Robert Dockery Covington

20 Aug 1815 - 2 Jun 1902

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Robert Dockery Covington

20 Aug 1815 - 2 Jun 1902
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Grave site information of Robert Dockery Covington (20 Aug 1815 - 2 Jun 1902) at Washington City Cemetery in Washington, Washington, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Robert Dockery Covington

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Died:

Washington City Cemetery

300 East Parkview Dr
Washington, Washington, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Robert, born in Rockingham, North Carolina, died Washington, Utah. Pioneer leader and First Bishop of Washington Ward.

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Benjamin Lamoni Alexander & Catherine Malinda Kelley Alexander and their Families

Contributor: finnsh Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

Benjamin Lamoni Alexander was fine looking man, he was a child pioneer. Born in Nauvoo, Hancock, illinois on January 22, 1841. He was the sixth child of Randolph and Myrza Alexander. Converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Apostle Wilford Woodruff was one of their missionaries. (See Wilford Woodruff's Journal entries) Benjamin crossed the plains in the Willard Richards Wagon Train Company of 1848. He would have been about seven years old. See; Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868.Willard Richards Company (1848) Departure 3 July 1848; Arrival 10-19 October 1848. The family was living in Parley's Canyon, when the President Brigham Young called their family to go and be a part of the Cotton Mission. So they packed up and left for Washington City, Washington, Utah, around 1963. By the next year Benjamin had married a lovely young lady, with a rich Irish Heritage, Catherine Malinda Kelley, who was living in the Covington Mansion, built by her step-father, and Bishop and Leader, Robert Dockery Covington, her step-father, having married her mother Malinda (Melinda) Allison Kelley after the death of both of their spouses. Catherine was born February 7, 1946, to Milton and Malinda Allison Kelley after the death of her father, Milton who was helping to care for the Captain Jefferson Hunt families who went with the sick detachment. Captain Jefferson Hunt was his and Malinda's Uncle. Their mothers were sisters. Jane and Catherine. He had gone on a hunting expedition and developed Pneumonia and passed away on the fourth of November of 1846 in Pueblo Pintado, Mckinley, New Mexico; now Pueblo, Colorado. Catherine had one other sister that we know of named Martha Jane Kelley 1837-1842 in Edwards, Illinois. Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868 Kelley, Malinda Allison Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Kelley, Malinda Catherine Catherine Malinda Kelley Alexander Birth Date: 7 Feb. 1847 Death Date: 17 Feb. 1899 Gender: Female Age: infant Company: Mormon Battalion Sick Detachments (1847) Sources: Utah State History Cemeteries and Burials Database Milton and Malinda Allison Kelley were with a group of latter-day Saints who answered the call to join up with the Mormon Battalion. Malinda served as a Laundress, while Milton cared for the Hunt Families according to microfilm records. I have also seen him listed as a member of Company B, along with his brother Nicholas Kelley who was also there with his wife Sarah and her child Parley (Raymond Parley B. ) from a previous marriage. Sarah served as a Laundress too. They were with the detachment sent to Pueblo in charge of Captain Higgins. After the death of Milton, Malinda, along with her baby daughter, came to Salt Lake City with the Captain James Brown wagon train; along with other members of the Mormon Battalion sick detachment in 1847. Malinda met and married Robert Dockery Covington on the 26 September 1848. He lost his wife, Elizabeth Thomas on 7 December 1847. Malinda then helped raise Elizabeth's remaining living children; John Thomas, Emily Jane, and Robert Laborius Covington, along with her daughter Catherine Malinda (Kate), and her and Robert's daughter, Mary Ellen Covington. Robert left to serve a mission to the Southern States, missing the birth of his daughter Mary and he was gone about seven years. Following his return, Nancy Roberts joined the family as a plural wife to Robert. She had Phoebe Ann Covington in 1857 in Big Cottonwood, and then the family was called to the Southern part of Utah to the Cotton Mission in Washington City, Washington, Utah. Catherine would have been ten years old when the move was made. The family traveled with other families also called to the Southern Mission. Robert D. Covington was the leader of their group. It was this Covington Family that first started to call the area "Dixie." Nancy had three more children; Thomas, Nancy Malinda, and James Isaac Covington. Nancy Malinda Covington, died in 1963 and Nancy Roberts Covington, died 14 March 1864 and James died 24 May 1864 at the time. This left Malinda to care for all these children, including a Lamanite girl child they rescued from being sold into slavery by traders coming through their area. They named her Alice and she died in her teens of one of the child hood diseases of the times. Catherine was surrounded by step-brothers and sisters, and a half sister, that she shared her mother with. They in turn shared their father with her. She would have seen several of the early church leaders, like Brigham Young, as they came to Washington City, to check on the Saints and to see how the Cotton Mission was doing. Such as Brigham Young. Catherine would have helped her mother with the household tasks and the care of the younger children. The picture of Benjamin and Catherine that is connected to this story is one of a copy of one that was given to my mother and hung on her wall. It now hangs on mine! I look at Catherine and I can see " her Iris eyes are smiling!" This family built and lived in the historical Covington Mansion. The bottom floor was for the family. while the upstairs rooms which could be reached by a staircase of the outside of the home, was used for community meetings and dances. The home has since been remodeled, but remains a historical monument. Benjamin with his family, consisting of his parents and several of his brothers and sisters, had been living in North Canyon Ward, now Bountiful as of 1855.(See; the 1850 Census record.) They were among other families from the Southern States called by Brigham Young to Washington, They came about 1863. It was during the Cotton Mission days that Catherine and Benjamin met and married on the 14th of January 1864 in Washington City, Washington, Utah. They were sealed on 12 October 1867 in the Endowment House. Catherine was a young bride of 16 years and 11 months of age. Benjamin would have been 23. There home was not to far from the site where Randolph Alexander was lived with his families, (Ben's father). And not far from the home Robert D Covington had built for his family. Several members of the Alexander family are buried near, where Randolph's home was, in what is now known as the Old Alexander Cemetery. A single monument with names of Alexander familirs, sits a top the side or back yard of property now owned by a Gibson family. Benjamin and Catherine had the following children; 1. Zina Myrza Alexander, born on Christmas December 25, 1864 in Washington City, Washington, Utah, married George Adelbert Searle on 9 September 1884 in Vernal, Uintah, Utah, and died March 22 1932 in Salt Lake City. They were the parents of seven children. 2. Milton Lamoni Alexander, born on February 3 1867 in Washington City, Washington, Utah, married Lucinda Jane Adams on June 25, 1888 in Sliver Reef, Washington, Utah. They had six children, Lucinda died in 1897 and is buried in Circleville, Piute, Utah as are their twins Della and Delbert. Milton married Nancy Eunice Hale on October 2 1898 in Craig, Moffat, Colorado. They had two daughters together, Milton died on February 11, 1911 in Altonah, Duchesne, Utah, Nancy or Nan as she was known served for a time there as Post mistress. 3. Lois Arabelle Alexander Hancock, was born on December 23 1869 in Washington City, Washington, Utah and married Ether Thomas Hancock on January 20, 1886 in Washington City, Washington, Utah. They had eleven children. She died on December 21, 1949 in Roosevelt, Duchesne, Utah. 4. Robert Angus Alexander was born on May 17, 1872 in Washington City, Washington, Utah and Married Annie Maria or Mariah Dobson on October 4 1897 in Circleville,Piute, Utah, They were the parents of 12 children. He died on June 25, 1955 in Provo, Utah, Utah. 5. Mary Catherine Alexander was born on December 21, 1874 in Washington City, Washington, Utah. She married James Orin Searle on June 26 1892 in Circleville, Piute, Utah, they had children, more research needs to be done here.) She died on July 3 1945. 6. James Bird Alexander was born on March 17, 1877 in Washington City, Washington, Utah, he married Ruby Collier on Feb 1 1904 in Washington City, Washington, Utah. More research needs to be done. 7. Woodruff Moroni Alexander was born on June 18 1879 in Washington City, Washington, Utah. He married first, Lucinda Jane Adams, and after her death in 1897 he married Nancy Eunice Hale. 8. William Zera Alexander was born on 1 of December 1882 in Washington City, Washington, Utah. He married Roxanna Favorett Hall. He died in 1918 from the Flu, that also killed his brother Benjamin Lamoni Alexander jr. and his brother Woodruff Moroni Alexander. 9. Benjamin Lamoni Alexander Jr. was born on 30 June 1886 in Washington City, Washington, Utah and and married Lottie Timothy on the 15th of May 19, 1906 in Vernal, Uintah, Utah. 10. Loretta Alexander was born on November 25, 1888 and died December 29, 1888, A twin to Loren Alexander. 11. Loren Alexander was born on November 25, 1888 and died on the same day. Both Loretta and Loren may of been born in Washington City, Washington, Utah or Harrisburg, Washington Utah. It appears that the family started migrating about this time ; perhaps to go where the work was, as some members of the Alexander families came through this area. I found some records indicating that they were in Circleville, Piute, Utah for a short time and then moved on to the Uintah Basin where several of their children also moved. Records of Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Film number 0025870 for years 1887-1942. Show the family living there, Benjamin Lamoni and Catherine, his wife, and sons; Woodruff, William Zeri (on ward record, Zera on other records), Lamoni, (Benjamin Lamoni Alexander jr.). Their son Robert Angus Alexander and his bride, Annie Dobson are seen on these records later listed with their daughter Annie Arminnie Alexander who was born 11 November 1900 at Circleville, Utah. She was their third child; previously they had lost a stillborn son on 6 July 1988, and a son they named Robert Randolph born 6 July 1889 and died October of 1899 while they were in Delamar, Nevada. Catherine's mother, Malinda was visiting her in Circleville when she passed away on 18 November 1894. It was probaly not long after that she and Benjamin moved on to homestead land in the Uintah Basin. She was living in Vernal, Utah when she died on the 17th of February 1899 at the age of 52. Six years later, Benjamin met and married his second wife Marie (Mary Kruger Schramm in Salt Lake. Marriage record found on film Early Church Information File; 1750711 Ruby, Lesle - Schuchart, Eva L.C. Index card shows name in full Schramm- Marie (Mary) Card no.59 When born age 46. Residence and Occupation Salt Lake City Date of License 17 May 1905 Where issued Salt Lake City When Married 17, May 1905 Where Salt Lake City To whom married Benjamin L. Alexander Groom Last Name: ALEXANDER Groom First Name: Benjamin L. Groom Residence: Bride Last Name: SCHRAMM Bride First Name: Mary Bride Residence: Place: Salt Lake City Date: 17 May 1905 County of Record: Salt Lake State: Utah Volume: Page: 473 By whom married Theodore McKean Marriage record of Salt Lake County Book 1. Page 237 ; Marie had come to America from Germany with her two living children; Paul and Margaret. She was a convert to the Church of Jesus Christ and was honored in a newspaper article as the first woman to start a Relief Society for Women in Berlin, Germany. On some records Marie (Mary) has been referred to as Margaret, but Margaret is her daughter. Margaret Schramm Cannon was the daughter of Emil Richard Schramm and Marie (Mary) Kruger Schramm Alexander. She married Brigham T. Cannon, later, divorced. She married Melvin George Holten in 1930 and they had a son named Melville Holten. Marie also had two other children from her first marriage, Paul Schramm who along with Marie and Margaret immigrated to America and a daughter Bertha Milda schramm who died July 27, 1890 in Berlin, Germany. Emil died August 9th 1890, just days after Bertha. Marie died from a auto-pedestrian accident May 19, 1939 in Salt Lake City. She had been living there with her daughter Margaret Scramm Cannon (Holten) and her grandchild Melville Schramm Holten. They are buried all three next to each other in the Salt Lake Cemetery, not far from Primary Children's Hospital in Salt Lake. My mother told me that when Benjamin was stayed for a time with his son Robert Angus Alexander and his wife, Annie Mariah Dobson Alexander, He would sit in a rocking chair and sing until around 4:00 a.m. Annie was not too happy about this as it disturbed her sleep and she was a very busy woman. Ben died while at his son William Zera Alexander's home in Altonah on Feb 11,1913 and was buried next to his first wife, Catherine Malinda Kelley Alexander, in the Maeser Cemetery near Vernal, Uintah, Utah. His headstone says Feb 11th. His death certificate says Feb 13, 1913. The death certificate was not issued until much later. Catherine Malinda is shown as Malinda K Alexander here on their gravestone. I have seen it written both ways. They have a grandson, named Alden Alexander who died as an infant and is buried near them. He is the son of Robert Angus and Annie Maria Dobson Alexander. Marie and Benjamin were older when they married and did not have any children. Some people seeing the grave of Alden next to Ben and Catherine's grave had assumed that he was the son of Ben and his second wife, and some confused Marie with her daughter Margaret so there are also records that have assumed he was married to a Margaret Schramm, but it was Marie (Mary) Kruger Schramm Alexander. This story with photos also appears on my Blogsite "Our Family Treasures. Compiled and written by Julia Nielson Corry To learn more about the Cotton Mission you can read: SOUTHERN UTAH MEMORIES: The Washington City Cotton Mill Factory by Loren R. Webb for KCSG.com Published - 08/10/12 - 02:00 PM Other books about this family; "The Red Hills of November by Andrew Jensen.

Robert Dockery Covington

Contributor: finnsh Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

ELIZABETH ANN THOMAS and ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Came west in the Edward Hunter - Jacob Foutz Company (1847) Name Birth date Death date Age at Arrival in Salt Lake Valley Covington, Robert Dockery 31 Covington, Elizabeth Thomas 27 Covington, John Thomas 7 Covington, Emily Jane 5 Covington, Robert Laborius infant Robert Dockery Covington, son of Thomas B. and Jane Thomas Covington, was born Aug. 20, 1815 in Rockingham, Richmond Co., North Carolina. His wife Elizabeth Thomas was born April 21, 1820 in Marlboro Co. South Carolina and died Dec. 7, 1847 in Big Cottonwood Utah. His grandfather was John Covington and his grandmother was Nancy Wall. Nancy’s forefathers immigrated to America at an early date. His grandfather on his mother’s side was William Thomas and his grandmother was Rachel Roe. Robert D. Covington and Elizabeth Ann Thomas married in about 1838 or 1839. Soon after their marriage they moved with Robert's father, Thomas B. Covington, to Summerville, Noxubee County, Mississippi. Robert was a college graduate, who helped on his father's plantation raising cotton and tobacco. With the help of slave labor, the Covingtons established a large successful plantation in Summerville. Here three children were born to Robert and Elizabeth Ann. John Thomas, August 7, 1840; Emily Jane, January 1, 1843; and Sarah Ann, February 2, 1845. Sarah Ann died the same year (1845). THE GOSPEL PREACHED TO COVINGTONS Robert Dockery Covington was overseer on two plantations. He was loved by the African-Americans, who respected his word at all times. During this time period many of the Thomas family, relatives of Elizabeth Ann Thomas, had also moved to Summerville, Noxubee County, Mississippi. Some of the Covington and Thomas families attended Gospel meetings which were presented by Mormon missionaries. Robert D. and Elizabeth Ann Covington were baptized February 3, 1843. After joining the Mormon religion they felt the need to join the Saints in Nauvoo. We have no record of this part of their life but some of their grandchildren said they remembered hearing that before they left, the African-Americans were against them leaving and loudly lamented their departure. He set his slaves free, which was protested by the slaves because of their deep love for him. Robert’s father and siblings disapproved of this new religion and as a result he was eventually disinherited. Robert and Elizabeth’s son John was a very small boy when his parents joined the church. Too small to be lead into the waters of baptism, but big enough to baptize the little Negros in the muddy pond, much to the consternation of their owners who didn't want the children to be Mormons. IN NAUVOO In 1845, Robert D. and Elizabeth Ann Covington left Mississippi and joined the Saints in Nauvoo, Illinois. They received their temple endowments in Nauvoo in the fall of 1845. They spent 1846 at Winter Quarters. After just two years in Nauvoo, the Covington family joined the great Mormon Westward migration. Traveling by wagon train they headed toward the great Salt Lake Valley. They traveled in Edward Hunter's Company under the leadership of Captain Daniel Thomas. Emily Jane was 4 years old and John Thomas was 6. The wagon train endured rain, hail storms, dust storms, lack of good water and wood to burn. INDIANS ON THE TRAIL TO UTAH Indians often followed the group and sometimes approached their camp to beg or trade for food. On one occasion the travelers had stopped to repair wagons near a growth of wild currant bushes. John and his younger sister Emily were given an empty lard bucket and sent to pick the ripe currants. When their container was about full, several Indians reared up from hiding with a loud war whoop. The frightened children dropped the bucket and ran for camp. When they looked back the Indians had retrieved the currants and were laughing at their big joke. The Indians, on several occasions, stampeded their cattle. However, the Mormon leaders tried to maintain a friendly relationship as no one wanted a hostile confrontation with the Indian followers. 1847 ARRIVE IN THE VALLEY Somewhere near what is now known as Scotts Bluff, Nebraska, Elizabeth Ann gave birth to her last child, Robert Laborious on August 1, 1847. After traversing the last of the cold, slow and rough miles through the mountains, the Hunter Company arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on September 27, 1847. ELIZABETH DIES Elizabeth was frail and weakened from the hardships of the journey. She fell ill of a severe respiratory infection and died September 7, 1847. Milk was so scarce that the baby was raised on clabber or anything else they could get for him. (Clabber is a yogurt-like substance with a strong, sour flavor. In rural areas of the Southern United States, it was commonly eaten for breakfast.) Meriam Adair was the Good Samaritan who cared for the baby. Robert moved his family to the Cottonwood settlement located just south of Salt Lake City. He became the school teacher and was called Professor Covington by the community. He accumulated land and livestock and married twice more. He went on a mission to the Southern States in the fall of 1849 and returned in the spring of 1856. MARRIAGE TO MALINDA ALLISON KELLEY AND NANCY ROBERTS Robert married a widow Malinda Allison Kelley on Sept. 26, 1848. She had one child, Kate, from her previous marriage. To their union was born a daughter Mary Ellen. Later, Robert took as his plural wife a girl named Nancy Roberts, age 17, to whom he was sealed on Dec. 28, 1856. To them were born four children, Phoebe, Thomas, Malinda and James. He was sealed to his wife Elizabeth Thomas in 1856, Nancy Roberts taking her part. The family lived in Big Cottonwood when the locusts destroyed the crop in the Salt Lake Valley. The Covington’s crop was unmolested but instead of living in the midst of plenty while their less fortunate neighbors were starving Bro. Covington gave everything up to accept the call to Dixie. MOVE TO DIXIE In April of 1857 Robert D. and a number of other men from the Southern States were called by President Brigham Young to travel to Southern Utah to establish a new settlement on the Virgin River. Ten families under the leadership of Samuel Adair and twenty-eight families led by Robert Covington arrived in Washington on May 5th 1857. At the age of 14, Emily Jane Covington was one of the 160 men, women and children who were called to move 330 miles to Southern Utah to establish a new Mormon settlement. A native of Rockingham, North Carolina, he had experience with directing slaves on cotton plantations, so he was well familiar with the raising of cotton. These two groups laid out the town and called it Washington after the first President of the United States, George Washington. Robert D. Covington was the first bishop of Washington ward established August 1, 1858, and was bishop from 1858 to 1869. Bishop Covington built a large two-story rock home just east of John D. Lee's home, completed in 1859 and is still standing. It is the oldest building in all of Washington County. The home was used as a recreation center for the community dances, parties and other functions were held. Church meetings were held there also. Brigham Young stayed here many times while visiting the area. To get to the upstairs, one had to go outside and climb wooden stairs to the second story. There was no other way to get to the upstairs from the main floor. This was done so that people coming for a get together would not disturb the main floor family living quarters. He took his position as Bishop seriously and endeavored in every way to be the father of his Ward. Whenever anyone needed help, this bishop helped him even if he had to use his own means for it. Before he died he owned only a small part of the property he started with. He was a friend to the Indians and was often called upon to settle disputes among them. One day Bishop Covington saw an Indian beating his wife. He found a good stout willow and after showing the Indian the error of his ways proceeded to give him a good switching. Nancy died on 4 March 1864 at the age of 25. LIVING THE UNITED ORDER Early in 1874, President Brigham Young introduced the United Order in St. George and sent John R. Young and others to Long Valley to organize branches of the order there, including Washington where the Covington’s lived. Nearly all of the members joined. Those following the United Order erected a number of wooden homes and a large dining hall. In the spring of 1875 the order was abandoned. Robert Dockery Covington died in June 1902 at the age of 87 in Washington, Washington, Utah.

Malinda or Melinda Allison Kelley Covington 1815-1894

Contributor: finnsh Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

Malinda Allison, my great great grandmother was born to Isaac Allison and Jane Hunt, a sister to Catherine Hunt, who was the mother of Milton. She was born on the 16th of October 1815 in Crawford, Kentucky. She was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-say Saints by her Uncle Captain Charles Jefferson Hunt. They had a daughter named Martha who passed away when she was about 6 years old. They also may have had a son in 1838, also deceased. They went with the Mormon Battalion. I found records on microfilm that seemed to indicate that Milton was there to help with the Hunt families for Captain Jefferson Hunt. He and Malinda who went as a Laundress were with the sick detachment in Pueblo, Pintada, New Mexico, (Colorado); Milton went on a hunting excursion and became ill because of the cold and exposure and died with pneumonia on 4 Nov 1846. After Milton passed away Malinda was cared for by other Mormon Battalion members and it was a month later that she gave birth to a daughter, she named Catherine Malinda Kelley. I have also seen her name as Malinda Catherine. Milton’s brother Nicholas and his wife, Sarah and step-son, Raymond Parley Bathrick, were also among the members of the sick detachment. Malinda traveled to Utah in 1847 in the Captain James Brown wagon train with her daughter Catherine Malinda Kelley, and it was there she met and married Robert D. Covington, who was also left a widow, when his wife, Elizabeth Thomas Covington, passed away after arriving in Utah, leaving him with three children, John Thomas, Emily and Robert Laborius Covington. Their two other children, Sarah and Catherine had preceded her in death. Malinda had one child with Robert, Mary Ellen Covington, and she also helped raise Phebe and Thomas, his children by his plural wife Nancy Roberts, who died in March 1864. James Isaac Covington her baby born February 1864 died a couple months later.wife Nancy Roberts, who died in 1864. Nancy had lost a girl, Nancy Melinda, earlier. Robert and Malinda also adopted a lamanite girl, they rescued her as a small child, from being sold into slavery by her captors and they raised her as their own until she died around the age of fifteen of one of the common childhood diseases of the time. Malinda died on Nov 18, 1894 in Circleville while visiting family. (Some records have her death as 1881, while others 1894. From my research it appears her family had not arrived yet in Circleville or Circle Valley by 1881, so the second date is more accurate. To learn more read the book, "The Red Hills of November" by Andrew Karl Larsen, or "Utah 'Dixie' Birthplace" Compiled by Harold P. Cahoon and Priscilla J. Cahoon. Check out The collections at the DUP Museum in Salt Lake City, or visit the website for the International Daughters of Utah Pioneers. they have a collection of pioneer histories and photos for a small fee. Visit Washington City and tour the pioneer museum and see the pioneers commemorated in the front of the museum by Bronze Portraits or Statues. Malinda is one of the Bronze portraits, (plans are under way for a statue to be built to honor Malinda, by Jerry Anderson. There is also a full sized statue of Robert D Covington. Many of these people in the Pioneer Memorial will have connections to my pioneer families. See the home in Washington which Robert D Covington and Malinda and families lived in. It was built in 1859, and is a two story home where Brigham Young would stay and others passing through town. they held meetings on the top floor which then was entered in by stairs on the outside of the house. My great grandmother Catherine grew up here and married Benjamin Lamoni Alexander, also a pioneer who was born in Nauvoo and crossed the plains and whose family was also called to the Cotton Mission. It was probably Catherine and Benjamin who were living in Cedar Valley (Circleville) whom Malinda was visiting at the time of her death. Evidence suggest that several of the Alexanders passed through Harrisburg, & Silver reef and so forth. Catherine and Benjamin's last two children may of been born in Harrisburg and died there according to some records, rather than Washington City, where the rest of their children were born. My direct line Grandparents; Robert Angus Alexander met and married my direct line grandmother, Annie Mariah Dobson, whose family lived in Circleville in October of 1897 and then migrated to the Uintah Basin with the rest of the families of Benjamin and Catherine Kelley Alexander, to homestead new land in the Uintah Basin. Catherine passed away in Vernal, Uintah, Utah and is buried in the Maesar Cemetery, next to her husband and the infant son of Robert and Annie Alexander who died in 1905. Catherine died 17 Feb 1899. Benjamin died in 1914. Malinda's child with Robert, Mary Ellen Covington married James Harton Thompson, he died in 1873, leaving her with two children, James Harton Thompson and Malinda Caroline Thompson. Mary Ellen some records indicate she may of died in Cottonwood, Utah on Nov 18 1894. Robert Dockery Covington died on the 2nd of June 1902 and is buried in Washington City. His wive's names are also on his headstone and a 'Woman of the Mormon Battalion' marker honoring Malinda is also there. written & compiled by Julia Corry

Robert Dockery Covington History

Contributor: finnsh Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

Robert Dockery Covington was a college graduate, who helped on his father's plantation raising cotton and tobacco. His wife, Elizabeth Ann Thomas was born April 21, 1820 in Marlboro District of South Carolina and on February 2, 1839 she married Robert Dockery Covington. (1) John's parents moved shortly after their wedding to Marlboro County, South Carolina. (2) The next move came with Robert's parents, Thomas B. Covington, known as "Big Tommie" (3) and Jane Thomas. They settled in Summerville, Noxbee, Mississippi. They established large plantations and they prospered, because of Jane Thomas's relatives, having settled there since 1834, also the rich soil and plenty of slave labor helped a great deal. This was the place where John Thomas Covington was born on August 4, 1840. (4) It was three years later; on January 1, 1843 that John's sister Emily June Covington was born. (5) Around this time, Daniel Thomas had brought home a Book of Mormon. And after Robert Dockery Covington and his wife had heard Elder Clapp preach for two weeks, they were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints on February 3, 1843, in Noxbee County, Mississippi by Benjamin Clapp. (6) Although most of Elizabeth's family joined the church, Robert's family thought that he had lost all his reason. Little did Robert's parents, Thomas B. Covington and Jane Thomas, realize that the son whom they had greeted with open arms at his birth, August 2, 1815 in Rockingham, Richmond, North Carolina, would one day be disinherited by themselves. (7) In fact, in Covington books written by non L.D.S. authors, Robert's name isn't listed among the children. Although, his older brother James, who also joined the L.D.S. church and moved to Salt Lake City, Utah. Nancy later returned to Mississippi in a state of disillusionment. Soon after Robert had joined the Church, he longed to join the Saints in Nauvoo. At this time he was overseer on two plantations. (9) He set his slaves free, which was protested by the slaves because of their deep love for Robert. (10) Now preparations to leave got underway. On February 1, 1845 Sarah Ann Covington was born. John had a new baby sister. John Thomas Covington was not yet 5 years old, and stories have been told that he "baptized" many of his Negro playmates in the muddy ponds (11) before his family left for Nauvoo. (12) Robert Dockery Covington and Elizabeth Ann Thomas Covington received their endowments January 20, 1846 in the Nauvoo temple. (13) Soon John Thomas Covington lost his sister Catharine Covington, born 1846 and died in 1846 in Nauvoo, Illinois. He also was to lose his toddler sister Sarah, born 1845 in Mississippi and died October 16, 1846 in Winter Quarters. (14) John had gone from a life of wealth and plenty, to a life of great needs and want, but these circumstances and happenings were not all that happened to this family. In 1847, Robert, Elizabeth along with children John and Emily started for Utah in the Edward Hunter Company under the direction of Captain Daniel Thomas. (15) Elizabeth was expecting again and the ordeals the Saints had to suffer had made in roads on her health. It must have been a trying journey for it seemed that the forces of the elements were pitted against them. The dust storms, the hail storms, lack of good water, and wood to burn, with Indians camped on the opposite bank of the Platt River stampeding cattle crossings often to beg or trade for food that was such a scarce commodity. Sometimes they swarmed in their camp like bees and would often help themselves to whatever was handy. Housewives would often be missing their camping and cooking equipment. One day while the men were fixing broken wagons they stopped near some currant bushes. Robert D. sent his children John and Emily with buckets to gather what they could. They worked hard picking clean the currant bushes as they went. Just as they finished filling their buckets full of currants, an Indian stepped from behind a bush and gave a war hoop. The children dropped their buckets and fled to the camp. When they neared the camp they looked back and saw the Indian with their currants laughing at his huge joke. On the morning of August 1, 1847 it was quiet, the heat was terrific. The party of immigrants had called a halt. Saints had not found wood to burn for 11 days and the water was unfit to drink. Some of the animals had died by licking alkali off the ground. They also had wagons to fix. Mrs. Sessions, the midwife was called to take care of Elizabeth Covington. Mrs. Sessions had a buggy so she drove back to the second hundred a distance of some 5 miles. She, Mrs. Sessions brought Sister Covington back to her camp and put her to bed with a new son, Robert Laborious Covington. This all took place in Scotts Bluff, Nebraska. The Saints were halted here for the day and A.O. Smoot called a meeting and pleaded with the Saints to be more united and to trust in the Lord, and to consider these experiences like a school, readying them for leadership positions. The saints had many hardships to bear during their track westward, some times traveling many miles only finding sparse food for their cattle and other animals, Indians often came into camp and would spread blankets on the ground wanting to trade or be fed, the Saints were counseled not to trade with them, but to feed them. There was much sickness and death among the pioneers. Eliza R. Snow was a great comfort to the sorrowing, on one occasion she remarked, "Death makes occasional inroads among us. Nursing the sick, tending wagons was laborious service and showed the patient faithfulness with which it was born. To consign loved ones to these desolate graves was enough to try the hearts of the strongest." On August 5, they camped 8 to 9 miles from Fort Laramie where the food was plentiful and the water was good, they stayed here for 5 days to fix wagons in need of repair, wash clothes, and mend them and to bake. While camping here some bears near the camp disturbed their sleep. Two Indian women who were gathering berries nearby saw these bears and they left gatherings for the bears, some of the pioneers in the company witnessed this. Traveling became very hard and was going very slow due to the rough terrain, there were hills to climb and several wagons broke. In September, the pioneers crossed miles of sand and the winds blew very hard, here they saw fearful storms and sand, rain, and snow. They encountered pioneers going back East to help the remaining Saints travel west. These travelers camped all night with the party and gave them words of encouragement and of telling them about their new homes in the West. Their words were welcomed and there was a feast prepared by the women of the company that night. The last miles into the valley were hard ones because of the cold and rugged mountains they had to travel. But arrive they did on September 24, 1847. The Robert Dockery Covington family arrived in the valley, the trip had taken its toll though for Robert's wife was frail, the hardships had all but taken her strength. She hoped to get stronger, but the cold winter winds along with a severe cold only added to her troubles, and on December 7, 1847 she left her devoted family to carry on her good name. (16) Marian Adair, a good person helped the family out by helping with the new baby, since milk was very scarce she fed the baby buttermilk and clabber. (17) Robert Dockery Covington next married a widow, Malinda Allison Kelly, so John, Emily, and baby Robert had a new stepmother and stepsister Kate. (18) This family settled in the Big Cottonwood Ward in Salt Lake City. While they were in Big Cottonwood, Robert was able to teach school and was called "Professor Covington". This is also the area that they lived in when the locust infested Salt Lake Valley. Their crops were spared and they shared their food with their starving neighbors. (19) In the fall of 1849, John Thomas Covington was only 9 years old when his father accepted a call to be a missionary in the Southern States. (20) And on December 28, 1849, a new daughter was born to Malinda and Robert, she was named Mary Ellen Covington. (21) May Ellen Covington didn't meet her father till she was almost 7 years old and John was almost 16. That was in the spring of 1856, when Robert returned from the Southern States mission. (22) Robert Dockery Covington took a plural wife on December 28, 1856. (23) Her name was Nancy Roberts. To this union was born three children Pheobe, Thomas, Malinda, when Nancy Roberts died, Robert's second wife Malinda mothered her children as well as those of Robert's first wife Elizabeth. (24) This Covington family accepted a calling to settle Dixie and moved to Washington, Washington County Utah. John Thomas Covington found himself in new surroundings once again, and on August 1, 1857, the son of the Bishop of Washington Ward. John's next few years were filled with hard work, planting, harvesting of grains, corn, tobacco, and cotton. In 1858, Grape cuttings from California were planted as well as Chinese sugar cane. And in 1861 peach stones were planted and the peach trees began to grow. (26) Robert Dockery Covington's family prospered and built a spacious home, he, Robert D. had cut large stones from a nearby mountain and built a grand home for those day pioneers. The walls were three feet thick and built Colonial style. There were two fireplaces on each of the three floors. The upper floor was used for years as a dance floor for the young people, many people spoke of their generous and good hospitality. (27) SOURCES 1. Eckersley, Leona "Family Group Sheet of Robert Dockery Covington." 2. Unknown, "History of Robert Dockery Covington." 3. White, eurie Covington, Covington Cousins page 55, 1956 4. Source 2. 5. Sources 1 and 2 6. Covington, Robert Dockery, "St. George High Priest Record" 7. Source 2 8. Covington William Slaughter, The Covington’s, page 44, October 1941. 9. Meeks, Lourie (John Thomas Covington's Granddaughter), "History of John Thomas Covington" 10. Sources 1 and 2 11. Sources 9 and a list of Deaths and burials in the camp of Israel at Caler's park after Sept. 1846 pg. 2 12. Source 2 13. Source 6 14. Source 1 and a list of Deaths and burials in the camp of Israel at Caler's Park after Sept. 1846 pg. 2 15. Source 2 16. Source 1 and 2 17. Source 9 18. Source 1 19. Source 9 20. Source 9 21. Source 4 22. Source 6 23. Source 6 COVINGTON FAMILY HISTORY Robert Dockery Covington Written, by himself April 1872 St. George High Priest Record Book 15649 (He wrote a beautiful hand.) Robert Dockery Covington was the son of Thomas and Jane Thomas Covington. I was born Aug. 20, 1815 in the state of North Carolina, Richmond Co. City of Rockingham. Baptized Feb. 3, 1843 by Benjamin Clapp in the state of Mississippi Noxube Co. Ordained a bishop Aug. 1, 1858 by Arnasa Lyman and George A. Smith. Received my endowments in Nauvoo in the fall of 1845, came to Salt Lake in 1847, and spent 1846 at Winter Quarters. I went on a mission to the Southern States in the fall of 1849 and returned in the spring of 1856. I was sealed to my wife Elizabeth Thomas 1856, Nancy Roberts taking her part. We had four children John, Emily, Sarah, and Robert. I was sealed to my wife Malinda Allison on Dec. 28, 1856 by whom I had one child Mary Ellen. Was sealed to Nancy Roberts Dec. 28, 1856 by whom I had four children Pheobe, Thomas, Malinda and James. My grandfather was John Covington and my grandmother was Nancy Wall. Her forefathers immigrated to America at an early date. My grandfather on Mothers side was William Thomas and my grandmother was Rachel Roe. Robert Dockery Covington was appointed May 6, 1857 Bishop of Washington Ward Washington Co. Utah. Set apart Aug. 1, 1857 with Brother Harrison Pierce 1st counselor, Brother John R. Ragean 2nd Counselor. 1877 Aug. 7, Orderville, Utah-The members living in Orderville were organized into a ward with Thomas Chamberlain as bishop. Early in 1874, President Brigham Young introduced the United Order in St. George and sent John R. Young and others to Long Valley to organize branches of the order there. Nearly all of the members joined, but in the spring of 1875 a division took place and some withdrew. Those following the United Order erected a number of wooden homes and a large dining hall. The people started out with full support of the program. They succeeded, and Orderville has the reputation of continuing in the order longer and more effectively than any other settlement in the west. Under the laws and agreements entered into by all concerned the order continued for 12 years, until 1886, when President John Taylor advised them to separate and live as other communities. Name Variants: Robert Dusky Covington --at Nauvoo Temple Endowment Register 1845-1846 and Robert Duchey Covington in LDS Biographical Encyclopedia. Jenson, Andrew. 1951 Volume: 4, Page: 592. Residency 1845, Nauvoo, Hancock, Il.; 1847, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Ut.; 1870, Washington, Washington, Utah. Vocation: Farmer. Reference: Utah Federal Census and Family Group Sheet. Robert was among the 4th ten of the 2nd fifty of the 2nd hundred under Captain Daniel M. Thomas of the Pioneers of 1847. Reference: Rosters of Pioneers 1847 and Pioneers of 1847. Easton, Susan W. In 1870 Robert lived in a household of 6 with a real wealth of $1500 and a personal wealth of $789. Reference: Utah Federal Census 1870. Robert was bishop of the Washington ward, S. George Stake, Utah from 1858 to 1869. Reference: LDS Biographical Encyclopedia. Jenson, Andrew. 1951, Volume 4 page 592. Robert was a member of the 8th quorum of seventy. Reference: Membership Card Index. Margetts, Minnie.

Collection of Histories and other information on Robert D Covington

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Life History of Robert D. Covington 1815-1902 Robert Dockery Covington was born August 20, 1815 in Rockingham, North Carolina. After moving to Noxubee Co., Mississippi he and his wife Elizabeth owned slaves and managed a slave plantation. He was well experienced in growing cotton. Robert accepted Mormonism there, and after a two or three year delay, traveled to Nauvoo and traveled to Winter Quarters. A son, Robert Laborius Covington was born August 1, 1847 in Scott's Bluff, Nebraska. Elizabeth died on December 7, 1847 just weeks after they arrived in the Salt Lake Valley. While in Salt Lake City, Robert married two women, Malinda Allison Kelley and Nancy Roberts. These two wives came with him to Washington in the second group of Southern families on May 6, 1858. It is said that it was this family who first called the area “Dixie” after their southern homeland. The name quickly spread to the surrounding areas. They met the Adair group at Adair Springs. Robert was selected to be a branch president of the branch attached to the Harmony Ward. Immediately they started to build a dam on the Virgin River, dig ditches, prepare ground for planting, and make the area livable. On August 1, 1858 the church branch was changed into a ward. Robert became the first bishop of the Washington Ward and served until 1869. Robert was in the Territorial Legislature from 1858 to 1859. Three local men served in this capacity: John D. Lee, Robert D. Covington and Francis Boggs. The community used the Covington home often for dances, parties, and church functions. Robert D. Covington's two story red rock home was built in 1859 and is the oldest building still standing in all of Washington County. It is located on the northwest corner of the intersection of 200 East and 200 North. Robert Dockery Covington was a dedicated man and fulfilled his duty to his community, his church, his family and to himself. He was one of the stalwart citizen's of Washington, Utah. He came as one of its main leaders in the spring of 1857 and remained there until his death on June 2, 1902. He now rests in the Washington City Cemetery Robert D. Covington (Story told to Martha Elizabeth Alexander Averett by her parents; History of Murray Elijah Averett and Martha Elizabeth Alexander.) “I remember the story my parents told me about Robert Covington, Washington’s first LDS Bishop. He was a very good and kind and so sincere, but easily upset, so some men loved to tease him. One time they told him Johnson’s Army was coming and they could hear the hoof beats of the horses on the East Ridge. Naturally, Bishop Covington thought that he would be the first one they were after, so he put on his clothes wrong side out and hid in the fields all night. He returned early the next morning past the home of Susan Crawford, who was out for a bucket of water. She called “Good Morning, Bishop Covington.” “Sister Crawford” he answered, “did you really recognize me in this strange attire.” “I’d know you anywhere” she said. (Memoirs of Martha Alexander Averett; History of Murray Elijah Averett and Martha Elizabeth Alexander.) In the early days of Washington the Robert Covington and John D. Lee homes served as out dances floors. A group of we young people would gather at these places and have a very enjoyable time dancing to the music of the fiddle and accordion. Then sometimes we would assemble at the Old Bowery which was located where the church house now stands, and have a good time playing games or dancing on the ground. In this way we young folks enjoyed ourselves very much. Robert D. Covington Home- used in the LDS Church film about Lorenzo Snow and Tithing. A popular meeting place in Washington in the early days. Now owned by a young family. (Memoirs of Murray Elijah Averett; History of Murray Elijah Averett and Martha Elizabeth Alexander.) “My first years in Washington were spent herding Cattle. The people put their animals in herds together to keep the Indians from stealing them. At night they were gathered together in a big corral and guarded. My cousin Elijah and brother John herded with me. The worst whipping I ever had was given to me for not wanting to herd on Sunday when the Indians were bothering. We had herded our turn and Mother had got us ready to spend Sunday with the rest of our folks when Bishop Covington came and told her he could get no one to go out with the animals. When we objected to going Mother gave us a whipping but we didn’t go out with the cattle until Monday morning anyway. The cattle stayed in the corral all day Sunday, but well do I remember that whipping. I might state that during this time my father was on a mission back to the States.” The Following information comes from the Pioneer Heritage CD. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 5, p.419 Tribute must also be paid the following women, some with children, who started from Ft. Leavenworth, wintered at Fort Pueblo and entered Salt Lake Valley in late July, 1847 with the sick detachment under Captain James Brown; Celia Mounts Hunt, Matilda Nease Hunt, Mary McCree Black Brown, Sarah Blackman Higgins, Ruth Abbott, Susan Smith Adams, Eliza B Allred, Elzadie E. Ford Allred, Harriet Brown, Agnes Brown, Emma Reasor Brown, Mary Button, Jane Wells Cooper Hanks, Emeline Bigler Hess, Mary Ann Hirons, Fanny Maria Allen Huntington, Malinda A. Kelley, Albina Marion (Williams) and Phebe Lodema Merrill, Martha Jane Sharp Mowery, Caroline Sargent, Rebecca Smith, Caroline E. Sessions, Elizabeth Shelton, Sarah D. Shupe, Catherine Steele, Sophia Tubbs, Isabella Hunter Wilkins. Robert Dockery Covington from Pioneer Heritage Library CDFamily # # in Family:651 2 Last Name:*COVINGTON First Name(s):ROBERT DOCKERY Plaque #:P12B Age:87 Birth Date:1815 Death Date:1902 Other Information: Mr. M. E. Moody, Sr., tells me that his uncle, Joseph Damron, herded sheep in that area during the early days, and that the valley was named for him. Mr. Moody gives the spelling as Damron, and says that he does not know that his uncle had any legal claim there. In James G. Bleak, Annals of the Southern Utah Mission, MS., Vol. 1, I find in the minutes of the County Court held on the 7th of March, 1859, an item of business which reads, "A herd ground, 8 miles square, was granted to Robert D. Covington in Dameron Valley, said Grant not to conflict or interfere with the grazing of any other settlement or previous rights." So it would seem that the name dated back before that time, and the spelling of the name for the records seems to have been established as "Dameron," from which it has been variously called "Damon" and "Diamond." Covington, Robert D., 123 Name:ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Sex:Male Birth Date:20 AUG 1815 Birth Place: RICHMOND,, NORTH CAROLINA View Marriage 1 of ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Download Original File Family Husband: ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Wife: ELIZABETH THOMAS Child: JOHN T. COVINGTON Child: EMILY J. COVINGTON Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.19 Among those who lived there and worked upon the farm during the Order and immediately after were: John T. Covington and family, Thomas Chamberlain and family, Cyrene Fackrell, Myron Holgate, Hans Sorensen, John Carling, Elijah Adair, Joseph Palmer, Robert Covington and Thomas Stolworthy. Heart Throbs of the West, Vol.8, p.430 Collins, Albert W.33Jan. 3, 1814Butler, Georgia Collins, Susan34Feb. 10, 1818 Marlboro, S. C. Collins, Adeline5Oct. 7, 1842Noxubee, Miss. Covington, Robert D.32Aug. 20, 1815 Richmond, N.C. Covington, Elizabeth27April 21, 1820 Marlboro, S. C. Covington, John T.7Aug. 7, 1840Noxubee, Miss. Covington, Emily J.4Jan. 1, 1843Noxubee, Miss. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.10, p.313 The next day we came to a place called Harrisburg. This place had been recommended to me in which to settle. It being a very healthful place. So I went and hunted for the town, but did not find it. I found a few places where some cedar sticks were set up and covered with bagos or ground sugar cane. We then went on to Washington. When we reached the top of the last ridge we found the town nearly under us on a nice fiat between two ridges. Here we found some of our old neighbors who received us very kindly. We found Robert D. Covington, the Mangums, and Adams Rickey, and others who had been sent on that mission, some years before. The appearance of these brethren and their wives and children was rather discouraging. Nearly all of them had fever and ague or chills as they are called (malaria). They had worked hard in the country and had worn out their clothes, and had replaced them from the cotton they had raised on their own lots and farms. Their women had carded, spun and woven by hand and colored with weeds this cotton. The men's shirts, the women's and children's dresses and sunbonnets were all made of the same piece of cloth. Their clothes and their faces were all of a color, being blue with chills. This tried me harder than anything I had seen in all my Mormon experience. Thinking my wives and children, from the nature of the climate, would look as sickly as those now surrounding me. But I said, "We will trust in God and go ahead." I think this was the first day of December, when we arrived in Washington town. Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.472 It was where Quail and Cottonwood creeks join the Rio Virgin that Moses Harris halted his family in the spring of 1850 and founded a home. He had come from San Bernardino, California the fall before and had wintered in Washington County. Other families joined him and improvements were made, but soon a fire occurred, wiping them out. Discouraged, some of the settlers moved to Minersville, in Beaver County, but later that same year the sons of Moses Harris returned to the site he had selected, and the little town of Harrisburg was born, with Silas Harris, son of Moses Harris, appointed to preside over this branch of the Washington Ward. Nine families resided there in 1860. In the spring of 1861, they moved a little farther up on Quail Creek, with the approval of Bishop Robert D. Covington, of Washington County. Besides the Moses Harris family and his son s [p.473] families, James Lewis, and Hosea Stout, with their families, had settled there. In the spring of 1862, William Leany, John Brimhall, William Robb, Allen J. Stout, Priddy Meeks, Orson Adams, John Adams, Samuel Hamilton and Elijah Knapp Fuller had joined the settlement, bringing their families, forty one souls in all. Apostles Orson Pratt and Erastus Snow met with the people at the home of Moses Harris and organized them into a branch of the Church, making the name of Harrisburg official. James Lewis was made president, with Moses Harris and Hosea Stout as counselors. William Leany and John Brimhall were appointed teachers and William Leany was made water master. Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.526 Early in 1857 Brigham Young called Samuel Adair and Robert D. Covington as leaders of two companies of pioneers to settle here and grow cotton. In 1861 a Scandinavian company came to assist in the work. The town was named in honor of George Washington and was the county seat from 1859 to 1863. A cotton factory was built to process the cotton grown in the Virgin River Valley and the area became known as "Utah’s Dixie." Cotton Factory Camp Washington County, Utah Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.526 In the spring of 1857 fifty families under the leadership of Robert Dockery Covington, who had been an overseer on a cotton plantation in North Carolina, and Samuel Adair were called to make a settlement to be named Washington. Cotton raising proved successful. President Brigham Young promoted the building of this historic Cotton Factory at Washington, so that the people could process their own cotton. An Enduring Legacy, Volume Ten, p.328 In 1857, Robert D. Covington, directed by Brigham Young, led twenty eight families to Washington, Utah, to establish the "Cotton Mission." In 1859, a large structure was built that would serve as a meetinghouse for the Saints, a way station for the early missionaries to the Indians, and the home of the first bishop in Dixie, Robert Covington. The spacious upper floor, entered by an outside stairway, became a community social center, with parties, dances, and plays held there until 1877. Built of native Navajo sandstone, it is the oldest remaining building in Utah’s Dixie. Foster Camp An Enduring Legacy, Volume Ten, p.328 "The Robert D. Covington home in Washington, Utah, is constructed of light pink sandstone, the same kind used in Washington Ward chapel, the old Cotton Factory, the St. George Stake Academy (Dixie Academy) which later became Dixie College and several of the old homes in Washington.... 1. Treasures of Pioneer History, Kate B. Carter, DUP, 1957, vol. 6, p. 493. 2. Information from Encyclopedic History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints, Andrew Jenson. 3. From life story of Anders Peter Anderson. 4. Our Pioneer Heritage, Kate B. Carter, vol. 10, pp. 148 50. 5. Material by Alva and Zella Matheson. 6. Information from Salt Lake Tribune and Pettyville records. 7. David County Clipper, Aug. 6, 1976. 8. Material by Della Dame Edmunds. 9. Treasures of Pioneer History, Kate B. Carter, vol. 6, p. 518. 10. Information by Lola Haskins. 11. Box Elder Lore, Bernice Gibbs Anderson, Box Elder Chapter SUP, pub. Brigham City, Utah, 1951, p. 121. 12. Material from Islands and Ports of California, Duncan Gleason, Port Adtniral Phineas Banning, Mayne Krythe, Pioneer Stories, Preston Nibley. 13. Information by Dorothy H. Martin. 14. Material from Iron Mission Days Committee. 15. Information by Vee Carlisle. 16. Salt Lake Tribune, Oct. 12, 1985. 17. Black Hawk and His War, and The Fort Ephraim Black Hawk War Peace Treaty, Virginia Nielson. 18. From "History of Malan Heights," by Helen Jensen, Oct. 1977. 19. Information by Stella Peterson Frahm. 20. These Our Fathers, Gunnison Valley Centennial History, p. 36. 21. "The Robert Dockery Covington Home," A. Karl Larsen. 22. The Settling of Huntsville," Nellie Newey. 23. From material by Jennie A. Wild. 24. Material by Bertha Cragun. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.708 Beverly, Can.). She was born Jan. 5, 1830. Their children: George William b. July 7, 1850; Gilbert Mann b. Oct. 27, 1852, m. Armelia Allen; Elizabeth b. Sept. 19, 1854, m. John T. Covington; Robert Nelson b. Nov. 19, 1856, m. Margaret Ann Schurz; Alexander F. b. March 15, 1859, m. Martha Naizer; Lydia C. b. April 11, 1861, m. Orson W. Allen, 1888; Lewis b. May 26, 1863, m. Adelaide M. Lewis; Cynthia Jane b. Jan. 12, 1866, m. William H. Heaps; Christina b. April 3, 1868, m. Earnest Griffin; Daniel Cook b. April 23, 1870, m. Almira Larsen; Andrew Patterson b. June 28, 1873, m. Hattie Burr. Family home Adamsville, Utah. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.867 FARR, WINSLOW, JR. (son of Winslow Farr and Olive Hovey Freeman). Born May 11, 1837, East Charleston, Orleans county, Vt. Came to Utah October 1848. Married Emily Jane Covington Oct. 17, 1858 (daughter of Robert D. Covington and Elizabeth Ann Thomas). Their children: Winslow Robert; Emily Olive; Lafayette Thomas; Lorin Freeman; David James; Moroni; Mohonri; Ida Almena; Silva May; William Henry; Mary Isabel; Barnard Elijah; Aaron Adelbert; Jonathan. Walked and drove three yoke of oxen across the plains. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.1188 Married Mary Ann Jones March 11, 1860 (daughter of William E. and Mary Jones), who was born Feb. 8, 1845. Their children: Mary Jane b. Nov. 18, 1861, m. John Limb Feb. 6, 1878; Liza Ann b. Dec. 15, 1863, d. July 6, 1865; Martha Ellen b. June 21, 1866, m. John E. Cox Dec. 27, 1882; William Urban b. Oct. 10, 1868, m. Rosa E. Adams Nov. 14, 1890; Daniel Jones b. Feb. 25, 1871, m. Ellen S. Adams June 19, 1895; Margret Caroline b. Nov. 26, 1873, m. John D. Adams Dec. 30, 1891; Robert Charles b. April 7, 1876, d. July 23, 1901; George Heber b. March 30, 1879, m. Lydia C. Covington June 5, 1901; Lewis Jenkins b. Sept. 18, 1881, d. Jan. 20, 1907; Clara Bell b. March 25, 1884. Family home Beaver, Utah. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.1316 Wed. 6.—The Saints who were settling Washington, in southern Utah, were organized into a branch of the Church with Robert D. Covington as president. He was ordained a Bishop Aug. 1, 1858. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 1, p.4 Wed. 6—The Saints who were settling Washington, in southern Utah, were organized into a branch of the Church with Robert D. Covington as Bishop Aug. 1, 1858. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 1, p.157 It took two years to build the fort at Holladay. Some of those who helped in the building were Ezekiel Lee, Rodney Badger, Lyman Stevens, George Boyes, William S. Covert, William Hutchins, William Riter, C. A. Harper, David Brinton, Solomon Chase, Winslow Farr, William Casto, Robert Covington, William Hyde and William Bringhurst. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 1, p.496 Robert Dockery Covington buried his wife, Elizabeth, in December of 1847 and on September 26, 1848, he married Malinda. They afterwards made their home in Cottonwood for a short time at which place a daughter, Mary, was born December 28, 1849. Robert was called to the Dixie mission in 1857 where he established a home in Washington, Washington County. Malinda became the mother of seven children. She adopted a Lamanite girl who lived in their home from the year 1861 to February, 1879, when she passed away. Malinda died November 18, 1894 in Circleville while visiting with members of her family. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 2, p.469 Daniel Monroe Thomas, son of Henry and Ester Covington Thomas, a second cousin, was born December 27, 1809 in Richmond county, North Carolina. He had ten brothers and sisters, viz: William, Henry, Elijah, Joseph, John, Robert, Rachel, Amanda, Harriet and Catherine. His mother died in North Carolina in March, 1835. The father had promised all his children a good education, but two years after the death of their mother, the three eldest sons, now young men, desired to go west. The father was loathe to leave as the younger children had not finished their schooling: however, after some persuasion, he moved his family to Mississippi and settled in Moxubee county in Tombigee Valley. Nine years later Daniel heard the preachings of the Mormon Elders in this vicinity and brought home a Book of Mormon. Soon after all the members of the family were baptized into the Mormon Church by Elder Benjamin L. Clapp, February 12, 1844. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 2, p.570 Robert Thomas, son of Henry and Esther Covington Thomas, was born January 8, 1822 in Richmond county, North Carolina, one of a family of twelve children. All the members of the Thomas family joined the Mormon Church in the year 1843. The following year they moved to Nauvoo, Illinois and here Robert was employed as a wagon maker preparatory to the westward trek. He was selected as a member of the original company and of this memorable journey and his life in the valley he wrote as follows: Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 4, p.541 Was relieved from 'Western Union Telegraph Office' November 28th, 1866, and immediately commenced working on the wires of this city. Dec. 1st had wires, etc., arranged so as to work to Ogden, which office had been opened at my request by an old operator, coming from the north. Dec. 4th started north, roads bad, arrived at Ogden on 5th, David E. Davis of Ogden takes charge. Arrived at Box Elder and fixed up the office on the 6th, Peter Matson of Box Elder takes charge. Arrived at Logan on 7th, fixed up the office on 8th. Joseph Goddard of Salt Lake City takes charge. I left for Salt Lake City 7 a.m. on the 9th, and arrived 4 a.m. on 10th. From Dec. 10th until 18th was detained in Salt Lake getting operators, machinery, etc., ready to go south. Arrived at Provo on the 19th and opened office on 20th. Joseph West of Ogden takes charge. Arrived at Payson 21st, and opened office on 22nd. John D. Stark of Payson takes charge. Arrived at Nephi 23rd partly fixed up office and left for Moroni on the 26th with one wagon and my conveyance. Sent two wagons and the southern operators to Scipio to build about half a mile of double line as the line was not put up to the town. Arrived at Moroni same day, and opened office. Mr. Torgeson of Salt Lake takes charge. Arrived at Mt. Pleasant 27th and opened office. Anthon H. Lund of Mt. Pleasant takes charge. Arrived at Manti 28th and opened office. John Hougaard of Manti takes charge. Arrived at Nephi again 29th arranged the office, batteries, etc. left Wm. Bryan of Nephi in charge. Arrived at Scipio Jan. 2nd 1867 and fixed up office. Zenos Pratt of Provo takes charge. Arrived at Fillmore 3rd fixed up office (and as neither of the Fillmore students were competent to take charge of the office) Richard Horn of Salt Lake takes charge. Arrived at Beaver on 7th (the line being some distance from Cove Creek Station was unable to open the office, arranged however to have all ready when we returned). Opened office at Beaver. S. A. Kenner of Salt Lake takes charge. Arrived at Parowan 10th and opened office. Wm. B. Dougall of Salt Lake takes charge. Arrived at Kanarra 12th. People not expecting an office had no suitable place to put it. Ran the wires into President Roundy's temporarily. Geo. [p.541] Peart of Salt Lake takes charge. An office was built and we fixed it permanently as we returned. Arrived at Toquerville 13th no place to put the office. Bishop Willis said he would fix an office as soon as he could. Arrived at Washington and overtook Stickney there. Bishop Covington did not know where to put the office until you were heard from, we did not open it. Went to St. George the same day 15th Stickney arrived with the wire (at St. George) at 11:40 a.m. and we got to work with Salt Lake at 12 o'clock office in St. George Hall. The house designed for the office was not finished sufficient to occupy. Went to Toquerville on the 22nd and as they were not ready could only put the office in temporary operation. George Tribe of Salt Lake takes charge. On 24th to Washington and opened that office placed Adolphus Whitehead in charge. Having got the St. George office, machinery, batteries etc. and arranged with Robert Lund in charge. We left for Salt Lake Jan. 30th and arrived Feb. 16th, calling at all of the offices, fixing up Cove Creek office, Clarence Merrill of Fillmore takes charge. Moving Kanarra instruments to a house the people have built for them. Left offices in as good condition as possible. Many supplies are still needed in most of the southern offices. I however requested the Bishops to supply the operators whatever was needed for the present. The Salt Lake office should be arranged so as to have the receiving department downstairs, the operating department upstairs, this would be a decided improvement and one that I would recommend. Not a man on this line ever worked a Telegraph line before, the line was strung and put into operation in the middle of winter. It is about five hundred miles in length, taking all into consideration please permit me as an old operator to say that I think the working of the same almost a miracle. Hoping that my portion of the work will meet your approbation, I remain your brother. Journal History Feb. 18, 1867. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 6, p.313 During the previous summer a handful of settlers from the town of Washington under Bishop Robert Covington, and a small working party under Joseph Home fitted out by President Brigham Young and others, had opened up a small cotton farm below the mouth of the Santa Clara River and had demonstrated the possibility of the enterprise, though when we arrived about the 15th of November Elder Horne's party had returned north abandoning the enterprise as too expensive the way they had taken it, without their families, and so far from a source of supplies. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 15, p.444 In April 1857, twenty eight families and a number of young men under Robert D. Covington were called to settle on the Washington flat east of the present St. George to experiment with cotton culture. Since most of these people were from the [p.445] Southern States, they came with high hopes but the nature of the land itself was such as to crush their spirits. Barren flats stretched to black lava formation or red sandstone, and on the lower levels alkali encrusted the surface in white ridges. The first season they did not get a third of the crop—much of the seed did not germinate and alkali killed most of the plants that did come up. Covington, Robert Duchey LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 4, p.592 Covington, Robert Duchey, Bishop of the Washington W a r d, St. George Stake, Utah, from 1858 to 1869, was born Aug. 20, 1815, in North Carolina, a son of Thomas D. Corington and Jane Thomas. He was baptized Feb. 3, 1843, came to Nauvoo in 1845, and to the Valley in 1847, and was ordained a Bishop Aug. 1, 1858, by Geo. A. Smith. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.169 DAMRON VALLEY, St. George Stake, Washington Co., Utah, is a small valley lying north of St. George, between that place and Pine Valley. In 1859 a herd ground, eight miles square, was granted by Washington County court to Robert D. Covington, on condition that said grant should not conflict or interfere with any rights of other settlers. Damron Valley is noted as a fine grazing country. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.928 Washington as a settlement dates back to 1857, when some twenty eight families and a number of young men were called by Church authorities to settle in southern Utah. When that company of missionaries was organized in Salt Lake City prior to starting out, Robert D. Covington was appointed to take charge of the company, which arrived on the site of Washington, May 5, 1857, and commenced activities while encamped at the Adair Springs in the valley where the town of Washington is now located. On May 6, 1857, the settlers were organized as a branch of the Church with Robert D. Covington as presiding Elder. The nearest post office was at Cedar City, 50 miles distant, and the nearest white men were at Tonaquint, a village near the mouth of Santa Clara, some eight miles away. Most of the first settlers of Washington hailed from the Southern States and were called because they had some experience in raising cotton. The pioneers of Washington, which thus founded the first real L. D. S. settlement of importance in Utah south of the Rim of the Basin, went to work with a will making improvements, building houses, making water ditches, plowing and planting; they met with considerable success. In 1859 Washington was made the county seat of Washington County. In 1858 some of the families who had vacated San Bernardino in California located in Washington. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.928 Following is a complete list of the Bishops of Washington Ward: Robert Covington, 1857–1869; John Woodruff Freeman, 1869–1877; Thomas J. Jones, 1877–1881; Marcus Funk, 1881–1888; Andrew Sprowle, 1888–1908; Calvin Hall, 1908–1924; Arthur A. Paxman, 1924–1925, and Victor E. Iverson, 1925–1930. On Dec. 31, 1930, the Washington Ward had 447 members, including 103 children. The total population of the Washington Precinct was 490 in 1930, of which 435 resided in the town of Washington. Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, May 6, 1857 (Wednesday) The Saints who were settling Washington, in southern Utah, were organized into a branch of the Church with Robert D. Covington as president. He was ordained a Bishop Aug. 1, 1858. Mormon Manuscripts to 1846: Guide to Lee Library, BYU Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Robert Dachey 20 Aug 1815 Latter Day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints by Andrew Jenson. [Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Company, 1901 1935.] v.4, p.592 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, Robert Dockery 20 Aug 1815 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.93 Family # # in Family:651 2 Last Name:COVINGTON First Name(s):ELIZABETH ANN (THOMAS) Plaque #:P12B Age:27 Birth Date:1820 Death Date:1847 Other Information:F Family # # in Family:* Last Name:THOMAS First Name(s):ELIZABETH ANN (COVINGTON) Plaque #:P12B Age: Birth Date:* Death Date:* Other Information:651 2 Family Husband: ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Wife: ELIZABETH THOMAS Child: JOHN T. COVINGTON Child: EMILY J. COVINGTON LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 3, p.525 Stewart, John Riley, Bishop of Torrey Ward (Wayne Stake), Wayne county, Utah, from 1901 to 1906, was born Aug. 27, 1873, in Beaver, Beaver county, Utah, the son of Urban Van Stewart and Ellen Adams. He was baptized May 21, 1882, at Adamsville; ordained a Deacon Nov. 30, 1884, by Joseph H. Joseph; ordained a Priest Aug. 30, 1897, by Bishop George Coleman at Teasdale, Wayne county; ordained an Elder Oct. 14, 1897, by Willis E. Robison at Loa; ordained a Seventy Oct. 19, 1897, by Apostle John Henry Smith; received his blessings in the Salt Lake Temple Nov. 20, 1897, and filled a mission to the Northern States in 1897 1900, [p.526] laboring principally in Michigan. After laboring as presiding Elder and assistant Sunday school superintendent at Grover, he was ordained a High Priest and Bishop April 5, 1901, by Francis M. Lyman and set apart to preside over the Torrey Ward, which position he filled until May, 1906. In 1903 (Aug. 14th) he married Ellen Amelia Covington (daughter of John Thomas Covington and Elizabeth Adams), who was born Dec. 10, 1884, in Orderville, Utah. The children by this marriage are the following: Ellen Elizabeth, born April 26, 1904; John Riley jun., born Oct. 25, 1905; Golda, born Dec. 21, 1907; Cecil Van, born March 7, 1910; Gerold William, born March 21, 1911, and Junius Kent, born July 17, 1913. His wife died July 17, 1916, in childbed. Bro. Stewart acted as second counselor to President Gearson S. Bastion from 1906 to 1910 and then as first counselor to Joseph Eckersley from 1910 to 1915. He is a farmer and stock raiser by avocation. Family # # in Family:650 1 Last Name:*COVINGTON First Name(s):JOHN THOMAS Plaque #:P12B Age:68 Birth Date:1840 Death Date:1908 Other Information: John Covington had an impressive experience while herding sheep for the Order in House Rock Valley in an early period of its history. One early morning, as he set about preparing his breakfast, before giving his attention to the increasing restlessness of the sheep, a bystander might have noticed a movement in the underbrush as a fine specimen of Indian slipped cautiously but swiftly behind the branches of a gnarled oak tree a few paces to the South. Brother Covington tripped slightly as his foot caught in a tangle of undergrowth, and partially fell. In that instant the Indian, in paint and feathers, stepped from behind the tree. As Brother Covington arose, he found himself facing the muzzle of a gun. [p.200] Shocked, and for the moment terrified, he wavered between a desire to run or to stand his ground. The impulse to run passed in almost the instant it was created and he stood, composed, complacently facing his adversary. His compelling gaze riveted the Indian's attention and caused him to hesitate. Knowing little of the Indian tongue, he could do nothing in argument. Neither was argument the Red man's method. Seeing his advantage, and as if by inspiration, Brother Covington slowly opened the bosom of his shirt, baring his breast and coolly said, "Shoot, you squaw, I have no gun"! The Indian lowered his weapon, uttered a few guttural sounds and disappeared among the trees. Brother Covington learned later that his act of bravery in inviting death probably saved his life. Unconscious of the effect, Brother Covington had used about the only words he could have spoken to save his life. Covington, John, 199 Mr. M. E. Moody, Sr., tells me that his uncle, Joseph Damron, herded sheep in that area during the early days, and that the valley was named for him. Mr. Moody gives the spelling as Damron, and says that he does not know that his uncle had any legal claim there. In James G. Bleak, Annals of the Southern Utah Mission, MS., Vol. 1, I find in the minutes of the County Court held on the 7th of March, 1859, an item of business which reads, "A herd ground, 8 miles square, was granted to Robert D. Covington in Dameron Valley, said Grant not to conflict or interfere with the grazing of any other settlement or previous rights." So it would seem that the name dated back before that time, and the spelling of the name for the records seems to have been established as "Dameron," from which it has been variously called "Damon" and "Diamond." Covington, Robert D., 123 8James Warren Covington, "Federal Relations with the Colorado Utes, 1861 1865," Colorado Magazine 28 (1951) :257 66. Yes, and John D. Lee administering to a dying child, George W. Brimhall praying for rain, or Dudley Leavitt giving up his horse to be killed for food as Jacob Hamblin's party returned from the Hopi Indians or his wife "Aunt Mariah" Leavitt racing by buggy to deliver another baby. And what about George Brooks, Miles Romney, Erastus Snow, Orson Pratt, Jr., the Gardners, the Gublers, the Hafens, the Toblers, the Stahlis, the Iversons and Sprouls, thc Larsons and Jolleys, Bishop Covington, and all the others. 46Salt Lake Herald, July 22, 1885; K. E. Covington, "Two Years on the Desert," True West 14 (January February 1967): 68; Ogden Standard, July 28, 1897; Lillian Wood, "Lucy Lee: A Family History," graduate seminar paper, University of Utah, 1977, copy at Utah State Historical Society; Ogden Daily Herald, May 14, 1885. 61Covington, "Two Years in the Desert," p. 68; Anderson interview, pp. 3 4; Name:ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Sex:Male Birth Date:20 AUG 1815 Birth Place:, RICHMOND, , NORTH CAROLINA View Marriage 1 of ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Name:JOHN T. COVINGTON Sex:Male Birth Date: 7 AUG 1840 Birth Place:, NOXUBEE, , MISSISSIPPI View Parents of JOHN T. COVINGTON Name:EMILY J. COVINGTON Sex:Female Birth Date: 1 JAN 1843 Birth Place:, NOXUBEE, , MISSISSIPPI View Parents of EMILY J. COVINGTON Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.1, p.291 Phoebe Ann Covington Pace was born, November 21, 1857, in Big Cottonwood, and was married to John Ezra Pace, January 11, 1877. This was the second marriage of Mr. Pace. His first wife was Caddie Ivins, who passed away six years after his second marriage, leaving four children under eight years of age. By that time Phoebe had three children of her own, but she tenderly mothered the seven children all under eight years of age. As time went on, nine more children were born to her. Her duties and labors were many. :257 66. Yes, and John D. Lee administering to a dying child, George W. Brimhall praying for rain, or Dudley Leavitt giving up his horse to be killed for food as Jacob Hamblin's party returned from the Hopi Indians or his wife "Aunt Mariah" Leavitt racing by buggy to deliver another baby. And what about George Brooks, Miles Romney, Erastus Snow, Orson Pratt, Jr., the Gardners, the Gublers, the Hafens, the Toblers, the Stahlis, the Iversons and Sprouls, thc Larsons and Jolleys, Bishop Covington, and all the others. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.2, p.477 Flowers were made of a material called at that time book muslin. It resembled what we now call organdy. Some hats were finished with a band on the outside and a sweat band underneath the edge. Some hats were crocheted from cotton yarn. The brims of the hats were generally stitched many times. Women who made hats in the United Order days were Ann Carling Chamberlain, Liddie K. Young, and Johannah Covington.—Records of Camp 2, Orderville, Hattie Blackburn. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.3, p.25 With the outbreak of the Civil War, Brigham Young became interested in developing the cotton industry so the Dixie Mission was established with but one outstanding purpose in mind: to produce cotton. After the year 1863, when one hundred thousand pounds of cotton was raised, cotton mills began to appear at various points of this locality but the most important one was built in 1865 at Washington, Utah Territory. It soon became known as the Rio Virgin Manufacturing Company and was destined to grow into one of the largest business centers in this country serving a district from St. Thomas, Nevada on the south, to Panguitch, Utah on the north. James Davidson was the first superintendent and his daughter, Maggie, who afterwards married Benjamin Paddock, taught Amanda Pace, Mary Covington and Lucinda Clark, the different steps in the cotton business, such as lapping, carding, spinning and weaving, and these girls were the first employees of this factory. Brother Davidson, his wife and son, died of thirst between St. Thomas and the Beaver Dam Wash, May 12, 1869. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.16 Stockyards. The Order stockyards and horse stables were built north of the Order Fort. In 1877 Zemira Palmer and John T. Covington were in charge. Later George W. Adair, Israel Hoyt and E. R. Billingsley were appointed. In the fall, after the crops were gathered into the yards, men, women and children would gather to husk the corn, and sometimes on moonlight nights they would gather for this purpose after a day's work in the fields and other departments of the Order. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.19 Francis L. Porter, Thomas Chamberlain, Howard, Henry, Susie and Lucy Chamberlain, Eunice Brown, Abbie Porter, Sylvia Meeks, Clara and Heber Meeks, Chastie Chamberlain, Abigail Cox, Helen Palmer, Mary Kokerhans, Margaret Fackrell, Molly Stolworthy Black, Tory Hancock, Ruhama Adair, Alvira Cox, Mary Covington Larsen, and Clara and Minnie Esplin. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.19 Among those who lived there and worked upon the farm during the Order and immediately after were: John T. Covington and family, Thomas Chamberlain and family, Cyrene Fackrell, Myron Holgate, Hans Sorensen, John Carling, Elijah Adair, Joseph Palmer, Robert Covington and Thomas Stolworthy. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.22 The women also made cloth hats. For the material they preferred heavy denim. They had patterns for the hats. These consisted of triangle pieces cut out for the crown and one straight round piece for the brim. The sections of the crown were sewed together and this, in turn, was sewed to the brim. The brim was usually made of two thicknesses of the cloth, with often a thinner piece placed between to serve as padding. Nicer hats were made of thinner material, such as percale. This was of different colors and was also starched to make it stay in shape. They were also quilted. Flowers were made of a material called book muslin. It resembled organdy. Some hats were finished with a band on the outside and a sweat band underneath the edge. Some hats were crocheted with cotton yarn. They sewed brims around and around to make stiff. Women who made hats in the Order were Ann Carling Chamberlain, Liddie K. Young and Johannah Covington. Heart Throbs of the West, Vol.8, p.430 Collins, Albert W.33Jan. 3, 1814Butler, Georgia Collins, Susan34Feb. 10, 1818Marlboro, S. C. Collins, Adeline5Oct. 7, 1842Noxubee, Miss. Covington, Robert D.32Aug. 20, 1815Richmond, N.C. Covington, Elizabeth27April 21, 1820Marlboro, S. C. Covington, John T.7Aug. 7, 1840Noxubee, Miss. Covington, Emily J.4Jan. 1, 1843Noxubee, Miss. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.10, p.313 The next day we came to a place called Harrisburg. This place had been recommended to me in which to settle. It being a very healthful place. So I went and hunted for the town, but did not find it. I found a few places where some cedar sticks were set up and covered with bagos or ground sugar cane. We then went on to Washington. When we reached the top of the last ridge we found the town nearly under us on a nice fiat between two ridges. Here we found some of our old neighbors who received us very kindly. We found Robert D. Covington, the Mangums, and Adams Rickey, and others who had been sent on that mission, some years before. The appearance of these brethren and their wives and children was rather discouraging. Nearly all of them had fever and ague or chills as they are called (malaria). They had worked hard in the country and had worn out their clothes, and had replaced them from the cotton they had raised on their own lots and farms. Their women had carded, spun and woven by hand and colored with weeds this cotton. The men's shirts, the women's and children's dresses and sunbonnets were all made of the same piece of cloth. Their clothes and their faces were all of a color, being blue with chills. This tried me harder than anything I had seen in all my Mormon experience. Thinking my wives and children, from the nature of the climate, would look as sickly as those now surrounding me. But I said, "We will trust in God and go ahead." I think this was the first day of December, when we arrived in Washington town. Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.472 It was where Quail and Cottonwood creeks join the Rio Virgin that Moses Harris halted his family in the spring of 1850 and founded a home. He had come from San Bernardino, California the fall before and had wintered in Washington County. Other families joined him and improvements were made, but soon a fire occurred, wiping them out. Discouraged, some of the settlers moved to Minersville, in Beaver County, but later that same year the sons of Moses Harris returned to the site he had selected, and the little town of Harrisburg was born, with Silas Harris, son of Moses Harris, appointed to preside over this branch of the Washington Ward. Nine families resided there in 1860. In the spring of 1861, they moved a little farther up on Quail Creek, with the approval of Bishop Robert D. Covington, of Washington County. Besides the Moses Harris family and his son s[p.473] families, James Lewis, and Hosea Stout, with their families, had settled there. In the spring of 1862, William Leany, John Brimhall, William Robb, Allen J. Stout, Priddy Meeks, Orson Adams, John Adams, Samuel Hamilton and Elijah Knapp Fuller had joined the settlement, bringing their families, forty one souls in all. Apostles Orson Pratt and Erastus Snow met with the people at the home of Moses Harris and organized them into a branch of the Church, making the name of Harrisburg official. James Lewis was made president, with Moses Harris and Hosea Stout as counselors. William Leany and John Brimhall were appointed teachers and William Leany was made water master. Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.526 An Enduring Legacy, Volume Ten, p.328 "The home has three stories or, more properly, two stories and a basement. Each floor, including the basement, is equipped with a well built rock fireplace. Bishop Covington—he was Washington's founder and first bishop—used the basement and main floor as living quarters. On the north side is a railed porch, a common feature of the better pioneer homes, which was reached from a door in the large upper room."21 An Enduring Legacy, Volume Twelve, p.86 The homes of Lee, Covington, and Tailor served as dance halls for us young folks. We would gather at these places, pay our tickets in factory pay or produce, and dance to the music of the fiddle and accordion. Sometimes we would have candy pulls and peach cutting parties. In this way we enjoyed ourselves very much. Lafayette Thomas Farr picture on InfoBase’s. Son of Winslow Farr, Jr., and Emily Jane Covington. Born Feb. 14, 1864, Paradise, Utah Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.867 FARR, LAFAYETTE THOMAS (son of Winslow Farr, Jr., and Emily Jane Covington). Born Feb. 14, 1864, Paradise, Utah. Married Nancy Hipwell Sept. 30, 1885 (daughter of William Hipwell and Elizabeth Barton). Their children: William Hipwell; Winslow; Emily Jane; Elizabeth; Aaron Lafayette; Lawrence; Harriet Olive; Flossie; Laura May; Glenn. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.1014 Married Karste Mortenson in Sweden (daughter of Andres Mortenson and Anna Pahrson of Sweden), who was born Sept. 10, 1821. Their children: Johanna, m. John T. Covington; Mary Christena, m. Joseph Ash; Charlotte Elena, m. Joseph Simkins; John Williard; Joseph and Emma Helena, died; Ellen, m. John H. Fullmer. Family home Beaver, Utah. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 1, p.192 "Soon after that I was sitting on the ditch bank with Carmi Porter one day and we were sharing confidences about girls. I told him how I felt about Grandma. I'll be darned if he didn't go and tell it around and she got to hear it. A night or two after that we were at a dance. We had dances in the dining hall. We would shove [p.193] all the tables against the walls and shave soap on the floor to make it smooth. I was standing by the door when Grandma came in with Alvin and another girl. He was courting two at the same time. That was a common way in the polygamous days. The music started up. We had good music for our weekly dances. Brother Covington and Lon Cox would trade off with the fiddle. That was all the instruments we had, but we thought it was great. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 1, p.496 Malinda Catherine, daughter of Milton and Malinda Kelley came to Utah with her mother in July 1847. When she grew to young womanhood she married Benjamin Alexander. They lived in Salt Lake City for a time then moved to Vernal, Utah where she reared a family of six boys and three girls. She passed away in Vernal in 1899. —Marian Covington Bradshaw. See History of Benjamin Lamoni and Catherine Malinda Kelley Alexander. For clarification on some points. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 5, p.23 After these missionaries arrived in the cotton country they received their portions of land with gratitude. David H. Cannon, a missionary of 1861, tells of his wife and himself receiving their spot of ground: "We knelt down together in the evening shade [p.24] behind a large chaparral," he wrote, "and thanked the Lord for the land that was ours. We dedicated it to Him and asked His blessings upon it and upon our endeavors to make it productive...." The missionaries of '61 needed more help if the Territory was to be supplied with cotton. They could use five hundred more laborers, but all they got were two hundred families sent south in October 1862. These new recruits were told by their leaders that the soil and water in the Dixie country were "actually aching" for men to combine them into the making of good cotton. President Heber C. Kimball assured them, "God is inspiring this mission," so, South they came and joined their brethren in the spirit of "energetic" hopefulness along with hard work in preparing the 1863 cotton crop. And their efforts were not in vain for according to \= in his report at the October Conference held in St. George: "the cotton crop is this year better than usual." He further told the congregation that the cotton produced in Dixie was better than that grown in Tennessee and equal to that produced in the Carolinas. Cotton was now being grown all along the Virgin River, and cotton gins were set up in Grafton, Virgin City and Washington which aided the growers. 56,094 pounds of ginned cotton were produced this year and sold for fifty cents a pound. Top price for cotton on the New York market was ninety three cents. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 13, p.25 Sunday February 7th. At an early hour accompanied by Bp. R.D. Covington went some 4 miles up the Rio Virgin to see the condition of the Church sheep herd some 1600 in charge of Bro. E. Larkin. Found them in bad condition many of them dying & loosing their wool. Bro. Larkin was doing his best to save them & keep them healthy. He lacks experience. Gave him some advice & then returned to Town took breakfast & then to meeting. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 13, p.47 His daughter Maggie, who had worked in the textile mills of her native Scotland, proved to be an efficient teacher of the various steps in the manufacture of cotton textiles—lapping, carding, spinning and weaving. Her first pupils were Amanda Pace, Mary Covington, and Lucinda Clark, three young ladies from Washington who thus became the first local employees of the new enterprise which was in operation early in 1867. Davidson himself was an expert machinist. June of 1869 found James, his wife and their twelve year old son in St. Thomas on the Muddy River. LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 3, p.525 Stewart, John Riley, Bishop of Torrey Ward (Wayne Stake), Wayne county, Utah, from 1901 to 1906, was born Aug. 27, 1873, in Beaver, Beaver county, Utah, the son of Urban Van Stewart and Ellen Adams. He was baptized May 21, 1882, at Adamsville; ordained a Deacon Nov. 30, 1884, by Joseph H. Joseph; ordained a Priest Aug. 30, 1897, by Bishop George Coleman at Teasdale, Wayne county; ordained an Elder Oct. 14, 1897, by Willis E. Robison at Loa; ordained a Seventy Oct. 19, 1897, by Apostle John Henry Smith; received his blessings in the Salt Lake Temple Nov. 20, 1897, and filled a mission to the Northern States in 1897 1900, [p.526] laboring principally in Michigan. After laboring as presiding Elder and assistant Sunday school superintendent at Grover, he was ordained a High Priest and Bishop April 5, 1901, by Francis M. Lyman and set apart to preside over the Torrey Ward, which position he filled until May, 1906. In 1903 (Aug. 14th) he married Ellen Amelia Covington (daughter of John Thomas Covington and Elizabeth Adams), who was born Dec. 10, 1884, in Orderville, Utah. The children by this marriage are the following: Ellen Elizabeth, born April 26, 1904; John Riley jun., born Oct. 25, 1905; Golda, born Dec. 21, 1907; Cecil Van, born March 7, 1910; Gerold William, born March 21, 1911, and Junius Kent, born July 17, 1913. His wife died July 17, 1916, in childbed. Bro. Stewart acted as second counselor to President Gearson S. Bastion from 1906 to 1910 and then as first counselor to Joseph Eckersley from 1910 to 1915. He is a farmer and stock raiser by avocation. Covington, Joseph W. LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 4, p.483 Covington, Joseph W., Bishop of Lankershim Ward, Hollywood Stake, California, from 1928 to 1929, was born Aug. 8, 1879, in Orderville, Utah, the son of John T. Covington and Johanna Lundblad. He was baptized Oct. 13, 1887, ordained a High Priest April 22, 1923, by Geo. Albert Smith, and a Bishop Jan. 29, 1928, by Melvin J. Ballard. Covington, Joseph Willard LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 4, p.515 Covington, Joseph Willard, Bishop of the San Pedro Ward, Los Angeles Stake, California, from 1923 to 1925, was born Aug. 8, 1879, in Odenville, Utah, a son of John Thomas Covington and Johanna Lundblad. He was baptized Nov. 13, 1887, ordained a High Priest Jan. 10, 1911, by Heber J. Grant, and a Bishop April 22, 1923, by Geo. Albert Smith. LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 4, p.677 Stolworthy, Willard Chase, first counselor in the Young Stake presidency from 1924 to 1930+, was born Sept. 16, 1891, in Orderville, Utah, a son of Henry Thomas Stolworthy and Johanna Elizabeth Covington. He was baptized in September, 1899, filled a mission to the Southern States in 1912 1913, was ordained a High Priest Feb. 21, 1914, by Rudger Clawson, and set apart as first counselor in the stake presidency March 22, 1925. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.413 The Latter day Saints who had located in that part of Los Angeles which constituted the district of Lankershim were organized as a branch June 13, 1924, with Edmund R. Paul as presiding Elder. The branch was organized as a regular bishop’s ward in 1927 with Edmund R. Paul as Bishop. He was succeeded in 1928 by Heber W. Norton, who later in 1928 was succeeded by Joseph W. Covington, who in 1929 was succeeded by Mathoni W. Pratt, who in 1930 was succeeded by Jesse L. Mortensen, who presided Dec. 31, 1930. On that date the membership of the Lankershim Ward was 216, including 50 children. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.522 The first title to land held by any white man to any part of the ground around Moccasin Springs was obtained from William B. Maxwell by a Brother Rhodes, who paid Maxwell 80 head of sheep for his claim. Brother Rhodes located at the springs as a ranchman as early as 1864, and he induced Randall (Randolph) Alexander to settle with him. The two together bought such remaining lands from the Indians as these natives still seemed to own. The ranch was vacated in 1866 because of Indian trouble. In 1871 Levi Stewart and others purchased the Alexander claim and divided the stock into eight or ten shares. A company under Louis Allen, consisting of people who had broken up their homes in the Muddy Valley (Nevada), located temporarily at Pipe Springs and Moccasin. Later the Canaan Cattle Company secured some property at Moccasin Springs, of which Lorin Pratt took charge for several years. Still later John Thomas Covington took charge. He was succeeded in 1883 by Christopher B. Heaton, who assisted the Indians in their farming, but without much success, as the Indians were not inclined to work very hard. A branch of the Church was organized as early as 1886 with Christopher B. Heaton as presiding Elder. He presided until 1890, when he moved to Mexico, where he was killed by Mexicans in 1894. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.775 The San Pedro Ward was organized April 22, 1923, with Joseph W. Covington as Bishop. He was succeeded in 1925 by LeRoy C. Boren, who in 1930 was succeeded by J. Golden Kimball, jun., who presided Dec. 31, 1930. On that date the Church membership of the San Pedro Ward was 256 souls, including 70 children. Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, December 18, 1888 (Tuesday) In the Second District Court, at Beaver (Judge Jacob S. Boreman), John T. Covington, of Orderville, Thomas Chamberlain, of Graham, Kane Co., Cornelius McReavy, of Washington, Andrew Anderson, of Koosharem, James H. Langford, of Junction, Piute Co., and Benjamin Perkin, of Carcass Creek, Piute Co., were each sentenced to six months' imprisonment and $300 fine; all for u.c. Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, June 17, 1889 (Monday) Benjamin Perkins, Andrew Anderson, John T. Covington, Cornelius McReavy, James H. Langford, Carl Olsen, Soren Jacobsen and Charles Frampton were discharged from the Penitentiary. Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, December 31, 1905 (Sunday) Berrill Covington, an old pioneer, died suddenly in Ogden, Weber Co. Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, June 12, 1908 (Friday) Mrs. Sarah Bitter Gibson, wife of the late Jacob Gibson, died in the Sugar House Ward, Salt Lake Co., Utah, and John Thomas Covington, a Utah pioneer of 1847, died at Loa, Wayne Co., Utah. Guide to Archives and Manuscripts Collections In Selected Utah Repositories Petersen, Erma P. Genealogy, [19 ]. 354 p. Summary: Collected biographical sketches, personal histories and genealogies of the ancestors of Petersen. Includes information on the Pace family and early Utah history and settlements. Gift of Erma P. Petersen, 1968 and 1972. 1. Lawrence family Genealogy. 2. Pace family Genealogy. 3. Pace, Catherine Rankin. 4. Pace, William Wilson, 1857 5. Pace, Wilson Daniel, 1831 1899. 6. Anderson, Nancy Pace, 1801 1875. 7. Anderson, Miles, 1795 1876. 8. Tyler, Mary Adelia Pace, 1864 9. Redd, Ann Moriah, 1830 1909. 10. Rance, Icevinda Pace Rohner, 1867 11. Pace, John Hardison, 1856 12. Pace, Pauline Ann Bryner, 1857 1931. 13. Sorenson, Amanda Lucinda Pace, 1850 14. Rawson, Margret Angeline Pace, 1842 1929. 15. Pace, James, 1811 1888. 16. Pace, John Ezra, 1845 1932. 17. Ivins, Caroline Augusta, 1845 1884. 18. McDonald, Julia Ann Ivins, 1859 1900. 19. Pace, Phoebe Ann Covington, 1857 1928. 20. Pace, Elizabeth Lee, 1851 1912. 21. Payson (Utah) History. 22. St. George (Utah) History 23. Thatcher (Ariz.) History. 24. Frontier and pioneer life. 25. Mormon Battalion, 1846 1847. MSS SC 52 ID: UTBV86 A32 Guide to Archives and Manuscripts Collections In Selected Utah Repositories Seaman, Anna Porter. To commemorate the Orderville United Order, 1875 1885. 15 pp. : photocopy of typescript. Includes biographies of original settlers. Location: Utah State Historical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah. 1. United Order Orderville (Utah). 2. Orderville (Utah). 3. Mount Carmel (Utah). 4. Glendale (Utah). 5. Kane County (Utah). 6. Porter, Francis Lysander. 7. Bowers, Isaiah. 8. Carling, Isaac Van Wagoner. 9. Carroll, Charles Negus. 10. Chamberlain, Thomas. 11. Covington, John. 12. Hoyt, Israel. 13. Biographies. MSS A 2006 ID: UTSX89 A1736 Davis Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies (1977), pg.105 Itinerary of trip to Washington County. Made molasses. Married Emily Jane Covington. Some flashback and repetition of 1857–58 events. Raised cotton. To Cedar City to deposit molasses. Mormon Manuscripts to 1846: Guide to Lee Library, BYU Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Bergetta Adair Our Valley compiled by Rosetta Biggs. [Mesa, Arizona: Biggs, 1978.]p.198 Photo p.199 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.86 Mormon Manuscripts To 1846: A Guide To The Holdings of The Harold B. Lee Library compiled by Hyrum Leslie Andrus and Richard F. Bennett. [Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1977.] p.35 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Elizabeth Hodges 1793 1881 Mormon Manuscripts To 1846: A Guide To The Holdings of The Harold B. Lee Library compiled by Hyrum Leslie Andrus and Richard F. Bennett. [Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1977.] p.36 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, Elizabeth Lemon 21 Apr 1820 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.93 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, Emily J. 1 Jan 1843 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.93 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Heber Chase 16 May 1882 1956 History of Kane County compiled and edited by Elsie Chamberlain Carroll. [Salt Lake City: Kane County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 1960.] p.503 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, John 1951 Our Valley compiled by Rosetta Biggs. [Mesa, Arizona: Biggs, 1978.]p.199 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, John T. 20 Aug 1815 3 Jun 1908 History of Kane County compiled and edited by Elsie Chamberlain Carroll. [Salt Lake City: Kane County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 1960.] p.503,520 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, John Thomas 7 Aug 1840 13 Jun 1908 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.93 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Joseph Our Valley compiled by Rosetta Biggs. [Mesa, Arizona: Biggs, 1978.]p.198 Photo p.199 Covington, Joseph W. 8 Aug 1879 Latter Day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints by Andrew Jenson. [Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Company, 1901 1935.] v.4, p.483 v. 4, p.515 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Lavina Our Valley compiled by Rosetta Biggs. [Mesa, Arizona: Biggs, 1978.]p.199 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Robert Dachey 20 Aug 1815 Latter Day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints by Andrew Jenson. [Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Company, 1901 1935.] v.4, p.592 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, Robert Dockery 20 Aug 1815 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.93 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Thornton, Priscilla Covington 1839 1916 Mormon Manuscripts To 1846: A Guide To The Holdings of The Harold B. Lee Library compiled by Hyrum Leslie Andrus and Richard F. Bennett. [Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1977.] p.189 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors West, Mary Ann Covington Stratton 1815 1908 Mormon Manuscripts To 1846: A Guide To The Holdings of The Harold B. Lee Library compiled by Hyrum Leslie Andrus and Richard F. Bennett. [Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1977.] p.197 Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.19 Francis L. Porter, Thomas Chamberlain, Howard, Henry, Susie and Lucy Chamberlain, Eunice Brown, Abbie Porter, Sylvia Meeks, Clara and Heber Meeks, Chastie Chamberlain, Abigail Cox, Helen Palmer, Mary Kokerhans, Margaret Fackrell, Molly Stolworthy Black, Tory Hancock, Ruhama Adair, Alvira Cox, Mary Covington Larsen, and Clara and Minnie Minnie Esplin. From the “Prominent Pioneer Men And Women Who Helped Settle Washington City,” Plaque Robert Dockery Covington, The leader of the second group of twenty-eight southern families, came on May 6, 2857. A native of Rockingham, North Carolina, He had experience with directing slaves on cotton plantations, so he was well familiar with the raising of cotton. These two groups (speaking also of the Adair Group,) laid out the town and called in Washington after the first president of the United States, George Washington. Robert D. Covington was the first Bishop of the Washington Ward established August 1, 1858, and was Bishop from 1858-1869. Bishop Covington built a large two story rock home just east of John D. Lee’s home, completed in 1859 and is still standing. It is the oldest building in all of Washington County. The home was used as a recreation center for the community where dances, parties and functions were held. Church meetings were held there also. Brigham Young stayed here many times while visiting the area. To get to the upstairs, one had to go outside and climb wooden stairs to the second story. There was no other way to get to the upstairs from the main floor. This was done so that people coming for a get together could not disturb the main floor family living quarters. Cotton Factory 1870-1871 Two additional floors Factory had been completed by 1879. Brigham Young sold the Factory to the Zion’s Cooperative Rio Virgin Manufacturing Company in 1871. Large amounts of cotton were expected from the Muddy Mission (Southern Nevada) However, because of the high tax rates of the state of Nevada, which were payable only in gold (which they did not have), the Muddy settlers were forced to abandon their hard-won farms and homes and move elsewhere. This unexpected loss of cotton, coupled with the investment in a larger building and additional machinery, created a serious problem for the factory. Pres. Young told people it was their duty to sustain the factory at Washington by raising wool and cotton and by sending their girls to learn how to spin, weave, color, and dress the cloth. (Plaque under Cotton Factory picture at Washington Pioneer Museum.) The Granary The first settlers of Washington City built granaries to store dry grains, tools, wine and other items. The sandstone and black lava rock in this reconstructed building came from the Morgan Adam Granary which was originally located at 60 South 100 West. The original granary was probably erected in the late 1800’s. It was slightly smaller than this building and had air holes instead of windows. Some of the granaries in this community were used not only for storage but for family living space, and on one occasion, a school. Washington City Historical Society Erected 1994 Monument. Utah’s Dixie Birthplace, Washington City Founded in 1857 After the Adair and Covington companies meetings with Isaac C. Haight in May 1867 they immediately started to prepare for the land to grow crops. William H. Crawford, secretary of the group, wrote to the Deseret News, May 7, 1857. “…thinking you would like to hear from the saints that were called to come to this place for the purpose of raising cotton and such things as could not be raised in other parts of the valleys of the mountains and so far as we have examined I pronounce it a good place for that business.” The city was laid out shortly after this meeting, but by whom is not known. William H. Crawford was qualified because he was elected county surveyor in August 1857. The blocks and lots of the city were surveyed and streets were named. Immediately they went to work making ditches and dams to get water so crops could be raised. It was too late to plant wheat, so corn was raised. Cornmeal became the main flour to be used by the settlers. It was course and caused some discomfort to those who ate it. The best farming ground was found along the river bottom and was only a few feet above the water level. It was relatively easy to construct a brush dam to divert the water to this land but they soon learned that the unruly Virgin could easily wash out their dam. Their first year here the dam washed out twice. Every year thereafter the Virgin washed out their dam at least once. Some years three dams were lost. In 1886 they started to build the pile dam to solve this problem. It was completed in 1889. In December 1889 it took the Rio Virgin only eight days to completely destroy that dam. The population of the city fell from over 600 to 312 by 1892. Half of the homes were vacant. Malaria was rampant and most of the citizenry were too sick to care for themselves. The new Washington Fields Dam was started in 1890 and finished in 1891. The dam was built where the Shinarump Sandstone crosses the river which was up-river thereby doubling the available land for agriculture. The new canal went into operation in 1891 and was finished to cover the newer farming land in 1893. Five major tunnels were built through which this canal flowed and they were all built with a single jack, star drill, shovel, pick and wheelbarrow. The river was conquered! Wire fencing became available; Lucerne (alfalfa) was grown in greater amount to feed the stock and was harvested by mechanical machinery and not by hand; the marshy ground was drained reducing malaria and the Cotton Factory was built. The Factory was built with private money and supplied work for the local people. It is one of the main reasons the Cotton Mission didn’t fail. Construction work started in 1865 and finished in 1967 with a building one story high. It was soon learned that the weaving functions through the Factory had to be balanced out so in 1868 the upper stories were added and finished in 1870. It never was a money-maker but supplied much needed work. In the spring of 1861 Brigham Young and other general authorities met at the Bowery in Washington City and decided that the Cotton Mission needed to be reinforced which led to the calling of 309 families who came in November and December of 1861, and established St. George. Snow’s Grist Mill, in Washington, was built in 1866. A stone church was built in 1877 which was also used as a school. It was considered to be the best building in the area for these purposes. In 1909 a stone school, which still stands, was built partly by donated labor. The Covington Home, built in 1859, still stands. The Relief Society Hall, built in 1875, also stands and has be3en restored. These 1857 Missionaries, being Southerners, named this area Dixie after their former homeland, thus Washington City is the birthplace of Utah’s “Dixie”. ERECTED BY THE CITIZENS OF WASHINGTON CITY AND THE WASHINGTON CITY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 1998 Letter from Lorraine Thompson on Robert Dockery Covington Hi Julia, I am thrilled that you are doing a book on Robert Dockery Covington. Please let me know if there is anything I can do to support your efforts. I definitely want to buy some books, so please let me know when you are ready to print and I will get you some money. When I looked over what I have on Robert D. Covington, it appears the history I have was probably taken from the DUP history. I am not positive, however, because there is no source sited on the paper. It begins, "Born 20 August, 1815 in Rockingham, Richmond Count, North Carolina, he crossed the plains in 1847 in Edward Hunters Company under Captain Daniel Thomas arriving in the Valley 25 September, 1847. In the Sixteenth Century, William, John and Henry Covington came from England to the United States with Lord Baltimore." Is that consistent with what you already have? If not, let me know and I will get a copy of this history to you. Mike's grandpa, Isaac Loren Covington wrote a beautiful family history, but it deals more with earlier ancestors. He did include some history of the united order in Orderville. I don't know if you are interested in those things or not. If you are, I will e-mail you a copy of his history as well. I have attached a copy of the picture I told you about at the wedding reception. It would be wonderful if you could identify any of those in the photo. The original print was in Mike's Grandma's family history book (Anna Eager Covington) and is now in Mike's mother's possession. There is no description with the photo, but Mike's mom said she thinks it is a picture of her father's family while they were living the United Order in Orderville. Grandpa (Isaac Loren Covington) would be one of the children in the photo. Isaac Loren Covington was born 20 Feb, 1885 in Orderville, UT to John Thomas Covington and Lydia May Carling. In "Heart Throbs of the West" by Kate B Carter, a book available in the Cedar Public Library and in the Institute Library, there is a passage describing life in Orderville during the United Order days. It includes the following passage: For recreation, the people had many good dances, and also had good music. John T. Covington was a violinist and leader of the band. Other violinists were DeLaun M. Cox, Isaiah Bowers and Henry Ammon Fowley. Thomas Healy played the accordion, Isaac V. Carling had a melodeon, which his daughters played. This melodion was the first musical instrument brought here. DeLaun M. Cox made two fiddles, one a large bass fiddle. He whittled out the case and used horsehair for the bow, fastening it onto the bow with glue made by boiling the hoofs of animals. They danced quadrilles, waltz quadrilles, Scotch reel, upper reel, Virginia reel, money musk, French four and others. A dancing school was held where Orville S. Cox taught the young folks the steps and always had them keep time with the music. They would begin dancing as soon as supper was over, which was usually before dark, moving the tables back in the old Dining Hall, and dance until one o'clock. Children's dances were in the daytime. Waltzes or round dances, as they were called, were not allowed. Willard Carroll, the dance manager, said that they must shun the very appearance of evil and that the round dance was one of those evils. The manager would give each young man a number and would call half of them to take partners for a dance and then call the other half to dance the next time. If any were found dancing out of his turn he was called off the floor. A man was not supposed to dance with the same partner twice during the evening. William Ira Butler called the quadrilles. Later on waltzes were allowed, but only two waltzes during the evening. The young folks were watched and if they danced too closely they were called. Thanks again for the work you are doing. I don't know if this information and picture will be of any help, but perhaps it will at least be fun to read. Lorraine Thompson Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 5, p.419 Tribute must also be paid the following women, some with children, who started from Ft. Leavenworth, wintered at Fort Pueblo and entered Salt Lake Valley in late July, 1847 with the sick detachment under Captain James Brown; Celia Mounts Hunt, Matilda Nease Hunt, Mary McCree Black Brown, Sarah Blackman Higgins, Ruth Abbott, Susan Smith Adams, Eliza B Allred, Elzadie E. Ford Allred, Harriet Brown, Agnes Brown, Emma Reasor Brown, Mary Button, Jane Wells Cooper Hanks, Emeline Bigler Hess, Mary Ann Hirons, Fanny Maria Allen Huntington, Malinda A. Kelley, Albina Marion (Williams) and Phebe Lodema Merrill, Martha Jane Sharp Mowery, Caroline Sargent, Rebecca Smith, Caroline E. Sessions, Elizabeth Shelton, Sarah D. Shupe, Catherine Steele, Sophia Tubbs, Isabella Hunter Wilkins. Robert Dockery Covington From Pioneer Heritage Library CDFamily # # in Family:651 2 Last Name:*COVINGTON First Name(s):ROBERT DOCKERY Plaque #:P12B Age:87 Birth Date:1815 Death Date:1902 Other Information: Mr. M. E. Moody, Sr., tells me that his uncle, Joseph Damron, herded sheep in that area during the early days, and that the valley was named for him. Mr. Moody gives the spelling as Damron, and says that he does not know that his uncle had any legal claim there. In James G. Bleak, Annals of the Southern Utah Mission, MS., Vol. 1, I find in the minutes of the County Court held on the 7th of March, 1859, an item of business which reads, "A herd ground, 8 miles square, was granted to Robert D. Covington in Dameron Valley, said Grant not to conflict or interfere with the grazing of any other settlement or previous rights." So it would seem that the name dated back before that time, and the spelling of the name for the records seems to have been established as "Dameron," from which it has been variously called "Damon" and "Diamond." Covington, Robert D., 123 Name:ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Sex:Male Birth Date:20 AUG 1815 Birth Place:, RICHMOND, , NORTH CAROLINA View Marriage 1 of ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Download Original File Family Husband: ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Wife: ELIZABETH THOMAS Child: JOHN T. COVINGTON Child: EMILY J. COVINGTON Download Original File Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.19 Among those who lived there and worked upon the farm during the Order and immediately after were: John T. Covington and family, Thomas Chamberlain and family, Cyrene Fackrell, Myron Holgate, Hans Sorensen, John Carling, Elijah Adair, Joseph Palmer, Robert Covington and Thomas Stolworthy. Heart Throbs of the West, Vol.8, p.430 Collins, Albert W.33Jan. 3, 1814Butler, Georgia Collins, Susan34Feb. 10, 1818Marlboro, S. C. Collins, Adeline5Oct. 7, 1842Noxubee, Miss. Covington, Robert D.32Aug. 20, 1815Richmond, N.C. Covington, Elizabeth27April 21, 1820Marlboro, S. C. Covington, John T.7Aug. 7, 1840Noxubee, Miss. Covington, Emily J.4Jan. 1, 1843Noxubee, Miss. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.10, p.313 The next day we came to a place called Harrisburg. This place had been recommended to me in which to settle. It being a very healthful place. So I went and hunted for the town, but did not find it. I found a few places where some cedar sticks were set up and covered with bagos or ground sugar cane. We then went on to Washington. When we reached the top of the last ridge we found the town nearly under us on a nice fiat between two ridges. Here we found some of our old neighbors who received us very kindly. We found Robert D. Covington, the Mangums, and Adams Rickey, and others who had been sent on that mission, some years before. The appearance of these brethren and their wives and children was rather discouraging. Nearly all of them had fever and ague or chills as they are called (malaria). They had worked hard in the country and had worn out their clothes, and had replaced them from the cotton they had raised on their own lots and farms. Their women had carded, spun and woven by hand and colored with weeds this cotton. The men's shirts, the women's and children's dresses and sunbonnets were all made of the same piece of cloth. Their clothes and their faces were all of a color, being blue with chills. This tried me harder than anything I had seen in all my Mormon experience. Thinking my wives and children, from the nature of the climate, would look as sickly as those now surrounding me. But I said, "We will trust in God and go ahead." I think this was the first day of December, when we arrived in Washington town. Heart Throbs of the West, Vol.11, p.416 Garner, Louisa Ann71843 Garner, David Edmund4Jan. 10, 1846 Garner, Eliza Coffin Garrett, Levi C.12March 20, 1838Pennsylvania Garsford, Isaac35July 7, 1815England Garsford, Ellen Parkes25Aug. 12, 1825England Gates, Mariah24Feb. 11, 1826Canada Gay, Alexander Gay, Martha CovingtonMississippi Gean, William A. Gean, Esther A. Pierce Gean, Mary Ann18Dec. 29, 1832 Geddes, Marion G.701780Scotland Geddes, Robert701780Scotland Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.472 It was where Quail and Cottonwood creeks join the Rio Virgin that Moses Harris halted his family in the spring of 1850 and founded a home. He had come from San Bernardino, California the fall before and had wintered in Washington County. Other families joined him and improvements were made, but soon a fire occurred, wiping them out. Discouraged, some of the settlers moved to Minersville, in Beaver County, but later that same year the sons of Moses Harris returned to the site he had selected, and the little town of Harrisburg was born, with Silas Harris, son of Moses Harris, appointed to preside over this branch of the Washington Ward. Nine families resided there in 1860. In the spring of 1861, they moved a little farther up on Quail Creek, with the approval of Bishop Robert D. Covington, of Washington County. Besides the Moses Harris family and his son s[p.473] families, James Lewis, and Hosea Stout, with their families, had settled there. In the spring of 1862, William Leany, John Brimhall, William Robb, Allen J. Stout, Priddy Meeks, Orson Adams, John Adams, Samuel Hamilton and Elijah Knapp Fuller had joined the settlement, bringing their families, forty one souls in all. Apostles Orson Pratt and Erastus Snow met with the people at the home of Moses Harris and organized them into a branch of the Church, making the name of Harrisburg official. James Lewis was made president, with Moses Harris and Hosea Stout as counselors. William Leany and John Brimhall were appointed teachers and William Leany was made watermaster. Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.526 Early in 1857 Brigham Young called Samuel Adair and Robert D. Covington as leaders of two companies of pioneers to settle here and grow cotton. In 1861 a Scandinavian company came to assist in the work. The town was named in honor of George Washington and was the county seat from 1859 to 1863. A cotton factory was built to process the cotton grown in the Virgin River Valley and the area became known as "Utah’s Dixie." Cotton Factory Camp Washington County, Utah Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.526 In the spring of 1857 fifty families under the leadership of Robert Dockery Covington, who had been an overseer on a cotton plantation in North Carolina, and Samuel Adair were called to make a settlement to be named Washington. Cotton raising proved successful. President Brigham Young promoted the building of this historic Cotton Factory at Washintgon, so that the people could process their own cotton. An Enduring Legacy, Volume Ten, p.328 In 1857, Robert D. Covington, directed by Brigham Young, led twenty eight families to Washington, Utah, to establish the "Cotton Mission." In 1859, a large structure was built that would serve as a meetinghouse for the Saints, a way station for the early missionaries to the Indians, and the home of the first bishop in Dixie, Robert Covington. The spacious upper floor, entered by an outside stairway, became a community social center, with parties, dances, and plays held there until 1877. Built of native Navajo sandstone, it is the oldest remaining building in Utah's Dixie. Foster Camp An Enduring Legacy, Volume Ten, p.328 "The Robert D. Covington home in Washington, Utah, is constructed of a light pink sandstone, the same kind used in Washington Ward chapel, the old Cotton Factory, the St. George Stake Academy (Dixie Academy) which later became Dixie College, and several of the old homes in Washington.... 1. Treasures ofPioneer History, Kate B. Carter, DUP, 1957, vol. 6, p. 493. 2. lnformation from Encyclopedic History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints, Andrew Jenson. 3. From life story of Anders Peter Anderson. 4. Our Pioneer Heritage, Kate B. Carter, vol. 10, pp. 148 50. 5. Material by Alva and Zella Matheson. 6. Information from Salt Lake Tribune and Pettyville records. 7. David County Clipper, Aug. 6, 1976. 8. Material by Della Dame Edmunds. 9. Treasures of Pioneer History, Kate B. Carter, vol. 6, p. 518. 10. Information by Lola Haskins. 11. Box Elder Lore, Bernice Gibbs Anderson, Box Elder Chapter SUP, pub. Brigham City, Utah, 1951, p. 121. 12. Material from Islands and Ports of California, Duncan Gleason, Port Adtniral Phineas Banning, Mayne Krythe, Pioneer Stories, Preston Nibley. 13. Information by Dorothy H. Martin. 14. Material from Iron Mission Days Committee. 15. Information by Vee Carlisle. 16. Salt Lake Tribune, Oct. 12, 1985. 17. Black Hawk and His War, and The Fort Ephraim Black Hawk War Peace Treaty, Virginia Nielson. 18. From "History of Malan Heights," by Helen Jensen, Oct. 1977. 19. Information by Stella Peterson Frahm. 20. These Our Fathers, Gunnison Valley Centennial History, p. 36. 21. "The Robert Dockery Covington Home," A. Karl Larsen. 22. The Settling of Huntsville," Nellie Newey. 23. From material by Jennie A. Wild. 24. Material by Bertha Cragun. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.708 Beverly, Can.). She was born Jan. 5, 1830. Their children: George William b. July 7, 1850; Gilbert Mann b. Oct. 27, 1852, m. Armelia Allen; Elizabeth b. Sept. 19, 1854, m. John T. Covington; Robert Nelson b. Nov. 19, 1856, m. Margaret Ann Schurz; Alexander F. b. March 15, 1859, m. Martha Naizer; Lydia C. b. April 11, 1861, m. Orson W. Allen, 1888; Lewis b. May 26, 1863, m. Adelaide M. Lewis; Cynthia Jane b. Jan. 12, 1866, m. William H. Heaps; Christina b. April 3, 1868, m. Earnest Griffin; Daniel Cook b. April 23, 1870, m. Almira Larsen; Andrew Patterson b. June 28, 1873, m. Hattie Burr. Family home Adamsville, Utah. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.867 FARR, WINSLOW, JR. (son of Winslow Farr and Olive Hovey Freeman). Born May 11, 1837, East Charleston, Orleans county, Vt. Came to Utah October 1848. Married Emily Jane Covington Oct. 17, 1858 (daughter of Robert D. Covington and Elizabeth Ann Thomas). Their children: Winslow Robert; Emily Olive; Lafayette Thomas; Lorin Freeman; David James; Moroni; Mohonri; Ida Almena; Silva May; William Henry; Mary Isabel; Barnard Elijah; Aaron Adelbert; Jonathan. Walked and drove three yoke of oxen across the plains. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.1004 Married Catherine Mayer in Pennsylvania (daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth Mayer). Their children: Alexander A. b. March 1, 1831; Elizabeth b. July 26, 1833, m. Barrol Covington; Samuel b. Oct. 4, 1836, died; Margaretta b. Oct. 4, 1839, m. Robert E. King; Mary Ann b. Sept. 1, 1843, m. Henry Pickering; John Knox b. Aug. 19, 1845, m. Jane Burgess; William b. April 15, 1849. Family home Salt Lake City, Utah. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.1188 Married Mary Ann Jones March 11, 1860 (daughter of William E. and Mary Jones), who was born Feb. 8, 1845. Their children: Mary Jane b. Nov. 18, 1861, m. John Limb Feb. 6, 1878; Liza Ann b. Dec. 15, 1863, d. July 6, 1865; Martha Ellen b. June 21, 1866, m. John E. Cox Dec. 27, 1882; William Urban b. Oct. 10, 1868, m. Rosa E. Adams Nov. 14, 1890; Daniel Jones b. Feb. 25, 1871, m. Ellen S. Adams June 19, 1895; Margret Caroline b. Nov. 26, 1873, m. John D. Adams Dec. 30, 1891; Robert Charles b. April 7, 1876, d. July 23, 1901; George Heber b. March 30, 1879, m. Lydia C. Covington June 5, 1901; Lewis Jenkins b. Sept. 18, 1881, d. Jan. 20, 1907; Clara Bell b. March 25, 1884. Family home Beaver, Utah. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.1241 Married Susan Ann Gay Feb. 9, 1857, Salt Lake City (daughter of Alexander Gay and Martha Covington, De Kalb, Kemper county, Miss.; former died at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, on the way to Utah, latter pioneer 1850). She was born June 13, 1841, and came to Utah 1851, John Brown company. Their children: Martha Ellen, m. Jacob Kesler; Nelson Gay, m. Susanah Wanless; Sylvia, m. Fred B. Margetts; Susan Ann, m. Archer W. Clayton; Alexander, m. Sarah Vannotta; Robert John, m. Susan Winn; Amy Jane, m. John H. Evans; Ida, m. Ezra O. Taylor; Annor. Families resided Salt Lake City. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.1316 Wed. 6.—The Saints who were settling Washington, in southern Utah, were organized into a branch of the Church with Robert D. Covington as president. He was ordained a Bishop Aug. 1, 1858. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 1, p.4 Wed. 6—The Saints who were settling Washington, in southern Utah, were organized into a branch of the Church with Robert D. Covington as Bishop Aug. 1, 1858. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 1, p.157 It took two years to build the fort at Holladay. Some of those who helped in the building were Ezekiel Lee, Rodney Badger, Lyman Stevens, George Boyes, William S. Covert, William Hutchins, William Riter, C. A. Harper, David Brinton, Solomon Chase, Winslow Farr, William Casto, Robert Covington, William Hyde and William Bringhurst. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 1, p.496 Robert Dockery Covington buried his wife, Elizabeth, in December of 1847 and on September 26, 1848, he married Malinda. They afterwards made their home in Cottonwood for a short time at which place a daughter, Mary, was born December 28, 1849. Robert was called to the Dixie mission in 1857 where he established a home in Washington, Washington County. Malinda became the mother of seven children. She adopted a Lamanite girl who lived in their home from the year 1861 to February, 1879, when she passed away. Malinda died November 18, 1894 in Circleville while visiting with members of her family. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 2, p.469 Daniel Monroe Thomas, son of Henry and Ester Covington Thomas, a second cousin, was born December 27, 1809 in Richmond county, North Carolina. He had ten brothers and sisters, viz: William, Henry, Elijah, Joseph, John, Robert, Rachel, Amanda, Harriet and Catherine. His mother died in North Carolina in March, 1835. The father had promised all his children a good education, but two years after the death of their mother, the three eldest sons, now young men, desired to go west. The father was loathe to leave as the younger children had not finished their schooling: however, after some persuasion, he moved his family to Mississippi and settled in Moxubee county in Tombigee Valley. Nine years later Daniel heard the preachings of the Mormon Elders in this vicinity and brought home a Book of Mormon. Soon after all the members of the family were baptized into the Mormon Church by Elder Benjamin L. Clapp, February 12, 1844. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 2, p.570 Robert Thomas, son of Henry and Esther Covington Thomas, was born January 8, 1822 in Richmond county, North Carolina, one of a family of twelve children. All the members of the Thomas family joined the Mormon Church in the year 1843. The following year they moved to Nauvoo, Illinois and here Robert was employed as a wagon maker preparatory to the westward trek. He was selected as a member of the original company and of this memorable journey and his life in the valley he wrote as follows: Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 4, p.541 Was relieved from 'Western Union Telegraph Office' November 28th, 1866, and immediately commenced working on the wires of this city. Dec. 1st had wires, etc., arranged so as to work to Ogden, which office had been opened at my request by an old operator, coming from the north. Dec. 4th started north, roads bad, arrived at Ogden on 5th, David E. Davis of Ogden takes charge. Arrived at Box Elder and fixed up the office on the 6th, Peter Matson of Box Elder takes charge. Arrived at Logan on 7th, fixed up the office on 8th. Joseph Goddard of Salt Lake City takes charge. I left for Salt Lake City 7 a.m. on the 9th, and arrived 4 a.m. on 10th. From Dec. 10th until 18th was detained in Salt Lake getting operators, machinery, etc., ready to go south. Arrived at Provo on the 19th and opened office on 20th. Joseph West of Ogden takes charge. Arrived at Payson 21st, and opened office on 22nd. John D. Stark of Payson takes charge. Arrived at Nephi 23rd partly fixed up office and left for Moroni on the 26th with one wagon and my conveyance. Sent two wagons and the southern operators to Scipio to build about half a mile of double line as the line was not put up to the town. Arrived at Moroni same day, and opened office. Mr. Torgeson of Salt Lake takes charge. Arrived at Mt. Pleasant 27th and opened office. Anthon H. Lund of Mt. Pleasant takes charge. Arrived at Manti 28th and opened office. John Hougaard of Manti takes charge. Arrived at Nephi again 29th arranged the office, batteries, etc. left Wm. Bryan of Nephi in charge. Arrived at Scipio Jan. 2nd 1867 and fixed up office. Zenos Pratt of Provo takes charge. Arrived at Fillmore 3rd fixed up office (and as neither of the Fillmore students were competent to take charge of the office) Richard Horn of Salt Lake takes charge. Arrived at Beaver on 7th (the line being some distance from Cove Creek Station was unable to open the office, arranged however to have all ready when we returned). Opened office at Beaver. S. A. Kenner of Salt Lake takes charge. Arrived at Parowan 10th and opened office. Wm. B. Dougall of Salt Lake takes charge. Arrived at Kanarra 12th. People not expecting an office had no suitable place to put it. Ran the wires into President Roundy's temporarily. Geo. [p.541] Peart of Salt Lake takes charge. An office was built and we fixed it permanently as we returned. Arrived at Toquerville 13th no place to put the office. Bishop Willis said he would fix an office as soon as he could. Arrived at Washington and overtook Stickney there. Bishop Covington did not know where to put the office until you were heard from, we did not open it. Went to St. George the same day 15th Stickney arrived with the wire (at St. George) at 11:40 a.m. and we got to work with Salt Lake at 12 o'clock office in St. George Hall. The house designed for the office was not finished sufficient to occupy. Went to Toquerville on the 22nd and as they were not ready could only put the office in temporary operation. George Tribe of Salt Lake takes charge. On 24th to Washington and opened that office placed Adolphus Whitehead in charge. Having got the St. George office, machinery, batteries etc. and arranged with Robert Lund in charge. We left for Salt Lake Jan. 30th and arrived Feb. 16th, calling at all of the offices, fixing up Cove Creek office, Clarence Merrill of Fillmore takes charge. Moving Kanarra instruments to a house the people have built for them. Left offices in as good condition as possible. Many supplies are still needed in most of the southern offices. I however requested the Bishops to supply the operators whatever was needed for the present. The Salt Lake office should be arranged so as to have the receiving department downstairs, the operating department upstairs, this would be a decided improvement and one that I would recommend. Not a man on this line ever worked a Telegraph line before, the line was strung and put into operation in the middle of winter. It is about five hundred miles in length, taking all into consideration please permit me as an old operator to say that I think the working of the same almost a miracle. Hoping that my portion of the work will meet your approbation, I remain your brother. Journal History Feb. 18, 1867. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 6, p.313 During the previous summer a handful of settlers from the town of Washington under Bishop Robert Covington, and a small working party under Joseph Home fitted out by President Brigham Young and others, had opened up a small cotton farm below the mouth of the Santa Clara River and had demonstrated the possibility of the enterprise, though when we arrived about the 15th of November Elder Horne's party had returned north abandoning the enterprise as too expensive the way they had taken it, without their families, and so far from a source of supplies. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 15, p.444 In April 1857, twenty eight families and a number of young men under Robert D. Covington were called to settle on the Washington flat east of the present St. George to experiment with cotton culture. Since most of these people were from the [p.445] Southern States, they came with high hopes but the nature of the land itself was such as to crush their spirits. Barren flats stretched to black lava formation or red sandstone, and on the lower levels alkali encrusted the surface in white ridges. The first season they did not get a third of the crop—much of the seed did not germinate and alkali killed most of the plants that did come up. Covington, Robert Duchey LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 4, p.592 Covington, Robert Duchey, Bishop of the Washington W a r d, St. George Stake, Utah, from 1858 to 1869, was born Aug. 20, 1815, in North Carolina, a son of Thomas D. Corington and Jane Thomas. He was baptized Feb. 3, 1843, came to Nauvoo in 1845, and to the Valley in 1847, and was ordained a Bishop Aug. 1, 1858, by Geo. A. Smith. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.169 DAMRON VALLEY, St. George Stake, Washington Co., Utah, is a small valley lying north of St. George, between that place and Pine Valley. In 1859 a herd ground, eight miles square, was granted by Washington County court to Robert D. Covington, on condition that said grant should not conflict or interfere with any rights of other settlers. Damron Valley is noted as a fine grazing country. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.928 Washington as a settlement dates back to 1857, when some twenty eight families and a number of young men were called by Church authorities to settle in southern Utah. When that company of missionaries was organized in Salt Lake City prior to starting out, Robert D. Covington was appointed to take charge of the company, which arrived on the site of Washington, May 5, 1857, and commenced activities while encamped at the Adair Springs in the valley where the town of Washington is now located. On May 6, 1857, the settlers were organized as a branch of the Church with Robert D. Covington as presiding Elder. The nearest post office was at Cedar City, 50 miles distant, and the nearest white men were at Tonaquint, a village near the mouth of Santa Clara, some eight miles away. Most of the first settlers of Washington hailed from the Southern States and were called because they had some experience in raising cotton. The pioneers of Washington, which thus founded the first real L. D. S. settlement of importance in Utah south of the Rim of the Basin, went to work with a will making improvements, building houses, making water ditches, plowing and planting; they met with considerable success. In 1859 Washington was made the county seat of Washington County. In 1858 some of the families who had vacated San Bernardino in California located in Washington. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.928 Following is a complete list of the Bishops of Washington Ward: Robert Covington, 1857–1869; John Woodruff Freeman, 1869–1877; Thomas J. Jones, 1877–1881; Marcus Funk, 1881–1888; Andrew Sprowle, 1888–1908; Calvin Hall, 1908–1924; Arthur A. Paxman, 1924–1925, and Victor E. Iverson, 1925–1930. On Dec. 31, 1930, the Washington Ward had 447 members, including 103 children. The total population of the Washington Precinct was 490 in 1930, of which 435 resided in the town of Washington. Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, May 6, 1857 (Wednesday) The Saints who were settling Washington, in southern Utah, were organized into a branch of the Church with Robert D. Covington as president. He was ordained a Bishop Aug. 1, 1858. Mormon Manuscripts to 1846: Guide to Lee Library, BYU DAUGHTERS OF THE UTAH PIONEERS. Adams Camp Collection, American Fork, Utah. Microfilm, positive, one reel. Biographical and autobiographical data on the following individuals: Arza Adams, Joshua Adams, Lydia Adams, Marillah Adams, Joseph Alston, Margaret Hull Rushton Alston, Jane Creer Binns, Henry Harts Boley, John Bourne, Sarah Binns Chipman, Washburn Chipman, William Henry Chipman, Edward Conder, Nancy Lance Stuart Dayton Cooper, Berrill Covington, Edward Covington, Elizabeth Hodges Covington, Hanah Hardy Eckersley Crompton, Agnes Gillispie Crooks, Thomas Crooks, Sinah Chipman Eldredge, James Gardner, David Grant, Alice Houghton Greenwood, William Greenwood, Leonard Elsworth Harrington, Lois Russell Harrington, Jane Charters, Robinson Hindley, Alice Houghton, Ebenezer Hunter, Margaretta Lemon King, Persia Moore Sweat McKee, John Mercer, Alice Thornton Mott, Milissa Smith Mott, Stephen Mott, Edwin Okey, Mary Ann Parker, Edward Robinson, Edward Robinson, Jr., Joseph Robinson, Jane Heath Silcock, Nicholas Thomas Silcock, Mary Ann Reece Steele, Richard Steele, Joseph Albert Stratton, Apollas Griswald Thornton, Edward Hotchkiss Thornton, Eleanor Thornton, Mary Thornton, Mary Griswald Thornton, Oliver Thornton, Priscilla Covington Thornton, Thomas Ephraim Thornton, Josiah Tufts, Robert Franklin Turnbow, Mary Ann Covington Stratton West, Ephraim Henry Williams, Johns Rosanna, Dilley Wood, John Wooton. (For greater detail, see individual entries.) Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Robert Dachey 20 Aug 1815 Latter Day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints by Andrew Jenson. [Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Company, 1901 1935.] v.4, p.592 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, Robert Dockery 20 Aug 1815 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.93 Family # # in Family:651 2 Last Name:COVINGTON First Name(s):ELIZABETH ANN (THOMAS) Plaque #:P12B Age:27 Birth Date:1820 Death Date:1847 Other Information:F Family # # in Family:* Last Name:THOMAS First Name(s):ELIZABETH ANN (COVINGTON) Plaque #:P12B Age: Birth Date:* Death Date:* Other Information:651 2 Family Husband: ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Wife: ELIZABETH THOMAS Child: JOHN T. COVINGTON Child: EMILY J. COVINGTON Download Original File LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 3, p.525 Stewart, John Riley, Bishop of Torrey Ward (Wayne Stake), Wayne county, Utah, from 1901 to 1906, was born Aug. 27, 1873, in Beaver, Beaver county, Utah, the son of Urban Van Stewart and Ellen Adams. He was baptized May 21, 1882, at Adamsville; ordained a Deacon Nov. 30, 1884, by Joseph H. Joseph; ordained a Priest Aug. 30, 1897, by Bishop George Coleman at Teasdale, Wayne county; ordained an Elder Oct. 14, 1897, by Willis E. Robison at Loa; ordained a Seventy Oct. 19, 1897, by Apostle John Henry Smith; received his blessings in the Salt Lake Temple Nov. 20, 1897, and filled a mission to the Northern States in 1897 1900, [p.526] laboring principally in Michigan. After laboring as presiding Elder and assistant Sunday school superintendent at Grover, he was ordained a High Priest and Bishop April 5, 1901, by Francis M. Lyman and set apart to preside over the Torrey Ward, which position he filled until May, 1906. In 1903 (Aug. 14th) he married Ellen Amelia Covington (daughter of John Thomas Covington and Elizabeth Adams), who was born Dec. 10, 1884, in Orderville, Utah. The children by this marriage are the following: Ellen Elizabeth, born April 26, 1904; John Riley jun., born Oct. 25, 1905; Golda, born Dec. 21, 1907; Cecil Van, born March 7, 1910; Gerold William, born March 21, 1911, and Junius Kent, born July 17, 1913. His wife died July 17, 1916, in childbed. Bro. Stewart acted as second counselor to President Gearson S. Bastion from 1906 to 1910 and then as first counselor to Joseph Eckersley from 1910 to 1915. He is a farmer and stock raiser by avocation. Family # # in Family:650 1 Last Name:*COVINGTON First Name(s):JOHN THOMAS Plaque #:P12B Age:68 Birth Date:1840 Death Date:1908 Other Information: John Covington had an impressive experience while herding sheep for the Order in House Rock Valley in an early period of its history. One early morning, as he set about preparing his breakfast, before giving his attention to the increasing restlessness of the sheep, a bystander might have noticed a movement in the underbrush as a fine specimen of Indian slipped cautiously but swiftly behind the branches of a gnarled oak tree a few paces to the South. Brother Covington tripped slightly as his foot caught in a tangle of undergrowth, and partially fell. In that instant the Indian, in paint and feathers, stepped from behind the tree. As Brother Covington arose, he found himself facing the muzzle of a gun. [p.200] Shocked, and for the moment terrified, he wavered between a desire to run or to stand his ground. The impulse to run passed in almost the instant it was created and he stood, composed, complacently facing his adversary. His compelling gaze riveted the Indian's attention and caused him to hesitate. Knowing little of the Indian tongue, he could do nothing in argument. Neither was argument the Red man's method. Seeing his advantage, and as if by inspiration, Brother Covington slowly opened the bosom of his shirt, baring his breast and cooly said, "Shoot, you squaw, I have no gun"! The Indian lowered his weapon, uttered a few guttural sounds and disappeared among the trees. Brother Covington learned later that his act of bravery in inviting death probably saved his life. Unconscious of the effect, Brother Covington had used about the only words he could have spoken to save his life. Covington, John, 199 Mr. M. E. Moody, Sr., tells me that his uncle, Joseph Damron, herded sheep in that area during the early days, and that the valley was named for him. Mr. Moody gives the spelling as Damron, and says that he does not know that his uncle had any legal claim there. In James G. Bleak, Annals of the Southern Utah Mission, MS., Vol. 1, I find in the minutes of the County Court held on the 7th of March, 1859, an item of business which reads, "A herd ground, 8 miles square, was granted to Robert D. Covington in Dameron Valley, said Grant not to conflict or interfere with the grazing of any other settlement or previous rights." So it would seem that the name dated back before that time, and the spelling of the name for the records seems to have been established as "Dameron," from which it has been variously called "Damon" and "Diamond." Covington, Robert D., 123 8James Warren Covington, "Federal Relations with the Colorado Utes, 1861 1865," Colorado Magazine 28 (1951) :257 66. Yes, and John D. Lee administering to a dying child, George W. Brimhall praying for rain, or Dudley Leavitt giving up his horse to be killed for food as Jacob Hamblin's party returned from the Hopi Indians or his wife "Aunt Mariah" Leavitt racing by buggy to deliver another baby. And what about George Brooks, Miles Romney, Erastus Snow, Orson Pratt, Jr., the Gardners, the Gublers, the Hafens, the Toblers, the Stahlis, the Iversons and Sprouls, thc Larsons and Jolleys, Bishop Covington, and all the others. 46Salt Lake Herald, July 22, 1885; K. E. Covington, "Two Years on the Desert," True West 14 (January February 1967): 68; Ogden Standard, July 28, 1897; Lillian Wood, "Lucy Lee: A Family History," graduate seminar paper, University of Utah, 1977, copy at Utah State Historical Society; Ogden Daily Herald, May 14, 1885. 61Covington, "Two Years in the Desert," p. 68; Anderson interview, pp. 3 4; Journal History, July 26, 1901; R. D. McKenzie, "The Oriental Finds a Job: Changing Roles of Chinese and Japanese Workers," The Survey 56 (1926): 151; Helen Z. Papanikolas and Alice Kasai, "Japanese Life in Utah" in The Peoples of Utah, pp. 336 39; Ogden Standard, February 28, 1902; Richard O. Ulibarri, "Utah's Ethnic Minorities: A Survey," Utah Historical Quarterly 40 (1973): 222; Allan Kent Powell, "The 'Foreign Element' and the 1903 4 Carbon County Coal Miner's Strike," Utah Historical Quarterly 43 (1975): 145. Covington traveling in the second Fifty of the second Hundred to wait on Sister Covington. She came back with me and I put Henry Heath, Wm. W. Potter, Berry A. Covington, Nathaniel M. Henry Thomas, W. Collins, Herbert D. Covington, Name:BERRIL COVINGTON Sex:Male Birth Date:27 NOV 1817 Birth Place:, , BEFORDSHIRE, ENGLAND Download Original File Name:ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Sex:Male Birth Date:20 AUG 1815 Birth Place:, RICHMOND, , NORTH CAROLINA View Marriage 1 of ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON Download Original File Name:JOHN T. COVINGTON Sex:Male Birth Date: 7 AUG 1840 Birth Place:, NOXUBEE, , MISSISSIPPI View Parents of JOHN T. COVINGTON Download Original File Name:EMILY J. COVINGTON Sex:Female Birth Date: 1 JAN 1843 Birth Place:, NOXUBEE, , MISSISSIPPI View Parents of EMILY J. COVINGTON Download Original File Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.1, p.291 Phoebe Ann Covington Pace was born, November 21, 1857, in Big Cottonwood, and was married to John Ezra Pace, January 11, 1877. This was the second marriage of Mr. Pace. His first wife was Caddie Ivins, who passed away six years after his second marriage, leaving four children under eight years of age. By that time Phoebe had three children of her own, but she tenderly mothered the seven children all under eight years of age. As time went on, nine more children were born to her. Her duties and labors were many. :257 66. Yes, and John D. Lee administering to a dying child, George W. Brimhall praying for rain, or Dudley Leavitt giving up his horse to be killed for food as Jacob Hamblin's party returned from the Hopi Indians or his wife "Aunt Mariah" Leavitt racing by buggy to deliver another baby. And what about George Brooks, Miles Romney, Erastus Snow, Orson Pratt, Jr., the Gardners, the Gublers, the Hafens, the Toblers, the Stahlis, the Iversons and Sprouls, thc Larsons and Jolleys, Bishop Covington, and all the others. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.2, p.477 Flowers were made of a material called at that time book muslin. It resembled what we now call organdy. Some hats were finished with a band on the outside and a sweat band underneath the edge. Some hats were crocheted from cotton yarn. The brims of the hats were generally stitched many times. Women who made hats in the United Order days were Ann Carling Chamberlain, Liddie K. Young, and Johannah Covington.—Records of Camp 2, Orderville, Hattie Blackburn. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.3, p.25 With the outbreak of the Civil War, Brigham Young became interested in developing the cotton industry so the Dixie Mission was established with but one outstanding purpose in mind: to produce cotton. After the year 1863, when one hundred thousand pounds of cotton was raised, cotton mills began to appear at various points of this locality but the most important one was built in 1865 at Washington, Utah Territory. It soon became known as the Rio Virgin Manufacturing Company and was destined to grow into one of the largest business centers in this country serving a district from St. Thomas, Nevada on the south, to Panguitch, Utah on the north. James Davidson was the first superintendent and his daughter, Maggie, who afterwards married Benjamin Paddock, taught Amanda Pace, Mary Covington and Lucinda Clark, the different steps in the cotton business, such as lapping, carding, spinning and weaving, and these girls were the first employees of this factory. Brother Davidson, his wife and son, died of thirst between St. Thomas and the Beaver Dam Wash, May 12, 1869. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.16 Stockyards. The Order stockyards and horse stables were built north of the Order Fort. In 1877 Zemira Palmer and John T. Covington were in charge. Later George W. Adair, Israel Hoyt and E. R. Billingsley were appointed. In the fall, after the crops were gathered into the yards, men, women and children would gather to husk the corn, and sometimes on moonlight nights they would gather for this purpose after a day's work in the fields and other departments of the Order. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.19 Francis L. Porter, Thomas Chamberlain, Howard, Henry, Susie and Lucy Chamberlain, Eunice Brown, Abbie Porter, Sylvia Meeks, Clara and Heber Meeks, Chastie Chamberlain, Abigail Cox, Helen Palmer, Mary Kokerhans, Margaret Fackrell, Molly Stolworthy Black, Tory Hancock, Ruhama Adair, Alvira Cox, Mary Covington Larsen, and Clara and Minnie Esplin. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.19 Among those who lived there and worked upon the farm during the Order and immediately after were: John T. Covington and family, Thomas Chamberlain and family, Cyrene Fackrell, Myron Holgate, Hans Sorensen, John Carling, Elijah Adair, Joseph Palmer, Robert Covington and Thomas Stolworthy. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.22 The women also made cloth hats. For the material they preferred heavy denim. They had patterns for the hats. These consisted of triangle pieces cut out for the crown and one straight round piece for the brim. The sections of the crown were sewed together and this, in turn, was sewed to the brim. The brim was usually made of two thicknesses of the cloth, with often a thinner piece placed between to serve as padding. Nicer hats were made of thinner material, such as percale. This was of different colors and was also starched to make it stay in shape. They were also quilted. Flowers were made of a material called book muslin. It resembled organdy. Some hats were finished with a band on the outside and a sweat band underneath the edge. Some hats were crocheted with cotton yarn. They sewed brims around and around to make stiff. Women who made hats in the Order were Ann Carling Chamberlain, Liddie K. Young and Johannah Covington. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.425 A few years later William Smith visited some scattered members of the Church in Illinois and Kentucky, teaching "lineal priesthood as applied to the presidency of the church." That is, he taught that his brother Joseph's eldest son had a right by virtue of lineage to succeed to the presidency of the Church; but also taught in connection with this that it was his right, as the only surviving brother of the former president, and the natural guardian of the "seed" of Joseph, the Prophet, to stand, in the interim, as president pro tem of the Church. There seemed to be a general acquiescence with this by the members of the Church remaining in the districts where he labored, and in the spring of 1850 he called a conference to assemble in Covington, Kentucky, where he effected an organization by having himself sustained as "president pro tem of the church" and Lyman Wight and Aaron Hook as counselors, and Wight also as spokesman. It is claimed that many of the "saints" in northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin were identified with this movement. Heart Throbs of the West, Vol.8, p.429 Covington, Berrill30Nov. 27, 1817Bedfordshire, England Heart Throbs of the West, Vol.8, p.430 Collins, Albert W.33Jan. 3, 1814Butler, Georgia Collins, Susan34Feb. 10, 1818Marlboro, S. C. Collins, Adeline5Oct. 7, 1842Noxubee, Miss. Covington, Robert D.32Aug. 20, 1815Richmond, N.C. Covington, Elizabeth27April 21, 1820Marlboro, S. C. Covington, John T.7Aug. 7, 1840Noxubee, Miss. Covington, Emily J.4Jan. 1, 1843Noxubee, Miss. Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.10, p.313 The next day we came to a place called Harrisburg. This place had been recommended to me in which to settle. It being a very healthful place. So I went and hunted for the town, but did not find it. I found a few places where some cedar sticks were set up and covered with bagos or ground sugar cane. We then went on to Washington. When we reached the top of the last ridge we found the town nearly under us on a nice fiat between two ridges. Here we found some of our old neighbors who received us very kindly. We found Robert D. Covington, the Mangums, and Adams Rickey, and others who had been sent on that mission, some years before. The appearance of these brethren and their wives and children was rather discouraging. Nearly all of them had fever and ague or chills as they are called (malaria). They had worked hard in the country and had worn out their clothes, and had replaced them from the cotton they had raised on their own lots and farms. Their women had carded, spun and woven by hand and colored with weeds this cotton. The men's shirts, the women's and children's dresses and sunbonnets were all made of the same piece of cloth. Their clothes and their faces were all of a color, being blue with chills. This tried me harder than anything I had seen in all my Mormon experience. Thinking my wives and children, from the nature of the climate, would look as sickly as those now surrounding me. But I said, "We will trust in God and go ahead." I think this was the first day of December, when we arrived in Washington town. Heart Throbs of the West, Vol.11, p.416 Garner, Louisa Ann71843 Garner, David Edmund4Jan. 10, 1846 Garner, Eliza Coffin Garrett, Levi C.12March 20, 1838Pennsylvania Garsford, Isaac35July 7, 1815England Garsford, Ellen Parkes25Aug. 12, 1825England Gates, Mariah24Feb. 11, 1826Canada Gay, Alexander Gay, Martha CovingtonMississippi Gean, William A. Gean, Esther A. Pierce Gean, Mary Ann18Dec. 29, 1832 Geddes, Marion G.701780Scotland Geddes, Robert701780Scotland Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.12, p.440 Gay, Martha Ann CovingtonDec.8, 1818 No. Carolina Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.3, p.277 One of the party, Berrill Covington, had gone some two miles from the road when he saw an ox which he immediately chased to camp. He was in good condition. We were satisfied that he must have had water, or he would not stay there. Asked Covington if he saw any. Said he believed he did but that it was full of worms. Sent parties to hunt water and if enough was found for the men only to make one smoke, if enough for men and animals, two. In about [p.278]one hour we saw two signals and took our teams to a hole of water in the midst of sagebrush. It had no appearance of being a permanent spring and was a most singular place for a pond. But one thing is certain—that it was providential. We got all we needed and the water did not appear to lower one particle, and what was remarkable, it had not a stagnant or bad taste, but pleasant. Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.3, p.285 I sent B. Covington to keep a fire for light which he could not do with good greasewood. Told him he could go to bed. We commenced riding around the animals to keep them in a circle which succeeded for a spell, when we would hear mules bray, apparently one mile off. We would go after them. I finally proposed to go to camp and traveled one half hour when I saw by the stars that we were driving directly from camp. I told this to James C. Sly who pioneered the road. We then said if Sly and a boy who was with us, would herd, John Murray and myself would try and find camp. Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.185 Proclaiming the birth of the new born Babe, A king o’er the people to reign— Singing "Glory to God in the Highest, Peace on Earth, Good Will toward Men." —Bergetta Covington Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.472 It was where Quail and Cottonwood creeks join the Rio Virgin that Moses Harris halted his family in the spring of 1850 and founded a home. He had come from San Bernardino, California the fall before and had wintered in Washington County. Other families joined him and improvements were made, but soon a fire occurred, wiping them out. Discouraged, some of the settlers moved to Minersville, in Beaver County, but later that same year the sons of Moses Harris returned to the site he had selected, and the little town of Harrisburg was born, with Silas Harris, son of Moses Harris, appointed to preside over this branch of the Washington Ward. Nine families resided there in 1860. In the spring of 1861, they moved a little farther up on Quail Creek, with the approval of Bishop Robert D. Covington, of Washington County. Besides the Moses Harris family and his son s[p.473] families, James Lewis, and Hosea Stout, with their families, had settled there. In the spring of 1862, William Leany, John Brimhall, William Robb, Allen J. Stout, Priddy Meeks, Orson Adams, John Adams, Samuel Hamilton and Elijah Knapp Fuller had joined the settlement, bringing their families, forty one souls in all. Apostles Orson Pratt and Erastus Snow met with the people at the home of Moses Harris and organized them into a branch of the Church, making the name of Harrisburg official. James Lewis was made president, with Moses Harris and Hosea Stout as counselors. William Leany and John Brimhall were appointed teachers and William Leany was made watermaster. Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol.6, p.526 An Enduring Legacy, Volume Ten, p.328 "The home has three stories or, more properly, two stories and a basement. Each floor, including the basement, is equipped with a well built rock fireplace. Bishop Covington—he was Washington's founder and first bishop—used the basement and main floor as living quarters. On the north side is a railed porch, a common feature of the better pioneer homes, which was reached from a door in the large upper room."21 An Enduring Legacy, Volume Twelve, p.86 The homes of Lee, Covington, and Tailor served as dance halls for us young folks. We would gather at these places, pay our tickets in factory pay or produce, and dance to the music of the fiddle and accordion. Sometimes we would have candy pulls and peach cutting parties. In this way we enjoyed ourselves very much. Lafayette Thomas Farr picture on INfobases. Winslow Farr, Jr., and Emily Jane ,Covington. Born Feb. 14, 1864, Paradise, Utah Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.867 FARR, LAFAYETTE THOMAS (son of Winslow Farr, Jr., and Emily Jane Covington). Born Feb. 14, 1864, Paradise, Utah. Married Nancy Hipwell Sept. 30, 1885 (daughter of William Hipwell and Elizabeth Barton). Their children: William Hipwell; Winslow; Emily Jane; Elizabeth; Aaron Lafayette; Lawrence; Harriet Olive; Flossie; Laura May; Glenn. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.1014 Married Karste Mortenson in Sweden (daughter of Andres Mortenson and Anna Pahrson of Sweden), who was born Sept. 10, 1821. Their children: Johanna, m. John T. Covington; Mary Christena, m. Joseph Ash; Charlotte Elena, m. Joseph Simkins; John Williard; Joseph and Emma Helena, died; Ellen, m. John H. Fullmer. Family home Beaver, Utah. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 1, p.192 "Soon after that I was sitting on the ditch bank with Carmi Porter one day and we were sharing confidences about girls. I told him how I felt about Grandma. I'll be darned if he didn't go and tell it around and she got to hear it. A night or two after that we were at a dance. We had dances in the dining hall. We would shove [p.193] all the tables against the walls and shave soap on the floor to make it smooth. I was standing by the door when Grandma came in with Alvin and another girl. He was courting two at the same time. That was a common way in the polygamous days. The music started up. We had good music for our weekly dances. Brother Covington and Lon Cox would trade off with the fiddle. That was all the instruments we had, but we thought it was great. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 1, p.496 Malinda Catherine, daughter of Milton and Malinda Kelley came to Utah with her mother in July 1847. When she grew to young womanhood she married Benjamin Alexander. They lived in Salt Lake City for a time then moved to Vernal, Utah where she reared a [p.497] family of six boys and three girls. She passed away in Vernal in 1899. —Marian Covington Bradshaw Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 5, p.23 After these missionaries arrived in the cotton country they received their portions of land with gratitude. David H. Cannon, a missionary of 1861, tells of his wife and himself receiving their spot of ground: "We knelt down together in the evening shade [p.24] behind a large chaparral," he wrote, "and thanked the Lord for the land that was ours. We dedicated it to Him and asked His blessings upon it and upon our endeavors to make it productive...." The missionaries of '61 needed more help if the Territory was to be supplied with cotton. They could use five hundred more laborers, but all they got were two hundred families sent south in October 1862. These new recruits were told by their leaders that the soil and water in the Dixie country were "actually aching" for men to combine them into the making of good cotton. President Heber C. Kimball assured them, "God is inspiring this mission," so, south they came and joined their brethren in the spirit of "energetic" hopefulness along with hard work in preparing the 1863 cotton crop. And their efforts were not in vain for according to Bishop Covington in his report at the October Conference held in St. George: "the cotton crop is this year better than usual." He further told the congregation that the cotton produced in Dixie was better than that grown in Tennessee and equal to that produced in the Carolinas. Cotton was now being grown all along the Virgin River, and cotton gins were set up in Grafton, Virgin City and Washington which aided the growers. 56,094 pounds of ginned cotton were produced this year and sold for fifty cents a pound. Top price for cotton on the New York market was ninety three cents. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 13, p.25 Sunday 7 feby. At an early hour accompanied by Bp. R.D. Covington went some 4 miles up the Rio Virgen to see the condition of the Church sheep herd some 1600 in charge of Bro. E. Larkin. Found them in bad condition many of them dying & loosing their wool. Bro. Larkin was doing his best to save them & keep them healthy. He lacks experience. Gave hime some advice & then returned to Town took breakfast & then to meeting. Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 13, p.47 His daughter Maggie, who had worked in the textile mills of her native Scotland, proved to be an efficient teacher of the various steps in the manufacture of cotton textiles—lapping, carding, spinning and weaving. Her first pupils were Amanda Pace, Mary Covington, and Lucinda Clark, three young ladies from Washington who thus became the first local employees of the new enterprise which was in operation early in 1867. Davidson himself was an expert machinist. June of 1869 found James, his wife and their twelve year old son in St. Thomas on the Muddy River. LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 3, p.525 Stewart, John Riley, Bishop of Torrey Ward (Wayne Stake), Wayne county, Utah, from 1901 to 1906, was born Aug. 27, 1873, in Beaver, Beaver county, Utah, the son of Urban Van Stewart and Ellen Adams. He was baptized May 21, 1882, at Adamsville; ordained a Deacon Nov. 30, 1884, by Joseph H. Joseph; ordained a Priest Aug. 30, 1897, by Bishop George Coleman at Teasdale, Wayne county; ordained an Elder Oct. 14, 1897, by Willis E. Robison at Loa; ordained a Seventy Oct. 19, 1897, by Apostle John Henry Smith; received his blessings in the Salt Lake Temple Nov. 20, 1897, and filled a mission to the Northern States in 1897 1900, [p.526] laboring principally in Michigan. After laboring as presiding Elder and assistant Sunday school superintendent at Grover, he was ordained a High Priest and Bishop April 5, 1901, by Francis M. Lyman and set apart to preside over the Torrey Ward, which position he filled until May, 1906. In 1903 (Aug. 14th) he married Ellen Amelia Covington (daughter of John Thomas Covington and Elizabeth Adams), who was born Dec. 10, 1884, in Orderville, Utah. The children by this marriage are the following: Ellen Elizabeth, born April 26, 1904; John Riley jun., born Oct. 25, 1905; Golda, born Dec. 21, 1907; Cecil Van, born March 7, 1910; Gerold William, born March 21, 1911, and Junius Kent, born July 17, 1913. His wife died July 17, 1916, in childbed. Bro. Stewart acted as second counselor to President Gearson S. Bastion from 1906 to 1910 and then as first counselor to Joseph Eckersley from 1910 to 1915. He is a farmer and stock raiser by avocation. Covington, Joseph W. LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 4, p.483 Covington, Joseph W., Bishop of Lankershim Ward, Hollywood Stake, California, from 1928 to 1929, was born Aug. 8, 1879, in Orderville, Utah, the son of John T. Covington and Johanna Luridbind. He was baptized Oct. 13, 1887, ordained a High Priest April 22, 1923, by Geo. Albert Smith, and a Bishop Jan. 29, 1928, by Melvin J. Ballard. Covington, Joseph Willard LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 4, p.515 Covington, Joseph Willard, Bishop of the San Pedro Ward, Los Angeles Stake, California, from 1923 to 1925, was born Aug. 8, 1879, in Ordervitle, Utah, a son of John Thomas Covington and Johanna Lundblad. He was baptized Nov. 13, 1887, ordained a High Priest Jan. 10, 1911, by Heber J. Grant, and a Bishop April 22, 1923, by Geo. Albert Smith. LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 4, p.677 Stolworthy, Willard Chase, first counselor in the Young Stake presidency from 1924 to 1930+, was born Sept. 16, 1891, in Orderville, Utah, a son of Henry Thomas Stolworthy and Johanna Elizabeth Covington. He was baptized in September, 1899, filled a mission to the Southern States in 1912 1913, was ordained a High Priest Feb. 21, 1914, by Rudger Clawson, and set apart as first counselor in the stake presidency March 22, 1925. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.413 The Latter day Saints who had located in that part of Los Angeles which constituted the district of Lankershim were organized as a branch June 13, 1924, with Edmund R. Paul as presiding Elder. The branch was organized as a regular bishop’s ward in 1927 with Edmund R. Paul as Bishop. He was succeeded in 1928 by Heber W. Norton, who later in 1928 was succeeded by Joseph W. Covington, who in 1929 was succeeded by Mathoni W. Pratt, who in 1930 was succeeded by Jesse L. Mortensen, who presided Dec. 31, 1930. On that date the membership of the Lankershim Ward was 216, including 50 children. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.522 The first title to land held by any white man to any part of the ground around Moccasin Springs was obtained from William B. Maxwell by a Brother Rhodes, who paid Maxwell 80 head of sheep for his claim. Brother Rhodes located at the springs as a ranchman as early as 1864, and he induced Randall (Randolph) Alexander to settle with him. The two together bought such remaining lands from the Indians as these natives still seemed to own. The ranch was vacated in 1866 because of Indian trouble. In 1871 Levi Stewart and others purchased the Alexander claim and divided the stock into eight or ten shares. A company under Louis Allen, consisting of people who had broken up their homes in the Muddy Valley (Nevada), located temporarily at Pipe Springs and Moccasin. Later the Canaan Cattle Company secured some property at Moccasin Springs, of which Lorin Pratt took charge for several years. Still later John Thomas Covington took charge. He was succeeded in 1883 by Christopher B. Heaton, who assisted the Indians in their farming, but without much success, as the Indians were not inclined to work very hard. A branch of the Church was organized as early as 1886 with Christopher B. Heaton as presiding Elder. He presided until 1890, when he moved to Mexico, where he was killed by Mexicans in 1894. Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, p.775 The San Pedro Ward was organized April 22, 1923, with Joseph W. Covington as Bishop. He was succeeded in 1925 by LeRoy C. Boren, who in 1930 was succeeded by J. Golden Kimball, jun., who presided Dec. 31, 1930. On that date the Church membership of the San Pedro Ward was 256 souls, including 70 children. Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, December 18, 1888 (Tuesday) In the Second District Court, at Beaver (Judge Jacob S. Boreman), John T. Covington, of Orderville, Thomas Chamberlain, of Graham, Kane Co., Cornelius McReavy, of Washington, Andrew Anderson, of Koosharem, James H. Langford, of Junction, Piute Co., and Benjamin Perkin, of Carcass Creek, Piute Co., were each sentenced to six months' imprisonment and $300 fine; all for u.c. Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, June 17, 1889 (Monday) Benjamin Perkins, Andrew Anderson, John T. Covington, Cornelius McReavy, James H. Langford, Carl Olsen, Soren Jacobsen and Charles Frampton were discharged from the Penitentiary. Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, December 31, 1905 (Sunday) Berrill Covington, an old pioneer, died suddenly in Ogden, Weber Co. Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, June 12, 1908 (Friday) Mrs. Sarah Bitter Gibson, wife of the late Jacob Gibson, died in the Sugar House Ward, Salt Lake Co., Utah, and John Thomas Covington, a Utah pioneer of 1847, died at Loa, Wayne Co., Utah. Guide to Archives and Manuscripts Collections In Selected Utah RepositoriesPetersen, Erma P. Genealogy, [19 ]. 354 p. Summary: Collected biographical sketches, personal histories and genealogies of the ancestors of Petersen. Includes information on the Pace family and early Utah history and settlements. Gift of Erma P. Petersen, 1968 and 1972. 1. Lawrence family Genealogy. 2. Pace family Genealogy. 3. Pace, Catherine Rankin. 4. Pace, William Wilson, 1857 5. Pace, Wilson Daniel, 1831 1899. 6. Anderson, Nancy Pace, 1801 1875. 7. Anderson, Miles, 1795 1876. 8. Tyler, Mary Adelia Pace, 1864 9. Redd, Ann Moriah, 1830 1909. 10. Rance, Icevinda Pace Rohner, 1867 11. Pace, John Hardison, 1856 12. Pace, Pauline Ann Bryner, 1857 1931. 13. Sorenson, Amanda Lucinda Pace, 1850 14. Rawson, Margret Angeline Pace, 1842 1929. 15. Pace, James, 1811 1888. 16. Pace, John Ezra, 1845 1932. 17. Ivins, Caroline Augusta, 1845 1884. 18. McDonald, Julia Ann Ivins, 1859 1900. 19. Pace, Phoebe Ann Covington, 1857 1928. 20. Pace, Elizabeth Lee, 1851 1912. 21. Payson (Utah) History. 22. St. George (Utah) History 23. Thatcher (Ariz.) History. 24. Frontier and pioneer life. 25. Mormon Battalion, 1846 1847. MSS SC 52 ID: UTBV86 A32 Guide to Archives and Manuscripts Collections In Selected Utah Repositories Seaman, Anna Porter. To commemorate the Orderville United Order, 1875 1885. 15 pp. : photocopy of typescript. Includes biographies of original settlers. Location: Utah State Historical Society, Salt Lake City, Utah. 1. United Order Orderville (Utah). 2. Orderville (Utah). 3. Mount Carmel (Utah). 4. Glendale (Utah). 5. Kane County (Utah). 6. Porter, Francis Lysander. 7. Bowers, Isaiah. 8. Carling, Isaac Van Wagoner. 9. Carroll, Charles Negus. 10. Chamberlain, Thomas. 11. Covington, John. 12. Hoyt, Israel. 13. Biographies. MSS A 2006 ID: UTSX89 A1736 Davis Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies (1977), pg.105 Itinerary of trip to Washington County. Made molasses. Married Emily Jane Covington. Some flashback and repetition of 1857–58 events. Raised cotton. To Cedar City to deposit molasses. Mormon Manuscripts to 1846: Guide to Lee Library, BYU Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Bergetta Adair Our Valley compiled by Rosetta Biggs. [Mesa, Arizona: Biggs, 1978.]p.198 Photo p.199 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, Berrill 27 Nov 1817 31 Dec 1905 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.86 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Berrill 1794 1881 Mormon Manuscripts To 1846: A Guide To The Holdings of The Harold B. Lee Library compiled by Hyrum Leslie Andrus and Richard F. Bennett. [Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1977.] p.35 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Edward 1826 1919 Mormon Manuscripts To 1846: A Guide To The Holdings of The Harold B. Lee Library compiled by Hyrum Leslie Andrus and Richard F. Bennett. [Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1977.] p.35 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Elizabeth Hodges 1793 1881 Mormon Manuscripts To 1846: A Guide To The Holdings of The Harold B. Lee Library compiled by Hyrum Leslie Andrus and Richard F. Bennett. [Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1977.] p.36 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, Elizabeth Lemon 21 Apr 1820 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.93 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, Emily J. 1 Jan 1843 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.93 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Heber Chase 16 May 1882 1956 History of Kane County compiled and edited by Elsie Chamberlain Carroll. [Salt Lake City: Kane County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 1960.] p.503 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, John 1951 Our Valley compiled by Rosetta Biggs. [Mesa, Arizona: Biggs, 1978.]p.199 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, John T. 20 Aug 1815 3 Jun 1908 History of Kane County compiled and edited by Elsie Chamberlain Carroll. [Salt Lake City: Kane County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 1960.] p.503,520 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, John Thomas 7 Aug 1840 13 Jun 1908 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.93 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Joseph Our Valley compiled by Rosetta Biggs. [Mesa, Arizona: Biggs, 1978.]p.198 Photo p.199 Covington, Joseph W. 8 Aug 1879 Latter Day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints by Andrew Jenson. [Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Company, 1901 1935.] v.4, p.483 v. 4, p.515 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Lavina Our Valley compiled by Rosetta Biggs. [Mesa, Arizona: Biggs, 1978.]p.199 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Covington, Robert Dachey 20 Aug 1815 Latter Day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints by Andrew Jenson. [Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Company, 1901 1935.] v.4, p.592 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors (Supplement) Covington, Robert Dockery 20 Aug 1815 Pioneers of 1847 by Susan Ward Easton. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1980. @ p.93 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors Thornton, Priscilla Covington 1839 1916 Mormon Manuscripts To 1846: A Guide To The Holdings of The Harold B. Lee Library compiled by Hyrum Leslie Andrus and Richard F. Bennett. [Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1977.] p.189 Wiggins, Marvin E. Mormons and Their Neighbors West, Mary Ann Covington Stratton 1815 1908 Mormon Manuscripts To 1846: A Guide To The Holdings of The Harold B. Lee Library compiled by Hyrum Leslie Andrus and Richard F. Bennett. [Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1977.] p.197 Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol.4, p.19 Francis L. Porter, Thomas Chamberlain, Howard, Henry, Susie and Lucy Chamberlain, Eunice Brown, Abbie Porter, Sylvia Meeks, Clara and Heber Meeks, Chastie Chamberlain, Abigail Cox, Helen Palmer, Mary Kokerhans, Margaret Fackrell, Molly Stolworthy Black, Tory Hancock, Ruhama Adair, Alvira Cox, Mary Covington Larsen, and Clara .Isaac Loren Covington would be one of the children in the photo. HISTORY OF ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON by Miriam Covington Bradshaw Born August 20, 1815 in Rockingham, Richmond Co., North Carolina. He crossed the plains in 1847 in Edward Hunter's Company under Captain Daniel Thomas arriving in the Valley Sept 25, 1847. In the sixteenth century, William, John and Henry Covington came from England to the United States with Lord Baltimore. (Lord Baltimore died before the charter was signed. The charter rights were passed to his son, Cecilius Calvert Baltimore (16xx-1775. Taken from Encyclopedia) They settled first in Maryland and Virginia where large grants of land were given to them by England's king. Family tradition states that William Covington was America's silver smith. The moulds were deeded to his daughter who cared for her parents in their old age. This daughter was the wife of Lord Calvert or Baltimore. Prior to the Revolutionary War, John and William moved to Richmond Co., North Carolina while Henry remained. As years passed, the Covingtons grew in numbers, most of them were capable in many fields of government, education, religion, manufacturing and farming. Robert Dockery was the great, great grandson of William. He grew to manhood in Rockingham. Most of his time was spent gaining a good education, and helping on his father's big plantation where the principle crop was cotton and tobacco. Soon after he married Elizabeth Thomas of Marlboro Co., South Carolina. He with his father's family moved to Summerville, Noxebee Co., Mississippi where several of his mother's people had moved in 1834. They soon established themselves on large plantations with plenty of slave labor to make farming a profitable occupation. Here three children were born. John Thomas, Aug 7, 1840, Emily Jane Covington Farr, Jan 1, 1843, and Sarah Ann, February 2 or May 4, 1845 who died that year. In 1843 Benjamin Clapp, Samuel Gurley and Mr. Hullet were preaching the gospel in a town ten miles away. Daniel Thomas happened to hear this new strange religion's doctrine. It sounded good to him so he came home with a Book of Mormon which his relatives were anxious to read. His brother, after reading it said, "You had better be careful how you fool around these Mormons. They may be deceivers. The book is quite a history, a very interesting novel, but I don't know about it all.' A week or so passed. The people of Summerville, at least some of them were anxious to hear the gospel. After Elder clapp had preached two weeks, Robert Covington asked for baptism Feb. 3, 1843. His wife's people all ask for membership in the church. Robert's father, mother, brothers and sister all turned against him. They felt that he had lost his reasoning. He was disinherited. When talk of joining the Saints in Nauvoo was first mentioned the slaves protested for they had deep love for their master. They all wanted to go too. In 1845 when he moved one couple with their children did go. I do not know if they came on to Utah or not. But my brother, John, living in Idaho by chance met a colored man who said that his father came west with Robert D. Covington and they later settled in Idaho. Two years with the Saints when the move west began, his wife was expecting a baby and the ordeals the Saints had suffered had made inroads on health. This must have been a trying journey for it seemed the forces of the elements were pitted against them. The dust storms, hail storms, lack of good water and wood to burn, with Indians camped on the opposite bank of the Platt River stampeding cattle, crossing often to beg or trade for food that was so scarce. Sometimes they swarmed in their camp like bees often helping themselves to whatever was handy. Housewives would miss their camp and cooking equipment. One day while men were fixing broken wagons they stopped near some currant bushes. Robert Dokery sent his two children, John and Emily with buckets to gather what they could. They worked hard cleaning the currants as they picked. Just as they finished filling their buckets an Indian stepped from behind the brush and gave a war whoop. They dropped their buckets and fled toward camp. When they neared camp they looked back and saw the Indian with their currants laughing at his huge joke. August 1, 1847 - Scotts Bluff, Nebraska The morning was quiet, heat was terrific. The emigrants had called a halt. Saints had not found wood to burn for eleven days and water was not fit to drink. Some of their animals had died by licking alkali off the ground. They also had wagons to fix. Mrs. Sessons had a buggy she drove back to the second hundred, a distance of five miles. She brought Sister Covington back to her camp and put her to bed with a new son, Robert Laborous Covington. While the Saints were halted, A. D. Smoot called a meeting pleading with the Saints to be more united, to trust in the Lord and to consider this a school of experience training them to be leaders. August 2 They traveled twenty-two miles on a dry prairie finding food for their cattle in only one place. They traveled fifteen miles on empty stomachs, traveling long after dark. August 4 Indians came into camp and spread blankets on the ground. We were advised to feed them, but not trade with them. There is sickness and death among the pioneers. Eliza R. Snow was a great comfort to the sorrowing. On one occasion she remarked," Death makes occasional inroads among us. Nursing the sick, tending the wagons was a laboring service. The patient faithfulness with which it was born. To consign ones loved ones to these desolate graves was enough to try the hearts of the strongest." August 5 They camped eight or nine miles from Fort Laramie where food was plentiful and water good. Here they camped five days to fix wagons, wash, mend and bake. Choke cherries and wild currants were quite near this camp. Seven death occurred on the journey. Captain Jedediah M. Grant lost a child. His wife died before they reached the Valley. But she was taken to the Valley to be buried. August 7 Bears near the camp disturbed their sleep. Two Indians women were gathering berries when they saws a bear watching them. Carefully laying their basket down for the bear to eat, they retreated. This was witnessed by some of the pioneers of the company. Traveling for a few days was slow and rough. There were hills to climb which broke several wagons. In September the pioneers crossed lots of sand and the wind blew hard. They saw fearful storms with dust, rain and snow. September 4 The pioneers going east to help the remaining Saints west camped all night with them giving words of encouragement and telling them of their new home in the West and what a feast was prepared by the women of the company. The last miles were hard ones because of the cold and rugged mountain country. September 24 They arrived in the Valley. Robert's wife was frail. The hardships had all but taken her strength. She hoped to get stronger, but the cold winds of winter added a severe cold to her troubles and Dec 17 she left a devoted family to carry on her good name. Robert had a trying time for a while with his motherless children. He lived in Cottonwood near Salt Lake City. here he was an able school teacher and was known as Professor Covington. He married Malinda Alison Kelly next. She gave birth to a daughter named Mary Ellen, Dec 28, 1849 in Big Cottonwood Utah. He also married Nancy Roberts, Born Jul 19, 1839 in Hyde, Cheshire, England. They were married in the Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Dec 28, 1856. She had four children, Phoebe Ann, Thomas, Nancy, Melinda and James Isaac. Then she died in 1864. With each child she was taken by team to Big Cottonwood where medical aid, the best to be had was provided. It took two weeks to make the trip one way. From Documentary History of the Church: The Dixie Mission left Salt Lake City April 6, 1807 and came to Parowan without any serious accidents. We remained three or four days to get grinding done. They went to Cedar City where we met President Height. It took six days from Cedar to WAshginton. President Height aided us on our trip having to make roads over the roughest ground I ever saw. We arrived May 6, 1857. On May 7, 1857 we were called together to organize a branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saint. We numbered about 160 men, women and children, 200 head of cattle, some sheep and pigs and children. Men who were called were J. B. Begina, John Spouce, Richard Queen, W.H. Crawford, john Thomas, J.D. McCollough, James Matthos, Gabriel Cooley, William Jergens, William Slade, Dr., William Slade, Jr., Robert Loyd, Joseph Harfield, John Freeman, J.M. Couch, John Hawley, William Hawley, Jacob Clark, Stephen Duggins, William Duggins, Thomas Smith, ?lmstead Richer, Alexander Parron, Robert Covington and Edward West. Brother Height took charge. Brother Crawford took the minutes, "Oh My Father" was sung. Bro Height offered prayer. It was moved that Brother Height appointed president. he appointed Robert Dockery Covington. It was Bro. Covington's right to choose his counselors. He said that he preferred for the President to choose his counsellors so Bro Harrison Pierce, 1st Counselor and Johnathan R. Ragean, 2nd Counselor were chosen. Instructions were given on how to honor the Priesthood, how to treat the Indians, and the Brethren were exhorted to put down evil wherever it was found. Prayer was offered by Harrison Pierce. That evening a meeting was held and the charge given over to Brother Covington. August 22, 1857 George A. Smith and others visited Washington where the Dixie Mission was being established. We arrived Tuesday August 18, 1857 and was most cordially welcomed by Brother Covington and others who spared no pains to make our visit a pleasant one. Brother Smith thought that no other settlement had a more promising start in the mountains, considering the lateness of the start. The corn planted by the Indians was fifteen feet high. Ours was not quite that high as it was not planted until the 15th of June. The cotton looked well, never had the old cotton grower seen so many balls on a single stock and such thrift. January 6, 1859 Robert Covington was in President's office when he with others went with President Young to administer to Fanny Murry, a sister of President Young. April 14, 1859 Elder Amasa W. Lyman tarried with Brother Covington. He found them busy planting wheat. October 31, 1859 Brother Covington in Salt Lake Reports the cotton crop good. Sugar came the best he had ever seen. June 3, 1857 Amasa M. Lyman writes, returning from California, he camped with Robert D. Covington who informed him that he though 1,000 acres of good land could be cultivated. Good herd grounds with plenty of grass also plenty of wood and water. 1860 Robert D. Covington was Notary Public for Washington Co. April 16, 1860 Was chosen as judge of cotton and tobacco of State Fair. April 1, 1861 A contract was let for a road to be built near Beaver Dams to Robert D. Covington, James D. McCullough, James Pierce and Walter E. Dodge. Robert has cultivated cotton every year since he was bishop and has preserved specimens and (unable to read) 1868 Grape cuttings were imported from California. The Chinese sugar cane was planted. Grain was taken from Fifty to Ninety miles to be ground. To get blacksmithing done, they also traveled that far. Many southern men left after the first year declaring cotton could not be grown there. Those who remained are acquiring sheep, cattle and goats. August 27, 1862 Robert D. was chosen County Representative of the Deseret Agriculture and Manufacturing Society. Within six weeks he was to hold a County Fair, give awards and choose helpers. September 25, 1862 President Brigham Young returning to Salt Lake related that they were given peaches and grapes to feast on in Washington. Also viewed with pleasure the fine crop of Brother Covington's who understood his business and puts whole heart into his work. March 22, 1863 Robert at St. George Conference took his seat with the State High Council November 2, 1865 Bishop Covington was one of the speakers. He reported Washington Ward in good condition. May 7, 1865 At conference in St. George, Robert D. was sustained Presiding High Priest over his Ward. November 6, 1864 A conference was held with Apostle Erastus Snow presiding. A convention of experienced men of Washington and Kane Counties to consider self protection. To establish uniform priced in Exchange for grain, etc. Cotton $1.25 lb, Molasses $4.00 gal, Tobacco 3.00 lb and preserves $6.00. Robert Dockery Covington was one of the men chosen. September 2, 1867 Robert D. Covington wrote the following letter: Washington Ward, St. George Stake, September 2, 1867 Elder George Albert Smith Dear Brother: Knowing you are interested in the property and general welfare of our Southern Utah Dixie, I thought it would not be amiss to send you a few particulars and items of interest with regards to the settlement. We have had the warmest summer ever experience in this country. It has had its effects of many of us in the shape of languidness. It has been very oppressive. But aside from this, the general health of the people has been very good. While sickness and death nd making such inroads on human families in different parts of the country, we feel like offering our prayers of gratitude to the Almighty for the blessings of health that we enjoy, not with-standing the difficulties we have had this seasons in obtaining sufficient water for irrigation. Our cane and corn look remarkable well. I believe the best that I have seen in the Washington fields. The cotton crop will be late because of the lateness of the season in getting water onto the land. Our fruit crop is profitable. The Indians are quiet and peaceful. (unreadable) taking all into consideration, we are pretty well satisfied with our Dixie home. I remain your brother in the gospel of peace, Robert D. Covington November 3, 1867 R.D. Covington's Washington Choir furnished the music. January 6, 1867 Bishop's from different settlements started on a missionary tour. R.D. Covington was the number. They visited and held meetings with all the people of the Upper Virgin Valley, then to the Muddy and Beaver Dam settlements. They reached St. Thomas on the 19th having crossed the Virgin River 38 times and the Muddy once. The people of Muddy had raised that year 6,500 bushels of wheat 10,00 bails of cotton. On the 24th of January they returned to St. George. The early part of February Iron Co with Pinto and Pine Valley were also visited. The products of the past five years were astounding. When they saw how much the people had accomplished. The choices products of the earth were there. February 24, 1867 The Western Union Telegraph Office came to Washington. Robert D. did not place it until he heard from President Young. It was put in Delph Whitehead's home. Moroni, San Pete Co, was as far south as the line. Col. D. D. MacArthur: Brother Mendez Cooper and William Prince have just come in from Harrisburg and they report that an Indian had told him that 40 or 50 Navajos were in the vicinity of Grape Vine Springs and had killed three head of cattle and were traveling in the direction of Harrisburg Fields. All are afoot. The friendly Indians are very much excited. The people of Harrisburg are on guard. Indians say they want horses. We wish to know immediately what to do. We await your orders. Yours hastily, Robert D. Covington. June 19, 1868 Elder George A. Smith wrote in the Millennial Star, "On horseback from Montana to Arizona. At Washington 19th of June. We were kindly received by Bishop Covington. He writes, 'It was amusing to see my sole companion, Dr. Boyd A. Batchalor from Louisiana pronouncing the quality to the cotton as we went through the mills and looking around at the buxom girls and mechanically nodding a yes, yes to the explanations of the sedate Bishop Covington as he explained the difference of spinning, weaving, twisting, etc.'" Southern Mission Conference November 20, 1868 Bishop Robert D. Covington was a speaker. He was still President of High Priest Quorum. He spoke of some of his 25 years experience. Referred to the Lamanites. Ask the people to give them work then pay them food and clothing to encourage them to be industrious. April 18, 1870 Bishop Covington just home from the Southern States Mission. He started for the east the 18th of last November. Labored in Mississippi and brought two families comprising thirteen persons as part of the fruits of his labors. The Bishops account of conditions is far from good. He says a feeling of unrest, insecurity to life and property to prevalent, greatly increased by suspension of military and civil rule. Instead Klu Klux Klan is numerous and powerful and by no means life is considered safe. Many are moving to Texas and California. He met no opposition from the ministers. A few scattered Saints were left in charge of S. P. Holley -- end of copy Robert Gardner wrote in his diary: We found Robert D. Covington our old neighbor and others who had been sent to that mission some years before. The appearance of these brethren, their wives and children was discouraging. Nearly all had Malaria. They had worked hard and worn out their store clothes and had replaced them with the cotton they had raised on their own lot or farm. The women had corded, spun and woven by hand and colored with weeds this cotton. The men's shirts, women and children's dresses and sunbonnets were all made of the same piece of material. Their clothes and faces were all of the same color, being blue with chills. This tried me more than anything I had seen in all my Mormon experience, thinking if I remained my family would soon look the same. I wanted to go back to Salt lake and spare them this. Brother Covington said, "Let's pray about it." We knelt in prayer. It was the Lord's will we stay. So I said, " We will trust in God and go ahead." Robert D. cut large stones from a nearby mountain and built a grand home for those pioneer days. The walls were three feet thick and built Colonial Style. There were two big fireplaces on each of the three floors. The upper floor was used for years as a dance floor for the young people. Many people speak of the Southern hospitality enjoyed in his home. He had no tolerance for sin. He had the name of doing a good job of h\keeping his Ward living the Gospel. He died at a ripe old age, nearly 87. june 2, 1902, Washington, Utah. Robert Dockery Covington. Written by himself April 1872. St. George, High Priest Record Book 15649 p. (he wrote a beautiful hand) Robert Dockery Covington was the son of Thomas and Jane Thomas Covington. I was born August 20, 1815 in the State of North Carolina, Richmond Co., City of Rockingham. Baptized February 3, 1843 by Benjamin Clapp in the State of Mississippi, Noxebe Co. Ordained a Bishop 1858 by Amasa Lyman and George A. Smith. Received my endowments in Nauvoo in the fall of 1845. Came to Salt Lake in 1847. Spent 1846 at Winter Quarters. I went on a mission to the Southern States in the fall of 1849. Returned in the spring of 1856. I was sealed to my wife Elizabeth Thomas 1867. Nancy Roberts taking her part. We had four children, John, Emily, Sarah and Robert. I was sealed to my wife Malinda Alison on December 1856 by whom I had one child, Mary Ellen. Was sealed to Nancy Robert Dec 28, 1856 by whom I had four children, Phoebe, Thomas, Malinda and James. My grandfather was John Covington. My grandmother was Nancy Wall. Her forefathers immigrated to America at an early date. My grandfather on mother's side was William Thomas. My Grandmother was Rachel Roe. Robert Dockery Covington was appointed May 7, 1857 Bishop of Washington Ward, Washington Co., Utah. Set apart August 1, 1857 with Brother Harrison Pierce, 1st Counselor Bro. Jonathan R. Ragean 2nd counselor. ________________________________________ Typed in WordPerfect Format by Valerie Evensen Dec 16, 1993. Converted to html Dec 31, 2003 by Mark Esplin. Robert Dockery Covington (1815-1902) Robert D. Covington was born August 20, 1815 in Rockingham, North Carolina. After moving to Noxubee County, Mississippi he and his wife Elizabeth owned slaves and managed a slave plantation. He was well experienced in growing cotton. Robert accepted Mormonism there, and after a two or three year delay, traveled to Nauvoo in 1845. Like other church members, he was forced to leave Nauvoo and travel to Winter Quarters. A son, Robert Laborius was born August 1, 1847 in Scotts Bluff, Nebraska and Elizabeth died on December 7, 1847 just a few weeks after they arrived in the Salt Lake Valley. While in Salt Lake City, Robert married two women, Malinda Allison and Nancy Roberts. These two wives came with him to Washington in the second group of Southern families who came to Washington on May 6, 1857. It was this family who, soon after their arrival, started to call the area "Dixie" after their southern homeland. The name quickly spread to all of the surrounding areas. They met the Adair group at Adair Springs. Robert was selected to be a branch president of the branch attached to the Harmony Ward. Immediately they started to build a dam on the Virgin River, dig ditches, prepare ground for planting, and make the area livable. On August 1, 1858 the church branch was changed into a ward. Robert became the first bishop of the Washington Ward and served until 1869. Robert was in the Territorial Legislature from 1858 to 1859. Three local men served in this capacity: John D. Lee, Robert D. Covington and Francis Boggs. The community used the Covington home often for dances, parties, and church functions. Robert D. Covington's two-story rock home was built in 1859 and is the oldest building still standing in all of Washington County [in 2008]. It is located on the northwest corner of the intersection of 200 east and 200 north. Robert Dockery Covington was a dedicated man and fulfilled his duty to his community, his church, his family and to himself. He came to Washington as one of its leaders in the spring of 1857 and remained there until his death on June 2, 1902. He now rests in the Washington City Cemetery as one of the cemetery's stalwart citizens. ________________________________________ typed by Mark Esplin 30 August 2008

Malinda or Melinda Allison Kelley Covington Census record 1880

Contributor: finnsh Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

Census record of 1880. People assumed that children listed were both Robert's and Melinda or Malinda's. Elizabeth had died, and so had Nancy who was a plural wife of Robert D Covington. Malinda raised these children. Census records list people as how they are related to the head and not particularly the spouse of the head of the household. Malinda only had one child by Robert. That was Mary Ellen Covington. Two known children by her first husband Milton Kelley, Martha Jane Kelley and Catherine Malinda Kelley Alexander. Robert and Malinda took it to their home an Indian girl child they called Alice Covington, whose parentage is unknown, to save her from being sold as a slave by traders. They raised her until she died about age 15. Malinda raised the living children of both of Robert's other wives. Until her death on November 18, 1898 in Circle Valley or Circleville, Utah. I am a direct descendant of Malinda or Melinda and her first husband Milton Kelley through their daughter Catherine Kelley Alexander. Census record showing Robert as Head; This shows the correct analyses as it refers to Robert Dockery Covington. Name: Robert Covington Event Type: Census Event Year: 1880 Event Place: Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Gender: Male Age: 64 Marital Status: Married Race: White Race (Original): W Occupation: Farmer Relationship to Head of Household: Self Relationship to Head of Household (Original): Self Birth Year (Estimated): 1816 Birthplace: North Carolina, United States Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Affiliate Publication Number: T9 Affiliate Film Number: 1339 HouseholdRoleGenderAgeBirthplace Robert CovingtonSelfM64 North Carolina, United States Malinda CovingtonWifeF64 Kentucky, United States Mary ThompsonDaughterF29 Utah, United States James ThompsonGrandsonM5 Utah, United States Robert CovingtonSonM33 Nebraska, United States Thomas W CovingtonSonM19 Utah, United States Malinda ThompsonGranddaughterF8 Utah, United States District: 93 , Sheet Number and Letter: 373D , GS Film Number: 1255339 , Digital Folder Number: 004244811 , Image Number: 00188

Life timeline of Robert Dockery Covington

1815
Robert Dockery Covington was born on 20 Aug 1815
Robert Dockery Covington was 10 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Robert Dockery Covington was 16 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Robert Dockery Covington was 25 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Robert Dockery Covington was 44 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Robert Dockery Covington was 46 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
Robert Dockery Covington was 59 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Robert Dockery Covington was 73 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
Robert Dockery Covington was 79 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
Robert Dockery Covington died on 2 Jun 1902 at the age of 86
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Robert Dockery Covington (20 Aug 1815 - 2 Jun 1902), BillionGraves Record 642381 Washington, Washington, Utah, United States

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