Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman)

5 Dec 1852 - 14 Jul 1894

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Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman)

5 Dec 1852 - 14 Jul 1894
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Grave site information of Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman) (5 Dec 1852 - 14 Jul 1894) at Pioneer Memorial Cemetery in American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

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Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman)

Born:
Died:

Pioneer Memorial Cemetery

320 N 100 E
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States
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finnsh

May 31, 2011
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P Goodwin

April 7, 2020
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Jennifer

April 15, 2020
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Ndbarrett

May 30, 2011

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Phoebe Adelaide Chipman Christensen

Contributor: Celique Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

Phoebe Adelaide Chipman was a daughter of Stephen and Phoebe (Davis) Chipman; Utah pioneers. She was born at Millcreek, Utah, December 5, 1852, where her father had built and operated the first flour mill there. While a small baby, her parents moved to American Fork, the town her father founded. Her father, Stephen, died in 1868 when she was just 15. Then four years later, her mother passed away. Phoebe was the eldest of seven children and played the role of mother. Her youngest sister, Bertha, was four and had been born just months after their father's death. Niels and Phoebe Chipman Christensen Three months after Phoebe's mother's death, Phoebe married Niels Christensen in the Endowment House and he helped to raise her little brother and sisters. In time they had seven fine, strong children of her own. Phoebe was a beautiful woman, deeply spiritual, and gifted in the art of making an ideal home. She was a wise and loving mother and a devoted wife. Through her efforts, she was instrumental in organizing “woman suffrage” in American Fork. “On October 2, 1890, tragedy struck [Phoebe and Niels’ family] suddenly. Their daughter, Phoebe Helen, a charming, dark-haired beauty of sixteen, died. The sorrow of the family was intense. [Helen, as she was called, was the oldest child. Bernard came next in the family.] Much of Bernard’s grieving at the loss of his sweet sister was dispelled because of a marvelously realistic dream he had the following night. In that dream, he stood with Helen at the foot of the bed where her body lay and once more, as a big sister would, she told him they would meet again and it would not seem long. That certainty never died out of Bernard’s life. Interesting, is it not, that this sweet spirit of assurance was given on the night of October 3, the fourteenth anniversary of Bernard’s birth? “[Phoebe] . . . remained unconsoled over her namesake daughter’s death. Despite the [fact that the family was in an] extraordinarily diffi[#$@^!]lt financial situation, Phoebe made a trip to Manti, Utah where, on October 21, 189l, she did Phoebe Helen’s temple work. Perhaps within those sacred walls a sense of peace came.” During the summer of 1893, Niels had several financial setbacks and Phoebe [40 years of age] was not well. “[The following summer] July 14, 1894, was a warm summer afternoon. Bernard was riding his little black mare. He was starting for Utah Lake to go for a swim when he met his mother coming out of a neighbor’s gate. She greeted him with a smile and, with the usual caution to be careful, turned and went up the street. Bernard watched her go. He had a strong urge to go with her, but turned his horse south and went for the swim. Upon his return he found a crowd of people in front of the family home. Bernard’s mother was dying. She had stood with the choir to sing the closing hymn at a funeral and had fallen unconscious, probably the result of a massive cere[#$@^!]l hemorrhage. “Among those gathered in the room where Phoebe lay was a Mrs. Tilleck, a convert to the Church from Australia. After Phoebe died and the crowd had disbursed, Mrs. Tilleck said quietly to the family, ‘Just before your mother died, I saw a short, dark-complexioned, very beautiful woman come in he door. She crossed the room and held her arms out over the bed. I saw Phoebe’s spirit rise out of her body and they left the room arm in arm.‘ There were many questions asked of Mrs. Tilleck about this remarkable woman she had never before seen, but Niel knew from the clear description which had been given that she was his mother-in-law.” Phoebe’s early death kept her from accomplishing some of the fine and helpful things she was capable of doing. “Adversity had come again to the Christensen family. Yet its refining hand molded in them a deep loyalty and love for each other. Bernard [at 17] now felt that his duty was at home. Someone had remarked that the Christensen children were such a handsome lot and so full of life, that with an easygoing father they would all go to the bad. In Bernard’s soul there burned a fighting resolve that they would not, and that intense resolve never diminished in his life. [Bernard had the greatest respect for his father, but said in later years that his father did not recognize the hazards which young people then faced.] When their mother died, John, Homer and Marie were all younger than twelve years of age. Mable was but thirteen. Edith, who assumed the burden of the housework, was only fifteen.” Knowing more of the history of Niels and Phoebe Christensen’s family life makes it easier to understand Bernard’s decisions, especially the one he made two or three years later to delay his mission. Yet he was true to himself and his resolve and when the time was right, he left his sweetheart, Maud Rosalie Driggs behind and served a mission to New Zealand. All quoted material is from the book, The Christensen Family of Soro, Denmark and American Fork, Utah, USA, by Allen C. Christensen, 1994, pp. 45-58.

Information on the life of Phoebe Davis

Contributor: Celique Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

"Phoebe Davis was a convert from England who migrated to New Orleans with her parents arriving there in April 1849. They joined with the other saints at Council Bluffs in June for the march toward the Rocky Mountains under the direction of Orson Spencer. The family located at Millcreek, where Phoebe met Stephen Chipman. She died, a widow, in her 44th year leaving four young children in the care of her oldest daughter, Phoebe Adelade, who married Niels Christensen three months later." "Stephen Chipman Pioneer," by Dean Whitaker Chipman, p. 15.

Phoebe Adelaide Chipman Christensen (1852-1894)

Contributor: Celique Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

“Phoebe Adelaide Chipman was the first child of Stephen and Phoebe Davies (Davis) Chipman.  She was born at Millcreek, Utah, December 5, 1852, where her father had built and operated the first flour mill.  While a small baby, her parents moved to American Fork, the town her father founded.  Stephen was well-to-do for pioneer times. He had married Phoebe Davies when he was forty-six and Phoebe Davies was twenty-three. His business interests and travel made it necessary for him to hire help. In 1861 he hired Niels Christensen “whose mild manners and willingness to work won Stephen’s confidence. . . .[Soon he was] “entrusted with greater responsibility for important ranch affairs.” Allen C. Christensen, The Christensen Family of Soro, Denmark and American Fork, Utah, USA, p. 18 (1994) Stephen died in February of 1868 when Phoebe Adelaide was just fifteen.   Following her father’s death, young Phoebe took on a more important role in her family, especially when her mother “suffered a long illness from a malady called milk leg.” Phoebe “was a very beautiful young woman and had several suitors.” Though Niels continued to work at times nearby, it was her mother who could see beyond Niels’ shyness and understood his latent strengths. Niels was eight years older than Phoebe. Ibid. pp. 24-25. Four years after her father passed away, her mother realized that her own days were numbered. She said to her namesake daughter, “I want you to marry Niels. He will be good to the children.” Ibid. p. 25 When her mother died in November of 1872, Phoebe took on the role of mother. She turned twenty the following month. Her youngest sister, Bertha, was four and had been born just months after their father's death. Phoebe married Niels Christensen 10 February 1873 in the Endowment House and he helped to raise her younger brother and sisters.  Ibid. p. 25. In time they had seven fine, strong children of their own--Phoebe Helen, Bernard Niels, Edith, Mable Elizabeth, John Stephen, Homer Paul and Olive Marie.  She loved music and “wanted her children to have a musical instrument in their home.” She bought a treadle organ for one-hundred dollars. To understand her sacrifice, she made and sold butter and gathered eggs to pay for it. “If one assumes that half of Phoebe’s sales were butter and half were eggs, she would have had to mold 1000 pounds of butter and to gather, clean and package 12,000 eggs in addition to her other responsibilities to have the funds needed to make the purchase.” Ibid. p. 150. Through her efforts, she was instrumental in organizing “woman suffrage” in American Fork. “On October 2, 1890, tragedy struck [Phoebe and Niels’ family] suddenly. Their daughter, Phoebe Helen, a charming, dark-haired beauty of sixteen, died. The sorrow of the family was intense. Helen [as she was called] was close to Bernard. Yet “much of Bernard’s grieving at the loss of his sweet sister was dispelled because of a marvelously realistic dream he had the following night. In that dream, he stood with Helen at the foot of the bed where her body lay and once more, as a big sister would, she told him they would meet again and it would not seem long. That certainty never died out of Bernard’s life. Interesting, is it not, that this sweet spirit of assurance was given on the night of October 3, the fourteenth anniversary of Bernard’s birth?” Ibid. p. 56. Phoebe Adelaide “remained unconsoled over her namesake daughter’s death. Despite the [fact that the family was in an] extraordinarily difficult financial situation, Phoebe made a trip to Manti, Utah where, on October 21, 189l, she did Phoebe Helen’s temple work. Perhaps within those sacred walls a sense of peace came.” Ibid. p. 56. During the summer of 1893, Niels had several financial setbacks and Phoebe [40 years of age] was not well. “She continued to brood over the death of her oldest daughter. Their financial struggle was not only a worry, but her pride was hurt as well. Her father had been well-to-do and it would appear that her family’s economic condition was far more difficult than the experience of many others, even for those financially difficult times. . . . “[The following summer] on a warm afternoon in July, Bernard got his little black mare [and started] for Utah Lake to go for a swim when he met his mother coming out of a neighbor’s gate. She greeted him with a smile and, with the usual caution to be careful, turned and went up the street. Bernard watched her go. He had a strong urge to go with her, but turned his horse south and went for the swim. Upon his return he found a crowd of people in front of the family home. Bernard’s mother was dying. She had stood with the choir to sing the closing hymn at a funeral and had fallen unconscious, probably the result of a massive cerebral hemorrhage. “Among those gathered in the room where Phoebe lay was a Mrs. Tilleck, a convert to the Church from Australia. After Phoebe died and the crowd had disbursed, Mrs. Tilleck said quietly to the family, ‘Just before your mother died, I saw a short, dark-complexioned, very beautiful woman come in the door. She crossed the room and held her arms out over the bed. I saw Phoebe’s spirit rise out of her body and they left the room arm in arm.’ There were many questions asked of Mrs. Tilleck about this remarkable woman she had never before seen, but Niels knew from the clear description which had been given that she was his mother-in-law.” Ibid. pp. 57-58 Phoebe’s early death kept her from accomplishing some of the fine and helpful things she was capable of doing. “Adversity had come again to the Christensen family. Yet its refining hand molded in them a deep loyalty and love for each other. Bernard [at seventeen] now felt that his duty was at home. Someone had remarked that the Christensen children were such a handsome lot and so full of life, that with an easygoing father they would all go to the bad. In Bernard’s soul there burned a fighting resolve that they would not, and that intense resolve never diminished in his life. [Bernard had the greatest respect for his father, but said in later years that his father did not recognize the hazards which young people then faced.] When their mother died, John, Homer and Marie were all younger than twelve years of age. Mable was but thirteen. Edith, who assumed the burden of the housework, was only fifteen.” Ibid. p. 58. With such sadness the Christensen family carried on. Bernard in particular was determined to get a job and against great odds succeeded. (See Bernard’s history.) Ibid. pp. 59-60. Somewhere in the difficult years that followed Phoebe’s death, a sacred and rarely mentioned experience came to Niels. Bernard “was out with a crowd of people whose conduct was not acceptable by either family or Church standards. When he returned home his usually mild-mannered father, Niels, demanded to know where he had been. When he said to a party, Niels sternly asked, ‘What was going on there?‘ When Bernard said that beer had been served, his father announced with unwavering finality, ‘Well, you are not ever again going out with those folks!‘ When Bernard asked, somewhat resistantly, ‘Why?‘ Niels said, ‘Because your mother was here.‘ Bernard asked, ‘Did you see her?‘ ‘No,‘ his father replied, ‘But she called for you by name at the at door, and again outside the living room window, and you are not going out with that crowd ever again?‘ The resoluteness of his father’s instruction, coupled with the gentle reprimand of the Spirit, were sufficient persuasion for Bernard. Whatever had been his minor mistake upon that occasion, it never was repeated in his life.” Ibid. p. 60. There is a description of Phoebe Adelaide Chipman Christensen that bears repeating: "[Phoebe] was a beautiful woman, deeply spiritual and gifted in the art of making an ideal home.  She was a wise and loving mother and a devoted wife."  from Stephen Chipman Pioneer 1805-1868 p.465 On a personal note ~ I was young the first time I remember hearing Dad [Paul D. Christensen] recount the story of Phoebe Adelaide’s death with her “angel” mother coming to take her. Even so, I knew immediately that I had learned a piece of the “great plan”. Mother and Dad’s Carole had angels come for her. Looking back over the years, knowing that the “other side” is real and filled with people who love us and are aware of our comings and goings has been a bulwark of my faith and testimony. Love you my Grandmother Phoebe Adelaide. (Karen) Sources: Allen C. Christensen, The Christensen Family of Soro, Denmark and American Fork, Utah, USA, (1994) Stephen Chipman Pioneer 1805-1868 p.465. Copyright held by Dean W. Chipman.

Paul (Poul) Christensen (1843 - 1914)

Contributor: Celique Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

Poul Christensen was born at Nykobbel, Soro, Denmark on 22 August 1843, the first son of Peder Christensen and Ellen Andersen. He would live the first twelve years of his life on the forested land that had been a part of his family’s heritage for three generations. A year later a son Niels joined the family. His father Peder was a large man who took care of the forest and the small farm that was part of the acreage. Just before Christmas when Poul was only four, his father was kicked in the groin by a cow and died a few days later. That left his mother Ellen with two small sons and the responsibility of remarrying in order to keep the forest stewardship. Ellen married Hans Christensen who was nine years younger. He was the father Poul would remember. Poul enjoyed school and years later would remember a weekly trip to the nearest town to buy bread. Both Poul and Niels each carried home two five-pound loaves which “made walking no easy task.” Allen C. Christensen, The Christensens of Soro, Denmark and American Fork, Utah, USA p. 1-2 (1994) When the Christensens joined the church in 1856, Poul’s life would be forever changed. With his family he left Denmark, sailed from England to American and crossed the plains as a handcart pioneer. [The last hundred miles of the ninety-three day journey,] “Poul took sick and nearly died. . . .For three days his mother and another woman half led, half carried him--there was no stopping. He was never strong enough to pull the handcart again.” Ibid. p. 14. In the fall of 1858 the family lived for a time with another family in Salt Lake City. Poul and Niels “had but a month in school, their only formal education in America. During this period they adopted the American custom of using their father’s surname as their own. That is why today we are the Christensens rather than the Pedersens. At this same time, Poul began spelling his name Paul. Paul soon learned to speak English without any Danish accent.” Ibid. p. 15. In the spring of 1839, the Christensen family moved back to Utah Valley [and settled in American Fork]. They ran the farm of Edward Hunter on shares. “The farm was in sagebrush. When they began to break the land out of the sagebrush, they discovered that the oxen which had been pastured out all winter were too weak to pull the big sages; Hans, Niels and Paul had to dig them up with a grubbing hoe before the soil could be plowed. They planted grain, but before harvest time their food supplies had been exhausted. While Niels was herding cattle one day he was approached by an Indian who asked for food. When the boy replied that he had none the Indian said, “me get some.” The Indian then cut a tall thistle, stripped the bark and began to chew saying that it was good. Niels also tried one. It was bitter and not at all to his liking. Later, however, necessity cultivated a taste of thistles and they often helped satisfy his hunger. . . .” “The Hunter farm’s virgin soil responded to hard work and frugal husbandry. The Christensens soon began to see more prosperous times. Niels and Paul cut native hay with a scythe which they then hauled to Johnston’s Army. . . .some twenty miles west. . .to feed the horses and mules at Camp Floyd.” Ibid. p. 16. In 1861, Niels began working some for Stephen Chipman and at other times was away from home as a teamster or driver because “he had a reputation as a good and gentle hand with animals. . . .During the years Niels was away, Paul remained at home where he carried the load of hard work that came with pioneer life. If there were complaints about the difficulties of those demanding times they were not shared. At least there is no record that suggests that Paul and Niels Christensen ever indulged themselves in the unprofitable exercise of muttering.” Ibid. p. 22. “Hans [Christensen] wanted children of his own and in 1863 he married Maren Jorgensen in plural marriage. She was also a Danish immigrant. . . .Into the one-room log house came the new wife” and eventually two children before “the Christensens built two log houses on land they now owned.” Ibid. p. 19, 23. The year 1873 brought two memorable changes. Niels married Phoebe Adelaide Chipman and Hans built a large home. “Hans, who was [acquainted with European home construction methods], decided to build a house which would be adequate for his wives, their children and grandchildren. The house must be strong enough to last to the millennium. Into the house went the savings and labor of Hans, Ellen and her two strong sons. The walls below ground were three feet thick. They were made of quarried quartzite set in lime mortar. Niels and Paul hauled much of this rock from the mountain west of Utah Lake.” Ibid. p. 45. By the time the house was finished “Ellen and Paul lived alone in the south half of the house. Hans and Maren and their seven children lived in the north half.” Ibid. p. 46. Though the house was built to last, Hans only lived in it for seven years. In 1880 while “picking gooseberries one hot summer day, [he] was overcome with the heat and died the same day.” [Paul’s mother Ellen, who was now seventy,] “was left with the responsibility of managing all of Hans’ affairs. . . .and Maren was to live only another five years.” Ibid. p. 47. “When Hans Christensen died he left a family of seven children ranging in age from fifteen years to six months. Paul Christensen was their stepbrother. Now thirty-seven years old, he did much to help provide for them. . . . “About this time, Paul was chopping wood behind the house. An unfortunate stroke of the axe brought a stick up into his left eye. Paul rushed to Phoebe, his sister-in-law, with his eyeball hanging out upon his cheek. She nearly fainted. The doctors knew comparatively little in those days [and Paul was unable to see in that eye again. . . . “Paul never married. . . .[He] took special pride in his appearance. This sense of self-esteem extended to many things that he owned. Although his brother, Niels, kept excellent horses which were well-groomed, Paul’s were usually better groomed. He would brush their manes and tails until they fairly shone. To him, an unkempt horse was a disgrace. . . .Twenty-five years after his death, his nephew Bernard would remark to his son, Clare, ‘Let’s take a little better care of the horses for the sake of Uncle Paul.’ When Paul went to church he looked like a Southern gentleman. His boots were shined, his clothes were clean and neat, and his beard was carefully trimmed.” Ibid. pp. 52-53. “In the fall of 1896. . . .Paul’s mother Ellen was nearly eighty-six. Her long life had been one of toil and hardship. Yet her soul was sweet and filled with love. She had been widowed a second time for over sixteen years. She now lived alone with Paul. . .in the big brick house. Niels was especially concerned one November evening about the health of his mother, and felt he should stay there with her. Ellen told her younger son that she was all right. Paul was there to look after her and she wanted Niels to go home and take care of his own family. She said to Niels, ‘You go home and if I am not here in the morning, it will be all right.” Paul kept the vigil. During the night his mother smiled at him and said, ‘Goodbye Paul, I’m going.’” Ibid. p. 59. “Paul and Niels had always worked together in perfect harmony even though they farmed separately. One was never too busy to help the other when the need arose. As Niels’ sons grew into manhood there was no lessening of that harmonious relationship. There was, in fact, a special bond between Paul and Homer Paul. Though Homer would sometimes tease his bachelor uncle unmercifully regarding supposed, albeit hypothetical romantic interests, Paul took a special pride in his namesake nephew who had grown into a towering man and a tireless worker. Paul was generous and perhaps a little indulgent where his nephews were concerned. . . .” Ibid. p. 100. “As his strength began to wane Paul gave up farming on his own. He sold his land to his nephew, Bernard, on a payment basis. . . .When Paul’s health failed he went to live with Niels. His mortal pilgrimage, begun in faraway Denmark, over seventy years earlier, ended quietly 9 January 1914 with his brother at his side. It must have been a terribly lonely moment for Niels. Their kinship had been remarkably close, even for brothers. Paul was buried in the American Fork Cemetery in the Hans Christensen plot, near the grave of his mother. Although he had never married or had children of his own, his name lives on in the family. Ibid. p. 124. Source: Allen C. Christensen, The Christensen Family of Soro, Denmark and American Fork, Utah, USA (1994)

Chapter 3 – Phoebe Adelaide Chipman Christensen 1852-1894 from the book Carry On – Stories from the lives of our Christensen Ancestors by Karen Christensen Luthy

Contributor: Celique Created: 11 months ago Updated: 11 months ago

“Phoebe Adelaide Chipman was the first child of Stephen and Phoebe Davies (Davis) Chipman. She was born at Millcreek, Utah, December 5, 1852, where her father had built and operated the first flour mill. While a small baby, her parents moved to American Fork, the town her father founded. Stephen was well-to-do for pioneer times. He married Phoebe Davies when he was forty-six and Phoebe Davies was twenty-three. His business interests and travel made it necessary for him to hire help. In 1861 he hired Niels Christensen “whose mild manners and willingness to work won Stephen’s confidence. . . .[Soon he was] “entrusted with greater responsibility for important ranch affairs.” Allen C. Christensen, The Christensen Family of Soro, Denmark, and American Fork, Utah, USA, p. 18 (1994) Stephen died in February of 1868 when Phoebe Adelaide was just fifteen. Following her father’s death, young Phoebe took on a more important role in her family, especially when her mother “suffered a long illness from a malady called milk leg.” Phoebe “was a very beautiful young woman and had several suitors.” Though Niels continued to work at times nearby, it was her mother who could see beyond Niels’ shyness and understood his latent strengths. Niels was eight years older than Phoebe. Ibid. pp. 24-25. Four years after her father passed away, her mother realized that her own days were numbered. She said to her namesake daughter, “I want you to marry Niels. He will be good to the children.” Ibid. p. 25 When her mother died in November of 1872, Phoebe took on the role of mother. She turned twenty the following month. Her youngest sister, Bertha, was four and had been born just months after their father's death. Phoebe married Niels Christensen 10 February 1873 in the Endowment House and he helped to raise her younger brother and sisters. Ibid. p. 25. In time they had seven fine, strong children of their own--Phoebe Helen, Bernard Niels, Edith, Mable Elizabeth, John Stephen, Homer Paul and Olive Marie. Phoebe loved music and “wanted her children to have a musical instrument in their home.” She bought a treadle organ for one-hundred dollars. To understand her sacrifice, she made and sold butter and gathered eggs to pay for it. “If one assumes that half of Phoebe’s sales were butter and half were eggs, she would have had to mold 1000 pounds of butter and to gather, clean and package 12,000 eggs in addition to her other responsibilities to have the funds needed to make the purchase.” Ibid. p. 150. Through her efforts, she was instrumental in organizing “woman suffrage” in American Fork. “On October 2, 1890, tragedy struck [Phoebe and Niels’ family] suddenly. Their daughter, Phoebe Helen, a charming, dark-haired beauty of sixteen, died. The sorrow of the family was intense. Helen [as she was called] was close to Bernard. Yet “much of Bernard’s grieving at the loss of his sweet sister was dispelled because of a marvelously realistic dream he had the following night. In that dream, he stood with Helen at the foot of the bed where her body lay and once more, as a big sister would, she told him they would meet again and it would not seem long. That certainty never died out of Bernard’s life. Interesting, is it not, that this sweet spirit of assurance was given on the night of October 3, the fourteenth anniversary of Bernard’s birth?” Ibid. p. 56. Phoebe Adelaide “remained unconsoled over her namesake daughter’s death. Despite the [fact that the family was in an] extraordinarily difficult financial situation, Phoebe made a trip to Manti, Utah where, on October 21, 189l, she did Phoebe Helen’s temple work. Perhaps within those sacred walls a sense of peace came.” Ibid. p. 56. During the summer of 1893, Niels had several financial setbacks and Phoebe [40 years of age] was not well. “She continued to brood over the death of her oldest daughter. Their financial struggle was not only a worry, but her pride was hurt as well. Her father had been well-to-do and it would appear that her family’s economic condition was far more difficult than the experience of many others, even for those financially difficult times. . . . “[The following summer] on a warm afternoon in July, Bernard got his little black mare [and started] for Utah Lake to go for a swim when he met his mother coming out of a neighbor’s gate. She greeted him with a smile and, with the usual caution to be careful, turned and went up the street. Bernard watched her go. He had a strong urge to go with her, but turned his horse south and went for the swim. Upon his return he found a crowd of people in front of the family home. Bernard’s mother was dying. She had stood with the choir to sing the closing hymn at a funeral and had fallen unconscious, probably the result of a massive cerebral hemorrhage. “Among those gathered in the room where Phoebe lay was a Mrs. Tilleck, a convert to the Church from Australia. After Phoebe died and the crowd had disbursed, Mrs. Tilleck said quietly to the family, ‘Just before your mother died, I saw a short, dark-complexioned, very beautiful woman come in the door. She crossed the room and held her arms out over the bed. I saw Phoebe’s spirit rise out of her body and they left the room arm in arm.’ There were many questions asked of Mrs. Tilleck about this remarkable woman she had never before seen, but Niels knew from the clear description which had been given that she was his mother-in-law.” Ibid. pp. 57-58 Phoebe’s early death kept her from accomplishing some of the fine and helpful things she was capable of doing. “Adversity had come again to the Christensen family. Yet its refining hand molded in them a deep loyalty and love for each other. Bernard [at seventeen] now felt that his duty was at home. Someone had remarked that the Christensen children were such a handsome lot and so full of life, that with an easygoing father they would all go bad. In Bernard’s soul there burned a fighting resolve that they would not, and that intense resolve never diminished in his life. [Bernard had the greatest respect for his father, but said in later years that his father did not recognize the hazards which young people then faced.] When their mother died, John, Homer and Marie were all younger than twelve years of age. Mable was but thirteen. Edith, who assumed the burden of the housework, was only fifteen.” Ibid. p. 58. With such sadness the Christensen family carried on. Bernard in particular was determined to get a job and against great odds succeeded. (See Bernard’s history.) Ibid. pp. 59-60. Somewhere in the difficult years that followed Phoebe’s death, a sacred and rarely mentioned experience came to Niels. Bernard “was out with a crowd of people whose conduct was not acceptable by either family or Church standards. When he returned home his usually mild-mannered father, Niels, demanded to know where he had been. When he said to a party, Niels sternly asked, ‘What was going on there?’ When Bernard said that beer had been served, his father announced with unwavering finality, ‘Well, you are not ever again going out with those folks!’ When Bernard asked, somewhat resistantly, ‘Why?’ Niels said, ‘Because your mother was here.’ Bernard asked, ‘Did you see her?’ ‘No,’ his father replied, ‘But she called for you by name at the at door, and again outside the living room window, and you are not going out with that crowd ever again?’ The resoluteness of his father’s instruction, coupled with the gentle reprimand of the Spirit, were sufficient persuasion for Bernard. Whatever had been his minor mistake upon that occasion, it never was repeated in his life.” Ibid. p. 60. There is a description of Phoebe Adelaide Chipman Christensen that bears repeating: "[Phoebe] was a beautiful woman, deeply spiritual and gifted in the art of making an ideal home. She was a wise and loving mother and a devoted wife." On a personal note ~ I was young the first time I remember hearing Dad [Paul D. Christensen] recount the story of Phoebe Adelaide’s death with her “angel” mother coming to take her. Even so, I knew immediately that I had learned a piece of the “great plan”. Mother and Dad’s Carole had angels come for her. Looking back over the years, knowing that the “other side” is real and filled with people who love us and are aware of our comings and goings has been a bulwark of my faith and testimony. I love you, my Grandmother Phoebe Adelaide. (Karen) Sources: Allen C. Christensen, The Christensen Family of Soro, Denmark, and American Fork, Utah, USA, (1994) Stephen Chipman Pioneer 1805-1868 p.465. Copyright held by Dean W. Chipman.

Life timeline of Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman)

Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman) was born on 5 Dec 1852
Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman) was 8 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman) was 27 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman) was 32 years old when Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is published in the United States. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885. Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, the narrator of two other Twain novels and a friend of Tom Sawyer. It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman) died on 14 Jul 1894 at the age of 41
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Phoebe D Christensen (Chipman) (5 Dec 1852 - 14 Jul 1894), BillionGraves Record 6001 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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