Richard Carlisle

1798 - 1879

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Richard Carlisle

1798 - 1879
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Richard Carlisle, born 1798, at Riseholme, Lincolnshire, England,was the youngest child of Thomas Carlisle and Elizabeth Taylor. His parents died when he was but a stripling. A well-to-do lady took him as her own son and educated him. This gave him an opportunity to study things out for himself and
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Life Information

Richard Carlisle

Born:
Died:

Alpine Cemetery

283 N 300 E
Alpine, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

pioneer of 1852
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Crowquill66

May 26, 2011
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finnsh

May 28, 2011
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Fran

May 27, 2011
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johnostout

April 27, 2018
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goinboatin

March 25, 2016
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domcia77

April 10, 2020
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Catirrel

May 26, 2011

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Richard Carlisle by Annie V. Thompson

Contributor: domcia77 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

Richard Carlisle, born 1798, at Riseholme, Lincolnshire, England,was the youngest child of Thomas Carlisle and Elizabeth Taylor. His parents died when he was but a stripling. A well-to-do lady took him as her own son and educated him. This gave him an opportunity to study things out for himself and thus become the great benefactor to all his posterity. As a young boy, Richard was privileged to attend school. The study of the Bible was an important part in the education of the youth, and Richard became quite a student of the Bible. He attended the Church of England where the services were quite different from today. The church warden kept order during the services by using a long stick called a "tithing stick." If any me n were falling asleep, he would prod them gently with his tithing-stick and wake them up. A feather was used on the ladies. If some were talking, he would prod them until they kept quiet and listened to the sermon. The sermon, too, taught some things that would seem strange to us. The church taught that God was without body, parts, or passions; that He sat on the top of a topless throne, and was so large He filled the whole universe, and yet so small He could dwell in one's heart. Richard became dissatisfied with the Church of England, as it did not teach the gospel as contained in the Bible. Therefore, he left that church and tried the non-conformist churches, but still did not find what he was looking for. Then he tried the Quakers. They were very desirous of having Richard among their numbers and entrusted him with their money. At their meetings they put their money bag on the table and all contributed. If there were any who were in want, they were allowed to take out what they needed. Still, the Quaker religion did not satisfy Richard, and he told his friends he would join no other church until God set up His kingdom here on earth. They asked him, "Do you think that will be in your day?" Richard replied, "I think it will." Richard married Jenney Field of Willingham, Lincolnshire, England. They were the parents of twelve children—including one set of triplets, two girls and one Boy. People came from the surrounding countryside to see the triplets. The Queen of England, sent them some presents. Two of the trio lived one year. The other triplet lived to five years of age. Three more of the children died. This made six who died young— half of their children! Richard's son, Joseph, had a dream that he saw a message come across the sea, and he knew the place to which it came. The dream was so impressive that he told his father about it and then went to see what the message was. There he found a Mormon missionary by the name of Joseph E. Taylor preaching the gospel. He reported to his father. Richard's family went to hear the Mormons preach. The other six children, along with their parents, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints within a period of a little over a year. Then they helped the missionaries in their preaching. Elder Joseph Taylor baptized all members of Richard Carlisle's surviving family. William L. Cutler and Charles Wharton assisted him with the confirmations. Preaching the gospel in those days met with bitter opposition in various forms. At one time, a group bent upon breaking up their meetings used a young man who was half-witted to cause a disturbance at the meetings. Richard's eldest son, Thomas Carlisle, took this in stride, and as was the custom of the church warden, Thomas had his long tithing stick which was somewhat pointed on the end. When they brought in this afflicted young man, Thomas stood in just the right position so that when this boy made his simpleton movements, he bumped into this stick with force enough to really hurt. After a few of these turns, the contentious group left, and the meeting continued. After that, no further trouble was experienced with this group. The ship Ellen sailed from Liverpool on Monday, 6 January 1851, having on board a company of Saints consisting of 466 souls, under the presidential care of Elders James W. Cummings, Crandall Dunn, and William Moss. Among those on board were Richard Carlisle, his wife Jenney Field Carlisle, and five of his children: Mary, Joseph, Alice, John, and Richard Matthew Carlisle.The ship remained anchored in the river beside Liverpool until the 8th, about 11:00 A.M., when anchor was weighed and the Saints were soon under way with a fair wind. The good Ellen ran at a rate of seven miles an hour until about 11 o'clock at night, when she struck a schooner, thereby breaking her jib-boom and main fore yards. The following day, the captain put into Cardigan Bay, North Wales to repair, and in a few days the ship was ready for sea again. But as the wind on the very day the vessel put into port changed to an unfavorable quarter and remained there for three weeks, she remained in port. The Saints considered the accident that had happened a blessing to them, as they were comfortable in port while hundreds of people were being tumbled about on the face of the troubled seas. During the storm, many vessels wrecked and hundreds of human beings were consigned to a watery grave. The captain, at length, became impatient. Although the wind still continued unfavorable, the Ellen again weighed anchor on 23 January and put to sea; but the wind blew a strong gale from the direction the ship wanted to sail, and consequently, only a little progress was made for several days. On 1 February, however, the wind changed to a favorable quarter. The Ellen stood fairly out at sea, and the passengers soon lost sight of the Irish Coast. From that time they enjoyed pleasant weather and fair winds. On the night of 14 March 1859, the Ellen anchored in the Mississippi River off New Orleans, making the passage from Cardigan Bay in seven weeks. During the voyage, ten deaths occurred—two adults who died of fever and eight children of either measles, consumption, or inflammation of the chest. The measles broke out among the emigrants the day they left the dock. Almost every child on board had them, besides several adults. Altogether, there were almost 70 cases. Many of the children also suffered from the tropical (whooping ) cough,. During the voyage, six marriages were also solemnized, and one birth took place. Immediately after leaving port, the presidency on board divided the company into twelve divisions or wards, allotting twelve berths to each division, and appointed a president over each. Then these twelve divisions were divided into two and a president appointed to preside over each six, so that there were twelve companies in the steerage with a president over each and two to preside over the whole. The second cabin was organized in like manner. The priesthood was also organized, and a president appointed over them to see that they attended to their duties. This complete organization was found to be of great utility in preserving peace, order, and the health and comfort of the saints on board. President Cummings and his counselors watched over their flock with the utmost care, and in meeting with the brethren, they could easily learn the condition of every Saint on board. If any were sick or in want, or in transgression , they were made acquainted with any, and immediately adopted measures to relieve the wants of the needy and to prevent iniquity from creeping into their midst. Men were appointed to visit every family twice a day and to administer to the sick. At the city of New Orleans, the company chartered the steamer Alexander Scott to take the emigrants to St. Louis, Missouri. They paid $3.50 per head for adults, all luggage included, and half price for children. The company left New Orleans on the morning of March 19, and landed in St. Louis on 26 March 1851. A number of emigrants, not prepared to continue the journey right away, found employment in St. Louis, while the others proceeded on their way to Salt Carlisle settled with his family in Alpine, Utah.Lake. Richard's wife, Jenney, died at St. Louis. The Carlisles, like all the other pioneers, had problems with wagons, oxen, scarce food, trails for roads, and little or no shelter from the weather.

Carlisle Monument

Contributor: domcia77 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

Dear Family: I thought you might be interested to know that the SONS OF THE UTAH PIONEERS constructed a monument honoring the Carlisle family who settled in the Mill Creek area of the city. The county made a small park at the end of Carlisle St., which is located off 39th South and 7th West. To locate this street go to 39th South and 7th West, turn north for about one and a half blocks. You will see the sign CARLISLE ST. Turn west and go to the end of the street. There is a sign saying DEAD END STREET. Go as far as you can and the street turns south into a small park. The county made this park and takes care of it. There is a nice bowery where the dedication was held. There were many of our relatives there as well as some of the sons of the Utah pioneers. Orval took pictures of the monument. You will need a magnifying glass to read the inscription on the plaque. This park is very close to the Jordan River. There is a walking track on the East side of the river. This is the Jordan River Parkway. This monument was dedicated about the 3rd Saturday in August. A few of us gave some money to help pay for the monument. There was also some money in a family fund that was used to pay for the monument. Love, Margaret Carlisle Wilson The following is a copy of the text on the monument: CARLISLE FAMILY HISTORICAL MARKER In the 1850's and 1860's, three brothers, Joseph, John, and Richard Carlisle, settled in this location between 700 West and Jordan River. Their endeavors included farming, dairying, and planting mulberry trees to raise silk worms. They developed a gravel pit on the west side of the river. They were family men of strong character, active in public schools and the community. The "Carlisle School" was built near here. It was a five-room brick building which served students in the area from 1905 until 1923. Many of their children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren settled and remained in this area. Carlisle Lane was a popular access to the Jordan River for irrigating, fishing, bird hunting, swimming, and berry picking. From this Carlisle family, like many other families from the "3900 block," came great men who fought for their country and honorable citizens who cared greatly about their community.

Jane (Jenny) Fields Carlisle 1795-1851

Contributor: domcia77 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

My paternal great-grandmother, JANE (JENNY) FIELDS, was born (or christened) November 20, 1795 at Willingham, Lincolnshire, England. I have a picture of the lovely little church where she was christened. It’s called St. Helen’s. Her parents, MATHEW FIELDS, JR. and DINAH FISH, had been married there; her father and all his brothers and sisters had been christened there, as were all the brothers and sisters of Jane. Later, Jane would be married in this same pretty little church. Jane was the seventh child and third daughter of eight children, three girls and five boys, all born at Willingham, between February 1780 and May 1799. They were named ANN, JOHN, MATHEW, JOSEPH (who died when nearly four years old), a second JOSEPH, ALICE, JANE and BENJAMIN. Nothing is known about Jane’s early life until she met and fell in love with RICHARD CARLISLE, a young man two and a half years her junior. Richard needed time to prepare for marriage but he did not want to lose Jane, so when he asked her to marry him, he also asked her to wait five years for him. She is purported to have said, “Why certainly I will wait, and not only five but ten, Richard, if you wish it.” My great-grandmother was a June bride, for they were married June 22, 1822 at St. Helen’s Church, Willingham, Lincolnshire, England. Richard had been twenty-four in April and she was past twenty-six. Jane’s husband had been born in Lincolnshire also but at Riseholm, his parents were THOMAS CARLISLE, JR. and ELIZABETH TAYLOR CARLISLE, also born in Lincolnshire but in other parts. Riseholm is two and a half miles north of the city of Lincoln. Richard was the youngest child of his parents, who died when he was but a stripling. However, a well-to-do- lady took him as her son and educated him. He had the opportunity to study things out for himself and as a young boy was privileged to attend school. The Bible was an important part of the education of youth and he became quite a Bible student. He attended the Church of England, where those who fell asleep were prodded with what was called a tithing stick. There were other strange customs; and Richard felt some of the doctrine strange, too. He began investigating the Non-Conformist Churches. Later, he tried the Quakers, who entrusted him with their money; and they were kind and generous to those in need, but he was not satisfied. Richard told his friends that he would join no other church until God set up His Kingdom here on earth. They asked him, “Do you think that will be in your day?” He replied, “I think it will.” So Jane had married a good, studious, thoughtful man. To them were born twelve children, eight boys and four girls, including twins and triplets. Because triplets are rather unusual, they received beautiful presents; and the Queen of England sent them quite a sum of money. I have learned since, that this grant, given in the royal name to the mother of triplets, is called King’s Bounty. The twelve children were born between April 1823 and June 1840. My grandfather, JOSEPH, the third child and second son, was born July 21, 1826 at Sherwood-on-the-Hill, Nottinghamshire. THOMAS and MARY were older. Then followed BENJAMIN AND JOHN, who were twins and did not live long. The triplets were MATHEW, RICHARD, and JANE. Mathew and Jane died at four months; Richard at five years. MARTHA, the ninth child, was also five years old when she died in April 1836. Before her death, JOHN was born in 1833 and ALICE in 1835. The last child was RICHARD MATHEW born in June 1840. My great-grandmother would have been forty-four years old when her last child was born. This last child was my great-uncle Dick and I knew him because he lived near us when I was a child. My own grandfather was fourteen years older and I remember him only a little. I was very young when he died. I knew the others not at all. Since these twelve children were born in several different places, in at least two maybe three different shires, the parents must have moved about considerably during the first eighteen years of their marriage. Richard worked in the lace mills of Nottingham for a few years but as his boys grew older he returned to Lincolnshire where he was employed as a farmer (one account says a gardener) and gamekeeper for a wealthy English Lord, brother to Sir Robert Peal of the English Parliament. This gave the children a better chance for a little schooling, which was hard to obtain at that time. With a big family and moving often, great-grandmother’s life must not have been easy. There was much sadness in many of those years because she lost six of her twelve children between May 1828 and April 1836. Her first three children grew up and came to Utah, as did her last three, but the six in the middle died very young. Jane was a refined and good woman who loved things in life that would make her a better person. Her son, Joseph, my grandfather, had a dream in which he saw a message come from across the sea. He was so impressed he told his father about it. He knew in his dream the place to which the message would come, so he went to see what it was all about. There he found a Mormon Elder preaching the Gospel. He reported to his father and the family went to hear the Mormons preach. They all believed and the entire family joined the Church within a period of a little over a year. Then they helped the missionaries in their preaching though there was bitter opposition in various forms. Elder Joseph E. Taylor baptized all of the Richard Carlisle family, Richard on July 30, 1849 and Jane, August 11, 1849 (78 years later I, her great-granddaughter would be married on that date.) William L. Cutler and Charles Wharton assisted with the confirmations. A branch of the Church was organized and Jane’s husband became presiding Elder. The Carlisle family kept an open house for the Elders. Jane was a good cook and always made them welcome. But the family’s hope was to immigrate to Zion, so they began saving their money to do so. Jane’s oldest daughter, Mary, had been working as a cook for a fine non-Mormon lady who liked Mary very much. Not long after Mary joined the Church this lady died and in her will left Mary a year’s wages in advance. Mary had also saved a year’s money for her trousseau, but when she joined the church, her fiancé deserted her. So it was Mary’s money that made it possible for her family to immigrate to Zion as early as 1851. The oldest son, Thomas did not leave with the family then but joined them a year later in St. Louis, Missouri. Jane must have been sad at saying good-bye to her home, family and friends but at least her husband and five of her living children were with her and the other was to follow. The Millennial Star lists the family as Richard Carlisle, age 52; Jenny (his wife), age 55; Joseph, a son, 24; John, a son, 17; Mary a daughter, age 26; Alice, a daughter, age 14; and Richard, a son, age 10. They sailed on the ship ELLEN from Liverpool. The account of their voyage is in Richard’s history. Once in St. Louis, the Carlisle family was among those who stayed there. They found employment for a year while awaiting Thomas’ arrival. There was an outbreak of cholera and being kind and helpful, Jane did a washing for a friend who was ill. She returned home that night, took sick and died June 24, 1851, age 55 years. They had been in St Louis three months. Richard and the children were grief-stricken at their loss but they stayed on, working until the next summer, when Thomas joined them. Jane would have been glad to know that all the family arrived safely in Utah, coming in various companies from June to September of 1852; and in two companies arriving in September 1853. Her daughter married John James and her son Joseph married Isabella Sharp in St Louis before they left for Utah. Jane would have been glad to know that through her son, Richard, Jr., her husband met a good woman who had lost her husband of cholera in Council Bluffs. She was Maria Dunsdon who consented to be Richard’s wife but wanted to be sealed to her first husband. He admired her for her loyalty to her dead husband. In 1869 they went through the Endowment House and were sealed to their companions. Richard and Maria had no children from their marriage. Jane must be happy that all twelve children are sealed to her and Richard, that she now has numerous descendants who wish they knew more about her, but are proud of the kind of woman she was and who are grateful for the heritage she has given them. Graves Along the Trail written by Maurine Carlisle Nielsen, April 1976 (She descended through Jane and Richard’s 3rd son Joseph. Our family came through their 10th son, John)

Richard Carlisle – Life Sketch of Great Great Grandfather

Contributor: domcia77 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

Writer unknown Richard Carlisle was born in the town of Riseholm Lincolnshire, England, April 30, 1798 or goodly parents. There was a case of love at first sight. Jan being eleven years older made it rather difficult for them to marry just at the time of his proposal, so he asked her if she would wait five years for him; she said, “Why certainly I’ll wait and not only five Richard but ten if you wish it.” To them were born eleven children, several boys and four girls. Among this group are one pair of twins and a pair of triplets. The twins lived by a very short time. The triplets all lived until they were five years old when two died, the other living until he was eleven years. Triplets being something unusual, they received many beautiful presents. The Queen of England sent them quite an amount of money. The names of the children are: Thomas Fields, Mary, Joseph, Jane, Martha, Benjamin, Mathew, Richard, John, Richard, Alice. Great grandfather worked in the lace mills of Nottingham for a few years, but as his boys grew older he could see that was no fit place for them. Returning to Lincolnshire, he was employed as farmer and gamekeeper for a very wealthy English Lord, brother to Sir Robert Peal, of the English Parliament. This gave him a much better chance to give the children a little schooling. This was a great advantage as schooling was very hard to get at that time. Great Grandfather and Great Grandmother were very refined and noble characters, and when in 1849 they heard the Gospel preached by Joseph E. Taylor, they obeyed it and were baptized by him in 1850. A branch of the church was organized and he was appointed Presiding Elder, and kept an open house for the elders to come. Their main object now was to save up their money to come to Zion and with the help of their daughter Mary who had saved her money for two years they were able to bring their family with them. They sailed for America in 1852 on the good ship Ellen. When coming thru the English Channel their ship was struck by another vessel causing them to wait for a time to have it repaired. The journey across the ocean in a sailing vessel was made in thirteen weeks. On reaching New Orleans, there was an epidemic of Cholera raging. On reaching St. Louis his wife was stricken with it and died in a very short time. He with most of his family started their long journey of 2,000 miles across the plains with ox teams, reaching Salt Lake in the fall of 1852. He first settled in Mill Creek or Cottonwood, as it was then called. A short time after, his son Richard M. in visiting in the ward, met Mrs. Maria Crook Dunsdon, widow of Thomas Dunsdon, whose husband had also died of Cholera at Council Bluffs while immigrating to Zion. On returning home, Richard Jr. told his father he believed she would make him a good wife. Great grandfather immediately went to see her., They talked things over, and he proposed to her. She wished a little time saying she would go to Salt Lake and get the advice of Brigham Young. Later Maria Dunsdon consented to be his wife, but told him she wanted to be sealed to her husband, Thomas Dunsdon. Great grandfather said he admired her much more for being loyal to her dead husband. In 1869 they went thru the Endowment House and had their endowments and the sealing done for their dead companions. Maria proved to be a very loyal, true wife to him. They later had Temple work done for quite a number of their dead on both sides. A few years later they moved to Alpine where they lived the remainder of their lives. Great grandfather was stricken with rheumatism and brights disease causing him to be a great sufferer for many years. He held many important positions in the church. He was a great Bible reader being of very studious nature, and though not being able to work he was always pleasant and happy, and passed many pleasant hours in conversing with his friends who were so very kind and thoughtful of him, calling on him at his home. Before being crippled so badly he took great comfort in gardening. He would make leather pads for his knees and go on his knees to free his garden of weeds, but finally had to give up his work entirely. He died April 10, 1879, in Alpine, being 81 years old when he died. May his beautiful life be a beacon light for all his children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren to follow. Found in my Grandmother Verland Beck's genealogy Submitted by Yvonne Williams

Richard Carlisle

Contributor: domcia77 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

Richard Carlisle was born in the town of Riseholm Lincolnshire England, April 30th 1798 of goodly parents. In 1819 he was married to Jane Fields, also of Lincolnshire, England. He was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Taylor Carlisle Jr. Thomas Jr., was born in Millinham, Linc., Eng., 19 November 1754, and Elizabeth Taylor at Messingham, Lincs., Eng., on 10 November 1759. His paternal grandparents were Thomas Sr., and Mary Hollingworth Carlisle. Riseholm, a St. Mary’s parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, Union, and County of Lincolnshire. It is two and one half miles North by East, from Lincoln; containing with the extra-parochial district of Grainge de Ligne, 52 inhabitants. How he spent his early life is not known, nor do we know how he and Jane Fields chanced to meet, but we do know that theirs was a case of love at first sight. Jane being older made it rather difficult for them to marry just at the time of his proposal so he asked her if she would wait five years for him. She said “Why certainly. I’ll wait, and not only five, Richard, but ten if you wish it.” They were married 22 June 1822, at Willingham, when he was 24 years old and she was 27. Jane was the daughter of Matthew Fields and Dinah Fish and was born at Millingham, Lincs., England. To them were born eleven children, seven boys and four girls. Among this group are one pair of triplets. The triplets all lived until they were five years old when two died, the other living until he was eleven years. Triplets being something unusual they received many beautiful presents. The queen of England sent them quite an amount of money. The names of the children are: Thomas Fields born 10 Apr. 1823 Mary born 10 September 1825 Joseph born 21 July 1826 Benjamin born 10 May 1827 Mathew, Richard, and Jane (triplets) born 3 June 1829 Martha born 16 March 1831 John born 9 February 1833 Alice born 9 Oct 1835 Richard Matthew born 21 June 1840 This was a large family to support and care for, but 5 of them were called back as infants or young children. Benjamin was only a few months old when he died. Two of the triplets, Matthew and Jane died at 4 months old and Richard died at 5 years old. Martha was also five years old. This was indeed a great sorrow to them, but they were certainly grateful for the six left in their care. Richard worked in the lace mills of Nottingham for a few years, but as his boys grew older, he could see that was no fit place for them. Returning to Lincolnshire he was employed as farmer and gamekeeper for a very wealthy English Lord, brother to Sir Robert Peal, of the English Parliament. This gave him a much better chance to give the children a little schooling. This was a great advantage, as schooling was hard to get at that time. He and Jane were very refined and noble characters, and when in 1849 they heard the Gospel preached by Joseph E. Taylor, they found a plan of life which they had been looking for. They readily accepted the truth and were were baptized, Richard the 30 July and she the 11 August 1849. Their son Thomas was baptized the 30 July 1849, with his father. Joseph, 16 September 1849, John 5 November 1849, Alice 16 November 1849, and Mary, who was perhaps away to work when the others were baptized, was baptized December 1856. Richard was baptized in the church, but don't have any date. A branch of the church was organized and he was appointed Presiding Elder, and kept an open house for the elders who came that way. Since joining the church, they had a great desire to immigrate to Zion in America and started to save for that purpose. Their main object now was to save up their money to come to Zion. This opportunity came much sooner than they had ever hoped for. Their daughter Mary had saved her money for two years they were soon to start.Mary had been working as a cook for a ladyt not of their faith, but a very fine woman, who thought a great deal of Mary. Not long after Mary joined the church, this lady died and in her will she left Mary a years wages in advance. They Mary, who had been planning to get married, had saved a year's wages, but when she joined the church, he deserted her. She now felt that this was the most important step to take to help her parents get the family to America. They sailed for American in 1852 on the good ship Ellen which sailed from Liverpool Monday, 6 January 1851, with J.W. Cummings as leader, and with 466 souls aboard. All the children came but Thomas Fields, the oldest son who must have come later. This trip was a long and eventful one. The ship remained anchored for two days in the river opposite Liverpool awaiting favorable winds. Then on Wednesday, it sailed for about 12 hours at the rate of 7 miles and hour and then at 11 p.m. it struck another schooner during a grog and was compelled to stop for repairs at Cardigan Bay, Wales. In a few days the ship was ready to sail, but the very day it was to start, the winds changed to unfavorable and they were held in port for 3 weeks. Even though this seemed long, they were very grateful they were not out at sea and have been shipwrecked as so many were, losing their lives. The captain became very impatient and finally started out again on 23 January 1851 but the winds were blowing the wrong direction, and so the progress was very slow. On 1 February the winds changed and they enjoyed pleasant weather and fair winds the rest of the journey. They anchored in the Miss. River off New Orleans, making the voyage from Cargigan Bay (which is a 12 hour sail from Liverpool) in about 8 weeks, (57 days). The measles broke out among the immigrants the day they left the docks and nearly every child on board had them as well as some of the adults. Measles at best, at home with modern conveniences are bad, and so it must have been terrible out on that sailing vessel, that depended on favorable winds to reach their destination, and also while fighting sea sickness. When they left the port, the presidency, James W. Cummings, Crandall Dunard, and Wm. Mose, divided the company into 12 divisions or wards, allotting 12 births to each division and appointed a president over each. Then those 12 divisions were divided in two and a pres. appointed in the steerage with a president over the whole steerage. The second class cabin was organized in like manner. The Priesthood was also organized. A pres. was appointed over them to see that they attended their duties. This was a great help in preserving peace and good will and help and comfort to the saints. During the voyage, six marriages were solemnized and one birth took place. On reaching New Orleans, there was an epidemic of cholera which was raging. They rode the steamer, "Alexander Scott," to St. Louis, paying $2.50 a piece for adults and half fare for children and all luggage was included. They left New Orleans on the morning of March 19, 1851, and landed in St. Louis 25 March after a good trip. While in St. Louis, his wife Jane died. She did a washing for a friend who had Cholera and came home that night, took sick and died, leaving the family without a mother. This was a great sorrow to the family and such a shock to Richard who loved her so dearly. They had made such plans together, when they should reach Utah with the rest of the saints there, and now he must face the journey without her to help with the rest of the family. He with most of his family started their long journey of 2,000 miles across the plains with ox teams reaching Salt Lake in the fall of 1852. Richard first settled in the Mill Creek in Cottonwood as it was then called. A short time after, his son, Richard, in visiting in the ward, met Mrs. Maria Crook Dunsdon, widow of Thomas Dunsdon, whose husband had also died of cholera at Council Bluffs while immigrating to Zion. On returning home, Richard Jr., told his father he believed she would make him a good wife. Richard immediately went to see her. They talked things over and he proposed to her. She wished a little time saying she would go to Salt Lake and get the advice of Brigham Young. Later Maria Dunsdon consented to be his wife, but told him she wanted to be sealed to her husband, Thomas Dunsdon. He said he admired her much more for being loyal to her dead husband. In 1869, they went through the Endowment House and had their endowments and the sealings done for their dead companions. They continued to do temple work for their kindred dead on both sides. Maria proved to be a very loyal, true wife to him and the children loved her dearly. She was a very good mid wife and spent many hours caring for the sick. A few years later they moved to Alpine where they lived the remainder of their lives. This was a small community surrounded by high mountains on the North and East and low foothills on the west. This town was know as Mountainville when it was first settled in 1850 and was six miles north of American Fork in Utah County. It was a beautiful place, and on a clear day one could see the beautiful Utah Lake eight miles to the south of them. Richard was stricken with rheumatism and Bright's Disease causing him to be a great sufferer for many years. He held many important positions in the Church. He was a great Bible reader being of a very studious nature, and though not being able to work, he was always pleasant and happy and passed many pleasant hours in conversing with his friends who were so very kind and thoughtful of him, calling on him at his home. Before being crippled so badly, he took great comfort in gardening. He would make leather pads for his knees and go on him knees to free his garden of weeds, but finally had to give up his work entirely. Richard held many important Positions in the church. He was a great Bible reader, not being able to work, he was always pleasant and happy, and passed many pleasant hours in conversing with his friends, who were so very kind and thoughtful of him, calling on him at his home. Richard Carlisle was a wonderful man and loved by all who knew him. Men with characters like Richard Carlisle will never be forgotten, for they have left landmarks along the streams of time that cannot be hidden. He told his granddaughter Martha, who lived with him, for some time, taking care of him while his wife Maria went out nursing, that he did not want any costly monument, for a good honest life was what he wanted to be remembered by. He died 10 April 1879 in Alpine at the age of 81. He had gone to join his Jane once again. May his beautiful life be a beacon light for all of his children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren to follow. He was survived by widow, Marie, and the following children: Thomas Fields, Mary Carlisle (Healey), Joseph, John, and Richard Matthew. His daughter Alice Wilkin Freestone, preceded him in death in 1868. Thomas Fields married Fanny Hocquad, Mary Married John James and later James Healey; Joseph married Isabells Sharp and Sarah Ann Lord, John married Elizabeth Hocquard, Alice married David Wilkin and George Freestone. Richard Matthew married Mary Hannah Wright. Written by great granddaughter Verland Beck Contributed by her granddaughter Yvonne Williams

Life timeline of Richard Carlisle

Richard Carlisle was born in 1798
Richard Carlisle was 6 years old when Napoleon Bonaparte is proclaimed Emperor of the French by the French Senate. Napoléon Bonaparte was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars. He was Emperor of the French from 1804 until 1814 and again briefly in 1815 during the Hundred Days. Napoleon dominated European and global affairs for more than a decade while leading France against a series of coalitions in the Napoleonic Wars. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, building a large empire that ruled over continental Europe before its final collapse in 1815. He is considered one of the greatest commanders in history, and his wars and campaigns are studied at military schools worldwide. Napoleon's political and cultural legacy has endured as one of the most celebrated and controversial leaders in human history.
Richard Carlisle was 21 years old when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founds Singapore. Sir Thomas Stamford Bingley Raffles, FRS was a British statesman, Lieutenant-Governor of British Java (1811–1815) and Governor-General of Bencoolen (1817–1822), best known for his founding of Singapore and the British Malaya.
Richard Carlisle was 27 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Richard Carlisle was 33 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Richard Carlisle was 42 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Richard Carlisle was 61 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Richard Carlisle was 71 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Richard Carlisle died in 1879 at the age of 81
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Richard Carlisle (1798 - 1879), BillionGraves Record 2225 Alpine, Utah, Utah, United States

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