help her father adapt himself to the situation. LaNey and Marjory could only see each other during the weekends as conditions were hard and they wanted to get LaNey through school at any cost. The following summer LaNey was able to get a little work with the A.A.A. as a check up engineer which meant going all over the state of Utah to check up on farmers. That same fall LaNey and Marjory were able to get a small apartment and they were then able to be together. My son graduated from the U.S.A.C. in the field of engineering in June 1936 and immediately after graduating he again went to work for the A.A.A., the same job he had the previous summer. This job lasted all that summer of 1936 and then he was put in the office for the winter. Marjory and LaNey lived by us in a trailer house they had bought. In the fall they moved into a home Harold and Effie had bought and took boarders. That was the same summer that my son was ordained an Elder and was made secretary of the Elders' Quorum and Marjory was teaching in Primary. On the 22nd of September 1937 they went to the Logan Temple and received their endowments and were sealed for time and eternity. "The following spring of 1938 money ran out on the job that LaNey had been doing so they moved in with us, they were only there a short time when again they secured work with the A.A.A. and moved to Salt Lake City, Utah. He worked with them for only a short time and then started working for the geographical survey and in August he and three other men worked at Randolph, Utah, he was then moved to Malad, Idaho and stayed there until January, when the weather became so cold they could not work. They bought a lovely home January 1, 1939 located a short distance from our home and moved into it and took boarders until spring. That same spring LaNey took up his work again where he left off the previous January. "We were always so interested in our boys and their affairs and we would try to help them whenever it was possible. When they were away Pete would look after their property, he would look after the renting of their homes and take care of their lawns by watering them, cutting the grass, etc., to make it possible for them to be away. "When LaNey was called to work away from home we rented our beautiful home and moved into LaNey's. We took over the boarders and carried on as if they were home in order for them to make their payments. I could feel my health was not so good and I worried a great deal over it, but I never said anything to my family because they would insist that I move back to our home and stop taking boarders. I did the best I could, which wasn't very good I know. "LaNey was transferred from that branch of this service to the topographic branch which was located at Sacramento, California. That year my son's health was very bad and we were all concerned about it. It worried me a great deal and I knew that I must carry on and help out and not let anyone know just how bad I felt. During the month of June 1940 LaNey was laid off from his work in Sacramento because all the money that was appropriated for this branch was used up. He and Marjory returned home to their house which we had been living in, then Pete and I moved back to our own home. "Marjory took in some boarders to try to make ends meet as LaNey's health was still very poor and he was steadily getting worse. He was advised by the doctors to be operated on as both his appendix and tonsils were infected very badly. This he did and he spent most of the summer resting, however, before school started LaNey was able to do some decorating in their home and got the house in pretty good order. Marjory arranged to take a number of boarders for the following winter, but after one week of school, on the 7th of October 1940, LaNey received a civil service appointment from the branch of the geographical survey and was sent back to Sacramento, California again. At the time they had eight boarders, and again we rented out our beautiful home and took over our son's home and Pete and I started cooking for these eight boarders." ============= I will add here a letter Mother wrote to her sister, Kate Christensen, dated November 17, 1940: My Dear Sister, How are you all, we are wondering about you. We are getting along fine. Pete and I are back here at LaNey's and Marjory's home again. Before we knew that LaNey was going to get work in Sacramento, Marjory had promised some students that they could get room and board here, it being so late in the school year we could not rent their home for them as all the teachers and officers had gotten settled for the year. Marjory wanted to help, but she found out that she could not help the way she had planned. She had given up having a baby, but just that is going to happen next May or June, --well, all of us are so happy for them. They have a lovely little apartment, three rooms, hardwood floors, disappearing bed, new refrigerator, bath and laundry, only two blocks from LaNey work. LaNey will have a month's vacation with pay and he gets his vacation in June, they will be apt to come home and have the baby born here. We were surely fortunate for we have been able to get a splendid girl to help with the work. She is a good cook and housekeeper, she goes all the time, I even have to remind her to take it more easy. Love, Mattie and Pete ====== I will continue with Mother's words concerning this period of time: "I could feel myself failing, and failing fast. I tried every way to hide it, but there were times that I would give completely up, at these times Pete would carry on the load with the help of a hired girl. By Christmas time or soon after I was forced to give up and went to stay with my daughter, Grace, at Franklin, Idaho. I stayed with my daughter and family for a week or so and then felt better and decided to go back and help Pete as he had been doing all the work while I was away." ====== I will add another letter that mother sent to her sister, Kate Christensen, dated March 2, 1941: Dear Sister Kate, I received your welcome letter, but the day it came I had taken a terrible cough, I coughed until I am so weak I can't stand on my feet. I have had two other attacks, but this is the worst. The doctor says it is an asthma condition caused from a cold. Pete had Doctor Hansen come up the other evening and he prescribed some medicine that is helping me, after I take a capsule I don't breathe near as fast and I know my heart don't beat near so fast. He examined my heart and found it was beating 90 when it should be beating 75. The cough is not so often and severe, so I will soon be well again. Grace came in when my cough was so bad and talked me in to going home with her, so I went and stayed six days. Pete was all alone with the work. I believe they were all glad to have me back if they do have to listen to this cough. Today is the first meal I have cooked alone for two weeks. Love, Mattie and Pete =========== I will continue with Mother's words concerning this period of time : “Soon after I returned home I found out that I was not able to continue with the work. Pete was able to find a man who was interested in taking over our son's home and we, with the help of Grace and Betty, moved back to our beautiful home again in our basement apartment. Pete took care of me, mowed the Lawns, managed LaNey's home, Harold' s home and our home. I wasn't any good. Grace came often to see us and so did Betty and NaDean. "My son, Harold, was transferred to Coulee Dam on March 10, 1939, Harold left first and Effie and the children went later. Effie was expecting a baby and she wanted to wait until after it was born, and then she drove her car and a trailer house behind the car, with her two babies, Harold W. born February 2, 1937 and this little new baby, just six days old when she left, born March 16, 1939. "Effie went into the Relief Society as president in August 1939 in the Grand Coulee Branch of the Northwestern States Mission. Effie resigned as a new baby was to come to their home the following year, Effie Lou was born August 30, 1940. However, before her birth Pete, NaDean and I drove out to Grand Coulee to visit them, we had a little car trouble just before we arrived, otherwise the trip was just wonderful. “Just before we left for Grand Coulee we received word from Pete's sister, Martha, that his mother had met with an accident and had broken her hip. She lay in bed for three months and it was beginning to heal and she could use it a little, when she was struck with a severe pain in the right side. They rushed her to the hospital in Blackfoot and operated on her, but found she had an obstruction and there was nothing to do but sew her up and wait for the end. For one week she lay and suffered, but just before the end Pete was with her, she opened her eyes, her mind cleared and she said, "Pete, my son, you are my oldest boy. I am going to pass on now to my Father in Heaven, I am asking you to keep our family together and to see that they don't forget their duty to their Father in Heaven.” Grandma died the 24th of August 1940 and they buried her on the 26th. Most of my family attended her funeral. Lester could not come because of the sickness of their son, Bruce, who had St. Vitus dance at the time. All of Pete's brothers and sisters were there except Amelia Rogers who lived in Pasadena, California. I felt very bad to have to part with Pete 's mother and the trip was a so hard on me, I had to be very quiet and could not do the things that I wanted to do. After we went back to our home in Logan I felt very sad at the loss of my beloved mother-in-law and it took quite sometime for me to get over it.” ====== I will add a letter Mother wrote to her sister, Kate Christensen, dated May 16, 1941: My Dear Sister Kate, I received your welcome letter and enjoyed it so much, I am sorry I have not answered sooner. I have had your letter here in a drawer by my bed and have read it over and over, and it is so nice I have had Grace, Dean, Betty and Effie read it. At first for a long time I felt so miserable I knew I would write such a bad written letter and not very interesting that I would be ashamed of it. I feel a little better lately, but can't do much work. I love to work among the flowers, but get so tired I can't accomplish much and my heart beats so hard and fast that I just have to hurry in the house and lay down. I am thankful I am able to go out, and with a little thoughtfulness I know I will be all right. Effie and the children came two weeks ago last Sunday, after they came it was about impossible to write. Harold came last Sunday to get them and to be here for Mother's Day. We had such a grand day Mother' s Day, the children were all here except Nick and Marj. (Nick is LaNey's nickname, ) Harold, Effie and the children went home yesterday about 10 o'clock. We enjoyed having them visit us, so much. Kate, I finished your family record the other evening with the exception of the questions I have written on the enclosed sheet, please answer them when you write again. I will get some blanks and send you one so that you will have yours. I want to get Hettie's and Lillie's, also Ana's, I have Helen's, I want to get Adrian's, too. Grace said she and Lester had read most of those books you said you and Hans had read last winter. I was up to Grace's for three or four days twice since I haven't been feeling well and read "How To Make Friends" while there. We are going to try and drive up for Decoration Day. It will be just about the time school is out, the day before I believe. It will not be long before our Marjory is sick now, I wish it was over. Let us know when your Marjory is over with it. Give our love to all your children and to Hans. Lovingly, Mattie and Pete ====== I will enclose a letter from Marjory to me telling me about her baby's birth dated July 1941: Dear Grace, My baby was born June 14, 1941 at Sacramento, California. LaNey Has put on an assignment a few days before the 14th at Jackson, California located about forty miles from Sacramento, not being an outdoor job he had no truck and us having no car I stayed at Sacramento. Your folks drove our new car from Logan and arrived at Sacramento on the 11th of June, and after the baby was born your father went back home and your mother stayed on with us. She and LaNey moved our things to Jackson and I went directly from the hospital to Jackson. She stayed about a week after we were settled and then she went home, she was with us about three weeks. Love, Marj and LaNey ====== Mother's own words concerning this time: "The spring of 1941 Pete and I drove out to LaNey's and Marjory's to be there when their baby was born. I will never forget poor little Marjory how she suffered and how terrible we all felt. I tried to help LaNey the best I could, but I wasn't very good, I was failing and everything I wanted to do I couldn't. After we returned to our home in Logan I still felt bad, I tried to do my work, but I just didn't have the strength. "On the 1st of October 1941 I was stricken with a severe gall bladder attack, so severe was the attack that for sometime I was almost given up. At this time they thought sure that I was going, Grace was with me helping me all she could. It was at this time when I was so ill and everyone thought I was going that my dear parents came to me, Pete's parents were there, too, and several other members of our family. They were waiting to take me away and how badly I wanted to go. "At that particular time Grace had the Elders and one of the men was Brother Thompson, our next door neighbor, the other my son, LaNey. They knelt down beside me and offered prayer, Brother Thompson doing the praying. Grace told me he promised me that I would recover and do a great work for my dead relatives. I started to recover from then on and in a few weeks was back on my feet again. Marjory and LaNey happened to come home unexpectedly, he had been given a three week vacation.” ====== I will enclose a letter written to LaNey and Marjory from. Mother dated February 24, 1942: Dearest Folks, We received your welcome card of the 18th of February and also one written on the 20th. I note Ronald's cough is better. I was sorry that you were disappointed about going into the field, it may be for the best and we cannot see it now. I know if we are prayerful and do what is right, as near as we know, God will guide us in the path that is best for us. I feel that way about making the trip out to Sacramento just now, I am not as sure of myself as I was before I was sick so I pray more than I did. When I was sick Father and Mother came for me and I know through Brother Thompson's and you children's prayers, our Heavenly Father let me stay awhile longer so now I must get some things done. I would love to come to visit you now, but after thinking it over more seriously and praying about it, I think I had better wait. I really should stay where we could get Doctor Hansen at any time, I worried while up to Franklin. I have had a pain in my left side further down than my heart, about opposite to my navel. I've had it a lot. At first it was just a soreness, but for over two weeks there was a pain, however, it is on the improve now. I think it is mineral oil that is helping me, Daddy is taking it and it is helping him. He has not had a movement without a physic or an enema for years until he started taking the oil; he has taken three or four large bottles of oil, Grace got him to try it, and he is just about normal now, he takes it every night. The bishop is so glad that Daddy is doing his ward teaching here on the triangle. He said as long as he was taking care of that to forget about the missionary work for they haven't been able to get this taken care of properly until now. Hug and kiss my Ronald boy for me, he is so sweet. Thanks for his picture, too. Love, Mother and Dad ====== I will add Mother's letter written to me on my 41st birthday dated January 23, 1942: Dear Grace and All, Just a line to you, tomorrow you will have a birthday. I can hardly believe you have reached your 41st milestone and I am getting so old, not so many years to enjoy my darling children and grandchildren in. I have been so busy in the past years that I haven’t enjoyed you all as much as I could have done. I would think of you all day long day after day, but not been able to do much for you. But I have loved you all as much as any mother could love her children. Enjoy your children, dear, while you have them with you, for soon you will wake up and discover the time has passed and they have left the home nest. We just heard from your brothers, they are all well. Nick and Marj sent us a good picture of Ronald, we received it yesterday. I let Doris go yesterday. I feel fine and will be so careful to not overdo. I put all my dishes up in the cabinet, they look so nice. I just enjoy doing my work and getting the meals, it is a lot of fun. I made a chair set like the medallion I was working at when you came, I finished the thread. I have made one medallion like the one you showed me how to do, but will not accomplish so much now that I am doing my own work. Did Betty tell you that I asked her to come down Saturday and stay all night? I got so lonesome for her so she came early, had dinner with us and slept with me. Her friend, Humpherys, came and brought her some warm ski shoes to go skiing with. She went up to school, or the dorm I mean, early Sunday morning and three or four couples went skiing Sunday morning. I called the dorm about 5:30 and they had gotten home and she was so thrilled. Dad is going down town, so will close and mail this. With Love, Mother ====== Mother continues with her story: "On November 21, 1940 my little granddaughter's engagement was announced. I will add the announcement below: Grace NaDean Lowe to Marry Utah Man Mr. and Mrs. Lester D. Lowe of Franklin, Idaho announce the approaching marriage of their daughter, Grace NaDean, to Vern Weatherston McFarland, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Archibald McFarland of West Weber, Utah. The ceremony will take place in the Logan Temple on Wednesday, December 4th. Mrs. Lowe will entertain with a trousseau tea for the bride elect at her home on Sunday, December 1st. Miss Lowe is a graduate of the Collegiate School of Beauty Culture at Logan, Utah, and for the past three years has been an operator at the Preston Beauty Salon in Preston. Mr. McFarland is a former student of the U.S.A.C. at Logan and for the past two years has been affiliated with the U.S. Grazing Service. "After their marriage Vern and NaDean made their home in Preston, Idaho. They bought the beauty shop that NaDean had been working in, and Vern was able to get a little work, but work was hard to find. “At this particular period, when World War II was being fought, most of our young men were called to serve in the military service and in order to avoid the draft, Vern enlisted with the U.S. Marine Corps. He left Salt Lake City the 29th May 1942, just eighteen months after their marriage, and went directly to San Diego to take his preliminary training. From there he went to sea in the North Pacific, he was stationed on a troop-transport and made the trip eleven times between Seattle and the Aleutian Islands. In August 1943 he was transferred into the Quartermaster Corps and after a period of three months schooling at San Diego, he left for the South Pacific and joined the 6th Marine Division at Guadalcanal." ====== I will add part of Mother’ s letter written to her sister, Kate Christensen, September 10, 1941, concerning NaDean and Vern at this time: Dear Folks, Just a few lines to let you know we are feeling pretty good and thinking of you every day, and I hope you are well. I received the card and lovely handkerchief on my birthday, thanks so much for the kind and loving wishes. I just returned from NaDean's last night. She brought Vern down to work Monday morning, driving truck, and I went home with them. She gave me a lovely permanent and manicure. They surely have it comfortable and home like in their apartment and are doing well with their business. She keeps three girls steady and an extra one on special days. She has learned how to manage her business without working so hard herself, on Mondays and Tuesdays she has one of her older girls, her cousin, open the shop and close it in the evenings and she goes in about two o'clock and works a couple of hours. She loves to work in her home, fixing it up and cooking. Vern has steady work now and they are so happy. Little Betty is going to start college the last of this month, she is going to live at the girls' dormitory here in Logan. Pete and I are taking life easy. We live in our three room basement apartment, we have it so handy to the furnace and laundry room. Love, Mattie and Pete ====== I will also include a letter written by Mother to Vern on December 21, 1942: Logan, Utah 249 Boulevard Dear Vern, I hope this finds you well, we are both enjoying pretty good health at this time. We did think there was a little chance that we may see you during the holidays, NaDean wrote us that she thought maybe there was, she said you were in good spirits which made us very happy. Pete has been working nights as a watchman up at the college, he goes on at 10 p.m. and works until 7 a.m., he has worked there nearly a month. It has been pretty hard on him losing sleep and walking all night, but last night it was not so tiresome, his feet did not hurt him so badly this morning. I guess you have heard about Betty and Roy going to get married Wednesday, the 23rd, at the Logan Temple. Betty stayed all night with us and yesterday she and Roy moved her things from the dormitory to their apartment they had just rented Saturday. I guess they have told you Roy was in training for the army up at the college, so they thought they would get married and enjoy a little while together before he has to leave for the service. You see, Vern, all the young people have about the same problem as you and NaDean, having to be separated is hard, if our Heavenly Father will permit it you will be reunited again, then we will all be so happy and thankful. I do hope you keep well and as contented as it is possible and have a merry Christmas. With all our love, Pete and Mattie ====== "I will add below Betty's and Roy's announcement of their marriage, dated December 27,1942: College Students' Nuptial Vows Two prominent students of the Utah State Agricultural College were united in marriage Wednesday, December 23rd, in the Logan Temple. Miss Betty Joyce Lowe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lester Lowe of Franklin, Idaho, became the bride of Roy Weaver Humpherys, son of Professor and Mrs. LaGrand R. Humpherys of Logan, Utah. The ceremony was solemnized by President Joseph Quinney, Jr., in the presence of the parents of the bride and groom. A wedding dinner was given at the Humpherys home and attended by immediate members of the two families honoring the young couple following the marriage. The newlyweds are well known in their home communities and are active in student affairs at the college. Betty is a sophomore in the school of home economics at the Utah State and is affiliated with Lambda Delta Sigma sorority and has taken an active part in dramatics. She has appeared in many public programs as a vocalist and dancer and is a member of the spurs, a national college women's service organization. She enrolled at the Utah state following her graduation from the Franklin High School. Roy is a junior in college, majoring in physical education and recreation. He is registered with the Enlisted Reserve Corps and is an advanced R.O.T.C. student on the campus. His affiliations include Sigma Chi fraternity and Blue Key, men's honorary service fraternity. This year he is junior manager of the Intra-Murals and last season won recognition at the college as director of public service bureau in charge of Search for Talent" project. Prior to attending Utah State, Roy was a student at Logan High School where he won letters in football, basketball and track. Following a short honeymoon trip Mr. and Mrs. Humpherys will make their home at 510 North 2nd East Street at Logan. "Dear little Betty was married to a fine young man I learned to like so well. They were married in the Logan Temple December 23, 1942, I was at their wedding, Brother Quinney officiated. "The following April Roy was taken into the army. Betty stayed with her folks and then followed Roy where he was taking his preliminary training at San Diego. It was while Roy was at San Diego that he was transferred into professional training in the field of dentistry, he still lacked a few college credits so the army returned him to Logan "There he could continue on with schooling." ====== I will add here a letter written by Mother to her sister, Kate Christensen, dated September 26, 1943: Dear Hans and Kate, How are you folks, we were wondering if you were well, I do hope you are both O.K. I had some bad cramps come into my right hand the other day. The cramps finally left, but since that time it has pained me quite bad. Pete is still working at night as a watchman up at the college, he has worked at it now for over eight months. Betty's husband and a few other boys were transferred back to the college here in Logan. They live near the school and were able to get a nice little one room apartment. Betty is going to take one or two hours of school work, herself, she will be able to see Roy a little more often then. He gets to come home Saturday nights and stays over Sunday. Dear little NaDean came in for a short visit today, she has just returned from Seattle to see Vern and be with him for a short time. She and I went up to Betty's apartment and had a nice visit with her. With all our love, Mattie and Pete ====== Mother continues with her story: "Roy continued to go to school in Logan, Utah until after Christmas time and about the first part of January he was called by the army to transfer to the San Francisco Junior College in California. He left Logan and went directly to San Francisco where he was screened and checked and double checked. About the last of February he was accepted by the Washington Jefferson Pre-Dental College in Pennsylvania. Roy called Betty to meet him in Ogden when he was passing through on his way to Pennsylvania, she did and they had a few wonderful days together before he went on his way. "Betty continued to go to school at Logan College and on May 28th she graduated from the L.D.S. Institute. I was not able to attend her graduation exercises because I was not so well at the time. After her graduation she left Logan and went to live with her parents in Franklin. After she got settled in Franklin she was able to get work at the Franklin County Court House at Preston, Idaho in the county clerk's office under Mr. Cleo Swenson. "Roy graduated from the Washington Jefferson Pre-Dental College the following September and went directly to the University of Southern California in Los Angeles where he had been accepted as a dental student in their school of dentistry. Betty joined Roy on his way through and they both went to Los Angeles together. Our dear little Betty was pregnant at this time and she was expecting her baby about the last of November. I was very concerned about my two precious little granddaughters as they both were pregnant, NaDean was also expecting a baby to be born about the last of January and her husband was in the South Pacific. "On the 28th of November Betty's baby boy was born and she wanted her mother to come to Los Angeles to be with her. Grace left a few days later and stayed until Betty was strong again, she returned about January 1st. “Little NaDean was living home with Lester and the children and was helping out while Grace was away, That Christmas while Lester and the children were alone, he asked Pete and I to spend Christmas day with him. He and NaDean cooked such a lovely dinner, just as if our daughter was there. We all opened our Christmas gifts together, which Lester had bought for us, and we had such a wonderful day together. My dear sons and their wives remembered us with lovely gifts also. They were so expensive that we hesitated to take them. Harold gave us a beautiful toaster and LaNey knew my vacuum cleaner was no good, so he bought me a new one. "I must add here that my children always remembered us both on our birthdays, Christmas, and Mother's and Father's Day. Also my precious grandchildren never forgot us on these days. We have been so lucky to have such a family. "After Grace returned from Betty's there were times I thought I needed her more than anyone else, she could understand me when no one else could. I came up to her house for a while, as I had been ill while she was away, to see if I could get to feeling better. I stayed two weeks with her. Just before I left for home NaDean' s baby was born January 24, 1945, on Grace's birthday, it was a fine little boy. Pete and I made several trips up to see NaDean while she was in the hospital in Preston before they brought her home to Grace's and Lester's. NaDean and baby stayed with Grace for three months and then moved back to her apartment in Preston so she could look after her business. "I had many nice visits with Grace and NaDean, once they came down together and did my spring house cleaning. I was so glad to get it done as we had received word from our boys and their families that they might come back to see us. I was afraid to think about it, or even plan for it, because I was so sure I wouldn’t see my beloved boys again in this life. I thought if they can't come home now, I don’t know what I will do. I wanted this visit more than I ever wanted anything in my life, I prayed to my Heavenly Father to please make this visit possible. God was good to me and my beloved family was all together again at my home during the month of May. I was feeling good at this time and what a wonderful time we had. Grace and family, NaDean and baby, and my sons and their wives, and all my little grandchildren were together. We had our family picture taken at this time, it was the only picture that we have had taken where our three children are with us. We also took many kodak pictures of the family, with the grandchildren and my great grandchild. I was the happiest person in the world as our beloved son, Harold, had not been at our -44- home for four years. "After the family left, it wasn't long before I found I was failing rapidly, losing ten pounds in three weeks. I spent a few days with NaDean and Grace and they both came down to Logan to see me often, but I didn't get to feeling any better. I wanted to live so badly so that I could see my other little great grandchild, that Betty and Roy had promised to bring home as soon as they could leave. By June 22nd I was very ill. I watched for brother Hanks to pass by, he works in the temple, to call him in and administer to me. I was able to contact him and he came in and gave me a blessing and administered to me, I can remember he told me, 'Be at peace, dear lady.' That gave me some encouragement. I wrote and told Grace I was not well and she drove right down to be with me. I was so thankful. ====== I will add here what Mother said on her card: Friday, June 22, 1945 Dear Grace, I don't feel very well this morning. Come down if you can and pray for me. Mother ======= Upon receiving the card I immediately drove down to Mother's and when I arrived my father and I took Mother to the Budge Clinic. The medicine the doctor gave us for her was able to relieve her for a short time only. That evening as I sat with Mother in her home (Daddy had gone to work), she asked me to look out of the east window at the beautiful mountains east of the city, then she took me to the south window and we both looked out over the river bottom with the beautiful homes on the island, then she took me to the north window in her bedroom and showed me that view, the beautiful temple was just beginning to light up and the picture was inspirational. Mother made the remark, "Could' anybody live in a more beautiful place?" She then told me that it would only be a matter of a few month's time, at the longest, that she could enjoy these earthly blessings. She said she was going to have to leave this beautiful home that she loved so much and her husband and family. She then said, “I would love to see my new great grandchild, Betty's baby, but I am afraid I will go before I have that opportunity.” At this time we had about completed the history of my mother's life. I remember that very evening when I was sitting with my mother, she asked me to record in the history some priesthood dates of her two sons. She had just received them from the Preston Third Ward where they used to live. We added these dates knowing that her history was about completed. She said she felt like a big load had just been lifted off her mind. ====== I will continue with Mother' s own words: "Grace thought that it would be better if she took me up to her home in Franklin so she could look after me and take care of her family at the same time. We had such a lovely ride up to Franklin in the car, but before going we first had a nice dinner and then went to the show, I liked the show so well that I wanted to see it over the second time. The name of the show was "The Song of Bernedette." I felt so good that day I even dreamed of getting well again, but the following Monday, the day we were to return to see the doctor, I could not leave my bed. Grace and Lester had the Elders come in and administer to me, Lester anointing and Brother Earl Shumway administering. Pete came up from Logan when he heard I was not so well. "I often see my daughter, Grace, crying, I don't want her to cry as it hurts me to see my children unhappy. I say to Grace often, “I have made many mistakes in my life” I can see now where I was wrong, wrong in things that were so important. I cannot right that wrong now, but I would live so differently if I had known then what I know now. I should have studied the gospel more and applied its principles in my life. I should have thought more of record work and going to the temple, there are so many things I should have done, but failed because I did not know how important they were. I thought I was right, but I guess it takes a lifetime to know that we are never right unless we follow in the footsteps of our Lord and Master, Jesus Christ.” "I love my dear grandchildren. Harold's little boys are growing up and starting to build fine characters. I could see this when they were here, Harold 'W. reciting the Articles of Faith. Effie is teaching her children the right principles and that is what I want her to do. God bless her for it. "Little Ronnie is a fine child, I love him like my own because I love his mother so. She has made my son the finest wife in the world and I am glad and very thankful this day that I have been blessed with such good companions for my children. "I love little NaDean and in my heart she is no different than her mother. I cry for her because she is so lonely, but her beautiful little baby boy is bringing her so much joy and happiness. “Little Bruce is growing up and I am proud of him. I'm sure he will not fail me. "Diane and Effie Lu, I love you too. Remember, children, after I have gone Grandma will be near you often leading the way and longing for her family, Be true to me, children, walk the straight and narrow path. It won’t be long now until I must leave you, but I shall always love you, each and everyone." Grandma ====== On the 11th of July Mother had become critically ill. Aunt Kate Christensen and Aunt Hetty Fackrell, Mother's two sisters, arrived and seeing how ill Mother was we all decided to take her to the hospital in Logan. The doctor in Preston made arrangements and we hired an ambulance to take her down. Lester and Aunt Hetty drove down in the car and Aunt Kate and I rode with Mother. As soon as Mother arrived in her room at the hospital they gave her two quarts of water in her veins as she had become dehydrated from constant vomiting before they completed the water treatment she had taken six quarts into her body. There was not much more the doctors could do but keep her comfortable, she was suffering from a bad heart and advanced gall bladder trouble. It was a constant fight to keep her from vomiting and this trouble caused her great distress and pain. My two brothers and their wives arrived in Logan the following Sunday and for a whole month were with Mother doing all they could to make her comfortable. When my brothers and their wives were forced to go home, My father' sister, Aunt Martha Thomas, came down from Blackfoot, Idaho, and the three of us watched over her. On Tuesday, the 2nd of September, We decided to move Mother to her own home as she had begged so hard to go. Aunt Martha was able to find some sheets and pillow cases she could spare from her own home and so we were able to keep Mother clean. At that time it was the last of the war years and nobody was able to buy sheets or linen for several years. Aunt Martha and I watched over Mother, changing her linen like we would a baby. Dear Aunt Martha never left Mother for more than a few moments the entire time she was there, but I would break away at times and occasionally go back to Franklin to see about my family and get things done up there so the home would run smoothly. I knew my mother was in the best of care while I was away. One of the sad things about Mother's condition was while she was staying at the hospital her bladder became infected by the use of a catheter. At this time we did not have any antibiotics or medicine to combat this trouble so she became so infected that her bladder passed straight blood, which was the direct cause of her death later. Mother was in great pain at this time and would scream out in pain. I sent her name to the temple and we had the Elders as often as we could. By Sunday, September 16th, she weighed no more than eighty pounds, her poor dehydrated body was, nothing but a skeleton. Her suffering was so intense that we all welcomed death when it came September 17th, at 10 a.m. ====== I will add here what came out in the newspaper in the obituary column: MATTIE P. FJELDSTED LOGAN -- Mrs. Mattie Parsons Fjeldsted, 67, former resident of Thomas, Bingham County, Ida., died Monday at 11: 20 am, in the family home, 249 Boulevard, after a 13-week illness. She was born Aug. 21, 1878 in Brigham City, a daughter of Robert Nelson and Henrietta Rogers Parsons. Her early life was spent at Brigham City and Promontory in Box Elder County. Later the family moved to Thomas, Idaho, near Blackfoot. She was married to P. C. Fjeldsted, Dec. 6, 1899, in the Logan L.D.S. Temple. Survivors include her husband, three of her five sons and daughters, Mrs. Grace Fjeldsted Lowe, Franklins Ida.; Harold N. Fjeldsted, Coulee, Wash.; LaNey E. Fjeldsted, Sacramento, Cal.; and the following brothers and sisters, Mrs. Henrietta Fackrell, Adrian Parsons and Mrs. Kate Christensen, Blackfoot, Ida.; Mrs. Anna Cotrell and Mrs. Helen Goodwin, Idaho Falls, Ida. Funeral services, to be conducted in Thomas, will be announced by the W. Loyal Hall Mortuary, Logan. ======= Rewritten by Grace Fjeldsted Lowe August 1968. ( Letter from Betty to her mother, Grace, shortly after Mattie's death.) Los Angeles, California October 17, 1945 Dearest Mother, This letter is especially for you this time. I guess you're almost alone, having Daddy and Bruce on their deer hunt and Diane working most of the day. Having no one around to occupy your thoughts, you're probably reminiscing over your dear sweet mother who has gone beyond. But Mother, think only that she has given up her earthly body and everything else about her is just the same, her thoughts, her love for her children, her kind loving way, her gentle personality, her graciousness and tenderness. She hasn't lost any of these things which are eternal. She surely must be happy now being with her own mother and father. You surely can't be selfish wishing she was still here, because if you could see her now she would probably be the happiest she's been in all her life. The suffering she had with her decrepit earthly body which was worn out with age is not with her now and she'll never suffer or have pain again. She had suffering many years before she went, but that is gone with her body too. Just think how grateful she must be that all this pain has finally gone forever and her spirit is as though she were young again with vigor and vitality. Mother while you reminisce, only kindle these thoughts that she is happy and contented. You've been a dear sweet beloved daughter to her and I know she'll be near you often. Cheer up Mother dear, and don't let even a single teardrop come into your eye. Why not think of it this way. Your mother loved you more than anything in the world and yet you grew up and left her by finding Daddy and becoming married. You were perfectly happy and content, but you did leave your mother in spirit and body which is as it should be. Now your mother left and is perfectly happy and content which is also as it should be. Why not say, "She’s gone and her work here was well done, now I must prepare myself and my children so they will be good enough to be able to meet her. There’s no time to grieve and be at a standstill because there's too much to do in order to prepare my family for this grand reunion.” This life is very short and making use of every minute by working and studying the gospel and the fine things of life is still not enough time to prepare for eternal life. So remember, Mother, there's no time to waste by mourning over things which are gone, but work for things of the future, things which you and those you teach will carry on long after life on this earth. We received your letter and enjoyed it so much. Yes, I did receive the lovely pin of Grandmother's that she left me and I just adore it. You have one too which I have always liked. We've been home from tending Grant's children a week and I've never loved this little apartment so much. I told you they adopted another child so I had seven including Judd to fix meals for. I guess it was worth it though, because I took all my washing out and got everything in the house clean and we didn't have any expenses for twelve days, food, electricity and gas, etc., then the Grants gave us a little money again. You knew I was helping Brother Muir. I get up early in the morning and get all the housework done, put Judd in bed at 9 am, for his morning nap and Brother Muir comes over at 9:30 and dictates while I type what he says. He stays for an hour and a half and sometimes two hours. Judd never wakes up before 11 so we get quite a little done. He then leaves me typing to do during the day and picks it up the next morning when he comes to dictate again. It surely is convenient, especially having him come here, then being able to do his work any part of the day I choose. He is writing the Church history of Southern California from the very beginning, and also writing personal biographies of interesting people that he has known. I've told him about you writing the Fjeldsted biography and exactly how you put in a lot of dates and interesting little personal family stories, etc., and he said he thought that is the very best kind, especially for Church records at a later date. He said it’s very hard to write about someone who is gone because you miss so many details and so many true feelings of members you are writing about, He said if it’s just for the family records that the way you wrote yours was grand. And I think so too, Mother, I don't see how you’ve done all that you have. You surely knew when to start writing it because you would have missed many things if Grandma hadn’t have related them to you. If you want, send it down and I’ll have Brother Muir look it over and maybe he will help to organize it and put a "foreword" at the beginning. Judd mimics everything we do now and is in the pulling stage, pulling everything down on him, even chairs. Whenever he wakes from a nap, the first thing he does is inspect every room and everything in it, pulling out all the pans, tipping the chairs over, lifting the toilet seat, pulling all the plugs out of the sockets, pulling Roy's book out of the book shelf, getting in the closet and carrying each and every shoe all over the house, then he decides he’s seen and done everything so he finally relaxes. He hasn’t any more teeth (only two) and instead of walking now, he’s running. One thing I can say though that is really good about him is that he is nearly trained on his toity and he knows how to kiss, he also sleeps good. NaDean can be thankful Royal is the modest little guy he is. As soon as Vern sees him, be sure and write us all the details about it. Hope Daddy and Bruce have good luck with their hunt again this year. Love to you, Mother, and all, Betty ========== Attention, please note: This Fjeldsted history that Betty is referring to in this letter is the original life story of Mother that we wrote prior to her death. By Grace Fjeldsted Lowe

ROBERT NELSON PARSONS “THE SECOND SETTLER IN THOMAS, BINGHAM COUNTY, IDAHO

Contributor: Simini Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

ROBERT NELSON PARSONS “THE SECOND SETTLER IN THOMAS, BINGHAM COUNTY, IDAHO” WRITTEN NOVEMBER 16, 1952 BY HIS GRAND-DAUGHTER, GRACE FJELDSTED LOWE In the early spring of 1885, Robert Nelson Parsons got the pioneering spirit and as a vast agricultural empire beginning to emerge west of Blackfoot, in Idaho Territory along the Snake River district, it was there that he decided to stake out a claim. At this time in his life Robert had recently passed his thirty-first birthday; it being on the 14th of January, and he had been married to Henrietta Louisa Rogers but eight years. Robert and his wife had three young children, two little-girls and a baby boy, Martha Abanatha, six and a half, Henrietta Letitia; four and a half, and Robert Adrian just eighteen months old. Robert and his little family had been living in Brigham City; Box Elder County, Utah prior to the birth of their youngest child, owing to his wife's ill health. They had bought themselves a small home in a peach orchard and Robert helped his brother, George Washington Parsons, take care of the Church cattle. In his spare time Robert would work with his fruit trees, specializing in grafting, etc. At harvest time he would load up his wagon and take his produce to the various settlements and sell his fruit from door to door. After careful study, thought, and consideration Robert loaded his wagon with the implements for homesteading and leaving his family, joined a wagon caravan which was going north. They left Brigham City and traveled by way of Malad, as Malad City had been a principal station for stage lines, freighting and emigrant service. Going near the head of Bannock Creek the road followed this creek north to Snake River (at this time Pocatello had not been settled), then following Snake River in a northeasterly direction the old road passed by Old Fort Hall, continuing on for twelve miles it led into the little town of Blackfoot. (This trip took three days and two nights on the road. ) The wagon train passed directly through the Bannock Indian country and for years this warlike tribe, under their wicked Chief Pocatello, had infested the highways of travel and committed all manner of crimes. However, the old chief died in 1880, sometime after the tribe had been confined to the Fort Hall reservation but the traveler while passing through the Indian country remained ever cautious and, for years would travel only in groups, remembering the past and the evil deeds of the Indians not so long ago. The Utah Northern Railroad had been built but four years and freighting was still heavy, especially in and around the frontier town of Blackfoot, as at this time up to the year 1901 there were no railroad branch lines northwest into the mining districts which had opened up on a large scale. Blackfoot was the last outpost and it was here the miners outfitted themselves before going into the mountains. When-the wagon train arrived in Blackfoot, the little town was then seven years-old. It was a center for cattle men, miners and freighters and was considered a typical frontier town with numerous gambling places, saloons and hostelries. Robert arrived at his destination after a long and tiresome trip and went directly to the home of one of his brothers, Joseph and family. Joseph Parsons and family, Robert's oldest brother, had made Blackfoot their, home since 1878 when the little town was first founded. Joseph built a two room log house and ran the first brick kiln in Blackfoot. He was also a faith doctor and his services in this capacity were often called for. Joseph's oldest' daughter, Martha Ann, was the first school teacher in this new settlement. She was the founder of a subscription school which met in the 1iving room of John Montgomery's home. Joseph's home was located in the northwest part of Blackfoot, now known as "Dipple Addition." It was named in honor of Henry Clarence Dipple, Joseph Parsons' son-in-law, who married his youngest daughter, Luella Parsons. Alphes Parsons and his family, Robert's brother just older than himself, had settled in Blackfoot in 1881 and they had a little home on the banks of the Snake River, west of the new settlement and southeast of the present Snake River bridge. Alphes helped his brother, Joseph, with the brick kiln. Upon his arrival in Blackfoot, Robert was anxious to file on some of the rich country west of the river and as the large toll bridge was now completed over the river, this district that he wanted to investigate was now open for homesteading. His first trip across the river was made by foot, as the price for crossing the toll bridge was $3.00 per team, 50 cents for horseback and pedestrians were allowed to cross over without charge. Mr. and Mrs. Hansen lived in a little frame, one room house, Southeast of the big toll bridge. They were the custodians and were ever watchful that the people crossing the big bridge did so according to the law. Mr. Hansen would stand near the bridge with his hand out ready to collect and his wife always had a happy "good morning." After crossing the big bridge on foot, Robert went directly west following the river with its heavy growth of dense willows and underbrush. He found the district west for three miles settled and claimed by new homesteaders. He traveled westward still following the river with its acres and acres of river brush and huge cottonwood trees. The road was very rough and wound through dry creek beds encumbered by huge, boulders and rocks, river brush, deep bogs and swift streams. There were numerous deep badger holes along the trail which could be dangerous had he stepped accidentally in one of these. After leaving South Riverside the road now had become only a cattle trail, few people had traveled this trail and it was difficult to follow. Continuing on for a distance of a couple of miles or so, Robert left the big river which wound itself in a south-westerly direction and he continued to travel due west for a distance of one or so miles. For miles and miles in every direction that Robert could see was a vast expanse of sage brush, there seemed no end to it. In every direction that he looked was a great waste of this brush, broken only by rivers and streams whose banks were a profusion of creek willows and huge cottonwood trees. Robert was alone and afoot, traveling was slow in this new country, but he was looking for a future home and his time and mode of travel were not important. He looked the country over very carefully, taking the time to examine more closely this great sage brush waste land. Robert Parsons was a man of vision and foresight, and looking into the future he could see at once the great possibilities of this vast Snake River Valley, with, its virgin soil, through irrigation and reclamation projects it could be transplanted from a barren desert into fertile fields and made to blossom as a rose. He noticed the size of the sage brush and knew that the soil must be rich and deep if it could produce such huge bushes. He also looked at the various streams running through this section and with a prayer in his heart he found the thing he was looking for, and it was here that he staked out a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres. However, in a very short time Robert took advantage of the Desert Land Act of 1877 and secured another 160 acres of this arid land that is located In the center of the present district called Thomas. This homestead claim took in a half section of land directly southwest of the present Wilson School. It consisted of all the land that ran one half mile west and one mile south. His Homestead Claim was received on June 8, 1895 by Grover Cleveland and recorded on June 26, 1900 in the Book of Deeds in Bingham County, Idaho, Application #2042, Certificate #1788. And so by making this claim in the early spring of 1885, Robert was given the honor of being the second settler in the Thomas district. There was not a living being within three miles to the east, which is now in Riverside, and three and a half miles to the southwest where "Big John Watson”, as he was occasionally called, had located on a stock farm. This property was purchased by the McBride brothers later. Robert feeling that he could easily lose his way when he returned to his claim again, decided to tear his red handkerchief in small strips and tie the strips to the top of the highest sage brush where his claim had been staked out, also along the trail for some distance from his claim. After all legal matters were taken care of and he had settled on his newly acquired property, Robert found this country rough and many obstacles were to be overcome. Besides the big sage brush growing on the sand and rocky soil there was a prickly vegetation, this in itself was a great menace. The streams were swift and dangerous to cross and it seemed at times to Robert as he worked alone on his land that the very elements were against him and his success. There was much to be done and much to be accomplished and at once Robert started his new home, this first home was primitive indeed and it was built in haste, but it was a beginning of something bigger and better. The location of this first home was directly west of the present Wilson School building, where the Chris Politis home now stands. Robert dug a fine cellar with straight even walls, he covered the roof with timber and then put dirt over the timber. There were no windows to let in the light, but Robert would open the heavy door that faced the east and the light would come in. It was a typical "dug out" in every sense, but it was a place to live until he could secure timber and material and build a better home. He grubbed a small patch of brush near the dugout and planted a garden, at first this garden was watered by hauling water from the nearest stream, but as time passed by this method was improved by diverting the, water from the nearest stream and using it to irrigate his growing seeds. • • • And now the time had come for Robert to drive his faithful team, Old Pete and Dollie, back to Brigham City to get his wife and family and bring them to their new home. THE FIRST SETTLER'S STORY It ain't the funniest thing a man can do Existing in a country when it's new, Nature, who moved in first-s good long while- Has things already somewhat her own style; And she don't want her woodland splendors battered, Her rustic furniture broke up and scattered, Her paintings which long years ago were done By that old splendid artist-king, the sun, Torn down and dragged to civilization gutter, Or sold, to purchase settler's bread and butter, She don't want things exposed from porch to closet, And so she kind of, nags the man who does it. She carries in her pocket bags of seeds, As general agent of the thriftiest weeds; She sends her black birds, in the early morn, To superintend his fields of planted corn, She gives him rain past any duck's desire-- Then maybe several weeks of quiet fire; She sails mosquitoes-leeches perched on wings, To poison him with blood: devouring stings, She loves her ague-muscle to display; And shake him up - say every other day; With thoughtful, conscientious care she makes Those travelin' poison-bottles, rattlesnakes, She finds time, 'mongst her other family cares, To keep in stock good wild-oats, wolves and bears. Well, when I first infested this retreat, Things to my view looked frightful incomplete; But I had come with heart thrift in my song, And brought my wife and plunder right along, I hadn't a round trip ticket to go back, And if I had there wasn't no railroad track; And drivin', East was what I couldn't endure; I hadn't started on a circular tour. My girl-wife was as brave as she was good, And helped me every blessed way she could. She seemed to take to every rough old tree, As sing'lar as when first she took to me. She kep' our little log-house clean as wax, And once I caught her foolin' with my axe. She learned a hundred masculine things to do; She aimed a shot gun pretty middlin' true, Although in spite of my express desire, She always shut her eyes before she'd fire. She hadn't the muscle (though she had the heart), In out-door work to take an active part. Though in our firm of Duty and Endeavor She wasn’t no silent partner what-so-ever. When I was logging, burning, chopping wood, She'd linger around and help me all she could, And keep me fresh - ambitious all the while, And lifted tons just with her voice and smile. With no desire my glory for to r-ob; She used to stan' around and boss the job; And when first class success my hands befell, Would proudly say, "We did that pretty well!" She was delicious, both to hear and see-- That pretty girl-wife that kept house for me. Well, neighborhoods meant counties in those days; The roads didn't have accommodating ways; And maybe weeks would pass before she'd see And much less talk with, anyone but me, The Indians sometimes showed their sun baked faces But they didn't teem with conversational graces Some ideas from the birds and trees she stole, But 'twasn't like talking with a human soul. And finally I. thought that I could trace A half heart-hunger peering from her face. Then she would drive it back and shut the door. Of course that only made me see it more. “Twas hard to see her give her life to mine Making a steady effort not to pine “Twas hard to hear that laugh bloom out each minute, And recognize the seeds of sorrow in it. No misery makes a close observer mourn Like hopeless grief with hopeful courage borne; There's nothing sets the sympathies to paining; Like a complaining woman uncomplaining. It always draws my breath out into sighs To see a brave look in a woman's eyes. Well she went on as plucky as could be, Fighting the foe she thought I did not see. And using her heart-horticultural powers, To turn that forest to a bed of flowers You cannot check an unadmitted sigh And so I had to soothe her on the sly; And secretly to help her draw her load; And soon it came to be an up-hill road. Hard work bears hard upon the average pulse, Even with satisfactory results; But when effects are scarce, the heavy strain Falls dead and solid on the heart and brain, And when we’re bothered, it will oft occur We seek blame-timber; and I lit on her. And looked at her with daily lessening favor For what I knew she couldn't help to save her. And discord, when he once had called and seen us, Came round quite often and edged in between us. One night, when I came home unusual late, Too hungry and too tired to feel first-rate, Her supper struck me wrong (though I'll allow She hadn't much to strike with any how) Ana when I went to milk the cows and found They'd wandered from their usual feeding ground, And maby'd left a few long miles behind 'em Which I must copy, if I meant to find ‘em. Flash-quick the stay-chains of my temper broke, And in a trice these hot words I spoke, "You ought to’ve kept the animals in view And drove 'em in, you'd nothing else to do The heft of all our life on me must fall, You just sit around .and let me do it all." That speech it hadn't been gone a half a minute Before I saw the cold black poison in it, And I'd have given all I had and more To've only got it safely back indoor. I'm now what most folks "well-to-do" would call, I feel today as if I'd given it all Provided I thought fifty years might reach And kill and bury that half minute speech. She handed back no words as I could hear, She didn't frown, she didn't shed a tear, But proud, half crushed, she stood and looked me o’er Like someone she had never seen before. But such a sudden anguish lit surprise, I never viewed before in human eyes I've seen it oft enough since in a dream. It sometimes wakes me like a midnight scream Next morning when stone faced but heavy hearted, With dinner pail and sharpened axe I started Away for my days work, she watched the door. And followed me half way to it or more, And I was just a turning round at this And asking for my usual good bye kiss; But on her lip I saw a proudish curve. And in her eye a shadow of reserve And she had shown - perhaps half unawares Some little independent breakfast airs; And so the usual parting didn't occur, Although her eyes invited me to her, Or rather half invited me, for she Didn't advertise to furnish kisses free; You always had, that is, I had - to pay Full market price, and go more'n half the way, So, with a short "goodbye", I shut the door, And left her as I never had before. But at noon my lunch I came to eat Put up by her so delicately neat-- Choicer, somewhat, than yesterday's had been And some fresh, sweet eyed pansies she'd put in-- Tender and pleasant thoughts, I knew they meant It seemed as if her kiss with me she'd sent Then I became once more her humble lover And said, "Tonight I’ll ask forgiveness of her". I went home over-early on that eve, Having contrived to make myself believe By various signs I kind of knew and guessed A thunder storm was coming from the West. “Tis strange, when one sly reason fills the heart, How many honest ones will take its part, A dozen first class reasons said 'twas right That I should strike home early on that night). Half out of breath the cabin door I swung With tender heart-words trembling on my tongue. But all within looked desolate and bare My house had lost it's soul,--she was not there, A penciled note was on the table spread And these are something like the words it said-- "The cows have strayed away again and I fear I watched them pretty close, don't scold me dear, And where they are, I think I nearly know I heard the bell not very long ago. I've hunted for them all the afternoon; I'll try once more, I think I'll find them soon Dear if a burden I have been to you, And haven't helped you as I ought to do Let old time memories my forgiveness plead I've tried to do my best, I have indeed. Darling, piece out with love the strength I lack, And have kind words for me when I get back." Scarce did I give this letter sight and tongue Some swift-blown raindrops, to the window clung. And from the clouds a rough, deep growl proceeded, My thunder storm had come, it wasn't needed. I rushed out door, the air was stained with black, Night had come early, on the storm clouds back, And everything kept dimming to the sight, Save when the clouds threw their electric light. When for a flash, so clean cut was the view, I'd think I saw her, knowing 'twas not true. Through my small clearing, dashed .wide sheets of spray, As if the ocean waves had lost their way. Scarcely a pause the thunder battle made In the bold clamor of its cannonade. And she, while I was sheltered, -dry and warm Was somewhere in the clutches of this storm! When she whos storm-frights found her at her best, Had always hid her white face on my breast, My dog, who'd skirmished round me all the day Now crouched and whimpering in a corner lay. I dragged him by the collar to the wall I pressed his quivering muzzel to a shawel, "Track her, old boy!" I shouted, and he whined Matched eyes with me, as if to read my mind Then with a yell went tearing through the wood, I followed him as faithful as I could. No pleasure trip was that, through flood and flame We raced with death, we hunted noble game. All night we dragged the woods without avail, The ground got drenched, we could not keep the trail, Three times my cabin home I found, Half hoping she might be there safe and sound But each time' 'twas an unavailing care, My house had lost its soul, she was not there. When, climbing the wet trees, next morning sun Laughed at the rain that the night had done, Bleeding and drenched, by toil and sorrow bent, Back to what used to be my home I went, But as I neared our little clearing, ground-- Listen! I heard the cow bell's tinkling sound. The cabin door was just a bit ajar, It gleamed upon my glad eyes like a star. "Brave heart,” I said, for such a fragile form She made them guide her homeward through the storm Such pangs of joy I never felt before, "You've come", I shouted and rushed through the door. Yes, she had come--and gone again. She lay With all her young life crushed and wrenched away--- Lay--the heart ruins of our home among Not far from where I had killed her with my tongue. The rain drops glittered mid her hair's long strands The forest thorns had torn her feet and hands. And midst the tears, brave tears, that one could trace-- Upon the pale but sweetly resolute face, I once again the mournful words could read "I have tried to do my best, I have indeed." And now I'm mostly done; my story's o'er; Part of it never breathed the air before, Tisn't ever usual, it must be allowed, To volunteer heart-history to a crowd, And scatter 'mongst them confidential tears. But you'll protect an old man with his years; And where so e’er this story's voice can reach, This is the sermon I would have it preach, Boys flying kites haul in your white winged birds, You can't do that way when you're flying words. "Careful with fire," is good advice we know "Careful with words," is ten times doubly so. Thoughts unexpressed may sometimes fall back dead. But God Himself can't kill them when they're said. You have my life grief, do not think a minute Twas told to take up time, there's business in it It sheds advice, who-e'er will take and live it Is welcome to the pain it cost to give it. This beautiful poem belonged to my mother, Mattie Parsons Fjeldsted. It was given to her by her father, Robert Parsons, shortly before he died. By Grace F. Lowe (20 November 1985) Note: This history was digitized by Merrill and Effie Lour Smart.

Henrietta Louisa Rogers Parsons by Grace Fjeldsted Lowe, Grandaughter, September 1984

Contributor: Simini Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

THIS MY HERITAGE LIFE STORY OF HENRIETTA LOUISA ROGERS PARSONS BY GRACE FJELDSTED LOWE, GRANDDAUGHTER SEPTEMBER 1984 Henrietta Louisa Rogers, daughter of Telemachus Rogers and Martha Diana Case, was born 31 July 1854, in the second ward in Salt Lake City. In tracing Henrietta's direct ancestral line, I go back some twenty seven generations to William the Conqueror, born about 1029 A.D. He was a genius of a man who lifted himself out of a mere Norseman into a great and powerful statesman. He was an empire builder. Many well known English families in this direct lineage, link this man William to the first emigrant that comes to the shores of America, eighteen generations later, but these men did not come with intent to rule or dominate, they sought the purer things of life, the right to worship God according to the dictates of their hearts. This was a new land, a New England, a land of opportunity. They were builders of an empire. These first American Ancestors that link up this long ancestral line from William the Conqueror to Henrietta are among the fore runners that made this nation the powerful civilization it is today. These first ancestors might have been classed with the radical element in the Church of England, but because of sympathy with the Puritan movement, but what was the Puritan Movement? It was equal opportunities for all, religious freedom and the right to believe in God as their heart dictated. They were in search of personal freedom, so turning their back on the old world that denied them this privilege, they dared the briney deep to begin a new life on a new frontier in a new country. John Case came to America in the year 1623, just a few years after the founding of America, at Plymouth Rock, (our Pilgrim Fathers). He married Sarah Spencer, a daughter of the emigrant John Spencer and was one of the founders of Hartford, Connecticut. John Case, Henrietta's first American Case Ancestor was born at Grayesend, Kent County, England, he with others joined a company of emigrants, headed by a Mr. Hooker and Reverend Samuel Stones coming to America in the year 1623 and settling in Newtown Community, now known as Boston, Massachusetts, and lived there for a few years. There was much complaining and fault finding because the Newtown emigrants were unable to obtain land and difficulties arose because of this. The views of their religious leaders and the civil leaders differed and the Newtown Company felt that they would be happier under the administration of their own people and live in some other part of the country. On the 31st of May 1636 they started on their pilgrimage by way of a pathless wilderness. Their guides were the compass and the North Star. The lowing of a hundred and sixty cattle, sounding through the dense forest, summoned them each morning to advance. Their journey was through the mouth of Chicopee River, hence down along the banks of the Connecticut River, swollen with spring time floods of melted snow. The Pastor's wife an invalid was carried on a litter because of her infirmity. It must of been near the middle of June before they reached their destination called Hartford, Connecticut. After crossing the swollen river on rafts and boats they settled down to make a new life in a new wilderness. This land had been duly purchased from the Indians through Reverend Stones and Mr. Goodwin, shortly before the company began their journey. The American Cases on this line, back to the first American emigrant John Case was breakers of new soil, pushing out from Connecticut, this family was always on the ever shifting frontier with its hardships, its privations and its dangers. Hence, we find a certain Aaron Case, whose 2nd G.G., Father John Case of Hartford Connecticut, coming by ox team from eastern New York State with his wife Abigail, and young family and locating within the present city limits of Troy, Bradford County, Pennsylvania in the year 1798, hewing for themselves a home in the wilderness. These first families coming to Troy were mostly New England Immigrants and the land that they secured had been given each settler one hundred and fifty acres and their oldest son was to receive one hundred acres of land for the sum of $1.50 per acre. Aaron and his family began their journey by ox team and sled during the month of February 1797, starting out from eastern New York State at Hebron and followed along the streams, cutting their way through dense forests and coming by way of Inaca, Spencer, Teoga Point Ulster and Sugar Creek. This was dangerous and hard, the Indians had been fighting the white settlers but at this time were not so war like. The wild animals were everywhere. The first night after they arrived in Troy, the family made a make shift shelter out of brush built by the side of a fallen tree. Abigal, the wife of Aaron, was born in North Hebron, Washington County, New York. They were the parents of ten children, six born at Granville, Washington County, New York and the other four at Troy. In a few days after they arrived with the assistance of other families living on Sugar Creek, Aaron constructed a log house, 16 feet square. The roof was covered with bark and a hole being left for the chimney. Having no furniture, holes were bored in the side of the house and pegs inserted and split planks were laid on them for a table, split basewood logs were used for a floor. For chairs, blocks were sawed the right length from the logs. After a short while of living in his new home Aaron constructed a grist mill and it was at this same mill that he was killed in the year 1828. Apparently there were other Case families that settled in and around Troy, one was Ruben Case a brother of Aaron Case, all coming from different sections of New York State. Aaron was a strict Baptist and his family was taught the principles of the Baptist Church. He believed very strongly that Jesus is the Christ, repentance and baptism for the remission of sins, with the promise of the Holy Ghost. Moses Case the oldest son of Aaron and Abigal was a fine specimen of a man, he was much like his father and had accepted the Baptist faith and was a strong member of the village and his family was taught the same principles. Moses was the oldest son of Aaron and he was able to receive 100 acres of land at the time his parents came to Troy, in having this property he was able to support himself and later his family in a fair way. He married Rachel Purdy, daughter of Israel Purdy and Mary Wicks of Brendan, Ruthland County, Vermont in 1809 and soon brought his new bride back to Troy, Pennsylvania, to make their future home. They had nine children, including Martha Diana, their seventh child born the 8th of October 1828, at Troy, Bradford County Pennsylvania. She was the mother of Henrietta Louisa Rogers Parsons, whom I honor by writing this history. These people of Troy were of the same cultural and domestic background as their ancestors at Hartford, Connecticut. They too were large people of culture which was cast into raw conditions and there were a mingling of high breeding and rough life and it must not be forgotten by their descendents that there was a serious purpose in their lives too, great devotion to religion and a deep conviction of the value of freedom from both Church and State. Aaron and his son Moses both fought on the 1812 war for Independence. Immorality was severely punished and it would seem by the record that comparative few men and women were offenders. Schools were established and the schools were taught mostly by women, Martha Diana Case was one of those women. People in the little settlement were well settled at this time and the village of Troy by 1823 had constructed two stores, two hotels, the Case grist mill, a blacksmith shop, a tannery, and a schoolhouse. I haven't been able to find the exact date that Moses Case and family came west but it had to be between the time their last child William was born, which was in the year 1827, at Troy, Bradford, Co., Pennsylvania and their daughter Martha Diana, whose marriage was on the 27th December 1842, at Flagtown, Ogle County, Illinois, (14 years time). These people traveled by ox team and covered wagon and usually came in groups of other people including relatives from the same area. In the year that Martha turned eighteen she had met and fallen in love and married Henry Howland, on the 27th December 1842. Henry was born the 12th July 1812 in the state of Vermont. At this writing (1984) we do not know the location of his birth. When he was a small boy his parents died and he went to live with an uncle, however in due time he left his uncle's house and took passage on a steamboat down the river southward. Henry was a large well built man and he enjoyed sports of all kinds, he was a great wrestler. He was a farmer and a blacksmith by trade and seemed to make a good living as he had several land holdings, according to the deeds in Ogle County. Henry and Martha took up a quarter section of land in Ogle County close by Flagtown, Illinois, and it was here that their four children were born. Their oldest child Henry Howland Jr., was born the 27th September 1843, Helen Rachel was born the ? April 1846, Emma Jane was born the 14th January 1849 and Martha was born the 18th December 1851. Their oldest child Henry died of croup in his fifth year 1848. While living in Flagtown, Ogle County, Illinois, Henry and Martha became acquainted with an elderly lady by the name of Sarah Leonard, she belonged to a different religious faith than any they had ever heard of before, it aroused their curiosity and they asked her many questions concerning it, she said she would lend them her books of the Church if they would be very careful with them and return them after reading them as she prized her books very much. One of the books was the Book of Mormon. Martha read the book in the daytime and in the evenings she would read it over again to her husband when his days’ labor was over. They began to think and converse about the Book of Mormon and say it might be true, the more they read and thought about it the more they wanted to know, they become so interested in the book that they invited Grandma Leonard to come and make them a visit, she come and become so attached to Henry and Martha that she made her home with them and taught the gospel so plain that the whole family could not help but see how true it was. It was while Grandma Leonard was living with them she told them about the Church and its beginning, and about the Church doctrines. Martha had always been a strict Baptist and the things that she was told excited her. Grandma Leonard explained to her that the Book of Mormon was written on gold plates and handed down from father to son for many generations, Mormon and his son Moroni was the last of the prophets to write in it and that the book was preserved in safety and was to come forth to mankind in the latter days. She also told Martha about the book being hid in the ground in a hill called Cumorah, which hill was located in the western part of New York State near a little village called Palmyra. She also told Martha about the great eternal truths that the book contained and if she would pray in faith to her Heavenly Father in the name of Jesus Christ, he would reveal the truth of the book to her by the gift of the Holy Ghost, causing her bosom to burn, then she would know for herself whether the book was true or whether it was false. Martha accepted the challenge from her friend, Grandma Leonard, and it was confirmed to her by the Lord Jesus Christ that it was true. Never had Martha felt the intense indescribable feeling of joy and happiness as she did through this confirmation. She knew now for herself the truth and beauties of the gospel. It wasn't long after her confirmation that she began to think about her parents and brothers and sisters that lived in and around Illinois, so Henry and Martha left their home in Flagtown and started out to Auroa, Kent County, where her parents were living and tell them about their new faith. But oh how disappointed she was, not one of her folks could see the Gospel as she saw it. They thought poor Martha had gone crazy with her bad health. How sad Martha and Henry were to think her parents and her brothers and sisters could not see the Gospel in its plainness such as they did. However, their faith was not shaken in the least so Martha and Henry returned home. It was not long after their return that the spirit of gathering began to be foremost in their minds. It was a long hard tedious journey to make in those days with teams and wagons across the plains to Salt Lake City, but they must gather with the saints there. They would often talk the matter over and ask their Heavenly Father if it was wise and prudent to take such a journey with their three young children but both Martha and Henry were of a courageous disposition, and felt like trying such a journey and thought perhaps Martha's health would improve if they were in a different altitude. So they began to make preparations for the long trip. Henry could find no one able to buy his homestead so he rented it for five years. They left Illinois about the first of May 1852 and met Captain John Tidwell's fifth company near Council Point, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, during the middle part of May. The Saints at Council Point had been there over a year and had received word from President Brigham Young the previous November that they should not detain their journey any longer. Many of the Saints were destitute and ill equipped to make the long journey. The saints were organized to help the poor by sharing their supplies and accepting an obligation of taking other families or individuals with them. Henry was a blacksmith and he brought his tools with him and helped the other men in the company prepare their wagons for travel. On June the 4th, the first wagons left Council Point and made their way to the upper ferry on the Missouri River. Henry and family were in the First Company of ten wagons. The record indicates there were seven members in the family. Henry, Martha, and their children Helen, Emma, and Martha, Grandma Leonard and a teamster by the name of Peter Preece. Henry had two wagons which indicates they were taking with them more belongings than most of the families who only had one wagon per family. Henry had six oxen, two cows, and two horses. They reached the Missouri River on the evening of June 10th and on June 11th the wind was blowing so hard that they couldn't make the crossing on the river safely. On Saturday June 12th the wagons were ferried across the river. They went through the Bluffs and made camp about three quarters of a mile beyond Winter Quarters. The Howland family apparently went back to the river to help the remainder of the Company get across. By Tuesday June 15th the last of the Company had crossed the Missouri River. The reason for taking so long to cross the river was that the man running the ferry gave the people going to California preference over the Mormon Saints. It was almost noon Tuesday June 15th as the company was making preparations for moving to higher ground for camping when a slight thunder storm brought a heavy rain. Henry had been ill for the past 18 hours with the dreaded disease called cholera, realizing that he might not be able to pull through this crises, he requested the brethren to baptize him, however he was too ill to be baptized, he passed away that same afternoon at the age of 40, leaving his family to strangers they had met only two weeks before. In the effort to prevent further spread of the disease to the family Captain Tidwell advised Henry's body to be taken to Winter Quarters for burial or his final resting place. Hoping that the rains would subside before digging the grave Grandma Leonard requested to ride with the wagon that was carrying Henry's body. In haste of the weather and the heartache over Henry, the men didn't get the horses properly harnessed, when Henry's teamster stepped on the wagon and took hold of the reins and spoke to the horses, the team took flight and run away. Away they went at a rapid rate, up and down a hill, and then circled back towards the river until they smashed the wagon at a gully and the teamster finally brought the horses to a halt. Grandma Leonard was thrown out of the wagon at the gully, and the wagon wheels ran over her chest. She lived just long enough to say “I’m a dead woman, lay hands on me" and then she died. Those who watched the runaway were paralyzed with fear. A few of the brethren ran after the wagon and Captain Whitlock mounted his horse and pursued the wagon. They brought the horses back after the crash and left three or four men to guard the two bodies and property while others made their way to higher ground. There was a double floor in the wagon and one floor was removed and a rough coffin was made for Henry and Grandma Leonard. A grave was dug and the two bodies were placed side by side in the same grave located about two miles west of the Missouri River. Heavy hearts were felt by the members of the company as they experienced the first two deaths of the company. It was several hours before Martha was aware of the accident as she fainted when the team first started to run and it was hours later before she came to herself enough to realize her situation. How lonely and sad were those days for poor Martha, but she had many good friends raise up to try to cheer her poor sad heart. Martha continued on her journey and I will add here the day by day story of Telemachus Rogers and others as they cross the plains. He was captain of the first 10 wagons. That evening all hands commenced to rollout in the midst of heavy rain to the new ground selected for camping for the evening. Some were sent to bring the broken wagon to be repaired. June 16: Captain Tidwell writes Bro. Benson and tells of problems and trip so far, and the accident. He said Henry Howland was their blacksmith and asked if Telemachus Rogers may return as he was badly needed. June 17: The last two wagons were one half mile behind the others when 3 Indians requested something of the first 2 wagons. A colored man was in it and he refused them, so they went to the last wagon to rob it, they thought, but the colored man went back and the Indians moved on. June 18: Mrs. Mary Ann Andrews from England, who came with a son, died of Diarrhea after lying about 30 hours and was buried on a hill. One wagon gat stuck in a slew, and one had the tongue broken. June 20: A meeting was opened by a brass band that we had in our midst, playing a lively tune. John King first gave an impressive talk saying that they were fulfilling prophecy, etc. Next, Captain Tidwell made a few remarks on the same subject. He then told them what bugle calls, up to 4 would mean. First, arise, 2 for prayer, etc., 4 to start the journey. BYE LAWS 1. Every man to be ready for duty when called, unless sick or unable. 2. Carpenters and blacksmiths to be released from duty when they have been at work for the benefit of the company. 3. Any man, no matter what his station or calling, if found asleep or otherwise neglecting his duty, first offense will be required to do double duty; 2nd offense will be required to perform one half days herding; and for the 3rd offense a fine of one dollar, etc. etc. June 20: After the meeting five individuals were baptized. One was Martha Diana Howland, age 28. June 21: Heavy thunderstorms. Rain fell in torrents for a short time, Half a dozen Indians came into camp. That night another baptism and confirmation and so it went----storms, another death or two slowing the traveling, once up early and made about 7 miles by noon. June 29: The whole company was thrown into cheerfulness by the arrival of our old friend and brother, Telemachus Rogers who came riding up. He was received in our midst with acclamation of friendship and cheers. Yea, all faces seem to manifest joy on the occasion. He came through in two days after he was liberated, and we can confidently say that he has the good feel of the whole crowd and of none more so than ourselves and our prayers is that the richest blessings of heaven may be his and also that of his family, for we have full confidence that he is a man of God and one that rejoices continually in doing good to all around him. We believe that ourselves have experienced this as much as any living on earth. Yea, we knew him to be a good friend to the friendless and forsaken and we can constantly say as far as ourselves is concerned, that he has been the means in the bands of the Great God, of cheering and healing up the wounds of a broken heart even of a spirit that has been crushed from very early childhood, caused by the scoffs and sneers that has been heaped upon us both by friends and others in consequence of our infirmities and for these kindnesses we can only say that our hearts overflow with love and gratitude to him, in thus having• compassion upon us and it does not step here. No, it does not for he has undertook to take us to Salt Lake Valley and thus far he has been like a father and his good lady our much beloved sister has been a mother unto us. For these blessings we pray God the Eternal Father to continually bless them with the blessings of earth and Heaven which we ask in the name of Jesus of Nazareth Even so. Amen. That evening difficulty arose; Thomas Robins counselor to Captain Tidwell and Captain of the first ten said things that plainly showed he did not regard the authority over him. He also refused to correll (coral) in the place that he should have done. Captain Tidwell held a meeting. He said Captain Robins had been grumbling and complaining for some time, so he was released. Robins said something to the effect he intended to resign his Captainship anyway. It was moved and seconded that Telemachus Rogers be captain of the first ten. The company desired Benjamin to purchase a bull, which he did. (Doesn't say the cost.) But a meeting held it was decided that each person owning cows give 10¢ per cow. I note Telemachus had 2 cows. June 30: Two adults baptized. (Part of the Journal was stained on James Watton but mention was made of several spiritual meetings at different times. Only 2 and 5 cows and one was Captain Tidwell. $11.95 was paid to aid payment for the bull. Later 5¢ per oxen was asked to be paid.) July 10: Sixth company reported they couldn't travel. Six were sick with cholera, many all ages died along the way with cholera and diarrhea. They camped along rivers. At times the heat and mosquitoes were almost unbearable. More deaths in July than in June. July 11: Captain Rogers shot a buffalo and then W. Clark shot it. They came rolling into camp with their horses loaded with buffalo meat. They brought what they could with them before sun down. They were surrounded by wolves and had enough to do to keep them off until they could get away. Also John Vance shot and killed one and brought it back in a wagon. Meat was divided. ' July 15: Telemachus helped kill another buffalo and then on the 16th a few went out on a buffalo hunt and 6 wagons left to bring in the meat. Through mismanagement, we find the wagons came in empty and Capt. Rogers and McCallough came in with 60 lbs. shot by Captain Rogers. They divided it among their own tens which caused some in the company not to feel right about it. July 18: Captain Rogers and a few others were chosen to go again and hunt. They had not been gone above one hour when Capt. Rogers returned having shot one. Seven yoke of oxen were sent to bring it into camp. This was shared with the camp. July 23: Mention of mosquitoes being bad, and such friends of these have been very plentiful during our traveling, Camps are usually near a river. July 24: Last few days weather has been extremely hot, almost too much for man and beast. Nearing Sandy Bluffs. July 31: Ezra Benson and company rolled into camp. A meeting was called that evening. Brass bands played several tunes. Franklin D. Richard, addressed the group followed by an address by Eraztas Snow late from Denmark. Brother Benson addressed the congregation on the necessity of dividing the company into two parts, to accelerate the speed of traveling. They called in two wings, all under the control of Captain Tidwell. Aug. 1: Brother Benson and company left early next A.M. Next day was spent in division and arrangements. Aug. 4: They mention steep ascents and very rocky roads. Captain Rogers engaged the rest of the day to repair wagon and had to stay behind to repair it. Aug. 5: Both wings stayed all day to repair wagons. T. Rogers set 35 tires. Next day traveled near 20 miles and that was a real good day. Aug. 8: Stayed all day again. All except those herding went to work repairing wagons. T. Rogers set 15 tires. That evening disappointed. Could not hold a meeting - thunder storm and heavy rain that lasted one hour. Weather becoming cool mornings and evenings but hot days. Aug: 10: Rogers killed a buffalo and it was brought into camp and divided. On the last day we fell in with some Indians. They were quite peaceable. Aug. 13: Rainy morning but it afterwards cleared up and Captain Rogers set 3 tires. . Aug: 14: Call came from herdsmen that Indians were upon them. Every man was on hand in the given time. Then another cry that their horses were gone. Three of the herdsmen with only axes in hand fearlessly went through thick brush and timber and secured all the horses. At that time the cattle were flying in all directions by the clatter of their feet, for it was pitch dark. In fact it was described as a stampede. Aug. 15: Al the cattle were secured and not one lost. Hands went to work to mend broken axletree, but could not accomplish it in consequence of not being able to get heat upon it. So a wooden one was put in its place. A meeting was held when the spirit blessing of God seemed to be upon all them present. (Several mention is made of such meetings.) Aug: 16 Captain Rogers shot another buffalo and it was brought into camp and distributed. (Rogers seems to be the only one to get the buffalo. Only once was mention made of someone else killing and bringing one in.) Aug. 17: This evening in prayer meeting it was moved by Telemachus Rogers that the priests and teachers go around and visit the Saints to know why all did not attend their duties as to prayer, to see if all was going on in peace and harmony with them. (This had not been done before.) Carried unanimously. Aug. 18: Lorenzo Snow, late from a foreign mission, and others passed them. Aug. 20: William Clark’s sick ox was not able to work, Capt. Tidwell solicited help. Some tried to raise contention, but were sharply reproved by Captain Tidwell. Phillip Armstead nobly said they might have his ox although his team was almost unable to serve himself. One was taken from Telemachus Rogers. Aug. 27: This morning we were met by a man with an ox team bringing a letter signed by the First Presidency. (Part was stained and missing but the message was counseling some of the Saints to settle at Green River. The form of list that each Emigrating Company was required to fill out respecting each individual in the company.) Captain Tidwell called the second wing together and desired them to have this list in putting down their names, and every other requirement unto it. But at present they would have nothing to do with it. Until the day before their arrival in the valley there was somewhat a spirit of disunion and contention with them. Captain John M. King one of the first faithful counselors, deserted his ten. It was said, by W.C. Dunbar that King came out and said he was going upon his own responsibility and would not be answerable for another man’s sins. It was well known unto most of the company that he had been harping with contentious spirit ever since the reorganization and division into two companies. James D. Ross, Captain of the Guard, signified that when Captain Tidwell and his company was from them, the second wing, they were in peace and union, and as soon as their company was with them they were otherwise. He also signified that Captain Tidwell had been the means of property being destroyed in our traveling so slow and also signified that E.T. Benson thought so when he and his company overtook us. But the majority of the company who know Captain Tidwell know that he has done the best he can for the good of the company and they feel to uphold him in his appointment and operations. That is to say the majority of the whole of the Fifth Company. They have been traveling around 20 miles a day recently. Sept. 1: Today we left, four families to settle here in Green River according to the request of the First Presidency. This evening under the hands of Captain John Tidwell in Green River, Isaiah Vandeburge, a colored man, was baptized and confirmed under the hands of Elder John Tidwell and Telemachus Rogers. A dance at night which went well in general and all seemed cheerful and merry. Sept. 2: George Foster and W.B. Counsworth deserted our company. Sept. 3: Rachel Weldon deserted us. This morning and the previous night Indians of the Snake Tribe visited our camp and some of our people did some trading with them. Met many Indians later and they seemed quite peaceable. Sept. 5: In the morning were at Fort Bridger and met 12 or 14 wagons with 5 and 6 yoke of oxen unto each besides a herd of oxen coming from the valley meet the hindmost companies. Sept. 6: Found a yoke of stray steers and a cow, so they put them into the yoke. About 5 miles further they found a wagon and people with it that had lost the stray cattle, so they were delivered unto them. Sept. 10: Crossed Canyon creek a number of times and other bad places caused by small springs. Captain Rogers hounds of the wagon broke and his good lady thrown out by going over these bad places. She was not hurt. Sept. 12: This evening the Lady of Captain Tidwell and a son (dau. in pencil) went over a small mountain and had to double teams. Sept. 15: Passed through the mouth of the canyon and rolled into the city in full rig and in good health and spirits rejoicing in the Lord our Savior who's hand and mercy has been over us up to the present moment through all our ups and downs. And from our hearts we say unto his name be praise and honor and glory, power, might and majesty both now and forever. Amen and Amen. Account ends with. "Will say one word concerning Captain Tidwell. What I have seen with my own eyes I believe to be a first rate good man that has tried with all his might to do the best he could of the whole company. And it is my prayer that the blessings: of heaven may rest upon him and every member in said company." George Bowering Clark Notes taken from a book at the B.Y.U. Library: Captain Tidwell's 5th Company 12 March 1976 By Verma L. Lee. One of the first steps taken by the settlers when they arrived in the Valley in 1847 were the founding of additional settlements in and around their chief city. As Brigham Young their leader first predicted when entering the Valley, "This is the Place", no other place was so well situated for their chief City. He knew it, an inner voice told him that of all the intermountain region, no other place was as well situated to begin to build on and to make it their headquarters as Salt Lake City, but the truth of it, President Brigham Young was a born colonizer and one of the greatest of his time, and how did he do this, exactly as his people do today, through divine inspiration and revelation from the Lord Jesus Christ. He was a builder of settlements, a builder of cities, and builder of an empire. When Martha and her family arrived in Salt Lake City, the little town was only five years old, many settlements had been established in the surrounding regions by this time. The Chief City was located on the way to California, the water was plentiful and irrigation, through divine revelation had come into its own. The first thing that Martha did was to buy her a home for herself and her family, she found one that was located in the second ward, but when Martha arrived it was then the original ward, Martha was not a strong robust woman so she was unable to do hard work, her only way to make a living for herself and three children was to go back to her former occupation and teach school. At this time the ages of her children were as follows, Helen Rachel age eight, Emma Jane age five, and baby Martha just past three years of age. Martha was able to get work teaching school in her own home, this way she could watch her own family and teach school, including her two oldest children at the same time. Living conditions in the family home was not easy, a one room adobe house and very little money, but Martha was able to support herself and family. It was often said by members of her family when they grew older, that during these hard times when she first arrived in the settlement, they were never without bread. Martha being of a generous disposition was always ready and willing to help others less fortunate While she was still a widow she took into her little home a poor blind woman and fed and cared for her for one full year, another time when she was alone struggling to make a living she invited a poor hungry lady to have dinner, she could not speak the English language. This lady was a Scandinavian, Martha asked the blessing on the food and the tears ran down the ladies face and after she was through she made Martha feel very proud, and thanked her in her own language and asked the Lord’s blessing on Martha and her fatherless children. About two hours later, after this lady left, a brother Tanner brought Martha two hundred pounds of flour. As early as 1852, there began to pass through Salt Lake City, parties of gold hunters enroute to California. The discovery of gold in Sacramento set the world on fire and all across the great plains from the east they come in hundreds. They come in covered wagon trains, richly laden with supplies and merchandise and all kinds of goods. Impatient that other merchants had arrived at the diggings first, they utterly threw away or sold at a very low price their cargos that they had hauled over a thousand miles. At this time Martha could buy dry goods and merchandise for all most nothing. Some of these miners who had come to hunt for gold decided to remain and cast their lots with the Saints. Most of them joined the church and later married Mormon girls. Trouble with the Indians south of Salt Lake City, located near Provo River about fifty miles away began to disturb the people as early as 1852. It was known as the beginning of the Walker or Ute Indian War, named after the Chief of the Ute Nation, Walkara or Walker, a ruthless Chief who would excite his warriors and cause trouble where ever he went. However, it was not only this Indian Nation that caused the settlers to be alarmed and ever on their guard. As during the summer of 1851, the Desert News, the only Newspaper in the Territory reported that one Pedro Leon and his party of about twenty-eight Spanish Mexicans were in Sanpete Valley trading horses, and mules for firearms, ammunition, and Indian children, and that they held a license to do this, signed by James S. Calhoon, Governor and Superintendent of Indian Affairs of New Mexico, supporting and authorizing them to trade with the Utah Indians. These Spanish Mexicans traveled on their way from New Mexico until they reached Green River where they sent some five or six of their leading men to see President Young, (Then Governor of Utah Territory.) Governor Young not being at home had gone South to Sanpete Valley. The S. Mexicans proceeded to Sanpete Valley where they met him and told him they wished to sell their horses and mules to local Indians and buy Indian children to be taken back to New Mexico and sold for slaves. Governor Young then informed them their license did not authorize them to trade in Utah Territory. They then sought a Utah license, but Governor Young refused to give it to them for the reason that they wanted to buy Indian children. This upset the S. Mexicans but they finally promised him that they would not trade with the Utah Indians but go immediately home. Twenty of this number with about three fourths of the horses and mules left. The eight remaining that were left behind are the men who are a party to these proceedings. Judge Snow decided against the eight S. Mexicans who were shown to violate their possessions, a squaw and eight children were liberated and the S. Mexicans sent on their way. It was thought this would end the trouble, but it didn't as some of these slave traders felt revengeful and at once went to work stirring up trouble with the savages against the Utah settlers. It was shortly before Martha arrived in the new settlement that a special conference of the Church was held in Salt Lake City on the 28th and 29th of August 1852 and a public announcement on Plural Marriage was made known. The conference met in the building which afterwards become known as the Old Tabernacle. There on the 29th of August 1852 the revelation on Celestial marriage was read to the assembled Saints, and sustained. The doctrine had been received through revelation to the Prophet Joseph Smith on July 12th 1847, eleven years earlier, and many of the leading brethren had secretly accepted the revelation and had been living the doctrine for years. The spring of 1853 was rendered locally as a great day in the history of Salt Lake City, as on the morning of the 14th of February the First Presidency, apostles and other dignitaries of the church went to Temple Square and there the ceremony of the consecrating of the ground in preparatory to excavating for the foundation of the Temple building took place in the presence of the assembled thousands of Saints. Martha was one of these people who were at the ceremonies and witnessed the President the Church pointing out where the exact location of the building was to be. Martha was interested herself in Celestial marriage and the new Temple as she had been asked by her friend, Telemachus Rogers who was Captain of the 1st ten wagons that brought her to Utah, to be his plural wife. Polygamy was a hard thing for Martha to accept and she did a lot of thinking about it during the coming year. Telemachus Rogers had married his first Wife, Mary Ann Lattermore early in life. We haven't the date of this marriage. She died the first year of their marriage, he married his second wife, Eliza Watton the 5th of February 1843 in New Orleans Louisiana, coming to Nauvoo by boat up the Mississippi River and sealed to her in the Nauvoo Temple 26 January 1846. At this period of time after they had arrived in Salt Lake City, Telemachus and family had settled in Farmington a little settlement 20 miles north. He was a blacksmith by trade so he became the village blacksmith of Farmington. I will include here a short history written by his Great Granddaughter in 1976. Telemachus Rogers was born 1 Jan. 1816 at Hampton, Elizabeth Co., Virginia. He was a son of Wilmot F. Rogers and Maria Hollier or Holyer. His father was surgeon in the United States Navy and served some time on the Battleship Constitution, known as Old Ironsides. He was only thirty three years old when he died the 6 Aug. 1824 at Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia. His mother died ten years later in 1834 at Norfolk, VA. Telemachus Rogers helped build the Nauvoo Temple and was asked to stay back for five years at Winter Quarters and outfit the Saints who were coming to the Salt Lake Valley. He and his family came with the 5th Company under John Tidwell. He was Captain over the 1st ten wagons. He had two wagons of his own, two horses, six oxen and four cows. Telemachus was noted for his generosity and extreme kindness, he was a well to do man before he crossed the plains but through his generous spirit, he longed to help those less fortunate, so he practically gave all his money away in helping others cross the plains. He gave the widow of Hyrum Smith a team of horses so that she could come with the first company in 1847. He settled in Farmington Utah and it was said by members of his family that he made the first plow in Utah while living there. First he drew a pattern on a piece of paper and tacked it on the wall and then made the plow by looking at the pattern. Telemachus Rogers was a great humorist and people loved to be around him. After Telemachus and Martha were married Martha and her children continued to live in their home in the Second Ward in Salt Lake City. However, it wasn't long after their marriage before trouble came between them as they were separated before their first child was born on the 31 July 1854. (I have often wondered if this could of been the very reason that trouble come, because of the distance between Farmington and Salt Lake City and in those days it was hard to travel especially in winter. Martha named this little girl after her first husband, Henrietta or Henrietta Louisa Rogers. She was a pretty little brown eyed baby with brown curly hair and very small in frame and with a very happy and loving disposition that showed itself from the very beginning. At once Martha’s children loved her and cherished this little sister all the days of their life. And never, never once did they ever refer to as their half sister. It was about 1852 that Chief Walker wore a haughty air and was believed by all who saw him that he was looking for a reason to declare war upon the settlers. The excuse come, and Walker at once took to the war path. A resident of Springville in Utah County, seeing a Indian buck whipping his squaw, took her part an inflicted upon the wife beater a severe licking, from the effects of this licking the Indian died. At this time Chief Walker, with his brother Arapeen and their bands of Indians were camped on the creek at the mouth of the canyon just above Payson. The savage who had been killed was one of their tribe. Walker highly angry, threatened Springville, but finding the people at that place on the alert, turned his attention elsewhere, striking lone wagons which was traveling, and killing the people that occupied them. Arapeen his brother undertook to strike the first blow, he went to Fort Payson, whose inhabitants were unaware of trouble, struck at that settlement by begging food and after leaving, killed the guards. These two Indian bands then struck out in different directions killing people where ever they could find them, at work, in their fields, stray wagons, or lone travelers. Many deaths were reported and the war on the southern settlers continued all through the summer of 1853. The people in Salt Lake City were worried that these two bands would strike the' main city unexpectedly, so they decided as a means of defense and example to other settlements that they would build a "Spanish Wall," around the city. It was to stand twelve feet high and be six feet through at the base, tapering in thickness. Gates and bastions were to be placed at suitable place s, it was to be made of adobes and was to be about nine miles long. The wall was begun at once but by the time the war ended it had not been fully constructed and was never completed. I will enclose below a short message to the people in the territory, from Colonel Smith, Commander of the Utah Militia. “To all the people of the territory we wish to say that it is evident that the Indians intend to prey and subsist upon our stock and will shoot and kill where ever and whenever they can. It is therefore expected in Payson Canyon and stronger ones upon their boarders, people should not be permitted to wander out any distance from the forts alone, or after dark but keep themselves secure and not permit any sense of security to lull them into carelessness by indifference to their safety. Let every enterprise be guarded, and look out that you are not surprised in harvesting and haying in the fields, even hauling and haying in the fields and the stock yards. As soon as you thrash the wheat, safely store it and be careful that you save plenty of hay sufficient for winter if you would have to keep stock. “We do not expect that any person will complain or think it hard to comply with these instructions for it is for the good and salvation for them to do so. The safety of the settlements depend upon it, and we expect them to be complied with." On the same day that Colonel Smith was given command of the Military districts in the southern settlements, the disturbed Governor Young sent a letter to Chief Walker. Chief Walker, I send you Tobacco for you to smoke in the mountains when you are lonesome. You are a fool for fighting your best friends, for we are the best friends and the' only friends that you have in the world. Everybody else would kill you if they could get a chance. If you get hungry, send some friendly Indians down to the settlements and we will give you some beef cattle and flour. If you are afraid of the tobacco which I send you, you can let some of your prisoners try it first and then you will know that it is good. When you get good natured again I would like to see you. Don't you think you should be ashamed, you know I have always been your friend. Signed, Brigham Young The situation now had become so serious that all traveling from settlement, to settlement, unless accompanied by a strong guard was extremely dangerous. Although the Ute Indians had taken the initiative in the first place, other tribes were beginning to engage in the war by shooting and stealing stock in the various sections of the southern territory. Governor Young on the 19th of August, issued a proclamation to the people of the territory forbidding the sale of any fire arms or ammunition to the Indians and called the officers of the Military in various settlements to hold their command in readiness and march at a moment’s notice, but not to shoot unless absolutely necessary. Still the Indian war went on and destruction was seen everywhere, and in some settlements many people had been killed and buildings and property burned to the ground. The following year of 1854 the Indian War was still in progress, destruction was in every settlement, people had been killed and homes and property abandoned. However by this time the Ute ,which were the beginners of the trouble, were beginning to get anxious for peace. This was not easy, as other tribes besides his own were now involved. However, after some time of trying, Governor Young and Chief Walker and others who were involved had a long meeting and after smoking of peace, a treaty was signed, and the war was finally ended. Martha had been teaching school in the fourth ward during the last part of the Indian war and she had worried about her four children alone in their home. Helen her oldest daughter took care of her three younger sisters while she was away, and at night or in the evenings Martha would teach her own children to read, write and do arithmetic. During the year 1854 was a disastrous year for the settlers in Utah, the crops that year had failed and the gaunt specter of famine was in the air, unseen since the period of scarcity following the cricket plague during the year 1848. This crop failure of 1854 had been due to a visitation of grasshoppers, pests almost as destructive as crickets, and having the advantage over the crickets, that when pursued could take to their wings and fly beyond the reach of their pursuers. Besides this there were, "no gulls" that came to the rescue and the ravage of the countless pests were wide spread and far reaching. The following year 1855 the grasshoppers returned again and devoured everything that was green. Added to this was a terrible drought, which completed the work of destruction. Then came the winter, one of the worst known in Utah, burying under the heavy snows the cattle ranges and causing the death from cold and starvation to thousands of animals. Many of these were beef cattle which would have supplied the next years' market. The loss in sheep was also heavy. In short, all things conspired against the settlers to create and usher in the famine that followed. During the early months of 1856 the suffering of the settlers were severe, many, were driven by necessity of digging roots, and bulbs, in order to survive until harvest time. All were not alike or as destitute as others, some of the people sensing the approach of famine, and dreading a repetition of their previous experience with the crickets, had taken the time and provided for such an emergency. The result was that these people’s bins and barns were full, while others were empty. However, not long did they remain full, but true to the spirit of Mormonism those who had, gave unto to those who had not, to share and share alike. Some settlers had followed the advice of the leaders, and the leaders themselves were ready when the famine come, and it was men like President Brigham Young, President Heber C. Kimball and other prominent men that distributed their supplies, food and etc, according to the size of the families that were destitute. Martha and her family were one of these families that suffered, and it was during the summer of 1855 that a poor hungry old lady came to her door begging for food. Martha had only enough for one meal but invited her in and shared with her all the food she had in the house. After she was through eating the lady thanked Martha and asked the Lords blessings on her and her family. The Lord did bless Martha as about two hours after she left a man by the name of Tanner brought Martha two hundred pounds of flour and this was enough to carry her through to the next harvest. It was about this same period of time that Martha began to think seriously about a third marriage. Brother Jedediah Morgan Grant was one of the Church Authorities and a prominent man in the City affairs had asked her to be his plural wife, however, Martha was not certain as to this marriage and after William Adams Hickman asked her to be his plural wife she had to go to her bishop and seek counsel as to what man she should marry. And after careful thought and consideration she decided to marry Mr. Hickman. They were married on the 21 September 1855 and the following year on the 2 November 1856 was sealed to him for time and eternity. Mr. Hickman was also a prominent man in Salt Lake City. He was a practicing lawyer, a United States Deputy Marshall, and a representative to the territory legislature at Fillmore Utah. He owned a part interest in a ferry boat at Green River and had a trading post where he traded with the freighters that passed by. Mr. Hickman lived with his large family at West Jordan (now known as Taylorville ten miles southwest of Salt Lake City. After they were married Martha sold her house and lot and moved to join her husband’s other wives in a little home provided by her husband, on his stock farm in West Jordan. I will list the names of Mr. Hickman's wives and the date of their marriages are listed below. 1.Bernetta Barkhart •••••••••••••••••••••• 12 Apr 1832 2.Sarah Elizabeth Luce ••••••••••••••••••• 30 Jan 1846 3.Minirva Wade ••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1 May 1949 4. Sarah Basford Meacham ••••••••••••••• 18 Aug 1850 5. Hannah Dyantha Horr ••••••• •••••••• 11 Sep 1854 6. Eliza Virginia Johnson •••••••••••••• 28 Mar 1855 7. Margaret (a Shoshonie Indian girl, raised at Brigham Young’s home) 28 Mar 1855 8. Martha Diane Case ••••••••••••••••••• 21 Sep 1855 9. Mary Jane LeCreata Horr •••••••• 30 Aug 1856 10. Mary Jane Hithering •••••••••••• 21 Jun 1859 All wives believed simplicity in the law of "Celestial Marriage", and all lived in harmony and love. Mr. Hickman was a kind and gentle husband and was good to his children and step children. I will write below what Mr. Hickman wrote in his live history during the year 1871, about this period of time. "During the summer of 1855, grasshoppers came into the' Salt Lake Valley and many other valleys in the territory, destroying the crops entirely and even destroying the grass on the bench lands and it looked as though it had been burned, leaving nothing for stock. I took my stock to Ruoh Valley in the winter and stayed there until spring and then moved back to my farm ten miles from Salt Lake City." Martha and the other wives of Mr. Hickman waited all winter for their husband to return. Martha was expecting a new baby during this time, which was born the 6th of August 1856. It was a baby boy and they named him Jordan River, after the beautiful little River that went through West Jordan. A story is told by the descendants of Sarah Basford Meacham of the paralyzing jealously that troubled Bernetta, the first wife. Probably during the winter of 1855 when several of the Hickman wives were pregnant or had just had babies, Bernetta who was twenty years older than the other wives, in desperation, feigned a pregnancy by wrapping layers of rags around her abdomen. She was treated with tender and loving care and released from all household chores so she could bare her child in comfort at age forty-two. When her condition persisted into the eleventh month, wife No #3 Minerva Wade and wife No #4 Sarah Basford Meacham, suspecting the truth of the matter, forced Bernetta to terminate "her pregnancy", in the barn. When the “rag baby” came forth it was duly buried under piles of dirt and hay and she in liars was put to bed for two weeks to recover from the "delivery” and loss of her child. I will continue with Mr. Hickman’s history, as he wrote it at this period of time. "I went to Green River the following Spring of 1857 to attend to my ferry and trade with the freighters who came through but the emigration was small so I soon come home and nothing of great interest passed that year. Good crops were raised that year and the poor people who had suffered so much with the grasshoppers the year before, now had plenty. The following winter was very severe and I again was forced to take our stock to another valley. "During the winter of 1856-57, Mr. Hyrum Kimball got a contract to carry mail from Independence Missouri to Salt Lake City Utah. He not being a man of much means sought assistance from Porter Rockwell and myself, both of us having stock to carry the mail. We agreed upon the terms that pleased us. Rockwell was to carry the mail to Laramie Wyoming and I from Laramie to Independence Missouri. Arrangements were made and we were ready to start, although two other parties had tried to go through the mountains and failed, one man froze to death before going twenty miles. "We were ten days going the first hundred and thirteen miles to Fort Bridger, with the best of animals and we were fifteen days going from Fort Bridger to South Pass. We would tramp the snow and lead the animals, which with a great deal of difficulty and effort, could only travel very slow. At night we would camp on some bare knoll that the snow had blown off from and by a poor sage brush fire, cook a camp kettle of coffee and another kettle of corn, having so little food I thought we would freeze to death. "We finally got through the snow into a little valley near "Devils Gate" on the Sweet Water where we found good grass for our stock. We finally got to Independence, men and animals tired out having been two months and three days making the trip. I delivered the mail and had to go down the Missouri River to Boonville to telegraph to Washington D.C. concerning the return mail, which I had to wait two weeks for. "I visited my father in law and then went to the Northern part of the state and visited my own father and mother, whom I had not seen for years, returning to Independence and then I started with the mail for Salt Lake City. After starting with the mail I went fifty miles up the river to Weston where I found some old friends and had a good sociable time for two weeks, while there I found one of my younger brothers George Washington Hickman, with a wife and three children and persuaded them to accompany me to Salt Lake City. "When we got to Laramie I with two of my men, started in advance for Salt Lake City, changing horses at different stations and we traveled the entire distance of five hundred miles in six and a half days. I had been gone nearly four months. "I went to Green River soon after I returned home, and set up a trading post and a ferry. I left my brother who I brought with me from my trip to Independence to take care of the job and I returned home. He did very well and I was well pleased with the results. "About this time the Express Company that we worked for during the winter before went out of business and I lost my entire outfit, which amounted to well over a thousand dollars. During the summer of that same year 1857, a large body of troops arrived in Utah Territory. They were known as the Johnson’s Army. Brigham Young said, "They will never cross the South Pass, we will stampede their stock and compel them to return". "General Burton with two companies of men went to do this, and I with the help of a few other men were to bring the stock in. Several attempts to stampede the stock belonging to the troops were made, but they always found the stock well guarded and returned without an animal. "The troops had by this time got through South Pass and the next thing was a general rally of all the forces in Utah, with a determination never to let them come to Fort Bridger, The Fort or Post was then and had been for two years, owned by the Mormon Church and under the management of Mr. Robinson who had charge of the same, from the time of its purchase. I having been one of the carriers of the heavy load of gold it took to purchase same. "Two or three companies of the Mormon Saints were sent to the Fort with instructions to annoy and cripple the enemy by driving off stock, burning trains and etc., so that they would have to stop, but had orders not to kill unless it couldn't be avoided. "The United States troops crossed Green River and came on to Hane's Fort, some twenty miles west. About this time the Mormon Troops were seen in every direction making hostile movements. Colonel Alexander, the commander of the United States troops, learned just what opposition he had to meet and that the pass down Echo Canyon was well guarded and fortified and several thousand men at the fortification which they had made in the canyon. "The Colonel then decided to take a different route and come into Salt Lake Valley on the north where he would have an open country. Leaving many supply trains behind, he started, but had not gone more than twenty-five miles when Captain Lott Smith with his company took his provision train of some sixty wagons, carrying from six to eight thousand pounds to the wagon and burned them. "Smith had been gone some six or eight days without being heard from and the commander, General Wells become uneasy and sent me with a small company to find him and report. A night’s travel took us to Green River and before it was light we were well secreted in the brush. I sent spies out with field-glasses to see if anyone was moving about the country. About ten 0'clock Lott Smith was seen coming in with one of his wounded men, having his thighbone shattered by a ball discharged accidentally. My spies met him and brought him to our camp. I saw one of the old mountaineers, an old acquaintance, and got him to take the wounded man to his camp ten miles down the river. "The soldiers who had been in charge of the burned train all started for Alexander's army and left the oxen running loose. Smith did not want to return until he had burned another train. I left after dark,' gathering all the oxen I could find, about two hundred and seventy-five, for Fort Bridger and got there the next day at noon in the midst of shouts and hurrahs, Lott Smith was back about twenty miles, found and burned another wagon train and then returned to Fort Bridger. "Their provision trains, after that, were guarded and when all were safe in the United States Camp on Hanes Fork, all horses, mules, and cattle, were kept under strong guard. "Our Troops were to be seen on the hills in every direction, taking good care to keep out of gunshot. I was sent to the Mountaineers to tell them to keep out of the way, for we intended running off all the stock we could find and they might be in the way and get run off (over) with the enemies stock. Most of them obeyed but some did not. "Much was said that winter with regards to the Johnson Army coming in. Arming, equipping, and a general preparation for fighting was the sole talk. During that winter Colonel Thomas Kane from Washington D.C. came to Salt Lake City to assist in settling the affair and to bring the war to a close. He then went back to Fort Bridger and on to Washington. About this time Brigham Young told the people of the territory, "Gather up and start south,” and such another moving was, scarce ever seen. "After Colonel Kane returned to Washington and explained the true condition in Utah President Buchanan appointed two men to settle the difficulty, Governor Powell of Kentucky and Ben McCollough. They got together with Governor Brigham Young and about twenty-five of the principal men in Utah and worked out a lasting peace. "Word immediately went forth to the people, "Everybody to their homes". General Johnson then moved his troops to Cedar Valley, about forty miles, south west of Salt Lake City and built the place known as Camp Floyd. This was in the spring of 1858." The past year had been hard on the Hickman family. The husband had been gone much of the time on business and then the Johnson's Army trouble started and it was hard to manage the large family without a father. Martha did some teaching but it was mostly the children of her husband’s other wives, along with her own, the men and boys that were old enough, were all gone to war except when they could take a short time off from their military duty. When word come to the settlers in West Jordon, to pack up and move south", the whole of West Jordon's population moved in a group, some settling in Pound Town, some in Salem, and some in Spanish Fork. These towns were located about forty miles south of West Jordon. After peace had been restored they all returned home. I will let Mr. Hickman continue with his life's story as to what was happening to him and his family about this period of time. 'I had a sociable time with the merchants and traders after the war, but they being speculators, I had no chance to make any money, I sold one of the traders two thousand dollars worth of beef cattle at a fair price and a few horses at a good price which was the principal business I did that year. Winter came on, times were lively, and money was plentiful. 'About this time there were considerable stock stealing from the government in fact all over the country from both Gentiles and Mormons. I did all I could to get those whom I knew, or acquainted with to quit and behave their selves, but it seemed to have no effect. I threatened to get after them if they did not stop. "Some quit it, but others continued and swore it was none of my business. A few of them took thirty head of mules from a government freighter and started for Southern California. They got about one hundred and fifty miles on their way, when they were over taken and brought back by Porter Rockwell and others, as the freighters only wanted his mules, the thieves were turned loose. "I was accused by them of finding this out and sending after them, and shortly afterwards seven of them caught me at the edge of town and surrounded me, swearing they would shoot me for having them captured. Three pistols were cocked at me, I tried to argue the case with them, but the more I said the more they raged until I thought they would shoot me anyway. "Believing that shooting was about to commence and I seeing no other way, but death, I jerked a revolver from each side of my belt, cocked them as they come out and with one in each hand told them, if fighting was what they must have, now was the time to turn loose, and I was ready for them. I cursed them for being cowards and thieves, then they become quite reasonable. "This all passed off without trouble, but I could hear threats being made by them every now and then. Then one day when I come to town, (Salt Lake City) I met a Mr. Gerrish of the well known firm of Gilbert and Gerrish, who said, “I was just going to send for you, we had seventeen head of horses and mules taken out of our corral last night.” I told him I believed it had been by some of this gang I knew and would travel around town and see what I could do. Through the right tract I was able to get the information on where the animals were hid. They had been taken about fifteen miles away on the other side of the Jordon River and hid in the brush and they were going to take them to California. "The gang was very angry when they found their horses gone. They commenced watching for me and I for them and on Christmas day 25 December 1859, I stepped through an alley while waiting for my teams, and this was their chance. Some half a dozen men met me, we had quite a scrap, I saw a man leveling his revolver on me, not more than ten feet away; I gave my body a swing as he fired and the ball struck my watch which was in my pants pocket, glanced off and struck me in the thigh, it went into the bone and passed around on the side of it. " I stayed in the city three months with my bad leg. Infection set in and I finally had them haul me home, but was not able to get around on crutches for six months and never expected to get over it, as I have twice come near dying with it since then. "I had that Fall before, brought a few hundred head of oxen which had hauled freight across the plains. My stock was neglected and I lost a good number of them while I lay sick. "The summer following the troops move to Camp Floyd (1858) a sale was made of almost everything except ammunition which was destroyed. The property sold very low; flour by the hundred pounds sack, fifty cents; bacon one fourth of a cent per pound; and other things in portion, I bought ten wagon loads. The barracks were sold to those who pulled them down and hauled them away and this has not been a house in the old barracks for eight years. "The little settlement adjoining across the creek, known as the town of Fairfield, is a nice little village but it is now called Camp Floyd, and is now my residence and has been for the last four years, since (1868) ever since I left my place ten miles south of Salt Lake City." In the spring of 1859, on June the 20th a beautiful little baby girl was born to Martha and they named her Arvilda Diana Hickman. At this period of time Mr. Hickman had moved from his stock farm and was living with his 1st wife, Bernetta in Fort Bridger or Fairfield. The reason he left his stock farm is only a guess, but I will put it down as I see it. He was called to go there by President Brigham Young to watch over the Gentiles that had such a hatred for the Mormon people. However, he owed his stock farm in West Jordon and spent much of his time there with his other families. Mr. Hickman had tried to get satisfactory help to watch over his stock farm and to assist his plural wives that were still living there, in case they needed help. He was able to find a fine young man that the whole family liked by the name of Nephi Euel Packer, he had been a soldier in the Mountains that fought against the Johnson Army. He entered the war about the same time as the Saints had established head quarters at Echo Canyon. By that time the enemy was very discouraged because of the many reverses suffered on the long journey to Utah and by the Mormon Saints which had burned most of their supply trains and destroyed the grass that their animals depended on and when they reached Fort Bridger and Fort Suply they found both places burned. It was plain to the U. S. Army that they could not reach Salt Lake City before spring. With injured pride the Commander gave orders that the troops should make Black Fork their winter quarters. After the Army decided to camp for the winter the Mormon Militia was able to return to Salt Lake City, except for a few men who were left on picket duty. On January 1st 1858 ten men including Nephi were called to replacement duty. They left Salt Lake in a blinding snow storm, when they reached head quarters, three of the men were sent to Yellow Creek, a distance of forty miles away, the trail being covered with deep snow, lost their way. Without matches and wandering blindly in sub zero weather, the three men including Nephi, soon found that if help didn’t come soon from some source they would all perish. While they were in this sad condition, Nephi left has companions and went a short distance away and he knelt down and prayed to his Father in Heaven to show him the way to camp. The answer came, "Over the mountains to the right.” Nephi got up on his feet and joined his companions and told the men, "Come on", and he led them over the mountains to a cove and there they saw a light shining from a cabin. It was through our faithful friend Colonel Thomas Kane that the United States government was finally persuaded to send a commission to Utah for further investigation which finally brought the war to an end. Soon after Nephi was released from the Army he went to West Jordon which was located ten miles away and found work at the stock farm of William Adams Hickman, who had partly owned and operated a trading post on the Green River and was United States Deputy Marshall and acquired a great number of stock including several hundred head of oxen which he bought from the freighters. Mr. Hickman was a very ambitious man and he was called away from home much of the time, because of business and being a U.S. Marshall and the Indian trouble and etc. Nephi helped Mr. Hickman with his live stock and other odd jobs, and it was told by the family that while he was at one of the Hickman wives homes that he first become acquainted with his future wife. Helen Rachel Howland, daughter of Martha Diana Hickman and step daughter of Mr. Hickman, as her own father had died while crossing the Missouri River while on their way to Utah. Nephi worked for Mr. Hickman for two years and on the 4th of April 1860 he was married. The story is told by the family that when they were married, Helen, being but sixteen years of age had been helping her mother with the family work and was without shoes on at the time. Nephi come rushing into the house and said, "We're going to get married now. Helen being bare footed looked at her feet and told Nephi she would hurry and put on her shoes, but Nephi was not willing to wait. Mr. Hickman whom Nephi worked for was in the home at the time, and they were married by him on the 4th of April 1860. Helen was married with one shoe on and one shoe off. After Nephi and Helen were married, they prepared to leave immediately from West Jordon to Brigham City, a distance of about seventy miles due north. Their mode of travel was by wagon and ox team, and they in a company of other travelers reached Brigham City in about two days. It was sometime after Nephi and Helen arrived in Brigham City that they decided to join a little band of people who had passed through Brigham City in April on their way to Franklin, the northerly part of Cache Valley. The distance from Brigham City to Franklin was near forty miles. The high mountains directly east of Brigham City were a great barrier. The pass through the mountains where the road wound itself through contained many hazards with steep mountains climbing and deep gullies. It took a full day to drive through to Wellsville Hollow where Maughan’s Fort had been constructed near a watering hole called "Haws Brush Springs.” It was at Haws Brush Springs that Nephi and Helen made camp the first night. The remaining distance from Wellsville to Franklin was near thirty miles, but the road ran through a valley and by starting early in the morning they reached Franklin by the end of the day. Franklin was on the frontier and the Indians of this vicinity at the time of its settlement was under Chief Kittemere, and his band were great beggars and thieves, and exacted beef, flour, grain, potatoes, and other provisions from the people. The policy of the settlers was to feed and treat the Indians kindly rather than fight them, and so the Indians requests were compiled with and at times it became extremely burdensome. During the spring and summer of 1860, the people of Franklin lived in their wagons while they built themselves homes, built a three mile irrigation ditch, planted and harvested crops and constructed roads into the near canyons where they could get timber. The first houses were built along the side of a square, enclosing a rectangle, sixty by ninety rods. The houses were all constructed with the fronts facing the inside of the square, with corrals and stock yards outside. Each man took his turn guarding the livestock or anything that happened to be outside the fort, as the Indians were not to be trusted. During the summer of 1860, the number of people in the little settlement of Franklin kept increasing until there were sixty families by fall. Among them were Nephi's father Jonathan Taylor Packer, his uncle Nathan Packer, and his cousin James Packer son of Nathan. Late that fall Nephi and Helen decided it would be best if they left the frontier and moved back to West Jordon for the winter, as Helen was very young and was going to have a baby the next spring. They spent most of the winter in West Jordon but decided to move to Brigham City early in the spring, where Nephi got work helping President Lorenzo Snow run a carding machine. Helen's mother Marta Diana Hickman and her two youngest children accompanied them, and on March 28th 1861 a lovely baby girl was born, and they named her Helen Diana. Helen’s mother stayed through the summer and taught school at Willard, a few miles south of Brigham City. Martha received word from her former husband, Telemachus Rogers, to prepare little Henrietta and have her ready to make the long trip to Farmington where he and his family lived, and spend the balance of the summer at his home, as she had several half brothers and sisters that she loved very much. Telemachus Rogers had contacted a man from Brigham City and he asked this man to call at his former wives home in Willard and pick up his daughter and bring her to Farmington which was on his way to Salt Lake City. Little Henrietta was ready when he pulled up in his wagon and they started out. They traveled all day long without trouble and when night came they camped in a lonely place called a desert. In the morning they got up to start their journey, the horses were missing. They were nowhere to be found. The man told Henrietta he would have to find the horses and while he was gone to close the opening of the covered wagon and stay inside and not leave it under any circumstances. Henrietta was just a little girl (about 8 years old) and she was frightened. Night came on and the man had not returned she said she could hear the barking and howling of the wolves that was so prevalent in this vicinity. The wagon cover kept blowing off from the wagon and she tried to fasten it tight but the wind was so hard and she was so small it was impossible for her little hands to hold it in place while she fastened it. The wild animals kept jumping over the wagon tongue and they howled and barked and jumped towards the top of the wagon. Henrietta was so frightened that she prayed earnestly with all her heart, asking her Heavenly Father what to do. Then she thought of the barrel of dried fruit. She scooped some of the fruit and placed a coat on it and crawled into the bed, and covered herself up the best she could. Her prayers were answered as the wolves ceased to howl and bark. It wasn't long after they stopped that she dropped off to sleep. Towards morning she heard voices. It was two men, they told her they had come for her, she tried to explain to them that she must stay in the wagon and wait for the man who had gone to find the horses, but one of the kind men said, "I had a dream, a little child was lost on the desert alone, and would perish if I didn’t go and find her”. After they found little Henrietta, they wrapped her in a big coat belonging to one of the men and held her on his lap while the other man drove his horses and she was taken back to her mother’s home in Willard. It was only a short time after Little Henrietta was rescued that Martha lost her home in Willard, a fire broke out and everything she had was destroyed. During the latter part of the summer, Nephi and Helen decided to move back to Franklin in Cache Valley. They settled in one of the little cabins in the Fort and after they left, Martha and her family thought it was time to go back to West Jordon where her other two children had been living while she was away teaching school. It was only a short time after Martha returned to West Jordon that she could see that something was wrong with Mr. Hickman. He was not living his religion as he used to, and it made her, Martha, very unhappy. What to do she did not know. She prayed to her Heavenly Father to open the way that she could get away with her children that they would not partake of the influence of the company that was forced around them. She would coax and beg Mr. Hickman to let her go and teach school but he would not listen. On June 4, 1861, the following spring, Martha had a lovely baby boy and they named him Don Carlos Hickman. I will let Mr. Hickman tell his life story about this period of time. There was nothing uncommon that transpired during the year 1860-61. “In the summer of 1862 I went to Montana after some Flathead Indian horses I bought the year before, from an old Mountaineer, Bob Demsey, and that year the Indians were very bad, killing off several wagon trains that were going to California and Oregon, on the route north of Salt Lake City. "This year there was a great cry of big gold diggings on the Salmon River and a good size emigration started for that place. We organized the company, and traveled to Deer Lodge Valley in Montana in peace, had a good jovial set of men and no difficulty. It was here we learned that the Salmon River diggings, where the gold was, was four hundred miles further off. Some men went one way; some went another, while about one third commenced prospecting in this country for gold. We organized into three companies to go in different directions. The company I was in found gold in different places, but none in paying quantities.” “I found my horses from Demsey the Mountaineer and concluded to return home. I got on the road and prospected along the way, when word came that gold had been found in great quantities, where east of Bannock City is now. I wanted to stop and work awhile but could not prevail on the five men that were going to Salt Lake to wait; and not knowing any other company going that fall, I concluded to go with them. "Provisions were scarce and none nearer than four hundred miles away, some members were entirely without food. Two came to me to know if I would take them home with me, both poor men, one went by the name of Dutch John and the other, Irish Ned , Dutch John got a saddle but poor Ned could find none so I had to leave Ned, but I gave him my claim, tools, and fifteen or twenty days of provisions, telling him that was all I could do for him. But here I must tell you of Ned’s good luck, the next summer he went to the United States with $42,000.00 that he took out of my claim I gave him.” "Companies coming in told us there was no use of trying to get through to Salt Lake City, for the Indians would kill us sure but we had started and all we wanted was to go ahead. The next morning I saw a smoke signal Indian fire raised on the mountain which was kept up all day, raising a smoke opposite from us as many as a dozen times. We traveled until dark, got our supper, raised a big fire and left immediately. We traveled fifteen or twenty miles, left the road and got into a deep hollow where we got good grazing for our animals. "The next morning we were off again and so continued until we got to the Snake River, building fires and leaving them. The Indians followed us all the while, but when we got to Snake River, where we expected to be out of Indian trouble no one was there. Tents were blown down and wagon covers flopping in the air and everything looked dismal. My company looked down in the mouth, I cheered them up by saying we could whip all of the Indians in the mountains. "The ferry boat was across the river. One of my men swam the river, some two hundred yards Wide, and brought the boat over. No signs could be seen of any persons having been there for many days and a more gloomy time I had never seen. The Indians had whipped trains were there were eighty men all armed and some large trains were all killed off and we, only seven men in all, with forty-six head of horses and mules all tired from hard traveling. We crossed the river and struck out for the mountains where we could see all around us and let our animals rest until dark. "When we started on again we saw fire-lights, and now the question was, "Indians or Whites?" After traveling eighteen miles we got close enough to see that there were plenty of wagons and we began to cheer up, thinking we were safe, and rolled, into camp greatly alarming the people, The Indians had them corralled four days, two trains together with the ferrymen. Some of the mountaineers had married squaws and had two Indians with them. "I was acquainted with the ferry party but they were all as badly scared as the others, knowing the Indians intentions, and they said, there were five hundred of them circling their camp and they were afraid to start. But as soon as it was known I was in camp there was a great shout. ‘We will get out of here now!’ Those that had never seen me would rush up and shake hands as though they had a deliverer come. My men looked astonished to think we had passed through such danger and asked me if I realized it? I told them I had but had kept it quiet, as they were all men I had not seen until I went to Montana. “Next morning a big meeting was held and I was chosen Captain to take them out of the country. We had one hundred and fifty men. I looked at them and thought about one third of them would be good fighting men and about one fourth would not fight at all. One man told me that some of the men said they would not fight. I then called their attention to the company and a vote was taken that I had full power to enforce all orders that might be disobeyed. "I asked the question, "What should be done with such men; if found backing out in time of trouble?" the cry was, "Do as you please with them, and we will back you up." Then I gave these orders, “If any man refuses to fight in time of trouble we will shoot him first, and if there any who persists in such a course to let me know and I will place them in front, and if they under take to run or back out, we would kill them and have no dead weight to carry out." A vote of the company was taken to carry out the order. That was the last of men saying they would not fight. All were on hand at a moment’s warning.” “We rode out, keeping flanking guards and spies on all the mountain points around. I kept the train and stock close together and every man with his rifle on his shoulder. Indians were constantly moving around us in different ways. At night all stock that could be was tied down and the balance was kept in corrals made with our wagons and a double guard of sixteen men, on all the time. "We moved on, finally we got to the Bannock Mountains. Here we had to double teams, but only moved a short distance at the time---- kept close together with our spies on all points around. Just as the last wagon had reached the summit, I saw through my opera glass, Indians coming from all directions and before we were out of sight there were several hundred gathered at the foot of the mountain where the smoke had been raised. "We kept the flanking guards while passing through the mountains, some five or six miles and then got at the head of Malad Valley where we had an open country to travel, to the settlement of Bear River. The Indians gave up the chase and did not follow us any further. "Two years after this, General Conner having subdued three murderous Indians near Franklin called the, "Battle of Bear River." I saw one that I had known on Green River some eight years before, I asked him if he had been one of the bad Indians murdering the whites two years before and he said, "We did not kill you or your party.” He then went on and told me that five hundred of them had corralled two trains and the ferrymen and that I had got to them when they did not know it. "He told me he saw me the morning after I got into camp, but did not know who I was, but watched our movements and soon found that a good Captain had got among them. They could see no chance to run off the stock or take the train and become satisfied that some great war Chief was with them. "He said the morning that they crossed the Bannock Mountains he got into rocks and covered himself up only leaving a little hole to see out of and could see that the big captain was me. He said he went to the front of the mountain and raised the smoke signals we saw, for the Indians to gather and they concluded it was no use to try any longer for I was the Captain and a Medicine Man and a great War Chief. I thought he might be telling the truth and he might not at any rate I would not liked to trust him. “We reached the settlement in good shape and I went home seventy miles further and found everything right and was aiming to live at home and be quiet; attend to my stock and raise my family.” ....Coming back to Nephi and Helen when they reached Franklin Fort. The season of 1861 in Franklin and surrounding country was a good one and the black rich virgin soil yielded abundantly and a good harvest of wheat, oats, potatoes, corn, cabbage, and other garden stuff was gathered that fall, the winter before was extremely mild but the rains were very disagreeable, filling the settlers cellars with water and their dirt roofs could not stand the steady down pour outside. Soon after the little settlement was founded, the people selected a committee of three of its members whose duty it was to have the land surrounding Franklin surveyed and divided. The land nearest the Fort was cut up into one acre, these lots were used for gardening. The land east of Franklin called the bench, was divided into five acre tracts, these were used to grow sugar cane. The meadows on the south and the river bottom land was to be used as farming land, each family living in the Fort during the summer of 1882 was entitled to both a lot for gardening and a farm to make a living on. Nephi and Helen chose a ten acre tract of land north of Franklin on the River bottoms between Maple Creek and Cub River. After Nephi married his second wife Matilda Patten, that same summer, he was entitled to an additional ten acre tract, he chose this adjoining the tract of land that belonged to him and Helen. In the fall, Nephi took both of his wives to Salt Lake City where they received their washings and anointings. After this was taken care of, Nephi and Helen went on to West Jordon to visit Helen’s mother Martha. Helen stayed with her mother throughout the winter and Nephi and Matilda returned to Franklin. The Indians become more and more troublesome. It was but a natural thing that these natives should look upon the white settlers as trespassing upon their hunting and fishing grounds. For revenge the Indians began to drive away and steal the horses and cattle of the settlers and even resorted to murder when the occasion served their purpose. Soon after Nephi returned from Salt Lake and West Jordon, a small company of men come down from Leesburg, a mining camp on the Salmon River, to get supplies and cattle. They lost their way in a blinding snow storm in the north end of Cache Valley and they kept on the west side of Bear River. When the storm cleared off they found themselves about west of Richmond and making a boat of some wagon boxes, the party crossed the river. While the last boat load was still on the river, some Indians from the Battle Creek Camp followed them and come upon them and began shooting. One man of the party was killed and several others wounded. The survivors hid in the brush during the night and made their way to Richmond, six miles south of Franklin. In the morning Bishop Marriner Merrill of Richmond sent some men down to bring in the dead men and the horses. The party was attacked by a large band of Indians, but they succeeded in getting away with the dead man's body and a number of horses. Bishop Merrill sent the message with Salvage and Bevins to Salt Lake City, which brought General Connor with two hundred soldiers from Fort Douglas. General Connor and his men arrived at Franklin during the evening of January 28th and on the 27th, Bear Hunter of the same camp at Battle Creek, came to Franklin and exacted twelve sacks of flour, (100 pounds to a sack) and wanted more. The people hesitated, seeming to them more than they could stand. (In those days flour was very scarce.) The Indians surrounded Bishop Preston Thomas's house and held a war dance, flourished their tomahawks and threatened the people. The next day, Bear Hunter came to Franklin for wheat. When he had collected three sacks, between six or seven bushel, the soldiers come in sight south of town. The old warrior did not seem worried as he did not leave until the soldiers were close to town and upon going, someone said to him, "Here comes the soldiers, you may get killed.” He coolly or carelessly remarked “Mav-ve-sa, soldiers get killed.” And then started for camp with his burden of wheat: It was evident though that the old Chief became a little worried as one of the sacks of wheat was picked up by the soldiers the next morning, about a mile out of town and the other two sacks before they reached Preston Flats, five miles beyond Franklin. Captain Connor and his soldiers camped at Franklin that night, and left the Fort at 3:00 o'clock January 29th, when they reached the Indian camp on Bear River. They found it well fortified under a steep bank in a gully which made a perfect protection against fire of the soldiers and drove the soldiers back three separate times. The Calvary crossed the river and charged the Indians first, but was driven back, fourteen soldiers being shot dead at the first volley. After three, unsuccessful attempts, General Connor fell back and divided his men into three parties, sending one down the creek to come up the gully, the other to come down the gully, while he attacked from the front. The two divisions that went up and down the creek in the gully came in behind the Indians on the high bluffs and killed them. The fight began in earnest and an eye witness said, "General Connor made good Indians out of about three hundred bad ones in a few seconds ". However, twenty-three Indians escaped and among these were Chief Pocatello and Sagerish, the fourteen dead and forty nine wounded soldiers were hauled back to Franklin by the settlers, where they were nursed and cared for. The dead and wounded were then taken to Fort Douglas in Salt Lake City by teams and sleighs furnished by the people of Franklin and other settlements in and around. Nephi Packer was one of those men who was a eye witness to the battle and he was also one of the men that hauled the wounded from the place of battle to Franklin Fort and after the wounded were well enough to travel, he was one of the men to take a sleigh load back to Salt Lake City. After Nephi delivered the wounded soldiers to Fort Douglas, he went on to West Jordon which was only a short way to see his wife Helen and baby and take them back to Franklin on his return trip home. Helen was expecting her second child in the spring and the thought of her going so far away caused Martha, her mother, a lot of worry. After talking it over with Mr. Hickman, she decided to take her two younger children and accompany them back to Franklin where she could watch over her daughter and be there to help when the new baby arrived. After they reached Franklin, Martha and her children moved into a cabin next to her daughters and they lived there in the Old Fort happy that they were together and prepared for the new baby which was born the 20th of May 1863. I will let Mr. Hickman tell his life story about this particular time. “I had not up to this time made the acquaintance of Governor Harding or General Connor, I didn't aspire to honors of officers, knowing that it would militate against me to be sociable with them. On two or three occasions I refused to go to the room where they were and be introduced to them. One day I was in the city at Abe Gilbert’s store, I saw the door open and Mr. Gilbert and the Governor come in. I started out, knowing that old friend Gilbert would introduce me and I did not want to get introduced, but before I got out of the store, I was called back and introduced to the Governor, who said he had been anxious to see me ever since he had come to the territory. "I found him frank and a sociable gentleman, but anxious to hear me talk and get my views what was going on in the United States, and a general expression of sentiments. I could not avoid talking and finally told him I was "Southern Raised”. We had quite a discussion. I thought I was through and was about to leave, when he said, “Now I want you to go back with me,” I went and I was introduced to General Connor. "The next time I went to town, I went by invitation and spent the evening with the Governor, he became very much attached to me. He told me the course he had taken and the lies that had been told on him and also the threats that had been made against him and asked me what I thought he had better do. I told him to attend to his own business and act in his official position, fearless, regardless of all consequences. "He said to me, “Will you stand by me?" I told him I would and he could depend on me if he had any trouble, ever since this we were the best of friends. After meeting General Connor, he asked me a great many questions about the country, roads, rivers, and etc. After getting through he told me he wanted to hire me as a guide and he might have other business for me to do. That I could stay at home when I was not wanted, but when wanted I would have to furnish my own horses and be on hand. "He wanted me to pilot him to Snake River to see the Indians there, see the country and go from there to Soda Springs or Bear River and locate a Military camp for the protection of emigration, he also wanted to catch a small band of Indians that he has not got the winter before. “In the spring of 1868 he, with two companies of Calvary, set out for Snake River, with one company of infantry with supplies, started for Soda Springs at which place the General told them he would meet them. I went with the infantry as a guide. The General got to the Snake River and found a good many Indians and had a good talk with them and they promised to be good Indians. And so they will be when they are dead. "They gathered by request that night and had a big dance. The General sent me with a Lieutenant and twenty-five men up Snake River, fifty miles to strike from the south to Soda Springs, where I was to meet him. I was to look out for a wagon road as it would shorten the route, fifty miles to the Montana mines where most of the travel was going that summer. We found a good place on Snake River for a ferry and then started across the mountains seventy miles without a trail, to Soda Springs. "We met a party sent out to escort us in, but we would not miss Soda Springs by a mile. Then the General sent me with a party down Bear River on the north side with a Lieutenant, and also a party down the other side of the river to look the practicability of a wagon road down the river. We returned to Soda Springs by this time. The company of infantry had arrived from the Snake River and the General located a military post there. “He paid of those troops, and then sent me with Lieutenant Fennerty to the Snake River Ferry to pay off a posse of troops which had been kept there during the summer for the protection of the ferry and immigration. We returned after having paid off the soldiers, to Soda Springs and there started for home on a tremendous cold day, the 8th of October 1863." It was while Mr. Hickman was on his way home that he called at the little settlement of Franklin, where his wife Martha Diana and her two children were making their home in one of the little log cabins in the fort. He was lonesome for his family, as he had not seen any of his wives and children all summer, so he stayed for three days and while he was there he told Martha that if she desired she could go and get her other three children, in West Jordon, and bring them back to Franklin to be with her there. Nephi Packer was very good to his mother-in-law and her children and cared for them the same as if they were his own. They all worked together making clothing, carding yarn, spinning cloth and any way to make an honest living. Nephi and Helen's second child was born the 29th of May 1863. It was a fine son and they named him Nephi Taylor Packer. Nephi and all the family had known for some that Mr. Hickman was associating with the Gentiles and also knew that Mr. Hickman had been active in hunting the minerals of the mountains. These two acts were strictly forbidden by the Church leaders and it hurt the plural wives of Mr. Hickman to the extent that they had all been secretly considering a separation. Mr. Hickman had no idea what was on his wives mind, when he gave his consent to let her bring the children to Franklin, and as soon as the weather conditions were warranted, Nephi made the long trip to West Jordan by wagon and gathered up Martha's belongings and with the remaining children, returned back to Franklin. When Martha's children returned, the oldest one Emma Jane, was now fifteen years of age, Martha was twelve and Henrietta was about nine. These three girls were able to attend school in the "Old Fort", which was located in the center of the square. The children sat on flat board benches which were hard at times, besides their regular studies of reading, writing, and arithmetic, they also learned to crochet, knit, and piece quilts, which in those days were considered very essential. Martha their mother was one of the teachers. The old Montana-Oregon freight road was the first and most important road. It went by way of Franklin Fort, going northwest up over the Preston flats and two and a half miles northwest on Bear River. Bridgeport was located where the road crossed Bear River at the mouth of Deep Creek. As early as 1860 this particular section of the bottoms around Bear River was known as the Franklin Meadows, where numbers of people from the Fort came to cut the wild hay growing there in great abundance. Later the next spring of 1863 some people moved there and built themselves homes for the purpose of farming and to look after the ferry boat that crossed the river. In 1863 the first year the boat was in use Nathan Packer, who was then in charge asked his nephew to assist him. Nephi helped his uncle the following two years. I will add here what Mr. Hickman wrote in his history, about this period of time. "“General Conner ask me about mines and said he knew it was not the wish of Brigham Young to have the mines opened in the country. He asked me also if I had any scruples about it on account of what Brigham Young had said. I told him I had not, and after wards I brought him a good piece of Galena ore from Bingham Canyon, which was the start of mining in Utah. "Leads were located, work done, and prospecting by different parties continued, many laboring under great disadvantages, but it continued until now, showing one of the greatest mineral countries in the world. I have located and helped others who have made nice sums of money. "A goodly number of General Connor's men were California miners, when they had nothing to do and by permission, went prospecting the country for precious metals. They made many good discoveries and organized districts. They located leads in Stockton, and other places; and it can truly be said of the General that he was not only a good General, subduing the hostile Indians and maintaining' peace, but an honorable gentleman. "And here I will state that just before this I had my last break with Brigham Young. In the spring I went to town and President Brigham sent for me. When I got to his place he said, that General Connors was a Gentile and it was against his wishes that I associate with the Gentiles and then I spoke up to Brigham Young for the first time in my life, and said, I would not do it, that General Connor was a good man and the best officer in Utah and I knew him to be an honorable man. I was then disfellowshipped from the Church. “Well, what next? I was one of those men who had plurality of wives and had children by them all. I had as quiet a family as anyone I ever saw of that kind and what I had done in that matter I had done in all good faith. I had not violated the Congressional Law of 1862 prohibiting polygamy. Neither did I ever expect to, as 1858 being the last year I had taken a wife. "I felt under obligation to take care of my wives and children, but to use their own language about me, they seemed determined to use me up. The Bishop and others would say to my wives that I was a bad man and commenced persuading them to leave me and they would see to it that they took their children with them. They soon got things going but never had the pleasure of making me give them a dollar, for I told my wives to help themselves and take all they wanted. "I many times asked them what I had done and what they wanted of me? Their reply was, "Oh, you have been with the Gentiles and their dirty government officers and have betrayed us! It is you that has put General Conner in possession of all the news that has gone back to Washington about the Mormons!" I would tell them that I had not, and even went so far as to have the General say he had never heard me say anything about the Mormons that would be criminal, but all this seems to do no good whatsoever. “About this time the Sweetwater Mines were discovered and I in company with others went to see them, it being in the portion of the country I had prospected in 1855. I stayed in the mines about a week. The last day I was there in company with one man I went some ten miles off prospecting, I saw Indian signs and two Indians hiding behind rocks. We did not go near them believing they intended hostilities, but kept a good look out, leaving that place and taking a circuitous route for camp. "After we had gone two or three miles we saw about a dozen Indians trying to get around ahead of us, but both being on the best of horses we soon got out of danger. I told at camp what I had seen and that there would be trouble, but would get few to believe me. I then told them that I had only a day or two longer to stay and if they did not go to work and organize, I would start home the next day. "They were then about one hundred and fifty men camped in squads up and down the creek, but no organization was gone into. The next morning I in company with ten others left for Salt Lake. The next morning Indians made a raid on, their camp, killed three men and ran off near a hundred head of horses, four mules, over half they had. We were over taken by some of the fleeing party before we got to Green River, a distance of nine miles. “I returned home and thought I would get some cheap place and do the best I could until things would have a change. I bought a small ranching place at the mouth of Bingham Canyon, moved my family and stock there and built a good corral and commenced to improve. I bought seventy-five head of Spanish horses and intended to do ranching and stock raising. Things kept a kind of nice condition with me, not doing much of anything but exploring the country for mines. "I found in the vicinity where I was living a good indication of mineral and told the people in my little town that they might have the mines near home and do well if they wished. Many of them were anxious and wished me to explore for them and would do what was right for me. I found some leads, drew up law and organized what is known as the Camp Floyd District, called a meeting and the laws and constitution together with the name I had given the district, were adopted. A clerk was appointed and a district was formed, and after this I in company of others founded a company and kept prospecting. “I have remained in a kind of solitary and lonely situation for the last four or five years after mediating on the past, I come here to Utah in all good faith and obeyed my leader, I got plurality of wives as I then thought in all conscience was my right. Yes, as did thousands of my brethren. Intending to treat them as wives, and raise up a posterity of whom I expected to be honorable in society "But what do I do, find my wives, through others advice have left me, and my children are some in Cache Valley, some in Ogden Valley, some in Weber Valley, some in Rush Valley all of which I might of stopped, and been able to give them a father's care and instructions, had I been such a man, and afterwards doing business for the Government, as I had a mind and associating with whom I pleased. "I have had ten wives and have twenty four children living, six grandchildren and one little great grandson, only a year and a half old. Though I am now 56, and now my children are scattered and my wives gone and I am lonesome and lonely, and only my good wife, the same girl I courted and married when a boy, sticks to me and owns me.” William Adam Hickman 1871 Martha's last child was a beautiful little girl and they named her Mary Razina Hickman. She was born 11 July 1864. On the 14th of September 1864 the Indians in the vicinity of Franklin had been giving the settlers very little trouble since the Battle of Bear River, and the settlement was rapidly growing and now the people were beginning to feel they wanted to move from the Fort. They began to build on the lots that had been allocated to them by the authorities, and everything was well and peaceable with the little colony as it now began to take upon it the appearance of a little village. The summer was favorable and abundant crops were harvested, but during the fall an accident occurred which very near cost every man, woman and child in the settlement their lives. A thousand Indians on a migration and hunting expedition were going through the country under the leadership of Chief Washakie. These Indians were a peaceful band and quite friendly with the white settlers. They had camped for a short rest in the river bottoms just north of the village and while there, some of the young warriors came up to the little town, and some of them secured from two of the local citizens a quaintly of liquor. One of the drunken Indians got on his horse and ran up and down the street trying to run over everyone he come in contact with. Finally he knocked down a woman by the name of Mary Ann Alder, and was trying to trample her to death when Ben Chadwick, who was feeding a thrashing machine, heard her scream and come running up with a butcher knife in his hand. He had been using the knife to cut the bands that bound the sheaves of wheat. Mr. Chadwick gave his experience as follows, "I ran at the Indian with the butcher knife, which was my only weapon, by this time the Indian had struck my father down and continued to race after Mrs. Alder, striking her down and trying to trample her to death under his horse’s feet, as fast as the men came up, the Indian would knock the pitchforks out of their hands with a large club. William Handy came running up with a pistol and seemed to hesitate and I said, "Give the pistol to me, I can shoot,” I took the pistol from his hands and shot. The Indian fell from his horse wounded in the neck. My father and the other men urged me to leave immediately. I rode three miles south of Franklin on William Davis's horse to High Creek and went to the home of John Lord and informed him what had happened. T disguised myself by shaving and cutting my hair, (previous to this Mr. Chadwick had worn his hair to his shoulders and had a long beard. I changed horses and returned back to Franklin about 12:00 0' clock that night with some “Minute Men”. When Mr. Chadwick fired the pistol, the shot was heard by the Indians who witnessed the scene from a distance. They uttered their wild war cry, which was indeed very frightening to all the people of the little settlement. Just about a quarter of a mile east of town where the Indian was shot, another scene was taking place. Robert Hull and Robert Hunt were on their way to the Indian camp at 5:00 o'clock in the evening, to try to recover a linzy skirt that had been stolen that morning from a lady, by two Indian women, Not knowing what had happened, Mr. Hull and his companion were watching Mr. Handy running with something in his hand. Suddenly Mr. Hull felt someone grab him, in another second he found himself staring into Chief Washakie’s pistol. The Chief snapped off the trigger three times, but the gun didn't discharge. Then he pointed the pistol away from Mr. Hull and fired, this time the shot exploded. The Indians who had immediately gathered and witnessed the scene must of thought Mr. Hull was a spirit, when their Chief could not shoot him. Mr. Hull was unarmed having left his pistol at home. This was very fortunate, for if the Chief had been shot all the people of the settlement could have been massacred as a result. When Chief Washakie grabbed Mr. Hull, Howard Hunt escaped and gave the alarm. Mr. Hull after being dragged to the Indian camp, was surrounded by young bucks who danced about him, and the squaws prodded him with butcher knives. Chief Washakie would say , "White man killed Indian,” and Mr. Hull could go if he would find the man who had shot the Indian. The group of men with Mr. Hull returned from the Indian camp about 1:00 o'clock that morning. After Mr. Hull had greeted his loved ones, he asked about Ben Chadwick. Upon finding Mr. Chadwick was in town Mr. Hull found him and warned him to leave at once, and said, "The Indians are determined to get you." The next morning Apostle Ezra T. Benson and Bishop Maugham from Logan, called a meeting at 10:00 o'clock. The Indians including Chief Washakie and some braves were invited to attend. They were given a place at the front of the bowery where the meeting was held. While speaking to the people, Bishop Maugham turned to Chief Washakie and asked, "What would you do if one of our men should go to your camp and started whipping and killing” Washakie answered, "We kill him". Bishop Maugham then said, "That's all we have done." During the argument that took place at this "Peace meeting," one of the finest examples of eloquence that is characteristic of the highest type of American Indian, was made by Chief Washakie. His theme was, "Put yourself in my place," the chief brought home to the Christians, the second commandment, "Do unto others as you should do unto you." In this brief speech was also a temperance lecture, he said "Until the white man came, there was no fire water and the Indians were sober”. Your people sold fire water to my people and made my warriors crazy. If my people sold fire water to your people and made your braves drunk how would you feel about it, would you like to see him shot down like a dog because he had made a fool of himself. Will the White Father put himself in Washake’s place? Bishop Maugham then said to the people of the settlement, "Talk about giving a man up that would save a woman’s life!” If you want to give anyone up to the Indians, give the ones who sell the liquor." To make a satisfactory peace offering with the Indians they were given two oxen, flour, cheese, and other food by the people of the settlement. During the latter part of the summer of 1864, Matilda, Nephi's plural wife, decided to leave the family circle, and she went to Bear Lake to keep for her father. There were no children born to this union. At this particular time Emma Jane Howland, was a beautiful little sixteen year old girl and had now fallen in love with a local man named Robert Nephi Cornish. He was born 13 December 1842, at Douglas on the Island of Man near England. His parents were converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and were baptized before leaving for America on the ship, ‘Ellen Marie", in 1851. At about eleven years of age, both the ocean voyage and the long trek across the plains was a great adventure for him. During June 1860 his family, along with himself were among the very first settlers to come to Franklin, they settled in the Old Fort and later secured property north east in the village. During 1864 at the age of twenty-two, Robert Nephi was called to go back to Winter Quarters, and assist in moving some poor emigrants to Utah, this emigrant train was under the command of William B. Preston, consisting of fifty wagons and four hundred emigrants. At this time Emma Jane Howland, was a beautiful raven haired girl with flashing black eyes, she weighed about one hundred pounds and wore a shoe size number 5 which fit her tiny foot comfortable, she was both nimble and quick on her feet and she dressed neatly and becomingly. At this time she was considered a very popular young lady and had several young men look at her with love in their eyes, wishing Emma Jane would show some sign of interest. The social functions of that day were limited, nearly all social functions were sponsored by the settlers themselves. The Church provided religious meetings and these were attended by all, both young and old. Dances were frequently held and at these affairs, the old, middle aged, and young would swing their partners in square dances, music was furnished by the local fiddlers. Once in awhile parties were given by socially minded matrons. At these affairs, games were played and the latest gossip passed from ear to ear. Colorful stories, fresh from the mining camps or freighters and their experiences, were told for amusement of the guests. Just before time for parting, refreshments were served. These generally consisted of homemade ice cream, cake, and lemonade. Occasionally, some high class stage productions were presented in Franklin and a few gifted people would take the time from their busy work schedule and select interesting plays, practice them and present them to an appreciative audience. Emma Jane showed great interest in these plays, attending them regular and applauding the performance. One of the actors was a dashing young bachelor by the name Robert Nephi Comish. Emma Jane loved him from the time she first became interested in boys and was waiting for a proposal. They were married the 21 January 1865, by Elder Peter Maughan in Salt Lake City in the Old Endowment House for time and eternity. After their marriage they moved into a little house in Franklin close to both their parents. Robert was a farmer by trade and he farmed land close by Franklin for the next ten years. Both he and his wife were active in Church and social affairs, including the productions of plays he was considered by the people in the community as being one of the best actors in the country. During the spring of 1865, Nephi and Helen Packer decided to move back to Brigham City. When they arrived there that early spring, they found that Brigham Young had called Lorenzo Snow to go to Brigham City in the year 1853 and build it up for the Saints. Soon after Lorenzo Snow arrived he organized the Brigham City Mercantile and Manufacturing Association, a cooperative enterprise in which several industries were brought into successful operation, such as a Woolen Mill, a Tannery, a Shoe Factory, a sheep and cattle herd, a cheese factory, tailors, furniture, blacksmith and wagon shop. The enterprise was conducted as nearly as possible to benefit everybody connected with it. Under Lorenzo Snow's direction Brigham City thrived and developed, many things it produced it drew attention of buyers from the rich place mining districts in Montana, who brought gold dust for the exchange of dairy products and other merchandise. The development of the rich mines influenced the commercial prosperity of Brigham City and the intercourse between the miners and the cooperative. They found it a good plan in helping Lorenzo Snow to make the city of Brigham City flourish and make the Cooperative Merchandising a success. Jonathan Taylor Packer, Nephi's father was one of these men who were in charge of the Merchandising Industry and when Nephi arrived in Brigham City he was able to get work under his father as a clerk. Brigham City in 1865 was much like Franklin, as both little towns were located in the North part of the valley, Brigham City being in Salt Lake Valley and Franklin in Cache Valley. Both valleys run north and south, Cache Valley being much the smallest was located along the north eastern part of Salt Lake Valley and a high mountain range separating the two. The main freight and stage road from Salt Lake City to Montana passed through Brigham City going in a north westerly direction to the head waters of Bannock Creek where the Cache Valley stage and freight roads crossed the mountains and then made a junction with the Salt Lake stage and freight road. Following the creek for about forty miles in a north westerly direction met the "Old Oregon Trail", on the Snake River. Both Franklin and Brigham City were the last out posts before the road went into the Bannock Indian Territory. The traveler along this route had many grievances against the natives as they were often harassed as they slowly vended along the road that lay in the direct country of the war like Indian tribes, such as the Bannocks, the Blackfeet, and the Snakes. Fortunate indeed was the train. Whether it be freight or emigrants that escaped their treachery. However, by the year 1865 a garrison of soldiers under Colonel Howe was stationed in the Snake River, this was called Fort Hall, and the Indian trouble decreased considerably. During the summer of 1865 Nephi was asked by his father to accompany a large shipment of freight that was going to Virginia City, Montana. This freight shipment consisted of flour, eggs, butter, and etc., and was meant for the miners in the various plaicer districts. Nephi accepted and at once made preparations for the long freight journey. A freighting outfit going to Montana mining district consisted of a great many wagons, as the larger the outfit the less danger they were to Indian attacks. Cattle were usually used for horse power and the number of animals in their train ranged from twelve to twenty head. Freight outfits traveled at a snail’s pace, making from eight to fifteen miles a day, according to the country they were in. It usually took from six weeks to, two months time to make the round trip to Montana. Nephi made several freighting trips the following two years. After Nephi and Helen moved to Brigham City, Martha felt lonely as she had made her home with them for so long. They asked Martha to go with them but she thought it best to stay in Franklin where she was known and she could get employment for herself and children. It wasn't long after Nephi and Helen left, that Martha was able to buy a piece of land and she had a two room log house built on it. She secured this property from the William Cornish family, located in the southeast part of the village by Spring Creek. Here she was able to raise enough food stuff to help her and her family and with what means she could make by teaching school and with her needle, as Martha was an expert at that, she could make her family a fair living. Martha's youngest child, Mary Rozine Hickman, a beautiful little two year old girl died the 12th July 1866 and this sad bereavement left her very lonely. Helen and Nephi being on a visit to Franklin at the time took Martha back home to Brigham City with them, where she spent the next several weeks recuperating. Martha Hickman's third daughter Martha Howland married Isaac Bartlett Nash the 8th of July 1867 in Salt Lake City in the Old Endowment House as her husband's plural wife. He was a blacksmith by trade and was a very prominent man in the community. He was the choir leader, a singer, Sunday School superintendent, stage director and play writer. He also had considerable talent on literary lines especially lyrics, poetry. Many of his songs were sang by the Sunday School children of his day. In 1852 he married Hester Elvira Pool, a very sincere Latter Day saint, who proved to be a very loving helpful mate throughout her life time. She was much older than Martha and was able to be of great assistance to her in her future life, in helping Martha raise a large family of twelve children. After the marriage of her third daughter, Martha Hickman who had separated from Mr. Hickman at this time, and whose lot was just a little harder than the family that had the protection of a father, had four young children at home. Henrietta, being the oldest, was her mother's right hand man, and would do all she could toward the support of her younger brothers and sister. Martha Hickman made a living for herself and children teaching school. Her classes were held in the vestry of the meetinghouse and as Henrietta grew older she often took the place of her mother in her school classes, as her mother was not a strong woman. She also helped her mother with the yard work, the soap making and candle making and would often go to the fields in the fall and glean the grain that was left after the harvest in order to get a little extra wheat for the family food supply. Henrietta was a very religious person and at the early age of fourteen years of age, her mother took her to Salt Lake City where she received her washings and anointings on the 3rd of October 1868 in the Old Endowment House. One particular time when Martha was away teaching school, Henrietta took the family washing down to the edge of Spring Creek, which was only a short distance from their home, and while she was washing she heard footsteps and looking around she saw an Indian. It was "Old Katoose," a bad Indian that everybody was afraid of, as he had made many threats in the past to harm different people. Henrietta was very frightened when she recognized him, but bravely she spoke up, "What do you want Katoose". The Indian began to come towards her pointing at the soap in her hands and he said, "I want soap.” Henrietta threw the bar of soap as far as she could throw it, while the Indian turned to get the soap, Henrietta ran up the hill to her home as fast as she could go. I will add here the story of the organization of the first Relief Society in the Franklin Ward, Martha was the first secretary and was instrumental in writing up of this history. ORGANIZATION AND MINUTES OF FRANKLIN WARD RELIEF SOCIETY AS FOUND IN ORIGINAL RECORDS 1868 The Franklin Female Relief Society was first organized April 22, 1868. Meeting opened with prayer by Bishop L. H. Hatch. The following named sisters were presented for acceptance as officers in the Franklin Ward and unanimously sustained: President, Sarah Borthwick; directors, Elvira Nash, Ortencia Stalker, Ann Smart and Mary Head; secretary, Martha D. Case Hickman treasurer, Catherine Mendenhall. Bishop L. H. Hatch reminded the sisters he had planted mulberry trees according to instructions, to feed the worms to make silk that it may be possible to manufacture articles we wear and adopt our own fashions. The sisters had a great work to do, they were capable of getting at things that men could not. Prayer by Alex Stalker. Minutes of May 7, 1868 when the Female Relief Society met. Hymn sung “Hail to The Brightness.” Prayer by S. Parkinson. The sec. read an address by Pres. Young. The bishop said he wished the sisters to perform their duties in this Society without fear. Said it was a society organized by Joseph Smith, the Prophet. Said the sisters held the Priesthood in connection with their husbands. There were many light duties they could perform instead of the brethren while they were engaged in more arduous tasks such as laboring in the fields, etc. He is much pleased with the donations, sisters all willing to pay for the pump, some objected paying for the telegraph instrument. Remarked that when the sisters fully understand the importance of the telegraph they would cheerfully respond to every call concerning it. Remarked there were some sisters knew their duties and cheerfully performed them, while others did not realize their duties. He does not want the sisters to wear themselves out, but to do the best they can in every good work. He said everyone did not come in the Church for the love of the Lord, but other motives actuated them. He read over the names of the subscribers for the pump, he was much pleased with the pump. Invited the sisters to see it. Particularly requested the sisters to attend all the meetings. He says business before pleasure. He said we were none of us very good, wished us to feel so, but try and improve. Bro. Smart made a few remarks, said we should be very careful about the remarks we made about each other, etc. The bishop asked the sisters to speak. Sister Smart said she knew this to be the work of the Lord, wished to do all the good she could, etc. Pres. Borthwick said she knew this was the work of the Lord, that she would do the best she could in her office. She showed a block of patchwork she had done, requested the sisters to fetch one each and they would then sew them together and make a good warm quilt for the poor. She spoke concerning the cleaning of the schoolhouse. Said if it met the bishop's mind she thought it would be a good thing for the sisters on the several blocks as it came in turn for the teachers to administer the Sacrament, to see to the cleaning of the schoolhouse, which fully met the bishop's approbation. Adjourned until the 19th of May. The names of the teachers on the several blocks, also the sisters which are appointed to superintend the cleaning of the schoolhouse: Isaac Nash 1st block - Mary A. Hull Robert Dowdle 2nd " - Sister Kingsford Thomas Low 3rd “ - Eliza Low John Doney 4th " - Mary Vail George Lee 5th " - Louisa Purnell Charles Fox 6th " - Elizabeth Fox James Packer 7th " -Hary Head Samuel Parkinson 8th “ -Arabella Parkinson Thomas Mendenhall - 9th block - Cathren Chadwick John Frew - 10th " - Sister Comish Nephi Comish - 11th " - Elizabeth Elsworth Andy Morrison - 12th " - Sarah Borthwick David Jenson - 13th “ -Sister Londengreen Samuel Huff - 14th " - Mary A. Huff Names of donators for the pump: Harriet Kingsford - 2 ¼ lb. butter Sarah Mayberry -1 lb. butter Anna Doney-1 lb. butterMary Collins-1 lb. butter Elizabeth Comish-1/2 lb. butterHannah Handy - 2 3/4 lb. butter Rebecca Rumsey -2 lb. butter Margaret Bennett -1 lb. butter Sarah Woodward -1 lb. butter Sister Adamson -1 lb. butter Sarah Pool -1 1/4 lb. butter Anna Olsen -1 lb. butter Sarah Chadwick -1 1/2 lb. butter Mary Whitehead -1 lb. butter Ester Dowdle -1 lb. butter Sophia Merrick -1 lb. butter Elen Corbridge -1 lb. butterJane Clayton -1 lb. butter Hannah Corbridge-1 lb. butterCatherene Mendenhall -1 lb. butter Jane Hull -1 lb. butterAnna Londengreen -1 lb. butter Mary Head. -2 lb. butter Mary A. Handy -1 lb. butter Ann Smart -2 lb. butter Mary Chadwick -1/2 lb. butter Louisa Mendenhall -1 lb. butter Louisa Mayberry -2 lb. butter Betsy Low-1/2 lb. butterCharlotta Mayberry -1 lb. butter Selina Gregory -1 lb. butterElizabeth Elsworth -1 lb. butter Names of donators for the telegraph instrument: Ann Smart - 1 lb. butter & eggs Sarah Borthwick - 1 lb. butter Arabella Parkinson- 1 lb. butter Catherine Mendenhall - 1 dzn. eggs Jane Clayton - 1 dzn. eggs Sarah Morrison - 2 dzn. eggs Benia Spumberg - 1 lb. butter Elen Clayton - 1 lb. butter May 19, 1868......The Female Relief Society met at schoolhouse at one o'clock. Prayer Sis. Handy. Report of the butter and eggs was read by Bishop Hatch after which the bishop spoke for some time. He spoke of Brother Mendenhall taking the butter and eggs to the city to pay for the nails for the meeting house. It was moved and seconded that a subscription be taken for the boys that cross the plains. A number of the teachers (brethren) were present at said meeting. The members of the Society busied themselves with putting a quilt together with linsey (coarse linen and wool fabric) which had been donated. The bishop blest the donations received, blest the subscribers, also encourages the sisters to go ahead. In original records names were given, but the following lists number of donators and variety of articles donated: For the nails 65 sisters donated eggs and butter and 1 sister donated a pair of men's sox; for the calico (cotton cloth) quilt 25 sisters donated eggs and butter, 9 sisters donated yarn and 1 sister donated a pair of knitting needles. June 4, 1868......The Society met at 3 o'clock. Sewed wagon covers, quilt pieces, and knit stockings until the bishop, Bro. Stalker and several of the teachers (brethren) came. The meeting was opened by prayer by Sister Smart. The sect. read the minutes of the two preceding meetings which were accepted. The bishop made a few remarks. He wishes the sisters to attend the fast meeting. Said he was well pleased with the spirit of the Society. Said there were a few brethren engaged on the meeting house. Hoped the sisters would sustain their husbands in their duties, for an encouraging word done so much good. Said the sisters should uphold the brethren in every good work. Didn't care how much influence a wife has over her husband in a good cause, she should be blest for it. There were some of the brethren going on the railroad, there were many duties sisters would have to perform in their absence. Wished the sisters would take hold and do the best they could for the up-building of their own families and Kingdom of God. Wishes the sisters to attend to prayers in their homes in the absence of their husbands. Bless the brethren and sisters. Bro. Stalker then made a few remarks. Said the bishop had the sisters in a capacity where he could talk to them. wishes his family to attend to prayers in his absence. He said we all had a great warfare before us for we had no good thing, but we had to strive for to obtain it. Said that when the brethren had the good feeling of their wives they could do so much better, as an encouraging word done so much good, the contrary so much hurt. Said he felt a good spirit there, hoped we would go ahead and prosper. We had his good feelings. The sisters that were appointed to support the cleaning of the schoolhouse were also appointed to act as teachers in collecting contributions. Prayer Pres. Borthwick. June 18, 1868...... Alex Stalker read a copy of the First Organization of The Female Relief Society, organized by the Prophet Jos. Smith in the Lodge Room, March 1842, in the city of Nauvoo. It was moved and seconded that we organize according to instructions received from Pres. Maughan of Logan. Bp. L. H. Hatch and Alex Stalker then proceeded to set apart the following sisters: Sarah Borthwick, President; Ann Smart, first counselor; Ortencia Stalker, second counselor; Elvira Nash and Mary Head, to act as aids. July 2, 1868......Society met. Opened with singing and prayer by Sis. Handy. The preceding minutes and list of donations and such were read by the sect. Then the sisters busied themselves in sewing on quilts, carding wool bats for wadding the quilts and knitting sox and edging. Bro. Stalker and Jenson came in and had a very pleasant time chatting with us. Closed with prayer by Sister Huff. Adjourned till July 16th. List of donations for lime and getting material for quilts: The Society furnished 16 lbs, of butter for the men that brought the lime for the vestry, and for quilts yarn, butter and wool were donated. July 16, 1863......The Society met at 3 o'clock. Prayer by the president. Sec. read the copy of The Organization of the Female Relief Society. Sisters busied themselves quilting, the presidents giving talks. Sister Smart took the floor, expressed her thankfulness for donations given in cheerfulness. Said, “We should not have malice towards each other, said if she had any towards anyone she would make it right before night. We should be industrious and economical and teach our children to be so also. We should not oppose any principle taught in the Church, polygamy in particular as that was a great principle.” She had two daughters in it and was willing her other should go in it likewise, etc. The sect., being unwell all day, fainted, was administered to by Sisters Borthwick, Smart, Starker and Huff. There has been five quilts quilted today. Adjourned until the 30th of July. July 30, 1868......The Society met at two o’clock. Opened by prayer by Sister Corbridge. Sisters busied themselves binding and piecing quilts until the bishop and Bro. Stalker came. The bishop asked the sisters what they wished to do with their quilts. Said whatever the majority said was law. Some proposed selling them to help about the meeting house. But he said he did not wish to take their labors for that purpose as there was abundance of means in the hands of the brethren, but if they felt disposed to make a carpet for the vestry he would gladly accept it. Said whatever they saw fit to do with their quilts would suit him. He thought if they could sell some of them and thus augment the funds of the Society so to have money to buy necessaries for the poor, it would be a good thing as it was warm weather and the poor did not need the quilts at present. Br. Stalker said he thought the sisters had done well, very well indeed. Fully agreed with the bishop's remarks. He thought it a good thing to sell or raffle the quilts and if they decided to raffle it would be perfectly right. Said the sisters should talk the matter over and agree what to do. Said he was much pleased with the spirit of the Society, blest us. The presidency made a few remarks. Said she was not particular what was done with the quilts, whatever the majority concluded to do with them suited her. She wishes, to get some means in shape to handle for the relief of the poor of whatever nature, but now especially for sickness. Remarked a case of sickness a few days ago and nothing comfortable, etc. Sister Smart said she was at Logan last week, saw Sis. Maughan, said they were going to raffle theirs. Said Sister Maughan preferred evening to give us some instructions. Favored by Sister Merrick and seconded by Sister Borthwick that we raffle the quilts. Sister Smart proposed the bishop and Br. Stalker be present at the raffling. The bishop left their blessing with us. Benediction by Sister Frew. August 13, 1868.......The Society met at 2 o'clock. Opened by prayer by Sister Huff. Sisters busied themselves sewing carpet rags. Sister Eliza Low being in made a few very appropriate remarks. Said she knew this to be the work of the Lord, always felt well in bearing her testimony, etc. Sister Elizabeth Packer she always responded to every call. Said she wishes to attend all the meetings, but through the press of business she could not always come. Remarked that the bishop said .at the third or fourth meeting that the sisters then present would attend as a general thing. Wishes to do all the good she could, etc. Sister Mary A. Morrison said she wishes to do the best she could. She did not want to hold back on account of her youth. Exhorted her youthful sisters to practice speaking in public, etc. Sister Corbridge said she felt well desirous to do all the good in her power. Said we should sustain our sisters in office, pray for and uphold them. Said this work was organized in the days of Joseph that we should learn everything that was good and useful. Said we should try and get things in shape so as to get some medicines for the poor in case they be needed now, etc. Sister Alice Pratt of Oxford remarked that she wants to talk a little. Said she felt well. Would be glad when they had a Society organized at their place. Hoped we would be blest, etc.. Sister Smart said she felt like talking a little to express her gratitude for the great blessings of having her friends around her. Said she had been very much blest since she was engaged in this work, especially since this Society was organized, and since her husband had been absent she had been particularly blest, etc. The president said she would like to see more present, but was thankful to those that were present. Said that we had thought of raffling, but had been informed that there had instructions been given by Eliza Snow against raffling and if that was so we would not raffle, but would do the best we could for the good of the Society, etc. Sister Parkinson made a few very appropriate remarks. Said she wished to do all the good she could, etc. Benediction by Charlotte Parkinson until 27th. August 27, 1868......The Society met at 2 o'clock. Opened by prayer by Sister Eliza Low. Sisters busied themselves piecing quilts, knitting, sewing carpet rags. Privilege been given to speak. Sister Kingsford that she felt glad to be a member of the Society, felt it would be a great blessing to the poor, etc. The sec. bore her testimony to the truth of this work. Said we are living in a great day, an age of the world. Exhorted the sisters to live so that we could feel to administer to the sick for the brethren might not always be present. There were many duties dissolving upon the Sisters, more so now and would continue to increase than ever before. She was glad this Society was organized, that we should throw away all bashfulness and fear and nobly do our various duties even as the brethren did theirs. Then we should do all we could to comfort the poor and sick, leave our own work, come to meeting, pray for the blessings of the Lord to rest on all our efforts. She also told her experiences of the day. Said there were a few sisters met at Sister Head's, that she was taken very sick with one of her bad spells and requested the sisters to administer to her, but they declined through bashfulness. She continued to get worse, finally told the sisters she could not live long in that situation. Requested them to administer again (Sisters Molen, Merrick and Head) which they did, she was healed immediately. Said she had after been healed under the administration of the sisters. Requested the sisters to pray for and uphold her so that she might be enabled to perform her various duties, especially as the teacher of the school for she could do much more good when the sisters upheld her to their children. Prayed for the spirit of God upon us too. The foregoing minutes were taken by Sister Molen of Hyde Park, she being here on a visit, the sect. took the remainder. Sister Head said she wished to do all the good she could, that we should pray for each other especially for those in office, that we all know this to be the work of the Lord and should act accordingly, etc. Sister Molen said she was glad to meet with us in this place, that she felt a good spirit here, that we should uphold and sustain all the sisters in office for they needed it, that she had a little experience in office, felt her weakness. Said we should be careful not to speak evil of each other especially those in office. Said we should visit the sisters in sickness, that a kind word done so much good. She knew that by experience for she was a sickly woman herself. Prays the Lord to bless and prosper all our efforts in this Society, left her blessing with us. Sister Corbridge said the counsel of the sisters was good, hoped we would all profit by it. She felt well in donating. She would try to do all the good she could, would visit the poor and sick and comfort them all she could. Sister Mendenhall remarked she felt to do all the good she could, etc. Sister Merrick gave a few very appropriate remarks. The presidency gave us some very good instructions. Benediction by Sister Susan Gosland. September 10, 1868......The Society met at 10 o'clock. quilted one quilt. September 27, 1868......The Society met at two o’clock, bound quilt, sewed carpet rags, knitted sox. Benediction by Sister Londengreen. November 10, 1868.......The Society met. Doubled yarn. Sister Stalker presided. On the 18th a few sisters met at Sister Smart's and quilted one quilt which was donated to a Mary Pool. The presidents and sec. were absent during these meetings. The meetings were discontinued until the 27th of February 1869. February 27, 1869......The Society assembled at the vestry. The Bishop, Br. Stalker and several of the teachers were present. The sec. being sick, there were no minutes kept of meetings. There were 4 quilts sold for 10 dollars apiece, two quilts for 9 dollars apiece, one linsey quilt for 18 dollars, 15 in money the remainder in calico which was used for Sister Pool's quilt, 3 pairs of sox sold for 3 dollars. Total amount 78 dollars which was sent to Salt Lake City by Br. Stalker to purchase a carpet for the vestry. March 11, 1869......The Society assembled at the vestry. Opened by singing. Prayer by Sister L. Mayberry. Braided mats for the vestry. The bishop and Br. Jenson came. The bishop said he was very much pleased with what the sisters had done, felt thankful for their help. Said we should be blest for all the good we done or would do. Told us to speak and act freely. Said we should pray for and uphold the officers and not have a spirit of jealousy among us. Wishes us to pray for him. Said the sisters had great faith, etc. Said we should try to use a good influence over our husbands and help him, etc. Said we should attend our meetings punctually and try to influence all our sisters to come for great blessings aviated us if we were faithful. Spoke of the organization of the Kingdom of God. Said some come into the Church half hearted, others with all their hearts. Saw when there was a dance it was generally well attended, should like to see as much interest in these meetings. Yet, he did not wish to find fault with us, but the Lord was not well pleased when we cared more for dancing than we did for our meetings. He felt very thankful for what the sisters had done to help complete the vestry. Said he had paid a great deal out, had done it cheerfully. Blest us, said he would find a place for us to meet. Br. Jenson said he well remembered when this Society was organized by Joseph Smith, the Prophet. Said the blessings of the Lord would attend our efforts. Said we were greatly blest and would be more so hereafter. Said when the brethren assembled in this room we would be remembered. Said everything we undertook we should accomplish. Said we should uphold and sustain the bishop, that we could be a great help to him, etc. Spoke of the organization of the Kingdom of God. Sister Handy was administered to. Benediction by Jane Clayton. Adjourned until 27th of March. March 27, 1869......The Society assembled at the vestry. Opened by singing. Prayer Sister Elen Corbridge. Mary Mayberry being invited to speak. Saw the Prophet Joseph. Said this Society was organized before this world was created, said it was especially for the benefit of the poor to build schoolhouses and educate poor children, etc. said Joseph. Great blessings would follow those that were faithful in this Society. Prays for the blessings of God to rest upon us. Sister Laird of Richmond said she was glad to meet with the Society of this place. Felt a good spirit here. She wished to do all the good she could, etc. Blest us. Sister Green said she would say whatever the Lord gave her. Said the Lord was well pleased with us, the angels were around us, etc. Blest us. The president, she was thankful for what the sisters had done. Felt happy when she and the teachers went around to be received cheerfully whether they could donate or not. Requested the sisters to attend their meetings punctually, did not like to have a black mark put against them, but the bishop required it. Blest us. Benediction by Sister Sylvia Hatch. April 8, 1869......The Society assembled at the vestry. Pieced quilts. The sec. being sick no minutes were taken. April 22, 1869......zzthe Society assembled at Br. Stalker's. Quilted one quilt. The sec. being sick no minutes were taken. May 6, 1869......The Society assembled at the schoolhouse. Opened by prayer by Sister Ortencia Stalker. Made carpet for the vestry and knit stockings. In the year 1869 the sisters were counseled to put money into the Cooperative Store in the name of the Relief Society. All the sisters responded cheerfully donating 50 cts. each, the following is a list of those sisters: Sarah Borthwick - 50 cts. Jane Frew - 50 cts. Ann Smart - 50 cts. Elizabeth Fox - 50 cts. Ortencia Stalker - 50 cts. Hannah Corbridge - 50 cts. Martha D. Hickman - 50 cts. Hannah Holhem - 50 cts. Catherine Mendenhall - 50 cts. Elen Clayton - 50 cts. Mary Ann Morrison - 50 cts. Elvira Nash - 50 cts. Hannah Handy - 50 cts. Martha Nash - 50 cts. Eliza Hull - 50 cts. Elen Priest - 50 cts. Margaret Bennett - 50 cts. Martha Biggs - 50 cts. Elizabeth Elsworth - 50 cts. Lucy Bennett - 50 cts. Sarah Ann Mayberry - 50 cts. Jane Nelson - 50 cts. Mary Mayberry - 50 cts.Mary A. Huff - 50 cts. Mary Collins - 50 cts.Elizabeth Kirkham - 50 cts. Charlotta Mayberry - 50 cts. Jane Hobbs - 50 cts. Louisa Mayberry - 50 cts. Mariah Wright - 50 cts Amanda Stalker - 50 cts. Serena Jensen - 50 cts Emily Stalker - 50 cts. Hannah Olsen - 50 cts Elen Stalker - 50 cts. Mary Ann Hull - 50 cts Elizabeth Packer - 50 cts. Mary Whitehead - 50 cts Margaret Taylor - 50 cts. Selina Gregory - 50 cts Mary Ann Hobbs - 50 cts. Margaret Dunkley - 50 cts Margaret Smart - 50 cts. Louisa Mendenhall - 50 cts Eliza Low - 50 cts. Christina Stones - 50 cts Elizabeth Cornish - 50 cts. Hannah Londengreen - 50 cts Mary Head - 50 cts. Elizabeth Laidon - 50 cts Harriet Kingsford - 50 cts. Sylvia Hatch - 50 cts Ann Doney - 50 cts. Cathrine Hatch - 50 cts Ester Dowdle - 50 cts. Alice Hatch - 50 cts Jane Hull - 50 cts. Louisa Pernell - 50 cts Margaret Whitehead - 50 cts. Arabella Parkinson - 50 cts Martha Vail - 50 cts. Mariah Parkinson - 50 cts Elen Corbridge - 50 cts. Charlotta Parkinson - 50 cts Susan Gosland - 50 cts Martha had made ready three times to go back to Flagtown, Illionis to her old home to sell the homestead that her husband Henry had left unsold when they come to Utah, but she failed each time to go. The first time Emma Jane had a relapse from the measles and was sick for a year. The second time she was sick herself, The third time she came as far as Brigham City and Helen her oldest daughter persuaded her not to go as she felt her mother was not able to make the long journey as her health was failing fast. Helen said they had all lived these many years without the money and they could do so in the future. Martha's lawyer being dead and the deeds burned in the flames when Martha’s house burnt down while she was teaching in Willard City, Utah, (destroying everything) it was necessary for Martha to go and attend to the business herself or not get the money. But they all preferred to live without the money than have their dear mother go and lose her life away from home. It was counted as a great loss and sacrifice, for Martha was reared a lady and while home did not know what hard work was or the trials and troubles of life until she buried her dear Henry. Oh, the bitter tears she shed after that, but she was always true and faithful to God and the truths of the Gospel and never spoke lightly of those in authority. She taught her children to be virtuous and true and to honor those in authority. She had her washings and annointings done in Salt Lake in the Endowment House the first year she arrived in Utah, in 1853. She was a good member of the Relief Society of Franklin until her last sickness serving as secretary for two years. I have been told that she was a expert with her needle, and the buckskin gloves she made were beautiful and she always had a ready market for them after they were finished. She embroidered the cuffs and gauntlets and also added a touch of Indian beads to make them attractive. Her ambition was greater than her strength, her health failed her but she still continued to teach school, although confined to her bed she would hear her classes, and after school and a rest she would sew, making many gloves by candle light. Not having the proper medical help she gradually grew weaker and at the age of 59, on March 16th 1872, she joined her first husband in the great beyond. She was the mother of nine children. This is the story of Martha Diana Cases’s life as one of her daughters, Rachael Helen Howland Packer, wrote in a brief sketch, July 3rd 1902. This is a brief sketch of the life of one of God's noble women and daughter of Israel. The only one of her father’s family who joined the Church. A poor little frail girl whose life was disposed of many times. Her posterity at this time of writing July 3rd 1902, runs over one hundred souls and it will be through them that her father’s family will be brought into the folds of our Savior. Martha's grandsons have taken missions to warn the people and preach to them the true Gospel and others will be called. Her children and grand children hold many responsible positions in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and it is with a sincere wish of the writer that all will be found faithful in the end. Martha was buried in the Franklin Cemetery on the 19th of March 1872 by the side of her loved ones in her fifty ninth year. Her sealings were broken to her husband Telemachus Rogers, and William Adam Hickman, and on the 14th of June 1939 and November 1958 all her children were sealed to Henry Howland. Martha was sealed to her first husband Henry, the 14th of June 1905. Henrietta Louisa had a very severe shock just prior to the death of her mother. Her girlhood sweetheart, _____ Stolker by name, had been visiting at her home in Franklin and had spent the evening with Henrietta, when he left for his parents home (the old Sam Wright home) he decided to take a short cut home that crossed Maple Creek east of town. The crossing was only a log laid across the creek and during the month of March the weather is still cold and the water high from the winter snow runoff. As he crossed the whirling stream on a slippery log, his boot slipped and he fell into the swift water and was drowned. His body was found a short time later lodged in some brush farther down the stream. After the death of their mother, Martha Diana Hickman, the children left the family home and went to live with their married sisters. Don Carlos Hickman the youngest child went to the home of his sister Martha Nash. Alvilda Diana Hickman went to live with Emma Jane Comish and Jordon Hickman and Henrietta Louisa Rogers went to live with their sister Helen Packer in Brigham City. When Henrietta and her brother arrived in the little city of Brigham City, during the early spring of 1872 they found a thriving busy little settlement. The railroad had recently been built connecting the East with the West and many new branch lines were in construction at this time of instance a rail road line going to Salt Lake City had been constructed and construction to Cache Valley was now underway. There had been a great influx of people from the east and west who had worked on the Continental railroad and many were there to witness the meeting of the Cross Country line and the driving of the Golden Spike at Promontory Point where the East met the West. One of the families that witnessed the driving of the Golden Spike was George Washington Parsons and his wife Lelitia who were friends of Henrietta at this particular time. Henrietta was in her sixteenth year, she was a very lovely young girl, small in stature and was deeply devoted to her Church and who wanted to earn her way in life and be independent of all relatives. She was able to secure work in the Brigham City Coop., under President Lorenzo Snow and worked in a little millenary shop where they made beautiful flowers of wool and wax , Henrietta loved this work and while working here she became acquainted with several wives of President Snow. In the year 1873 President Snow was called on a special mission to go to Palestine in the Holy Land to rededicate the land, to the Jews. Two of his wives worked in the shop where Henrietta worked, making beautiful artificial flowers, doing fancywork, sewing, tatting, kitting, netting and etc. The flowers were used in several ways, some were made up into lovely arrangements and put under a crystal glass bowl, others were put in picture frames under glass to hang on the wall and other flowers were used for millinery purposes. These beautiful artificial flowers had ready sale and any person who was apt in this art was assured of ready employment and Henrietta was one who became the best. It was during the year 1873 that Nephi and Helen and their six children left their home in Brigham City and moved to Millcreek, Morgan County Utah, where Nephi rented a shingle mill and ran the mill for two years and then bought a home in Richville, Morgan County, Utah where he lived another year. After Nephi and Helen moved away, Henrietta was able to find a small room in the upstairs of George Washington Parsons home who lived close by. Mr. Parsons worked for President Snow, in the Brigham City Coop, looking after the Church cattle. The Parsons were converted to the Church and were deeply religious people. They were kind to Henrietta and she soon learned to love them as if they were her very own people. One of the saddest experiences in Henrietta' s life came to her during the late fall or early winter (perhaps Thanksgiving time) In 1874, when her brother Jordon, age eighteen, decided to make the long trip across the mountains to Franklin, Idaho and spend a holiday with his sisters and brother Don. Jordon. He owned a fine riding horse and a very fancy bridle and saddle. He began the long trip by horseback across the mountain and was never heard from again. A bad storm came up and it was thought by most of the people that he lost his way and froze to death, however, his body was never located or did they find any trace of his horse or outfit, the family finally came to the conclusion that he must have met with foul play and was murdered for his fine horse and outfit and for what money he might have had with him at the time During the early fall of 1876 Henrietta becomes acquainted with Robert Nelson Parsons a handsome young man from the east and brother of George Washington Parsons. He had recently come to Brigham City to see his brother and family and to find employment which was plentiful in and around Utah and surrounding country in the construction of railroads and etc. One day after Robert arrived in Brigham City he was standing on the corner near his brother’s horse when he noticed a beautiful young lady coming down the street towards him. It was a raw cold winterish day and the wind was blowing, before the young lady reached the corner where Robert was standing a little child stopped her and began to talk to her, the young lady stooped down and felt the little girls face and she could see that the child was very cold. The young lady straightened up, putting her hands behind her back as if she was trying to unhook her underskirt, then she did a little pulling and maneuvering in order to get the underskirt loose which finally dropped to the ground. Henrietta picked up the skirt and placed it around the little girl, without being observed. Robert saw this little act of kindness and was greatly impressed. As Henrietta went on her way he decided then and there to become better acquainted with this lovely young woman who had been so kind to this little child. A small boy was standing nearby and Robert asked him if he knew her and who this young lady was. The small boy said he did that she lived nearby. Robert gave the young boy a dollar if he would introduce him to her. When Robert first met Henrietta he thought her one of the most beautiful girls he had ever seen, and often mentioned the fact to his children in later life. It didn't take Robert long after they become acquainted to discover they were falling in love and that they had both found, a wonderful new kind of happiness. However, there was one very, important thing in Henrietta’s new found happiness that caused her a great amount of sorrow and a great amount of mental suffering. Robert Parsons did not belong to the Church, in fact he wasn't even considered a religious man. This in itself must have been a terrible trial to Henrietta as she had been raised in the Church, and its teachings were the most important thing in her life. As at the early age of fourteen her mother, had taken her to Salt Lake City where she had received her washing annointings in the Old Endowment House, on the 3rd of October 1868. So in making up her mind as to whether she should marry this outsider or Gentile, was one of the hardest decisions that Henrietta ever made in her life time. What should she do, what would her beloved family think, how could she face them if she consented to marriage. These were some of her problems that seemed to haunt her very soul. Henrietta took her problem to her friend George Parsons and brother of her young sweetheart. But he too, could not help Henrietta understand. She did the best to explain to Robert the principles of the Church and what she believed in, but in vain, Robert was not religious and he didn't even want to talk about the Church let alone join it. Henrietta went to the Lord with her problems, she prayed and begged her Heavenly, Father for help, but pray as hard as she could, from the very depths of her soul, no help come forth, Henrietta was living alone, she knew she couldn't turn to her married sisters or their husbands for help as they would definitely refuse and would tell her to come back home to Franklin and marry one of her own faith there. This she could not do, she had left Franklin five years before and Brigham City was her home now, She loved Brigham City, and all her new found friends that she had made. Besides she had employment here. Henrietta could not find the answer, she loved Robert with all her heart and soul and as this romance progressed she found herself weakening in the thing she had always thought the most important. They were married on the 12th of April 1877, by Bishop Nicholas in the same little upstairs room that Henrietta occupied in the home of George Washington Parsons. Soon after their marriage Robert and Henrietta bought themselves a home, it was a modest little two roomed frame house located in a small peach orchard in the city of Brigham. Robert liked to work with his fruit trees and specialized in grafting, etc. At harvest time he would load up his wagon with fruit and take his product to the neighboring settlements and sell his fruit from door to door. Robert also worked for his brother, George Washington Parsons, who was called by President Lorenzo Snow to take charge of the Church Cooperative cattle herds. The cattle were pastured on land near Promontory Point and it was here that Robert and his brother George spent much of their time looking after the Church's cattle herd. Martha Abanatha Parsons, their first child, was born the 21 August 1878 at their home in Brigham City. She was a lovely little brown eyed girl with skin as fair as a lily; her hair was dark brown in color and a slight bit on the curly side. She was much like her father both in physical body make up and in temperament, being large in stature and shy and retiring in temperament. A second little girl was born to Robert and Henrietta on the 12 January 1881, just two and a half years later. They named her Henrietta Letitia in honor of Henrietta herself, and the wife of George Washington Parsons, Letitia Slack Parsons. Martha and Henrietta, or Mattie and Hettie, as they were called, were never separated very long at a time. They loved each other dearly and Mattie watched over her little sister tenderly and guarded her from danger at all times, and was her constant loving playmate from the time that little Hettie could walk until they were separated through marriage. Hettie was a pretty child also, but her biggest attraction was her alert mind and the ability to make people love her, she was quick of thought and could entertain any number of people and make them feel comfortable and at ease. Little Hettie was much like her mother, small in stature and quick of mind and body. Robert’s brother George Washington Parsons and wife Letitia had made Brigham City their home since the fall of 1864 when they were on their way to the gold fields in California, and because of Letitia's health the family was forced to stop and rest awhile in Brigham City. During the winter that they were resting, George and his young wife were converted to “Mormonism" and from that time on they never wanted to leave Brigham City. George and Letitia were both faithful members of the Church and it wasn't long before President Lorenzo Snow appointed George Parsons overseer of the Church Cooperative cattle herds. The cattle herds were pastured on the low rolling mountains west and north of Promontory Point where the grass was plentiful and there were great amounts of it. George would spend weeks at a time with the cattle and was required to be away from his family for long periods of time, as the cattle herds were of great importance and they needed his strict attention at all times. Robert helped his brother George with the cattle and he too would be away from home and family much of the time, and that was not satisfactory to Robert or his wife Henrietta. For many years, from 1830 to 1850, the people of our nation wanted a railroad built that would connect the east coast with the west coast, but the cost of the construction of such a venture was of such great amount that it was impossible at that time. The many rivers, small streams, and deep gorges had to be bridged, and the high mountains, with the deep snow of the winters, and the long dry barren plains, formed obstacles that had to be overcome if they were to build a transcontinental railroad. By 1860, during the Civil War, the nation became aware of the danger of invasion from the west coast and its inability to defend itself if this should come about, so Congress passed laws whereby the construction of such a railroad was made possible. Construction was ordered to start on one end at the Missouri River and on the other end on the Pacific coast, and continue working towards each other until they met. This junction where they met took place at Promontory Point in Northern Utah on the 10th of May 1869. A celebration was held where a golden spike was driven as a final link in this iron band, binding the east coast to the west coast. On one side of the spike was written, "The Pacific Railroad, ground broken 8 January 1863 and completed 10 May 1869." On the other side of the spike was written, "May God continue the unity of our country as this railroad unites the two great oceans of the world.” The transcontinental railroad was built as a defense measure by the government, but the government did not support the construction of side railroads which led off from the main railroad line, these roads were constructed by private companies and individuals. There were rich mines discovered in Idaho and Montana, but getting the equipment to these mines was a great problem. So men with vision and foresight began the task of building a side line to these far away mines so that their wealth could be enjoyed by all. The first railroad to enter Idaho was at Franklin, and this line was constructed by the Utah Northern Railroad Company. A company was also organized to build a railroad from Ogden, Utah, to Butte, Montana, a distance of 466 1/2 miles, this same company was to build a railroad from Brigham City to Corinne, Utah, a distance of near five miles. Work was started on the railroad to Idaho and Montana in 1871, this was a narrow gauge railroad only three feet wide. This road extended northeast from Brigham City to Cache Valley and on to Franklin, Idaho, and began operating on the 3 May 1874. The construction came to a standstill at Franklin until 1879 for several reasons, one of which was financial difficulties, there were problems of right of way, the company wanted to go north from Preston to McCammon and down the Portneuf River to the Snake River Valley, but from the Portneuf River to the Blackfoot River was the Bannock Indian Reservation and the railroad company could not obtain the right to construct a road across this territory, so consequently the company surveyed a route from Preston to Soda Springs and through the mountains down to Eagle Rock, which is now Idaho Falls, then on to Montana. While the construction was at a standstill at Franklin, the company went broke and it fell into the hands of the receivers and was sold at a foreclosure sale in Salt Lake City on May 3, 1878 to S. H. Clark who organized a new company under the name of Utah and Northern Railroad Company. Under his new management the construction was resumed with much of the road between Preston and Grace, Idaho, built and several miles of track laid. At this particular time the company was successful in obtaining the right of way across the Indian reservation, changing the route of the railroad so that it came through Pocatello and Blackfoot, then on to Idaho Falls, Idaho. It was this sudden change in the route of the railroad that founded the city of Blackfoot. Permission was granted to cross the reservation but there were to be no stops, so naturally the first stop would be after they left the Indian land and that would be just across the Blackfoot River. Some of the men who were responsible for the founding of the city of Blackfoot were Major A. E. Danilson, who was the Indian agent at that time; N. W. Shilling, a telegraph operator at the Indian Agency; John Rogers and Frank Berrymen, who were freighters from Corinne, Utah; Charles Bunting, a storekeeper at Fort Hall; and others. These men took up the land and laid out the city of Blackfoot and had it well under way when the railroad arrived on Christmas day, December 25, 1878. The construction of the railroad was pushed as fast as possible until it reached Eagle Rock (now Idaho Falls) on the 10 April 1879, Monida, in the spring of 1880, and Butte in the year 1881. ====== During the early spring of 1881, Robert and his family left Brigham City for Butte, Montana, where Robert secured work on the railroad as a section hand. Robert worked in and around Butte, Montana, only a short time when he was transferred to Dillon, Montana, where he was made a section foreman. It was while the family was living in Dillon, that Henrietta decided to cook for some railroad men, twenty to thirty in number, and if there happened to be a rush, the number of men increased to fifty or more. Henrietta had plenty of fine experienced help, which included an Irish cook by the name of Billie McGoogan, also a hired girl who took care of all the dish washing, Robert and Henrietta did very well financially with their work, money was plentiful, but like the old saying, "Easy come, easy go." Aunt Hettie often speaks about this time in her parent’s life and that her parents kept their money in a large cigar box that was stacked full of twenty dollar gold pieces, there were no banks in Montana at that time, and that one time her parents gave the two little girls a bright twenty dollar gold piece to play with and while they were playing, the twenty dollar gold piece was lost. Mattie and Hettie were very well behaved little girls, Robert just needed to move his eyes and they would run and mind him in whatever thing he wanted them to do. The railroad men who ate with the Parsons family often commented on such well behaved children. There was one old man who came to Robert and Henrietta and asked them for help. He was old and sick and could not work on the railroad. He was welcomed into the Parsons family tent and made to feel like one of the family. This old man was given food and shelter and when able, was given money and train fare to his destination. His last words to the family were, “God bless you always for such kindness.” Shortly before the birth of their third child, Robert Adrian, born 10 October 1883, Robert, Henrietta and children returned to Brigham City where they owned their home, and where Robert could get employment with his brother, George Parsons, herding the Church cattle. Note: I will add Aunt Hettie's own words concerning an incident that happened about this period of time. "Uncle George and Father worked near Corinne, Utah, herding cattle and sheep for President Snow. In fact, they worked together at this work off and on for a long time. One Sunday, Mother and we kiddies went out to see Father for a short visit, we rode out with Cousin Willie Parsons, Uncle George's son. I was a little over three years old at that time, but I well remember Father and Mother leading us children and walking along the edge of a large body of water which was the north end of Great Salt Lake. I remember we children running along the shore line, picking up the pretty little pink and white or cream colored shells while Father sang the song “Gathering Up The Shells From The Seashore”. Mother and we children thought Father so handsome with his dark eyes and his dark hair so well kept, he also had a dark mustache. I remember Mattie and I were wearing little red capes to keep us warm, suddenly a large number of cattle came slowly toward the water edge near us, as they got closer to us they all began to run, or sort of stampede, Father was quite excited and called out loudly, “The cattle are frightened of the little red capes, we had better get away from here quick.” In the early spring of 1885, Robert and Henrietta decided they wanted to homestead some land in the Snake River country west of Blackfoot, Idaho, where a new bridge had recently been constructed, making this land available to home seekers. Robert left Brigham City in his wagon which was loaded with all the implements needed to stake out a new homestead in a new country. Joseph Parsons and family and Alph Parsons and family, two of Robert's brothers, were living in Blackfoot. Joseph Parsons had come to Blackfoot in 1878 when the little settlement was founded and by the spring of 1885, when Robert arrived, Joseph was the owner of a brick kiln. Alphes Parsons and family came to Blackfoot in the year 1881 and he had helped Joseph with his brick business. Robert arrived in Blackfoot, Idaho, after a tiresome trip, which took him about three days to make, and began at once to make preparation to stake out some choice land that could get water for irrigation and for his stock. The first step in choosing a homestead was to determine if water was on the land, as this land that was close to the Snake River was sandy and gravelly and would be useless without water. Robert, like the homesteaders before him, had this thought in mind, and in locating the land of his choice he crossed the new bridge west of the settlement of Blackfoot and then followed the river in a westerly direction until he came to a slough (known as the Watson Slough) that left the river, and like the homesteaders before him, he continued down the slough and after passing the last homesteader to locate on the slough, he continued on about three miles and filed on land that this same slough passed through. In this way the new homesteader would be assured of water for his stock and water for domestic purposes until a well could be dug. Also in choosing land in this way, it would be much easier to get water for irrigation, as the homesteaders could unite with each other extending their ditches from neighbor to neighbor. Robert chose his homestead with this in mind and after careful thought and study decided to locate in what is now known as east Thomas, seven and a half miles west of Blackfoot, and staked out a homestead claim of 160 acres. In a short time he took advantage of the Deseret Land Act of 1811 and secured another 160 acres of land. This homestead claim took in a half section of land directly southwest of the present Wilson School. It consisted of all the land that ran one half mile west and one mile south. Homestead Claim received on June 8, 1895 by Grover Cleveland and recorded on the 26 June 1900 in the book of deeds in Bingham County, Idaho, Application # 2042, Certificate # 1788. And so by making this claim in the spring of 1885, it gave Robert the honor of being the second settler in the Thomas district. There was not a living soul within three miles to the east, which is now in Riverside, but three and a half miles to the southwest in the lower Thomas district "Big John Watson", as he was commonly called, had located on a stock farm in 1878. This same slough that passed through Robert's homestead passed through John Watson’s land and was named in his honor. After all legal matters were taken care of, and Robert had settled on his newly acquired property, he found the country very rough with many obstacles to overcome. Besides the big sage brush growing on the sand and rocky soil there was a prickly vegetation, this in itself was a great menace. The streams were swift and dangerous to cross and it seemed to Robert, as he worked alone on his land, that the very elements were against him. There was much to be done and much to be accomplished, and at once Robert started his new home, this first home was primitive indeed and it was built in haste, however, it was a beginning of something bigger and better. The location of this first home was directly west of the present Wilson School building. Robert dug a fine cellar with straight even walls, he covered the roof with timber and then put dirt over the timber. There were no windows to let in the light, but Robert would open the heavy door that faced the east and the light would come in. It was a typical "dugout” in every sense, it was a place to live until he could secure timber and material and build a better home. Robert grubbed a small patch of brush near the dugout and planted a garden, at first this garden was watered by hauling water from the Watson slough, but as time passed by this method was improved by diverting water and using it to irrigate his growing seeds. And now the time had come for Robert to drive his faithful team "Old Pete” and "Dollie” back to Brigham City to get his wife and family and bring them to their new home. When Robert arrived in Brigham City, he found his wife and family well and happy. Henrietta and children were delighted to have their husband and father back with them again. Robert began at once to make arrangements to dispose of their home and property. Henrietta packed the belongings in heavy paper and placed them in boxes in preparation to make the long trip to their new home. There were dishes, furniture, clothing, bedding, food, etc., that all had to be packed carefully as the road was rough and long. And then the day arrived to bid dear friends and loved ones “a sad goodbye” and to start the long trip, that would take three days to make, to their new home on the Snake River in Idaho. Note: I will add here what Aunt Hettie said about their new home. "Father drove to Brigham City after us in the late summer of 1885, when we arrived at our new home in Idaho we found our fine garden all matured. We lived in the dugout until they could build our log house. Our dugout was very comfortable with just a few things in it that were needed to keep house, a small table, some kitchen chairs, some kind of shelves made of boxes for our dishes, a rag rug, two beds, and a stove. I can't remember what we did for windows, but we must have kept the door open or lit the lamp early. Well anyway, Old Pete and Dollie, our horses, were kept in our yard nearby, how home like it all began to be, the nice garden, the horses feeding nearby, the dugout, and we, three children playing by the door in the sunshine. There was no place for us children to go on Sundays at our new home in Idaho, so we kiddies would go into the fields of sage brush and gather pretty flowers. The land where the tall sage brush grew was covered with many wild flowers, cream and yellow snowballs, bluebells, Indian paint brushes, and little pink sweet Williams that the honeybees loved so much. In sandy soil we would find the lovely sage lilies so waxy white with purple and lavender throats. We also gathered pretty rocks, little Adrian's pockets would be full of them when we returned home to our parents. We also looked for Indian arrowheads made from black obsidian, these Indian arrowheads were the greatest prize of all." ---------- The colonization of lower Snake River Valley represents the union of people from three directions. The Mormons threaded their way through the several valleys leading from Utah, easterners came with a great amount of cultural background, and the mining camps at the north and west contributed a lower level element from the Pacific coast. The southeastern Idaho pioneers were generally people of very limited means. Most of them were young folks, intent upon making homes and raising families where land, water, timber and grazing conditions were favorable. There was much promise in the soil that caused them to come willingly, although practically without capital, they threw themselves naked upon its sage covered bosom. The country was rough, encumbered by dry, prickly vegetation, the streams were swift and sometimes dangerous to cross. The daily activities of the people were a continuous hazard because of nature's undisputed sway over all the countryside. The temperature ranged from 100 degrees in the summer to 40 degrees below zero in the winter, however the air was dry and clear, making the cold less noticeable. Sometimes the frost killed the crops, other times high water flooded them out. Altogether it was an environment to try men's souls and weaken women's patience. Here people could not escape the excess cold in the winter and the excess heat in the summer. These first people knew the pangs of hunger, and food at the best was very meager. There were many stubborn elements designed to make people rough and ready, if not cruel and hard at times, and the settlers were naturally influenced greatly by their surroundings. There were few real rough characters, but more often the horny handed sons and daughters of toil were animated by high idealism, they were toiling towards a commendable goal of making life livable for themselves and families. There were bitter struggles encountered which was the nature of life and the times on the frontier. In southern Idaho the pleasure of the frontier settler centered in the home. The homestead was the pioneer's life and dream. It gave him standing, a place of security against old age. Once planted upon a section or land or a portion or land, he was established. There were children in the frontier homes, they were wanted and needed for their own sakes and for the help they would bring to the task of dominating the stubborn soil. From the start the children were trained for production. There was work for each and idleness was practically unknown, and through these responsibilities, characters were born free from such complexes such as jealousy and selfishness, and family ties and loyalties were of a very high degree. In the early settlement of Blackfoot and its surrounding country, the Mormon faith played a very small part in the beginning. From the year 1885 to 1890 (five years), Blackfoot was the hub of anti-Mormon activity and propaganda. There were religious and political issues over which intense feelings were aroused. A satisfactory adjustment of Mormon and Gentile relationship might have been achieved without turmoil, but it would have required much mutual concession and tolerance. Settlers on this frontier were naturally quick and direct, and when aggravated by factors of deep religious connections on one hand and a drive for political power on the other, great troubles were bound to come. One of the causes of Gentile distrust toward the Mormon settler was their Utah connections, and the organization of pioneer life around the Mormon Church (Example Franklin, Idaho). Its influence comprehended all the affairs of life. Indeed it was so great that the Mormon pioneer town was less a civil unit than an ecclesiastical one. The meeting house was the "town hall" and the bishop was the "mayor of the village". The bishop's court was the tribunal before which an offender was summoned, whether it be one of the brothers of the Church or a stranger within their gates. Of course the person was not required to obey the Mormon court's decisions, they could always appeal to the law of the land, but this entailed considerable expense. After all, this was the frontier and the Mormons had to live together, and all being interested in a common cause it was conventional for them to refer their problems to an authority that was well established, although not possessing actual jurisdiction in civil matters. That was the Mormon's way, but it differed greatly from the Gentile way of thinking. Another reason that the Mormons were unpopular in and around Blackfoot was their belief in polygamy. The Anti-Bigamy Law was enacted by Congress and signed by President Lincoln on the 8 July 1862. It defined plural marriage as bigamy and provided a fine of five hundred dollars and imprisonment for five years for violation of the law. On March 22, 1882 the Edmond's Act was approved, this measure made polygamy punishable by disfranchisement and a fine of not more than five hundred dollars, with imprisonment for not more than three years. Children of such unions were deemed illegitimate. It was under this act that prosecutions were started with the headquarters in Idaho, located at Blackfoot, Idaho. The Idaho anti-Mormon crusader was Fred T. Dubois. He was a graduate from Yale University who came to Blackfoot in 1880. He possessed an inclination for politics and in two years after his arrival he was successful in obtaining the appointment of United States Marshal for Idaho. He was energetic and ambitious and it soon became apparent that he was not only determined to enforce the Federal law against the Mormons to the letter, but also to destroy the Church's political influence. Mr. Dubois effected a militant organization of hard rough deputies in every Mormon district and arrests were frequent. Besides the arrests resulting from the usual activity on the part of the local deputies, special efforts were made in the form of raids that were directed by Dubois himself. Surprise attacks were organized in which a group of deputies would sweep into a community and catch the unsuspecting polygamist unawares. When a Mormon was indicted for practicing plural marriage, conviction was almost certain, because there were Gentiles living in every Mormon community who had knowledge of these plural marriages. This persecution did not cease until after the Manifesto, November 1, 1890. From the year 1888 to 1892 the anti-Mormon forces completely dominated the Idaho territorial government, but in the year 1893 the State Legislature, Idaho had then become a state, withdrew its restrictions against the Mormons and since that time they have enjoyed complete equality in all points of citizenship. Contrary to popular belief a man just didn't stake out a homestead claim, build a house and then start farming. Robert and Henrietta had many obstacles to overcome before this could come to pass. This was a dry desert country and no crops could be grown without water, so water was the greatest importance. Big John S. Watson, a cattleman, was the first man to stake out a homestead claim in the Thomas district. He had brought his cattle to his homestead in the year 1880 and they grazed on a large tract of meadow land where the Watson Slough entered into the Snake River. John Watson was born in Missouri and it was thought by many of his friends and neighbors that he was part Cherokee Indian. He came west with a stage line as one of the drivers and he continued doing this kind of work for some time, traveling over many western routes. He met and married Catholine Hill, and after their marriage settled down on a cattle ranch in Marsh Valley located near Arimo, Bannock County, Idaho. While living on his ranch in Marsh Valley, Big John Watson, as he was commonly called, was made deputy sheriff of Oneida County, and at this period of time Oneida County took in all of the territory of Idaho, from the Utah line to the Canadian border. Big John had the reputation of being a man without fear and it was while he was serving as deputy sheriff of Oneida County that he became acquainted with the Mormon people. He hated the Mormons or any person who associated with them, and it pleased Big John greatly to be of service to Fred T. Duboise in wiping out polygamy. He was of the greatest importance to Mr. Duboise as he was called to plan, direct, and lead many of the raids on the polygamist families, both in Idaho and northern Utah. When Big John came to the Thomas district, he constructed a dam on the slough which is now named in his honor, the "Watson Slough", this dam was located a short distance from his property and he made some diversion ditches to irrigate his meadow land. In the spring of 1885 when the new homesteaders began to settle on the slough above him, such as Robert did and other settlers in the Riverside district, it began to cause trouble between Big John and the new settlers, this is evident by the fact of a water filing record by him dated March 6, 1888 which consisted of the full water right to all water that flowed through the Watson Slough. There are also filing records by other homesteaders including Robert Parsons under dates as listed, June 1, 1886, May 18, 1888, July 15, 1888, etc. From these original filings and the great number of farms that were later irrigated from the Watson Slough, it is apparent that Big John's right to all the water was not legal and subsequently turned down. It is quite easy to believe that Big John, using his past reputation as to being a fearless man and a man without pity, caused the new settlers a great amount of trouble especially until the year 1888 when the water trouble finally came to a head. A man by the name of Jake Hoover, a new settler in Riverside, developed a great hatred for Big John. One evening when Big John was driving home from Blackfoot in his buckboard, Mr. Hoover stepped out in the middle of the road and pointed a gun at Big John's head and fired, the bullet missed him but struck one of his horses and the horse fell dead. This particular incident in the life of Big John Watson had a sobering effect on him and from that time on, or until his death, he was not quite so fearless. It was a very common practice among the founders of a new settlement such as the settling of the northwest side of Snake River to come in groups, usually families and relatives or very close friends. There were many reasons for this, but the most important reason was in case of trouble, sickness, or disaster, there would be someone close by who cared and would be of assistance. Robert needed some members of his family near at hand, so after he and Henrietta were settled, he began to contact each of his brothers and sisters and explained to them the great possibilities of this new country and the opportunity at hand to take up a homestead claim on some of this fertile land. Robert also contacted old friends whom he had known in Brigham City, Utah, and in the railroad camps in Montana. The first of these people to come to the Thomas district was a young unmarried man by the name of John Henry Stander. He was born on the 10th of October 1863 in Brigham City, Utah, son of Henry Christian Stander and Marla Hansen. He was the oldest of three children, his mother was left a widow when he was seven years old. John's early boyhood was spent in Brigham City, Utah, where he herded sheep on the western hills in about the same locality that Robert and his brother, George Parsons, herded the Church cattle. At an early age John secured employment with the railroad in Montana and while he was working there he saved his money and bought a team and wagon. In the fall of 1885 John Stander made the trip alone to the Thomas district where Robert and Henrietta had their homestead claim, he filed on 160 acres of land directly north of Robert's land. From the very beginning Robert and John worked together and planned together; both needed each other in many ways, both men needed logs to build a house and both needed a well dug for culinary purposes, ditches needed to be-built and there was sagebrush to grub and burn before their land could be made ready to plow and plant crops. Mr. and Mrs. William Wearywick and two children, Earl and Annie, came to the Thomas district soon after John Stander arrived. They settled on a homestead directly west of Robert's land. The Wearywick family had a large herd of cattle and they pastured the cattle near the Snake River. Their son, Earl, had a mouse colored pony and he drove the cattle to feed each day, passing the little humble home of Robert and Henrietta on his way back and forth to the pasture. During the late fall of 1885 Robert and John Stander decided to go to Bannock for a week to secure logs so that Robert could build a log house during the coming Winter. This meant that Henrietta and her three little children would be left alone. Robert did not like to leave his family alone for so long a time so he went to Riverside and secured a fourteen year old girl to keep his wife company. One night while Robert was away, Henrietta heard a noise that sounded like Wearywick's cattle tramping around in their garden; she and the fourteen year old girl decided to go out and drive the stock away, they had succeeded in getting the cattle out of the garden but there was one animal that was quite stubborn and refused to move. As they looked closer it appeared to be a wild animal, this frightened Henrietta so they both hurried back into the dugout and bolted the door. The next morning they went out to where the animal was standing the night before and looked at the tracks, Henrietta was not sure what the tracks were but decided to cover them over with a bucket so that Robert could identify them when he returned home. The tracks proved to be those of an adult brown bear. During the winter of 1885 Robert succeeded in building a large one room log house for his family, it was located a short distance north of the dugout. The family moved into their new house early in the spring shortly before the birth of Cora Lillian, a beautiful little girl born the 13th of May 1886. Robert and Henrietta were greatly pleased during the spring of 1886 when three of Robert’s brothers, along with one sister and her husband and the parents of Robert, decided to come to the Snake River country west of the big bridge and take up a homestead right for themselves, however, James Parsons, father of Robert, was unable to take up land by the homestead plan as he had previously used his right on another homestead before coming to the Snake River country. Robert’s youngest brother, Alph Parsons, who had made his home in Blackfoot for several years working for Joseph Parsons who was in the business of making bricks, decided that he and his family would settle on land in south Riverside. However, this land did not prove satisfactory and in a short time they moved to a better location and took up a homestead right on land located in the Thomas district one mile due north from Robert’s homestead. William Parsons and family located on land which is now in the present Thomas town site, located one and a half miles due west from Robert’s land. Thomas Duncan and wife, Ana, Robert’s youngest sister, settled on land two miles southwest of Robert’s homestead. This land was later bought by the Williams brothers, John and Griff Williams. James and Mary Parsons, parents of Robert, lived in a small house in the present townsite of Riverside about where the present store now stands. They made this their home until both their deaths, James Parsons dying the following spring and Mary Parsons dying on the 14th of November 1894, seven years later. Alph Parsons donated land for the Thomas Riverside Cemetery and it was his father, James Parsons, who was the first person to be buried in it. Schools were of the greatest importance in the life of Robert and Henrietta and even before their own little log house was constructed, Robert and his neighbors constructed a small one room log building on property belonging to Mr. William Wearywick about where the Ted Dance home now stands. It was completed for school to start on October 1, 1885, lasting three months and then reopening in the early spring of 1886. Expenses of the school were stood by the parents of the children attending. I will add the exact words written by Aunt Hettie as she wrote it when I asked her for this information: "Later that first summer more families arrived in our community and now there were enough children to justify a school. Father and Mr. William Wearywick and Mr. John S. Watson built a one room building on the northwest corner of Mr. Wearywick's homestead; it was a pretty place with wild flowers growing all around the outside. The first teacher was a young man from Kansas by the name of Mr. Daws, and the first children to attend school under him were Dick and Henry Watson, Earl and Annie Wearywick, and Mattie and Hettie Parsons. During the early spring of the same year other children attending were Laura, Charley, and Archie Simmons and Jessie, Bruce, and Archie Acuff. The following year 1886-1887 a lovely young lady by the name of Miss Bonnie was our teacher. She was teaching when our little brother, Adrian, started to school, I believe he was her pet because she paid so much attention to him, she often sat him on the table and after we older children had brought her lovely flowers, she would put some of the pretty bluebells in each of his little fingers and then sit him up in front of the class and say, "Aren't these clean little hands of Adrian's pretty." This remark by our beloved teacher always had a way of reminding we older children to be more careful about keeping our own hands clean." The Snake River School District No. 20 was organized in the fall of 1886 after a census had been taken of all children of school age within the district. The boundaries of the school district were as follows: Commencing at a point where the west side of range line 34 reaches Snake River, a little west of where the Chase Rich family home now stands, hence north to a given point, hence east along the section line between Riverside and Moreland until it reaches the Snake River about one mile from the bridge, hence south down the river to the beginning, consisting of a distance east and west near eight miles and north and south near three miles. This new country was virgin territory and didn't belong to any other school and since there was no school tax levied against the property, there was no money for school purposes. In order that this school business might be taken care of the people of the district held a meeting on January 3, 1887 at the home of J. C. Slack and elected a board of trustees to care for the school and its business. They elected Alphes Parsons for three years, J. C. Slack two years, and Robert N. Parsons for one year. On January 17, 1887 the board of trustees met and agreed that a ten mill tax should be levied on all property within the district to provide money to build a school house and operate a school. They decided that an election would be held on January 27th for the purpose of voting on the school tax. Notices were posted to that effect and the school election was held on that date, the majority of the votes were in favor of the school tax. However, it was over a year’s time before the men of the district could start to cut and haul cottonwood logs from the Snake River for the school building. Homer Lallaberty donated the ground on which the school was to be built and Emery La Roueque hewed the logs and fitted them together. School District No. 20 had been organized and the school house built but a short time, when so many new homesteaders moved into the district that the school building that had recently been constructed would not accommodate the children in the fast growing district, so a petition was presented to the county Commissioners to divide the district; this was met with some opposition, but owing to the long distance that some of the children had to travel and the crowded condition of the one room school house, the petition was met with favor and the district divided. As new settlers arrived and took up land, the meandering roads through the high sage brush were fast disappearing because the people were fencing their homesteads along the section lines so the roads were forced to follow the same. A community center was considered and Riverside, as the scattered countryside was then known, planned a town site, Mr. L. D. Wilson gave forty acres of land for the project. The school house was located one mile south of the town site so the people decided to build a new school house in the Riverside town site. On August 11, 1888 another little girl came to Robert's and Henrietta's home and they named this new baby Minnie Catholine, in honor of one of Henrietta's dear friends, Mrs. Catholine Steel of Blackfoot. This little babe was always known as "Katie". The winter of 1888-l889 was a very severe winter, it was known as the winter of the “big blow" when cattle and stock died by the thousands. This severe winter was not just local, but equally as bad over most of the whole United States. I will add here what Aunt Hettie says in her own words concerning this severe cold: “The year 1888-1889 was a very hard winter, many cattle froze to death and many died because there was no hay to feed them. Father made a trip to Tilden, a distance of Fifteen miles away, and was able to secure a half ton of wild hay, this saved our family cow for which we were all very thankful. Father and Mother took us children in the sleigh to see for ourselves the great number of cattle that had frozen all over the countryside. Big John Watson, who was called the cattle king of the Snake River country, suffered the greatest loss. There was no serious Indian trouble in the Snake River country after the settlers arrived, however, at times there were Indian scares which resulted in confusion. I will let Aunt Hettie tell about one Indian scare in her own words: “One afternoon when we children were little, a man rode up to our house on horseback, he was very excited and his frightening words ran about like this, "They say the Indians are going to attack the settlement tonight. All the settlers will meet at Slack's grove where the men will stand guard, so get ready and leave at once. "My Father and brother, Adrian, were at work in the field, and Mother notified them at once and they hurried to the house and began to make preparations to leave. Mother prepared the food and clothing for the family to take, while Father and my brother, Adrian, did all the outside chores, and then we started on our way, a distance of about one and a half miles east to where the Slack family lived. "When we arrived at the Slack home there were about eight or nine families gathered there besides our family. The women and children went into the house in which contained two rooms. The children were put to bed on a big family bed made on the floor while the women stayed up and prepared food for the men who were on guard. The men were furnished rifles and ammunition by the U.S. government and each man had a rifle. They went out into the large grove of trees that surrounded the Slack home and prepared for the attack. The men decided to hide themselves in the tops of the tallest trees where they could see for a long distance and still keep themselves hid. About midnight the men started slipping quietly out of their hiding places, one at a time, and came to the house for food. "The following day the settlers were still waiting for the Indian attack, but when evening came the settlers decided it was only another Indian scare so the men took their families and all returned back to their homes." Mattie's own words concerning this time in her life; "I was getting a big girl by now and I used to help the family by doing Mother's sewing. I remember the first time I was allowed to sew, Mother cut two little waists out of cotton flannel material and I sewed them up. They were for our little brother, Adrian. After this I began to do our family sewing and later on I sewed everything that our family had. "Father had only one son so he had to work very hard, clearing land, making ditches and roads, and farming the land that had already been cleared of sagebrush. We had a few cows and chickens and several pigs and sheep. Father didn't believe in his daughters doing much farm work so he worked even harder than most men to keep his girls from doing hard work in the fields. “When Father was a young man, he used to be very affectionate, he would kiss each of us before he went to work each day and at night he always kissed us "good night.” In sickness he was our family doctor and also our nurse as Mother had very poor health at this time. Father wasn't a religious man himself, but he always helped the family to do their duty." During the first part of October, 1889, Henrietta left her home and with her two youngest children, went by train to Franklin, Idaho where her two sisters lived, Martha Nash and Emma Comish. While on this trip a beautiful baby girl was born on the 9th of October at her sister Emma's home, located about two miles south of Franklin. Henrietta named this new baby after her beloved sister, Emma. While their mother was away Mattie and Hettie took care of the family and watched over the house. Soon after Henrietta returned home to her family they found their home was very crowded as they were still living in the one room and with the new baby there were six children. Robert added another room to their home the following summer. I will use Mattie's own words concerning this period of times: "When baby Emma was about two years old a terrible disease struck our happy home. Some people from the east with their two children came down with diphtheria. These people lost their two little children and having a pubic funeral, it scattered throughout the community. We were one of the families that suffered from it. We lost our darling baby Emma. We were all very sick. Mother and Father were the only ones in our family that didn't get it. They nursed us through this sickness, we had few doctors at that time, but through faith and prayers we only lost one child. "I was going to school at Blackfoot at this time. I worked for my board and room. After I had completed one winter of schooling away I returned home to my family. In a short time after I returned home another lovely baby girl came to live with us January 7, 1893, we named her Ana Luella after Father's youngest sister, Ana. Mother stayed with Father's oldest brother's family (Uncle Joe and Aunt Polly Parsons) when the baby came. I was home with the family at this time and I would help with the housework and take in a little sewing on the side, together with taking care of the post office." I have heard my mother speak of this period of her life many times and she always felt it was her mother's faith and prayers that saved her life. The effects of this terrible disease left her with a very bad throat as all through her girlhood and early married life she was troubled with quinsy. Her throat would start to gather as soon as she took a common cold and would usually have to be lanced before the trouble would clear up. This trouble with her throat continued until after my marriage in 1918 when she had her tonsils removed by a doctor in Salt Lake City. Robert and Henrietta were able to secure the first rhubarb (called pie plant) that was introduced into the Snake River Valley. It was the fine red strawberry type, they secured it from a seed house in the east at a cost of $2.75 for five roots. This rhubarb proved to be a great financial help to Robert and his family. They watched over it carefully and developed it where they could take a wagon load at a time and sell it in different communities. He went as far away as Pocatello and would sell his load for as high as twenty-five dollars. I would like to add here some thoughts by Aunt Hettie who was the poet in the family: "Father often gathered his "helpers" together, leaving Mother help for her welfare was always his first consideration. We would go with him and Brother, which seemed like a picnic to we children. My special duty was to watch for the dinner flag, as I was the one most often that saw it first. One of our special pleasures was to go with Father to the Snake River when he went for wood. We children loved to gather wild ripe currants which we enjoyed so much. Then our walks in the fields with Father and Mother, the big bonfires made ready in the daytime were enjoyed by all in the evenings.” Mother and Dad My mother is a sweetheart, A "pal" is dear old Dad; You always give wise counsel To your daughters and your lad; I hope to heed your teaching In everything I do, And keep my cherished memories Of you, who's been so true. Thrills and Memories What pleasant memories thrill me As I recall the happy past; When we were little sisters together Happy thots that always last. I recall our happy play-days, Then our school-days come to mind; Then our dances, and our parties, Happier days you'll never find. Best of all, was our home living, Parents, brother and sisters dear; Our united, happy family, Seems like Heaven was so near. By Hettie February 27, 1944 Although Blackfoot was a thriving little town at this time there was not a branch of the Church there. Those who had pioneered the settling of the town were not of this faith and anti-Mormon feeling ran high. The members of the Church who settled west of the River were considered part of Basalt Ward, but because of the distance it was impractical for members to attend the Basalt Ward so they held meetings in their own homes. By 1889 there were sufficient members of the Church to justify the organization of a branch with George Wintle as bishop. Most of the meetings were held in private homes because it was difficult to get the use of the schoolhouse for Church purposes. The membership of the Church increased quite rapidly and soon there were sufficient numbers to organize a ward. On October 15, 1893 the Riverside Ward was organized with Charles E. Lillenquist as bishop and I. H. Aldred and Hans P. Christensen as counselors. I will state here what Aunt Hettie says in her life story concerning their Church activities: "Now we had been going to Riverside for Church with a fine young man, George Wintle, as bishop. Even before this we went to Iona, a distance of about thirty miles, attending Sunday School Conference. We took part in the singing sometimes. We would go in a buggy or a light wagon, Bishop Eglestrum of Basalt Ward invited us to go. Our Riverside Ward was then a branch. Mattie, Adrian and I were baptized on the 4th of July 1894 by Brother Isaac H. Aldred who took us to East Riverside near Eliza Ellen Wilson's home and baptized us in the Watson Slough. We were confirmed the following Sunday." The first meeting house was built about one mile and a half north of Riverside on the Moreland town site. When the ward was divided and Moreland Ward created in 1896, the building was in Moreland Ward and the people of Riverside were back in the little log schoolhouse down by Snake River. That same summer the Riverside town site was selected and laid out and a schoolhouse built that was used as a Church house also. During the spring of 1895 a Mormon family by the name of Fjeldsted moved into the Riverside Ward. This family was a very religious family and they were active in their Church duties. They moved into the home that Robert's parents had lived in since they came to Riverside before their deaths, James Parsons died June 24, 1887 and his wife, Mary, having died November 14, 1894. This home was located in the town site just north of the present store of today. It was the oldest son of Peter John and Marie Fjeldsted that attracted Mattie, she said many times that she loved him from the first time they met. He was a dashing, good looking young fellow, large in stature, with a personality that attracted all who knew him. Their first meeting was in the little log schoolhouse down by the River where the Riverside Ward was holding their Church meetings. Mattie was now a beautiful young girl of seventeen, she had blossomed into one of the prettiest young ladies in all the country. Young Pete Fjeldsted liked her from the beginning and he set out to win her from a local boy who had been watching her and trying to attract her attention, this boy was young Herbert Adams. It was this same Herbert Adams that worried young Pete during the next few years, as both boys were greatly attracted to her and wanted Mattie for his girl. Young Pete and his father, Peter John Fjeldsted, secured employment on the Peoples' Canal which was in the process of being built. I will state here what John I. Watson, son of Big John, wrote in his history concerning this period: “In 1895 I filed on a homestead in what is now Thomas Ward and I was anxious to get water on it. I took my father's team and went to work on the Peoples' Canal. The ditch company paid $3.00 a day, $1.00 in cash and $2.00 in water stock. That did not work long as we could not feed our teams and ourselves on $1.00 a day. Later they gave us scrip we could take to the grocery store for our needs. We had to go miles to water our teams. We cooked our meals in a Dutch oven, slept in a tent "There we threw a fork full of hay on the ground for mattresses. Herbert and Robert Adams, twin brothers, and young Pete Fjeldsted and myself camped together. Later we took contracts to build other ditches. For sport Pete and I would get on the ditch bank with boxing gloves on and knock each other off. I worked out $700.00 worth of stock in the ditch. I can remember when the Moreland people gave a banquet for those who labored on the ditch. Pete's letter will explain further about the canal and his work: 3131 C. Street Sacramento, California June 8, 1948 Mr. Art Van Orden, R.F.D. Blackfoot, Idaho Dear Art: After viewing the break in the Peoples' Canal Sunday, May 30th, 1948, at the place where John Evans used to live, my mind went back some fifty-five years or near that time when as a young man I worked on that canal, part of the time in 1895 and 1896. I remember in 1895 John I. Watson, Herb and Bob Adams, and an older brother of John I. Watson, and myself had a contract of a distance of about three quarters of a mile beginning about a quarter of a mile above where the break occurred on Sunday, May 30th. At that time it was intended that the canal would be sixty feet from the bottom and on all fills and cuts the dirt was hauled back the sixty feet; that prevailed all along the ditch. In the winter of 1895 I worked on the big fill west of Moreland and the dirt was hauled back to a distance of sixty feet; that same method prevailed on every fill along the entire system. I worked on the fill just east of Burrow Basin, south of the road that runs along by the Thomas church house. That dirt was also dragged back sixty feet. Also, I worked on a fill about a point where you take out water for the pumping system, at that fill the dirt was also drawn back a distance of sixty feet. At that time, Art, there was so much arid land and much of it untaken, that the problem of right of ways was not considered. I also carried and drove stakes for Mr. Rhode, a surveyor, who was the first engineer on that canal. Every stake was driven to conform with the sixty foot ditch. I also remember several stockholders' meetings that I attended, when the two contending figures were Dr. Cluff and Sam Rich, both of those gentlemen had taken land away down along the canal which would have been considered in the second terminal, and at those meetings it was discussed pro and con, that the first division would be sixty feet in the bottom and the second thirty feet. Now, Art, you are at liberty to use this letter any time you see fit or I will make an affidavit covering the contents of my entire letter, or I will come up and testify, if necessary. With kindest regards to you and your family and thanking you again for your kind hospitality, I am, Very truly yours, /s/ Peter C. Felsted. The above statement is true and correct. Signed J. I. Watson 6/23/1948 ====== During the month of September 1896 Robert was baptized, this was a very happy time for Henrietta and her family as she had hoped and prayed that her husband would see the beauty of the Gospel such as she did and they could go to the Temple and be sealed to one another and have their children sealed to them for time and eternity. I will add here what Mattie said in her own words concerning this period: "At the time my sister, Helen Edna, was born, November 23, 1896 while Mother was still in bed with the new baby, all the children came down with German measles. We were all very sick. Father took care of us all including Mother and the baby, he was both doctor and nurse. A young man by the name of Pete Fjeldsted, whom I thought a lot of, would walk three miles every morning through snow to see how we were and to do what he could to help us out. He kept us in firewood so that we would have heat in the home for the sick family, he also did all the other outside chores that needed doing as Father was busy nursing his family. At this time I learned to truly love this young man and the next two years I kept company with him. We quarreled and he joined the American Volunteer Forces.” It was during the spring of 1897, after Pete had been going with Mattie for some time, that Robert told Pete that part of his homestead, the Deseret Claim, was now ready to prove upon, but owing to the fact that he lacked the necessary money to do so, he was afraid he would have to relinquish his rights to this land to someone else. He also told Pete that Isaac H. Aldred had partly decided to take it over, but as yet he hadn't done so as he could not get the needed money. Pete told his parents about the land and they were both very interested as Peter John had used up his homestead right while living in Logan, Utah before coming to the Snake River country. This was the only way for them to secure land of their own, so after making the necessary arrangements with Robert, the Fjeldsted family took over the Deseret Homestead right which contained one hundred and twenty acres of land. Forty acres were purchased by a man named McMurdie, this same land which contained forty acres later fell into the hands of Pete and Mattie after their marriage. During the summer of 1897 Peter John Fjeldsted built a two room log house and moved his family from the little house in Riverside to their new home he had just constructed. Young Pete helped his father as much as he could, but he was still working on the Peoples' Canal and continued to work throughout the winter when the weather would permit it. It was during the early spring of 1898 that Pete and Mattie had a lover's quarrel. The quarrel continued for sometime, but when Pete saw Mattie talking to her old boy friend, Herb Adams, it made him very angry and on the spur of the moment he joined the United States Army on the 3rd of May 1898. (We were then at war with Spain.) The night before Pete left, he and Mattie had a reconciliation and the quarrel was forgotten, but it was too late as Pete had to leave the following morning for Boise where he was to train for two weeks before going directly to the Philippine Islands. He was gone to war for about eighteen months or until November 1899. (The full story of Pete's experiences in the war is written up in the Fjeldsted family history.) Mattie's own words concerning this time in her life: "Pete was gone for about eighteen months and during this time I helped my family and stayed home. I wrote to my sweetheart nearly every day and when he returned we were soon married. After he arrived Pete was very sick with dysentery, but by December 6, 1899 we were married in the Logan Temple for time and eternity. We lived a short time in Pocatello after our marriage, later moving back to Thomas. "My beloved sister, Hettie, was very dear to me, she was always my pride and joy. I will always remember the fine young man she fell in love with and later married. Pete and I were having our wedding dance in Riverside at the ward hall. I was very proud of my handsome young husband, no other man could compare with him. I was so happy, I was dancing on clouds, no words could be put on paper how I felt; me in my beautiful cream colored silk wedding dress, which I had spent so many hours sewing to make it the prettiest dress in the world; my handsome young husband with his fine army manners and wearing his army uniform; my dear little sister, Hettie, and this new sweetheart she had found herself to be in love with, Trenor Fackrell was this young man's name. This was me, a bride, what a glorious night. "My dear little sister, Hettie, was married January 21, 1901 in the Logan Temple in a wedding dress I had made for her. I wanted to make it as near like my own as I could, as I wanted it for the nicest little sister in the world. Father and Mother bought the lovely cream silk material and I trimmed It in pearl beads and a water wave cream colored satin sash, which was so popular then. I also remember my dear little sister when she was Queen of May in 1900. That was the time she wore my wedding dress; she gave the May Day speech, I was so proud of her; I remember they took her picture, she looked so beautiful with her hair done up in curls, much like they wear it today. "After we returned to Thomas from Pocatello, we bought a forty acre tract of land located between my parents' farm and my husband's parents' farm. This land originally belonged to my father, but he had sold it to the McMurdie family and they were unable to make the payments on the land. This land contained a two room log house on it, we lived there until after my baby came, but before my child was born we were in need of money so my young husband went to work in the mines located in Montana. Before he left he made arrangements with a young couple by the name of Caldwell to come and live with me in one of the rooms. Mr. Caldwell would take care of the outside chores and his wife would see that I was all right while I was alone without my husband. "While Pete was away to the mines I sewed some and made a little extra money which we could put to good use. Pete came home from the mines for the baby to be born, he arrived home about a week before it came. A midwife took care of me, her name was Mrs. Crawford. A lovely little girl was born January 24, 1901 and we named her Golden Grace. I loved her so very much as she was so much like my handsome husband." I will add here the contents of a letter written to me on my birthday by my father: Room 475, Veteran's Hospital Oakland, California January 23, 1952 Mr. and Mrs. Lester D. Lowe, Just a few lines to my darling daughter to tell her that I have not forgotten what took place in a humble home that lacked all modern conveniences, but made up by what was lacking in luxuries with love. And, Daughter, I have not forgotten that beautiful girl wife that lay in awful pain while she gave birth to a little baby girl and when that baby was placed in her arms I can never forget that look of pride, for down in her heart she knew it was the finest of God's creations, and no other baby was as sweet as that little cherub that lay in her arms and nursed from the beautiful breasts that few women ever had. Well, Honey, I will write you in a day or two. Love to you from your father. Peter C. Fjeldsted Henrietta was a sincere religious woman and she often reminded her children what the Lord said, "Draw near unto me and I will draw near unto thee." D&C 88-63. She often said the way to draw near to our Heavenly. Father is to speak to him through prayer. Prayer was her soul delight, she knew the things of God because she had been taught them in her youth. These last twenty years being married to Robert, had taught her well, she had come to her Heavenly Father in humility and meekness, there was no other place to go, Robert had not changed his attitude in life to the degree that Henrietta could converse with him on the scriptures. Yes, he had been baptized into the Mormon Church, but that was mostly to please Henrietta. His testimony of the Gospel was very weak. He provided his children with a way to attend Church, which in the beginning was a long, long distance from his home and he helped his family to get to Church but he himself, was hard to understand just why he did it and why his wife was so determined that her children should always be in Church. Just what was there about this Church that made Henrietta so determined to teach her children the Gospel. Henrietta's response to this statement was always the same, "I have come that they might have life, and they might have life more abundantly. John 10-10. Henrietta would always follow up by saying, “To obtain this good life, or abundant life, involves an endless search for truth and knowledge and it is at the Church that one obtains this blessing." This was very hard for Robert to comprehend, in order for him to justify himself he always made the remark, "How can you be sure, how do you know that these things are true?" Henrietta's reply was always the same, her reply was answered in these words. “Spiritual truths must be fully understood by faith and righteousness”. And this answer to Robert was also hard for him to understand. Henrietta wanted her family sealed to her in the Temple, she had prayed and begged the Lord to open up the way that this blessing could be realized. She had talked to her presidency officers in the Riverside Branch, and they had advised her to be patient and when Robert was ready the Lord would open up a way for them to go. However, each time Henrietta made plans to take her family to the Logan Temple for sealing, Robert was opposed. Satan was there, and he put thoughts of criticsm and opposition in Robert’s mind, and Henrietta would have to forget her life's dream and wait for a little longer. ********* During the early summer of 1901 Robert had a change of heart, I will let my Aunt Helen Parsons Goodwin describe this experience as she wrote it in a letter dated July 6, 1952: "Dear Grace, "This letter contains a number of important spiritual experiences I have had in my life that has made my testimony stronger than it otherwise might have been. Some people claim never to of had anything happen to them similar to these I am going to write. I can't understand why so many wonderful things have happened to me. It makes me feel very humble for I know that “where much is given, much is expected." I hope and pray I can live in such a way that I will be worthy of these great spiritual happenings in my life. "In a special blessing I received the 19 July 1926 from Patriarch Hyrum G. Smith, he made this statement. "Thy faith will be increased through a variety of important experiences and through the mercy and favor of the Lord”. "It was quite a hard task for me to find the right language to explain to anyone else these events and I hope I will be inspired to use the right words that I can describe and explain in a way that anyone who may read these experiences can feel the Spirit of the Lord and know what is written is true. "About the early summer of 1901 when I was just a little girl about five years old, I was with my sister Ana who was nearly four years older than I, we were with my father one evening, watching him milk the cow. Ana and I were sitting up on a pole fence and he was milking the cow in the corral joining the cow barn. As I was sitting there on the fence, I suddenly noticed a man dressed all in white with a cane in his right hand standing six or eight feet from my Father, he didn't speak and he just stood looking at Father and Father didn't see him. I was very surprised and was going to callout to Father to look back at the man. Just then Father said, "Ana go to the house and get the strainer." My attention was distracted for a moment and when I looked back again the man was gone. Ana got down from the fence but didn't hurry, but stood looking into the cow barn until Father again told her to get the strainer. She saw this same man dressed in white standing in the cow barn. "After the milking was done and we were in the house, we asked Father who the man was, we had seen. He didn't know, as he hadn't seen anyone. So he and Mother had us tell everything we could remember about him and describe how he was dressed. He was in white, but I know now that he didn't have on Temple clothing. When I told Father the man had a cane in his hand he looked at Mother and said, " It's my Father, James Parsons." They both knew exactly how my Grandfather was dressed when he was buried and his cane was put in his casket with him. Ana and I both described to our parents, as we both saw him only in different places. She saw him as she went to pass the door of the cow barn, and I saw him out in the open corral near Father while he was milking. Anyone caring to, can have Ana tell this incident and she will confirm what I said as being true. "After this spiritual experience, Father did some real serious thinking and very shortly afterwards our whole family made a trip to Logan Temple and were sealed for Time and Eternity. We traveled in a covered wagon or a white top buggy, I can't remember which and was gone about ten days or two weeks." Mattie's own words concerning this period, Pete had left for the mining Camp that was located in Custer County, Idaho and he had been working in the mines as a blaster and digger. He had been away nearly six months and he was very anxious that the baby and I join him, but my parents were planning to take a trip to Logan, Utah as they were very anxious to have their Temple work done before I left to be with my husband as they wanted all their children sealed to them at this time. They were able to leave home during the month of July. They took a large three seated white top buggy and the whole family including Father and Mother and their seven living children and my six month old baby, and drove to Franklin for a few days and visited with my Mother's sisters and their families, and then we went to Logan where we made our camp in the front yard of my brother-in-law's home, Mathease Fjeldsted. Father received his endowments and Mother and the children were sealed on the 17 July 1901. Laura Nash, mother's sister's little girl went along with us from Franklin and stood for our own little dead Emma. We were indeed a happy family as we left Logan and started back to our home in Thomas. At last Mother's prayers were answered, her dreams come true, and now she would have her beloved husband and family for life and eternity. ********* Many people came and homesteaded land in the Thomas Community as soon as the People's Canal was surveyed and they were certain that they could get water on their land. However, the Canal was not completed until 1901. When the Canal was being constructed, many people were living on their homesteads and worked in the mines or on the railroad. (Robert Parson's side work, was on the railroad.) And still others, freighted to provide a living for their families until they could produce crops. Some cleared the brush from the ground and grew a, little dry farm grain, but as soon as the water became abundant, crops were produced and a thriving community grew. ********** As soon as the Canals and ditches began to pour out the water on the land, the homeseekers came from every direction. Through the aid of Lorenzo Thomas, an Attorney in Blackfoot, a Post Office was established at the home of Robert N. Parsons in Thomas. And by the time there was a need for a Community Center the finding of a central location was the most difficult problem. Some thought it should be at Johnson's corner, others thought it should be further south where the Thomas Beet Dump is located. Those people over in the basin which is now called Rockford thought the center should be further West. A committee of five men were chosen to decide on the location. These men were Robert K. McMurdie, D. J. Murdock, Alf Parsons, Ruel Barres, and Griffeth Williams. The present townsite was decided on by the majority vote of the people. Shortly after they decided on the townsite, Heber J. Grant an apostle from Salt Lake City, came out to Thomas and as he sat in a white top buggy, amid the Lava rocks and sage brush on a dry hill with hardly a home in sight he said, "Someday there will be erected right here a magnificent building dedicated to the Lord." These same words were witnessed to the fulfillment of this prophecy, by the building of a beautiful L.D.S. meetinghouse, which was started during the year of 1945. Edwin L. Felsted (Fjeldsted) was the building supervisor of construction. Lorenzo R. Thomas, again rendered his services in securing the title to the townsite so the people called the place Thomas Townsite, in honor of Lorenzo R. Thomas. In July 1900, John R. Williams returned from a mission in the eastern states. He and his brother Griffeth Williams were in the sheep business in southern Utah, when they began looking for new and bigger sheep range, they were informed by their sister who was living in Morland, Idaho that there was good sheep range in this country. Both men came here to investigate and being favorable impressed they decided to make this their home. They and their brother-in-law Cone Hemmingway, and a cousin Dave Harmon, bought the property of William and Ana Dunkin, sister and brother in-law of Robert Parsons, in September of 1900 and made this their home. Since John Williams had recently returned from a L.D.S. Mission he was religiously inclined and at once began promoting a local Church Organization, and in his efforts he found plenty of help among his neighbors. Although there had been a few members of the Church living in the area for the past 15 years, there had not been sufficient to elect a ward organization until the turn of the century. Members of the Church who lived here were members of the Riverside Ward and it was difficult for them to attend meetings because of the method of traveling. The mode of travel which was most common was a team of horses and a wagon or sleigh, a few of these people were fortunate to own a white top buggy and one of these families was the Robert Parsons family. But regardless of the kind of vehicle, folks sat in or where they went, "Old Dobbin," was the motive power. The horses were the source of transportation and they were valuable. Few people had enough horses to do the required farm work. They would work the horses all week in the fields and on Sunday drive them to Church, taking a feed of hay or grain in the back of the wagon or buggy for the horses to eat. I will list a few of the members living in the Thomas Ward at the time and and shortly before the Church organization: John R. Williams, Griffeth WilIams, John Stander, Julious Noack, Isaac Allred, Peter J. Fjeldsted, Daniel J. Murdock, James Hennifer, Robert K. McMurdie, Robert N. Parsons, Alf Parson, Heber C. Rich, Charles C. Sjostrom, Dave Harmon, Cone Hemmingway and a few other families that has been forgotten. On August 18, 1901, the organization of the Sunday School was effected. John R. Williams was sustained as Superintendent with J.E. Noack and Isaac H. Allred as assistants, and Philip Dance as secretary. Meeting was held in the little log school house where the Wilson School now stands. In fact all local public gatherings were held there as it served as a kind of a community center. On December 8, 1910 the M.I.A. was started with Grace Harmon as President and Mary Williams and Dora Crawford as counselors and Lillian Parsons as secretary. On January 15, 1902, a Relief Society Organization was created with Mary A. Williams as President and her counselors were Bertha Noack and Elnora Whittle. These organizations were a Branch of the Riverside Ward, and produced such a stimulating effect on the members of the community that it was decided by the Bingham Stake authorities that a ward should be created. On November 30th a meeting was held in the little log school house. Bishop George B. Whittle of Riverside, President R.H. Bybee and A. J. Stanger of Bingham Stake Presidency, were in attendance. President Bybee presiding. It was on this day at this meeting that the Thomas Ward came into being. John R. Williams was sustained as Bishop with John H. Stander and Julious Noack as first and second counselors, and Isaac Allred as Ward Clerk. ********* One of the first projects of the new ward was to build an open air dance hall on the banks of the Watson Slough, on the Dave Harmon property. A pond was built and boats were put on it, and a play ground planned. The project was completed and a grand opening was held the 4 July 1903. At sunrise, a 13 gun, salute, with heavy anvils and gun powder was given, and at various times they thronged out the day with heavy anvils and gun powder that could be heard from miles around. There was a Marshall of the day, who rode around on a horse dressed like General Grant. Where the speakers stand was, it was all decorated with red and white and blue bunting along with American flags and streamers. Teams and buggies were decorated likewise. A large American flag was briskly waving from a high flag pole, and a bowery was built where lemonade, homemade ice cream and candy were sold. People came from miles away, to play, sing, dance, and eat together. On July 10, 1904, the Bingham Stake President and high council were present and urged the members of the ward to build a new meeting house on the Thomas Townsite. The Thomas Hall as it was called, was erected in 1905 with hard work and sacrifice plus $600.00 from the General Church Office. It was built of Black Lava Rock secured on the grounds nearby. Its size was 40 feet by 80 feet with a basement under a 20 foot stage. The Mason work was done under the direction of James A. Cameron, and the carpenter work was done under the direction of Peter E. Van Orden and Hanse Petersen. This work was planned carefully and done well, as can be testified by men who nearly a half a century later took it down. The first meeting was held in the Thomas Ward on January 1, 1906. People came from far and near What a building, it could seat hundreds of people at one time and then all arise and start dancing. It was astounding, as it was the largest public building west of Idaho falls. Stake Conferences were held here. Stake socials, Old Folks Parties, and recreation of all kinds. It was the social center of Bingham County. It can be truthfully said, that the pioneer women in Southern Idaho were just as resourceful as the men. They did whatever necessary for the maintenance of the homestead. They were full partners in this great productive effort and although the housework was heavy enough, still their energies were generally extended to the care of a large garden, a flock of fowls and in many cases in milking of cows and work in the field. However, Robert was careful with his wife and daughters in this respect, Henrietta was not a strong woman, she had had many problems in her married life, miscarriages, family sickness, and a big family. My mother, Mattie, often spoke of this condition as I was growing up, she said, "For every living child my mother had, she had one and sometimes two miscarriages" There was no Doctors close, or anyone to be of help to her but the children and Robert, so Robert learned by experience to keep close watch over Henrietta and not let her over do while raising their family. At this time Robert and Henrietta were working towards a better life for their family, there were bitter struggles encountered which was only natural on the frontier. The homestead was the Pioneer's life’s dream. Once planted upon a section of land or portion thereof, he was established. Robert and Henrietta had been living on their homestead for nearly twenty years by the early turn of the century or about 1904. They were both fifty years old, and were still living in their little log house made of Cottonwood logs, chinked with mud. The family was crowded, they needed more room, so now Robert and Henrietta was considering building them a new home. They had thought of lumber and brick but when the new meeting house on the Thomas Townsite was started and the Masons had laid the lava rock they changed their minds and decided to build themselves a new home made of black lava rock. They planned their home with, four large rooms down stairs and four large rooms upstairs with a large hall way and stairway in the center of the home. Robert hired expert help to build the home and added features like a built in side board to keep Henrietta’s lovely dishes in, a pantry off from the kitchen, bedroom closets and etc. The home was completed during the year of 1906 and the family had moved into it by the years’ end and was enjoying the luxury of one of the finest homes in the Thomas Ward. Besides they had many other items not common in the community such as a well furnished parlor and dining room which had an organ and lovely settee, rocking chairs, carpets, and modern heating stoves. Robert was a good provider and gave his family the lovely things of life, as soon as they were available. He was a good musician and he played the violin and so he wanted his children to do likewise. Cathleen or Katie as she was called was the organ player of the family and she was a good one. In her early life before her marriage and after his marriage she accompanied the Slack Brothers Orchestra, and played the piano for all or most all the dances in the countryside. She also accompanied her Father and Ana on the violin. All the Parsons children had lovely voices and with their music ability they were a welcome source of entertainment in the Thomas Ward. Robert and Henrietta's main interest in life was their family, although Henrietta kept a well ordered home, her first love and interest was watching over each child and giving them an opportunity to develop their talent. Her oldest daughter Mattie was an expert seamstress on the sewing machine and she was able to make all the lovely dresses that she and her sisters wore. In fact, she did all the family sewing even to the making of her Father's and brothers best Sunday shirts. Henrietta's second daughter Hettie was a natural born entertainer. She had a quick mind and a special sparkle in her countanance that attracted those who were near her. She could entertain people by the hour and all that knew her loved her. She was a good writer, and also wrote poetry. Henrietta's only son Adrain was a fine young man and loved to help his father on the Homestead. He liked cattle and stock and became an expert at riding bucking horses and cattle. He became so good at this sport that he was asked to accompany a group of entertainers that was touring the country. He was their feature attraction, and they called him the “Idaho Kid". After Adrain joined the entertainers, the company toured the Eastern States. Adrain married Josephine Christensen, from the Riverside Ward, 17 April 1907. She was the daughter of Niels Christensen and Lena Hansen. After their marriage Robert and Henrietta sold them forty acres of land east of their home, and Adrain built a nice frame house on it, located west across the street from the Wilson Schoolhouse. Kathleen was the family piano or organ player. She married Hanse C. Christensen, 16 October 1907, they made their first home in Riverside at the old Niels Christensen homestead, (he was a brother to Josephine who married Adrain.) They lived there a short time and then moved back to Thomas where they bought a farm near the Snake River. Located about two miles south of the Wilson School. When it came time to leave the mines, during the summer of 1907, Peter and Mattie returned home to their homestead in the Thomas Ward. Mattie had the business head in the family, and it was she who had carefully saved the money and kept the expenses down so that when they returned they were able to payoff their homestead debt, and make other important investments. Grace their little daughter now age six (myself) had reached the age that she should be in school. After they got Grace in school that fall, they started thinking about building a new house. Mattie liked the black lava rock that her parents home was built from, and so they decided to start hauling rock that very same fall to build their new house with. The home consisted of three large rooms. The following year a large kitchen, pantry, and two porches were added. Pete dug the lave rock that was used to build the home with, it came from a rocky hill located about two miles northwest, near the Thomas townsite. James A. Cameron was the mason and Hans Petersen did the carpenter work. . . Mattie was very happy to be home among her loved ones again and she was also very happy that her dear parents were so comfortable. Her sisters had grown up to be beautiful young girls, each one of them had special talents and these talents were watched over and developed. At this period of time, many lovely parties were held at the Parsons home as there was so much talent in the family. Robert himself was the violinist in the family, Cathleen or Katie was trained to play the piano and organ. Ana played the violin and they all had lovely voices. Many times the Parsons family would hold their Christmas party at their home with the married children and their children all attending. What a gala occasionthis was. I will never forget our Christmases at Grandpa and Grandma Parsons home. There was the big lighted Christmas tree in the parlor and Grandpa dressed up as Santa Claus. The gifts were piled high, under the big tree and after a delicious supper, Santa Claus would pass out all the presents. This was one of my very first memories, after we returned back from the mines. These family "get togethers", was Grandma's fondest delight, what a beautiful memory of my Grandparents, that I have cherished all these years. Robert and Henrietta's daughter, Lillian, was married to Philip Anderson a son of Mr. and Mrs. Anders Andersen, (a close neighbor ) They were married in the Temple at Salt Lake City, 22 December 1909, Lillie as she was called, was always active in the Church activities in the Thomas Ward. She was sustained assistant Secretary in the Y.W.M.I.A. when the ward was first organized and she also served as secretary and then 1st counselor to Grace Harmon later. They made their home in Thomas, close by both parents. By the year of 1909, Robert and Henrietta's second daughter Hetty, had several children, and they made their home in lower Thomas Ward on a homestead they took up soon after their marriage, located one mile south and one half mile west of Thomas townsite. Trean and Hetty were very active in the Church and Community affairs, and served in nearly every organization of the Church. Commercial entertainment in the Thomas Ward was not plentiful, because it was expensive and the long distances to travel, with team and wagon or sleigh, made it impracticable, so the people of Thomas Ward furnished their own own, by putting on programs, parties, shows, dances and games. Almost every person in the community participated and contributed his part to the social life and well being of the community. The little log schoolhouse and the new brick schoolhouse (Wilson School) were used as a community center when the ward was first organized and the “Lagoon" was used as a summer playground, but when the Thomas Hall was built, all entertainment was promoted there. It was one of the biggest and best buildings in the county for community entertainment. There was a good dance floor and the best stage equipment in the county. There was a good group of musicians in the Ward, I will mention a few who have contributed so much to the Thomas Community life, Bill and Vern Slack, and Kathleen or Katie Parsons who furnished the music for all the dances, for so many years. Niels Anderson taught the people how to sing. Brigham Young told the people of Salt Lake City that dramatics provide a good form of entertainment and education, and it proved to be so in the Thomas Ward. Many, many shows have been staged, and at some time or another, almost every member of the ward took part. Here are mentioned only a few of the plays that were presented: “The Noble Outcast", The Cuban Spy", "Ten Nights in a Bar Room", “The Gunners of the Navy '", "Uncle Tom's Cabin", "The Lone Tree Mine", ”The Alaskan”, "Down the Black Country ", "Nothing but the Truth", "Pegleg and Peter”, and other shows have thrilled the members of the community. And those who portrayed some of the blackest villains were Pete and Edwin Felsted (Fjeldsted). In roles depicting the "sweet young thing", was Mattie and Ana Parsons Felsted, and many others but these four people were the ones who was the first in the dramatics of the Thomas Ward. Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, May Day, Fourth and Twenty Fourth of July always called for a celebration. Thanksgiving was usually observed with a Ward supper, everyone contributing food and work. A great feast was the result. Old and young went home with a full stomach and happy hearts. An appropriately decorated Christmas tree was a must. Every child in the community received a present, nuts, and candy was passed out by Santa. New Years was usually the dance of the year. They danced until about midnight then had a basket supper. Sometimes the baskets were sold to meet the expenses of the Christmas Party, sometimes baskets and ladies were exchanged to add a variety to the supper. Feed was brought for the horses, they were unhooked and cared for, “Baby Sitters", there were ,none. The children were brought along and beds were made on the benches where they slept, while mamma and daddy danced. May Day was the children's day, with picnics, games and braiding the of the Maypole being the feature of the day. The Fourth and Twenty Fourth of July was started off with, "Cannon saluted fired off at sunrise”. This was usually done by placing blasting powder between two heavy anvils and then setting it off. There was always a big parade and a patriotic program, and the afternoon was spent in races, games and sports and most of the time before the day was over it wound up with a horse pulling match. On March 1st, 1913, Robert and Henrietta's daughter Helen was married to a fine young man in the Thomas Ward. His name was Joseph Edgar Goodwin, son of John William Goodwin, and Catherine Maria Stacker, and they made their first home with Robert and Henrietta. I will include a newspaper article, sent in to the Bingham County Newspaper July 1913, by Hettie Fackrell. "Thomas Idaho- The very first James Parsons reunion was held in the Thomas Hall, Tuesday in the style of a reunion by the descendents of James Parsons and wife Mary Abanatha Thrift Parsons. Peter C. Felsted was, chosen as chairman and master of ceremonies a position that he filled with much credit and kept the ball rolling until the wee hours of the morning. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. George Washington Parsons from Brigham City, Utah, and Frank Parsons from Missouri, and twenty one families now permanently located in and around the Thomas Ward. The program consisted of songs, readings musical selections and etc., from the following named persons, Miss Ana Parsons, Helen Parsons Goodwin, Bishop John R. Williams, Mable Adams Turpin, Amanda Parsons. R. H. Hoare. Julious Noack, Mrs. Myrtle Parsons, and the Slack Brothers Orchestra gave several selections, all of which were of high class and helped materially in enlivening the fine program. At 11 0' Clock the benches were cleared from the center of the floor and every one present took part in dancing. One pleasant feature of the dancing was that all older folks took part. The floor manager permitting all over forty to "rag" all they wanted to, without restrictions what so ever. While the dancing was in progress or in full swing, the young ladies prepared hot coffee, sandwiches, chicken pie and cake and other dainties. At 2 O’Clock the party broke up, all hoping it would be the first of the annual James Parsons Reunions, so that the young and raising generation of the Parsons family will grow up to be a member with great satisfaction with their pioneer spirit. We hope this marks the beginning of many happy times to be. Robert and Henrietta's daughter Ana, was married to Edwin Leroy Felsted the 24th December 1913 in the Logan Temple. He was the son of Peter John Fjeldsted and Bertha Marie Jensen. The Fjeldsted family the Robert Parsons family had been close friends for many years as Peter Christian Felsted married Ana's older sister Mattie, fifteen years earlier, 6th December 1899. Robert and Henrietta’s children were all married now and no doubt but what they were very pleased when their youngest daughter Helen and husband moved in with them and made their parents home their home. I will add here what Helen said in a spiritual experience she had during the month of August 1914. "In August 1914 we were living with my parents, or we had two rooms in their home. Joe and I were married in 1913. He played baseball in the summer and basketball in the winter. One August Saturday afternoon the Thomas baseball team was playing Groveland at the Groveland ballpark. My brother-in-law Pete Felsted was the manager of the Thomas ball team. "Several times during that same morning my mother suggested to me, that I stay home from the ball game, and I wondered why, because when I asked her why, she gave me no reason, so I went to the ball game because it was the one day of the week when everyone look forward to. All the men quit their work on Saturday afternoons and the families attended the games for miles around. Mother seemed sad, but I being young and full of excitement and loving to watch my young husband play ball, I went on my merry way. As we were getting into the buggy to leave the house, "Mother came to the kitchen door and said, "Helen please be careful of an accident." We waved to her and said as we left, "Don't worry Mother we will be fine and we will see you in a little while." She told us afterwards that she had a premonition that something was going to happen to me. 'When we got to the ballpark, the carpenters were working on, the roof of the new grandstand which they were hurrying to finish shingling, before the game began. It was very hot that afternoon and my brother-in-law, Pete said, "Go in the grandstand and sit down”, so he and his brother Norman Felsted, and I walked over to the grandstand. Joe my husband, was on the ball diamond warming up for the game. Pete said to me afterwards, that when he went into the building he had a foreboding feeling, that something was wrong, and he looked around to see why he felt so uneasy, but as he couldn't see anything out of the ordinary he left and went out with the ball players. "Norman and I sat down on the second seat up from the ground and was talking and laughing as we were waiting for the rest of the ball team to arrive. I saw some of the players coming so I started to speak and tell Norman the team had arrived, just then a bridge plank fell out of the top of the grandstand and struck me on the back of my neck. Norman got a little of it on shoulders, which broke the jar. It drove both sets of my teeth through my tongue and threw the vertebra's of my back out, that feeds the heart and lungs. Blood shot out of my mouth and word got around that I was killed. I was taken to the home of Dr. Hale, who had studied to become a chiropractor, up to that time, hardly anyone had heard of him. "Dr. Alvin Hale had told his wife that same morning to leave her work and go with him to make his house calls so he could get back home by the time the ball game started. She laughed at him and said, "Why have you gone baseball crazy too?" He said, "No, I haven't, but there is going to be an accident today and they will bring the victim here." She went and assisted him, for he had several patients to visit, just as they returned home and stopped their horse at the back of the house, they were carrying me in the front gate. He came in the back door as we came in the front door. He came over to me and before my clothes were loosened or removed he put those vertebra's back in place without, knowing what had happened. I immediately began to breathe easier as most of my blood that was held back began to circulate again until my heart was pounding so hard that the doctor had to put a tight bandage around my body. "Joe was nearly crazy with fear, he and Pete didn't know how to tell Mother and the folks what had happened. Pete felt so responsible, because he had urged me to go sit in the grandstand. To make a long story short, I will explain that when the accident first happened a few of the ball players came rushing up to me, including Ray Merkley, and administered to me, Ray doing the praying. Although, I was nearly killed I made a miraculous quick recovery, and I've always felt deep inside that it was because of this prayer and Dr. Hale's fast thinking. It also taught me a great lesson to pay strict attention, when ever Mother had a premonition. That was certainly a testimony to me as well as all my sisters and brother." It was during the early spring of 1914 that Robert and Henrietta sold some of their property to Joe and Helen Goodwin their youngest daughter. This property was located due west about a quarter of a mile from their home. Joe was a carpenter by trade and they needed a home, so at once he started building them a three room frame house. About this same time Robert and Henrietta's daughter Ana and husband, Edwin Felsted, had purchased a forty acre tract of farming land, it was located only a, mile northwest from Robert's home. Now all Robert and Henrietta's children were married happily, and all living close to their parents home, all their children and companions were ambitious and hard working people, and all their family were doing things pleasing to their parents. It was late in the summer of 1915 that Henrietta decided to have a family picture taken. The day had come that this project must be accomplished. Henrietta had worried for some time past that something foreboding was going to happen to her family, and before this came about she wanted a family picture. So gathering all her children together with her husband they drove to Blackfoot and this was accomplished. Henrietta was very thankful later that she did this, as trouble and sorrow was to come to pass much sooner than Henrietta had any idea. It was during the early spring of 1916, and Robert had passed his sixty-second birthday, he decided that the work on the homestead was too strenuous at his age. He had worked hard for many years and was now bothered with rheumatism and other old age problems. He felt it would be easier on himself if he found some other work less strenuous, so after securing a good renter for his farm land, (his nephew Robert Parson Dunkin) he began the business of making cement blocks. His new business, was very successful in the beginning, as many people at this time wanted to build their home from these blocks. It wasn't long before his business had expanded to such an extent that he was now working in the little town of Blackfoot. Robert decided that he liked Blackfoot so well he wanted to make it his future home. He moved in with an old lady friend and made her home, his future home. Henrietta's heart was broken and so was her families, but there was nothing they could do to change Robert’s mind. He had met this woman many years before when he was working on the railroad and she had never given up, on the idea that Robert would leave his wife and family and marry her. After Robert left Henrietta, she was alone in the big rock house, it was so big and she was so lonely. This sad condition caused her to go into a deep depression, however she soon recovered with the love of her children and their close relationship. Each child tried hard to cheer their mother up, but Henrietta had lost her true love and this was not an easy thing to do. I will add here a poem written about this period of time by her daughter Hettie P. Fackrell MY TOKEN 0F LOVE Mother dear, a little token For you now it's Mothers Day Too much praise cannot be spoken, Of your gentle loving ways, You often worked when you were weary, To help your loved ones on their way; We will not forget you Mother, For your labors day by day. We will try sweet flowers to scatter, To make your pathway shine; Your rewards are sure dear Mother; Oh! We love you, Mother mine. A white carnation I will send you, To show my love to you sincere, I will not wait until you've left us, Oh no! I'll send it while you are here. I will write a little letter, to let you know that I am well, I know that it will please you better, Than words can ever tell, Other's love their mother dearly, How we love our own sweet own, We picture her as one most queenly When we think of Home Sweet Home. I will add another lovely poem written by Rita Fackrell Howell, daughter of Hettie P. Fackrell, written in 1952. KEEP ON STRIVING Do not give up though you think you have lost, Why! You haven't, You've just been delayed, "And the experience you've gained Is worth more than it cost, You'll profit by mistakes you have made. Brace up and get busy; there's work you must do, There's no time for ill regret, For many has had their trouble like you, Look ahead, and the past you'll forget. Do not envy another, but go right to work, With the faith that at last you will win. For failure will come, if your thoughts are to shirk, Get busy it is time to begin. Lend a hand to a neighbor, who's discouraged and blue, For at some time we all feel that way, It will be great help to him and to you, When your efforts and struggles are through, And later years when you look at the past, And realize life's work is all done, You'll be happy and glad that You've stayed to the last You'll be proud, of the victory you've won. Henrietta's sister, Emma Jane Comish died the 24th of December 1917. Her funeral was to be held in the Franklin Ward December 27th, when Henrietta received the sad news she began to make preparations to leave at once and attend her sister’s funeral. Her daughter Mattie Felsted and her daughter Grace (myself) accompanied her. They caught the evening train out of Blackfoot and arrived at the Dayton depot where cousin, David Nash met the train arid took them to his home in Weston, that was located a short distance away, and a lovely breakfast was prepared by Amenda, Dave's wife. When it came time for the funeral, they all drove over to the Franklin Ward, a distance of about nine miles. I will add the tribute that was given in the Franklin Newspaper, covering the funeral, Desert News 5 January 1918. " Mrs. Emma Jane Cornish died December 24, 1917 of rheumatism of the heart. The funeral was held here in Franklin December 27th and was attended by practically all the grown people in Cove and Franklin. Mormons and Non-Mormons alike, turned out to show their respects for her memory. The service began at 1 O'Clock with Bishop S. C. Parkinson presiding. Prayer was offered by Cecil Woodward and the benediction by Robert G. Lowe, Mrs. Nora Daines and Miss Hazel Larsen sang solos. The speakers were Bishop H. L. Blair of Cove and former Bishop Lorenzo L. Hatch of Franklin. Also Thomas Durrant and Bishop S. C. Parkinson spoke. "Mrs. Comish was the daughter of Martha Diana Case Howland. She was born in Ogle County Illinois, 14, January 1849. In 1852, she and her two sisters, Helen and Martha came to Salt Lake City with their mother, their father having died on the banks of the Missouri River before crossing the plains. The family resided in Salt Lake City and West Jordon until 1863 when they came to Franklin, Idaho, where Emma Jane married Robert Nephi Comish in 1865. Ten years later the family moved to Cove Utah where the couple proved upon a homestead claim and devoted themselves to rearing a family. She is survived by the children and two sisters and a brother, Mrs. Helen Packer of Showlow Arizona, Mrs. Henrietta Parsons of Blackfoot Idaho, and Don Hickman of Eureka Utah." I will include here what Mattie said in her history, about this period of time. "During the summer of 1918, we were making our home in Blackfoot, we had rented a house directly back of the Eccles Hotel, on the next block north. We had came to Blackfoot the fall before in order that our daughter Grace could continue on to high school. It was during the first world war and all the young men were leaving or had left, for the service of their country. Grace, our daughter now age seventeen, was writing to a young man at Franklin Idaho, who she had met while she and I were there on a visit, during the spring of 1915 this young man wrote and asked Grace if she would come down to Franklin and spend Idaho Day (June 15) with him as he was expecting to leave soon for the armed forces. At this time Grace was not serious about him, but she thought it would be fun to get away for a short vacation. "While she was in Franklin she fell in love with this young man and they were married on the 31st July 1918, by former Bishop John R. Williams of the Thomas Ward. The wedding was held in our home in Blackfoot and all our dear families were invited. Both the Parsons family and the Fjeldsted family. T had looked forward to having my own dear mother and father with us as Grace was their oldest grandchild, on both sides of the family, The Fjeldsted and the Parsons family. "When the wedding day arrived neither my mother or father came. Mother was still ill with a depression and Father couldn't stand to face his family with all the trouble he had caused. After Grace's marriage we sold the homestead in Pingree and moved to Salt Lake City where we bought some hotel property. I was very ill at the time as I had a bad spell of quinsy with my throat. I had to have my throat lanced. The doctor told us that I would hate to have my tonsils out, but I guess I left them in too long as it turned out I got rheumatic fever and after that I had arthritis which caused my hands and feet to deform. "Pete and I didn't like it in Salt Lake City, so far away from our beloved family and our dear little girl Grace, who was expecting a baby, so we sold our hotel property and moved to Franklin in the spring of 1919. Later that summer we purchased an Ice Cream business in Preston Idaho, and moved, there in time to enter our two little boys in school that same fall." After Pete and Mattie moved away from Blackfoot, Henrietta turned all her attention to her family that lived close by her. Each daughter was most tender and kind and gave Henrietta all their love that a daughter could bestow. They watched over her tenderly, every child was always ready and willing to help their mother, whenever she needed help. It wasn't long after that, Henrietta began to improve and her heart that was broken began to heal. It was during the year of 1921 that Henrietta's youngest daughter, Helen and her husband Joe Goodwin, left their little home in Thomas, located a short distance from Henrietta, and moved to Blackfoot, where Joe could get more carpenter work. They were living in Blackfoot at the time that their third child, Edgar LaVell was born March 3, 1923. It was also at this same period of time, and shortly before this, that Robert had secured a divorce from Henrietta and had married the woman that he loved. Robert needed more money to live on as his cement block business had not been the success that he had planned. It was only a short time later after his divorce from Henrietta that he sold the old homestead that Henrietta was living on, to his nephew, Robert Parsons Duncan. He took his share of the money which was one half, and Henrietta took her share and part of it she used to buy Joe and Helen's little home, and the balance of the money was put in the bank. She used the interest to live on. It was during the winter of 1922 that Reta Fackrell, daughter of Hettie Fackrell lived at the home of Robert and his wife. I will let her tell what she wrote about this period in a letter dated July 24th 1985. "I lived with Grandpa and his wife when I was going to school in Blackfoot for a few months. I think this was about the year 1921 or 1922, when I was 17 or 18 years old. I don't remember hearing Grandpa's wife’s name I always called her Grandma. I believe Grandpa and her were friends before either one were married. I believe Grandpa worked on the streets at Blackfoot hauling water to sprinkle them in the summer and fall. I remember the nice meals his wife cooked while I was there and how she would save any leftovers, like mashed potatoes and gravy and put them together to warm over for the next meal. I also remember her having the (Josephites) hold meetings at their home. The only thing I seem to remember quite clearly was her hiding the car keys from Grandpa so he couldn't drive. I don't know if it was her car and his keys, but I thought that wasn't right for her to do. I think she told me she only did this if he was drinking. I just can't remember which house Grandma was living in at this time. If it was the big rock house or the little one Uncle Joe, built. I remember like you do of the times when we were small and our folks took us to Grandma’s and Grandpa’s house for Christmas and how Santa would give out the gifts to each person." By the year 1924 things were beginning to get pretty bad for Robert, he had spent all his money that he received from his homestead and it wasn’t easy to live on the small amount he received by working for the city. He was now seventy years old and his health was not good. His wife was a fault finder and this was hard for Robert to endure. His children were not like they used to be when he and Henrietta were living together, some of them had never forgiven him. This was hard for Robert to take. He loved his children especially his only son and now he couldn't be close to him. As Robert's domestic trouble deteriated, he thought more and more about his past actions, finally the day arrived that Robert was told to take his personal things and "Get Out", of his' wife’s home, so packing his belongings he went to one at his daughter’s home, I believe his daughter, Hettie who was then living in Pingree Idaho, and told his troubles to her. Hettie gave him a home and made him feel welcome. It wasn't long after this that Robert got a divorce from his second wife. The children, that had been cold and distant to Robert, were the first ones to accept him back. (Mattie for instance) She and the other girls encouraged Robert to go back to Henrietta and seek forgiveness. Then they could all be happy again. This he did and although I haven't the date of their marriage, I do have the date of his rebaptism, in the Thomas Ward, on the 1st of August 1926. Robert and Henrietta lived together in the little three room frame house that she had bought from Joe and Helen, for the next four years and they seemed to be very happy. Their children that were near, showered them with love and attention, and those who were far away, made many trips to their beloved parents home to show their love too. I will let Mattie tell about her Mother's death, as she wrote it in her personal history in 1943. "My darling mother died of a stroke, of a fourteen day duration on the 7th of June 1930 at her home in Thomas Idaho. She had been standing at the window watching Father working in the flowers when it came upon her. Father found her there when he came in to the house and then sent immediately for the children. I went as soon as I could and I never left my sick mother's side until her death. It was a beautiful time of the year and I wondered if the flowers would ever look the same again. How happy I was that I had taken my dear parents, the year before, and brought them home to live at our house in Preston so that I could look after them during the long cold winter months, of 1929-30. That was one of the happy thoughts I had to think about when I was mourning the loss of my beloved Mother. The following year 1931, after Robert's daughter Ana, had got a divorce from her husband Edwin Felsted, she and her two youngest children, Adreane, and Oral came to Robert's home and kept house for him for the following two years, and on 23 July 1933 Ana was married for the second time to Hazen Samuel Cotterell. After Ana's marriage, Robert’s children could see it was hard for him to keep house by himself, and so they decided to have him move in with them, each child taking turns, watching over him and giving him loving care. First he went to his son Adrain’s home, and stayed there for a period of time, then he went to the home of each one of his daughters and stayed with them for awhile, but the home he chose to call his permanent home was at his daughter Katie's home. She made him feel, so welcome, and there was so much music and entertainment, living with her talented family. Robert lived six years after Henrietta's passing away, and enjoyed pretty good health. He made many trips to Preston, Idaho to visit his daughter Mattie and family, as she was also a very special daughter. Robert died from the effects of prostate gland trouble the 8th of January 1936 at his daughter Katie's home in Thomas Idaho. He was buried the 12th January 1936 in the Thomas Cemetery by the side of his faithful wife Henrietta.

Life timeline of Robert Nelson Parsons

1854
Robert Nelson Parsons was born on 14 Jan 1854
Robert Nelson Parsons was 7 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
Robert Nelson Parsons was 26 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Robert Nelson Parsons was 34 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
Robert Nelson Parsons was 45 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
Robert Nelson Parsons was 55 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Robert Nelson Parsons was 58 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Robert Nelson Parsons was 74 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
Robert Nelson Parsons died on 8 Jan 1936 at the age of 82
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Robert Nelson Parsons (14 Jan 1854 - 8 Jan 1936), BillionGraves Record 4542719 Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho, United States

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