Robert K McMurdie

17 Feb 1862 - 11 Feb 1942

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Robert K McMurdie

17 Feb 1862 - 11 Feb 1942
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ROBERT K. MCMURDIE Robert K. McMurdie was born Feb. 17, 1862, at Paradice, Utah. He was the son of Samuel McMurdie and Sarah Ann Kay who came from Scotland. In Logan, Utah, in 1883 he married Margaret Ann Mills. Who was born March 23, 1867, at West Weber, Utah; the daughter of William F. Mills, and
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Life Information

Robert K McMurdie

Born:
Died:

Riverside Thomas Cemetery

939-949 State Highway 39
Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho
United States
Transcriber

Will

September 1, 2013
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Will

August 1, 2013

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Robert K McMurdie is buried in the Riverside Thomas Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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MCMurdie-Margaret Ann Mills and Robert K Mcmurdie Copied from "miracle of the Desert"

Contributor: Will Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

ROBERT K. MCMURDIE Robert K. McMurdie was born Feb. 17, 1862, at Paradice, Utah. He was the son of Samuel McMurdie and Sarah Ann Kay who came from Scotland. In Logan, Utah, in 1883 he married Margaret Ann Mills. Who was born March 23, 1867, at West Weber, Utah; the daughter of William F. Mills, and Margaret Ann Hawkey who came from England. Robert was a big man, 6 feet 2 inches tall, tipped the scales at 190 with nothing but bone and muscle, broad across the shoulders with large hands and feet, brown hair, brown eyes with a soft warm twinkle. His hobby was fishing hunting and telling stories. He came to Blackfoot from Cache Valley in 1895 in a covered wagon with his family. He had two work horses and a saddle horse tied to the side and led two milk cows behind the wagon, and a crate of chickens hanging on the side. He first lived on the place owned by “Red” Johnson, just north of the Wilson farm. He also worked for Mr. Cluff at Goild Point mining. He lived on part of the Bob Parsons place then homesteaded the Castle Hill farm, (C. E. Jackson farm). He was one of the men who helped select the Thomas townsite and built one of the first houses there. He was active in all church and community activities. It is said he lifted more rock on the scaffold to build the Thomas hall than any other man in the ward. He had the experience of trapping several bears, three of them on the Big John Watson place. Margaret Ann was a small woman scarcely more than half his size. She had brown hair, grey eyes, and weighed 105 pounds. She loved her husband and shared their life together. They were the parents of eight children: She died Mary 17, 1929 at Blackfoot. He died February 11, 1942, at Driggs, Idaho. Both were buried in the Riverside Thomas Cemetery. Margret Ann, (Maggie) born January 8, 1886, married John A. Eiman 1902, second marriage to Pat Bell. William Mills, born Dec 29, 1890 married Hanna Hansen 1912. Nora, born February 4, 1802, married Lorenzo Ostberg 1919. Soffire, born August 12, 1898, married Robert Kunz. Jane, born August 7, 1900, married Herbert B. McCauley. George, born Sept. 8, 1902, married Clara Driggs. Sarah, born August 5, 1903, married Jack Wagner July 2, 1930 at Blackfoot. They have three children. Jack died Sept, 1, 1952, at Blackfoot, Idaho. HAND WRITING: Copied from “Miracle of the Desert” By Thomas H. William

MCMURDIE, ROBERT k

Contributor: Will Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

ROBERT K. MCMURDIE Robert K. McMurdie was born Feb. 17, 1862, at Paredice, Utah. He was the son of Samuel McMurdie and Sarah Ann Kay who came from Scotland. In Logan, Utah, in 1883 he married Margaret Ann Mills. Who was born March 23, 1867, at West Weber, Utah; the daughter of William F. Mills, and Margaret Ann Hawkey who came from England. Robert was a big man, 6 feet 2 inches tall, tipped the scales at 190 with nothing but bone and muscle, broad across the shoulders with large hands and feet, brown hair, brown eyes with a soft warm twinkle. His hobby was fishing hunting and telling stories. He came to Blackfoot from Cache Valley in 1895 in a covered wagon with his family. He had two work horses and a saddle horse tied to the side and led two milk cows behind the wagon, and a crate of chickens hanging on the side. He first lived on the place owned by “Red” Johnson, just north of the Wilson farm. He also worked for Mr. Cluff at Goild Point mining. He lived on part of the Bob Parsons place then homesteaded the Castle Hill farm, (C. E. Jackson farm). He was one of the men who helped select the Thomas townsite and built one of the first houses there. He was active in all church and community activities. It is said he lifted more rock on the scaffold to build the Thomas hall than any other man in the ward. He had the experience of trapping several bears, three of them on the Big John Watson place. Margaret Ann was a small woman scarcely more than half his size. She had brown hair, grey eyes, and weighed 105 pounds. She loved her husband and shared their life together. They were the parents of eight children: She died Mary 17, 1929 at Blackfoot. He died February 11, 1942, at Driggs, Idaho. Both were buried in the Riverside Thomas Cemetery. Margret Ann, (Maggie) born January 8, 1886, married John A. Eiman 1902, second marriage to Pat Bell. William Mills, born Dec 29, 1890 married Hanna Hansen 1912. Nora, born February 4, 1802, married Lorenzo Ostberg 1919. Soffire, born August 12, 1898, married Robert Kunz. Jane, born August 7, 1900, married Herbert B. McCauley. George, born Sept. 8, 1902, married Clara Driggs. Sarah, born August 5, 1903, married Jack Wagner July 2, 1930 at Blackfoot. They have three children. Jack died Sept, 1, 1952, at Blackfoot, Idaho. HAND WRITING: Copied from “Miracle of the Desert” By Thomas H. William

Robert Kay McMurdie Find A Grave Memorial# 42464262

Contributor: Will Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Robert Kay McMurdie Birth: Feb. 17, 1862 Death: Feb. 11, 1942 Family links: Spouses: Margaret Ann McMurdie (1867 - 1929)* Marintha Elthira Bingham Eccles (1862 - 1948)* Children: William Mills McMurdie (1889 - 1966)* *Calculated relationship Burial: Riverside Thomas Cemetery Blackfoot Bingham County Idaho, USA Plot: 67 Created by: LDS Family History Cente... Record added: Sep 27, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 42464262

Robert Kay McMurdie, By: George Mills McMurdie

Contributor: Will Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

I, George McMurdie was born 8th of September 1903, on the Castle Hill Farm, northwest of Thomas, Idaho. My father was 41 years old and mother was 35 at this time. My first recollections were when we lived in Thomas. I remember father taking us by team to the ranch. Sometimes we would go early by lantern light to start topping sugar beets. At another time dad would have me tromp the hay as he threw the hay on the hay rack. In the fall he would put the lantern on the lead horse and bind grain by lantern light. He was always on the go. In the fall he would go with his neighbors to the lava beds to get out cedar for wood. He was a man of few words and feared no man or beast. A man told him that he had a temper “of the seventh power” but I never saw him use it. Dad taught Sunday School in Thomas and loved to read the scriptures. He subscribed to the Church News and magazines. He was a rock mason and built his own rock house on the Townsite besides helping build many other rock buildings in the area. He helped to build the Peoples Irrigation Canal and received the first water from it on his homestead (the ranch) 2-½ miles west and north of Thomas. Dad reported and alerted the sheriff of an Indian uprising in time to avert a war by bringing in the militia. When I was about 14 years old, dad was hurrying to the house to get out of a storm. He had a hoe over his shoulder. The lightening hit the hoe and splattered over his back. It shook him up and he never completely got over it. He is now about 55 years old. About two years later he slipped on the ice and almost crushed his hip. He doctored it for four years before he could walk and go back to farming. This left him with a limp and much suffering. My father was lenient with others to a fault. About 1912 dad made a deal with Ren and Zoe., He let them build a house and use 35 acres. They were supposed to have bought it, but never did. They lived there close to 20 years. Dad trusted everyone. Rube Jensen sold dad a piece of Desert Claim of 160 acres. Rube got the money and skipped to Canada without giving dad a dead. Dad bought a Studebaker car. It was a lemon. He took it to the Basin on a visit and it broke down in Sugar City. Dad and mother had to leave it there and come home on the train. As time went on, an enormous bill was sent to him for repair and storage. As usual he trusted them. He then got a model T Ford and later a Buick. It was a good car, but dad couldn’t drive. He gave it a try, but he ran into Jim Hennefer’s calf and broke it’s leg. He paid Jim $7.50, took the calf home, put a brace on it and it turned out to be a good cow. Another time we were coming up out of Jim Cluff’s. He went through the wooden gate, closed the gate and started to go home, but dad let the car roll back. It backed into the gate and broke it and the new cane fish poles that were tied on the side of the car. We went home, got boards and material and fixed the gate. Dad gave up driving after that. The 1918 Buick Touring car had curtains that buckled on in the winter. He paid $600 for it and it got 18 to 20 miles to a gallon of gas, which cost 20 cents a gallon. As he didn’t drive, his son, George had to drive a team or ride horseback to the ranch whenever they needed to go to Blackfoot, which was very seldom. Uncle James came up on a fishing trip. They had gone out to Arco, but could only get little trout. So dad said to get the boat and we went down on the Snake River and caught a wash tub full of large trout that weighed from 10 to 15 pounds each. The next day Uncle James and company started to leave for their home in Utah, but before they got out of the gate in the yard, he ran over a small. pig. They felt real bad, so to make things aright, they stayed over while mother roasted the pig English style, with an apple in it’s mouth. The next day they went back to Utah. About 1920 dad and mother went to Brigham City with the team and light wagon to bring home a load of peaches. It rained and the peaches got wet and started to grow whiskers, so they went on 30 miles to Richmond where Aunt Mary Ann lived and bottled the peaches. Dad and mother enjoyed many happy fishing trips. One time we caught a gunny sack a quarter full of trout. Dad tied them to the running board of the car. There was a hole in the sack. They only had three left when they arrived home. On one trip one of the horses died and dad took it’s place by the side of old Queen and helped her pull the wagon five miles toward home, to Chandlers, where he borrowed a horse. Dad bought a five-gallon ice cream freezer. Then he would invite the neighbors around to have a party. He bought hard tack candy by the five-gallon can and treated all that came. After mother died in 1929, Sarah came to cook for dad. The she married Jack Wagoner and moved to Blackfoot where Jack found employment. Then dad remarried and moved to the Teton Basin. The following was taken from a book on Thomas Town history. The title is not available. “Robert Kay McMurdie was born February 17, 1862, at Paradise, Utah. He was the son of Samuel and Sarah Ann Kay McMurdie. He was a big man, 6’2” tall and tipped the scales at 190 pounds with nothing but bone and muscle. He had broad shoulders and large hands and feet, brown hair and brown eyes with a soft warm twinkle. His hobbies were fishing, hunting and telling stories. He came to Blackfoot from Cache Valley in 1895 in a covered wagon with his family. He had two work horses and a saddle horse tied to the side and let two milk cows behind the wagon, and a crate of chickens hanging on the side. He first lived on the place owned by “Red” Johnson, just north of the Wilson school known as the Anderson farm. He also worked for Mr. Cluff at Goild Point mining. He lived on part of the Bob Parsons place then homesteaded the Castle Hill farm. He was one of the men who helped select the Thomas townsite and built one of the first houses there. He was active in all church and community activities. It is said he lifted more rock on the scaffold to build the Thomas Hall than any other man in the ward. He had the experience of trapping several bears, three of them on the Big John Watson place. Margaret Ann was a small woman scarcely more than half his size. She had brown hair, grey eyes, and weighed 105 pounds. She loved her husband and shared their life together. They were the parents of eight children. She died May 17, 1929 at Blackfoot. He died February 11, 1942, at Driggs, Idaho. Both were buried in the Riverside Thomas Cemetery.” Gleanings of Robert Kay McMurdie Life by his daughter-in-law, Clara May Driggs McMurdie Young Robert grew up in Paradise, Utah, with his brothers and sisters on their father’s farm of 7,749 acres. The young McMurdie boys helped clear the land and do the chores. One day young Robert was helping his father fence. He had just dug a posthole and looked up in time to see a redskin aiming a gun at him. He sprang into the posthole and the bullet hit the pile of dirt. At the report of the gun, Samuel, his father, ran to where Robert was. The Indian saw him coming and quickly left. Robert told me of an incident that happened when he was a boy about the age of 8 years. Brigham Young, the leader of the Mormon Church, came hunting for someone who would deliver a message of great importance to his father. No finding anyone to take it, he came to my mother and asked her consent to send him. He gave them both a promise that if he would go that he would not see any Indians or be harmed, but to give the young mare the reign and she would take him to their camp. Now their camp was up in the timber where Samuel, his father, with several other men were operating a sawmill. The journey was a success as President Brigham Young had said it would be. Nevertheless the horse left the wagon road at one point. Robert was about to rein her back into the road when he remembered the warning. When the men came down to see President Brigham Young, they saw where a group of Indians had camped near the road where his horse had left the road and took off over the hill. My husband, George has often told this same story to me and my children. It is really a faith-promoting event. On the ranch in Thomas they had a large garden and several trees. In the garden he planted vegetables and a row of Tom Watson Watermelons. There was an extra large one which Robert wanted to save for seed, but one morning when he was out looking over the patch, he saw that the big melon was gone and a wooden churn was laid in it’s place. Ann used the churn for many years. In those days it was most popular to have a bearskin coat and gloves as they were warm and would shed the snow and as the men were mostly in the open when driving with the team and wagon they needed this protection. Robert owned such a coat and pair of gloves. One day a neighbor from a ranch on the river came driving up with his boy who had a broken leg. They had phoned ahead for the doctor to come meet them and set the leg. It was a distance of 12 miles on a graveled road, so Robert loaded them in his light wagon and with a fresh team started off to meet the Doctor. About half way there they saw the Doctor coming with his high stepping horses on a full trot. When his horses got near enough to smell the bearskin they reared and took the Doctor back to town on the run. So Robert took the neighbors on to town to the Doctor. The horses on the ranches were used to men with bearskin coats and gloves. Dad, as we fondly call him was now 78 years old and living with his second wife in Victor where he grew a lovely garden and kept a milk cow. It was September when George and I with our six children moved from Nyssa back to Cedron where we bought my Mother’s old homestead. Here came Walter and Dad with the harvest from his garden and his milk cow, which we were very grateful for. That winter he lived in Walter and Nora’s homestead cabin. We would often go visit them. In the spring we offered a place near the creek for them to build a cabin so they could be close to us. In June I went with dad to select the logs from our timber. We helped him peel them so they could dry in the summer sun. Then the men helped him build a two-room cabin where they lived for 2 years. His wife became mentally ill and went to Salt Lake to live with her son. That fall dad went to Utah to visit his people and came back in February. He did not let any of us know he was coming and rode the cold milkman’s sleigh back to Cedron where he stayed with Walter and Nora. We went down to see him. He complained of swelling in his legs. The next day they took him to the Doctor in Driggs where he was put in the hospital with blood clots. George went over to take his turn sitting with him and dad died that night, 11 February 1942 and was buried by his beloved Ann in the Thomas Cemetery. A Memory of Granddad by Lilly One day I was going to the barn, it was down by Aunt Maggie’s in Cedron but we used it, Granddad and dad were harnessing the horses and I heard this groaning sound. I went into the barn and the cow was lying down, bloated. I ran out and told the men. They hurried in and got the cow up and stood her head down hill and granddad got a piece of wood, about as big around as your thumb, about 6 or 7 inches long and pried her mouth open. He had a chew of tobacco he kept between two logs in the barn. He cut some off and poked it down the cow’s throat and pushed around on her belly to get the gas up. It wasn’t long and she was well. After we took care of the cow, we were standing by the horses and Granddad told me an experience he had with Brigham Young. He said his father was working some distance up in the mountains, getting out timber. Brigham Young needed him for something. He brought a horse to Granddad, who was 18 at the time. Brigham told him if he would get on the horse and not try to guide it, it would take him to his dad. All the horse had on it was a rope. I don’t know how his dad raised him, but I do know he was obedient, honest and dependable. So he said he got on the horse and it took him up the mountain. He had no trouble guiding the horse until in the black of the night. After traveling many hours without seeing a trail or sign of any human being, he saw a well traveled path. It was all he could do to keep from guiding the horse, being excited about seeing the path. But the horse stepped right across the path and took him on up the mountain right to his father. His father told him if he had followed that path it would have taken him right into the hands of hostile Indians.

Life timeline of Robert K McMurdie

1862
Robert K McMurdie was born on 17 Feb 1862
Robert K McMurdie was 18 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Robert K McMurdie was 27 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Robert K McMurdie was 34 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
Robert K McMurdie was 42 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Robert K McMurdie was 52 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Robert K McMurdie was 59 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
Robert K McMurdie was 69 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Robert K McMurdie died on 11 Feb 1942 at the age of 80
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Robert K McMurdie (17 Feb 1862 - 11 Feb 1942), BillionGraves Record 4954975 Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho, United States

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