Oscar William Mann

29 Mar 1893 - 28 Sep 1961

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Oscar William Mann

29 Mar 1893 - 28 Sep 1961
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OSCAR WILLIAM MANN Born March 29, 1893 in Bluffdale, Utah This history also contains what information we have about Oscar's parents, Oscar Leslie and Frances Ann Joyce Mann. Oscar had a hard childhood. He was the second child of Oscar Leslie and Frances Ann Joyce Mann. Oscar Leslie was born March 1,
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Life Information

Oscar William Mann

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

Simini

May 29, 2011
Photographer

Drewski

May 20, 2011

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Oscar William Mann Life Sketch

Contributor: Simini Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

OSCAR WILLIAM MANN Born March 29, 1893 in Bluffdale, Utah This history also contains what information we have about Oscar's parents, Oscar Leslie and Frances Ann Joyce Mann. Oscar had a hard childhood. He was the second child of Oscar Leslie and Frances Ann Joyce Mann. Oscar Leslie was born March 1, 1866 in Cottonwood, Salt Lake. Frances Ann Joyce was born May 23, 1867 in Leicester, England. Frances came from the Isle of Man when she was 8 years old with a Mormon family and lived in Bluffdale. She was a tiny woman; spirited and known for being stubborn. We do not have much information about her. When she was asked about her life by her children and grandchildren, she didn't want to talk about it. Oscar Leslie was described by his daughter-in-law, Ruby, as the sweetest man who ever lived. Oscar Leslie died on June 18, 1933. He was deaf, and was gathering coal on the railroad tracks for fuel for his home. He did not see the train coming, as he was bent down, and could not hear the whistle. He was hit by the train, his legs were cut off, and he died of his injuries. After his death, Frances Ann went to live with her daughter, Sarah and her husband, Earl in Springville. She died March 29, 1943 in the Payson Hospital. Oscar's older brother, Leslie Moroni, was born in Draper, Utah on April 7, 1891. He died when he was almost two years old on March 31, 1893 in Taylorsville, Utah. Oscar's younger sister, Sarah Eva, was born on October 26, 1895 in Provo Bench (Orem). She died on October 4, 1943. When Oscar was a baby, his parents moved to East Union. His father worked in Sandy in a smelter and became temporarily blind from the effects of lead poisoning. The family moved to Salt Lake and his mother took in washing and young Oscar sold the Salt Lake Telegraph and The Deseret News newspapers on the streets. In 1900, his father regained his sight and was able to go back to work. In 1902, the family moved to Northern Idaho, which Oscar says was a “wild and remote place, inhabited by Indians, cowboys and wild animals.” They lived on a 620 acre ranch bounded by mountains, and inhabited by wild chickens, bears, mountain lions, deer and elk. His father planted hay and raised cattle. In 1904, when the crops were at their best, great swarms of crickets destroyed all the grain and vegetables. With a long winter facing them, and no food supply for them or their animals, they were forced to sell the cattle for a small amount of money and move on. They packed only the necessities in a wagon and traveled for many days to Eastern Idaho. They had horses with sore shoulders, broken wheels on the wagon, and they suffered from thirst. They strained water from drying lakes and river beds through a blanket. They arrived in what is now called Idaho Falls. His father went to work at an adobe making plant. Oscar attended grade school. They moved 12 miles east to help with a farm owned by a Mr. Davis. Mr. Davis had a large sheep herd and many wild horses. Oscar spent a lot of time with Mr. Davis, who taught him how to set a trap, identify animals by their tracks, use a rifle, fall a tree, lasso a horse and ride. Mr. Davis gave Oscar a pony. In the fall, the family moved again, this time to Provo. Oscar attended school part time and worked because his father had poor health, and he needed to help his family financially. In 1913, Oscar went to work at the State Mental Hospital as an attendant, then as a stationary fireman, and then as an assistant engineer. He married Elaine Lawrenza Westphal on October 11, 1914. They had one daughter, Cozette Elaine, born October 30, 1915. Oscar met and fell in love with Ruby Helena Anderson. He divorced Elaine and married Ruby on February 9, 1917 in Preston, Idaho. They had nine children—Preston Joyce “Billy”, Ina, Lyle Oscar, Carol M., Grace Cecile, Marian Louise, Merrill, Gerald Ernest “Jud”, and Ronald Mads. Billy was killed at age 11 when he was run over after falling off the back of a wagon, and Merrill died at 17 months from pneumonia as a result of being burned when he climbed up to the stove and fell into a pan of boiling water. Oscar worked hard to provide for his large family, but these were difficult financial times and money was scarce. In the fall of 1917, Oscar went to work for the Union Pacific Railroad as a station engineer. In 1922 and 1923 he worked in Los Angeles as a machinist in the railroad shops. He returned to Provo to work for the railroad. He lost his job there when the stock market crashed in 1930. Over the next few years during the depression, he farmed, drove a truck for the Boulder Dam Forest Service and Provo Electric Company and was employed by the CCC (Civilian Conservation Core) which was formed by the government to provide employment. He earned only $36.00 a month with the CCC, building trails and doing other projects, mostly in Arizona. He came home every couple of weeks. He then worked at Pacific States Iron Pipe Company as a machinist from 1931, until he was called back to the railroad in 1941. He belonged to the International Order of Odd Fellows and the Brotherhood of Railway Machinists. He was a member of the Woodmen of the World for 45 years, and served as the secretary for this organization for 13 years. He liked to ride horses and loved gardening. He raised gladioli for some florists. Marian remembers, “Our yard was the gathering place for the neighborhood kids. Mama was very patient. Daddy built swings and a teeter-totter. He also built an arbor with a gliding swing and built a swing for little kids. We had a lawn area in the back and a large garden. On Easter, Daddy took us and a bunch of neighbor kids to a beautiful grassy hill up near Slate Canyon on the foothills east of our home. We packed a lunch and hiked to a series of three wells and rolled Easter eggs.” Oscar was a baptized member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, but did not attend. Ruby attended Relief Society on Tuesdays and had good visiting teachers, but did not attend on Sundays. The children were all baptized and the parents saw to it that they got to church. Oscar's obituary says that he was a ward clerk, so perhaps he became more active in his later years. In 1945, Oscar was working for the railroad again and the family was doing a little better financially. Oscar had an affair with Golda Buell Huntington. It was a shock that had bitter consequences for Ruby and the children. He later came to Ruby and asked her to take him back, but she refused. They were divorced and Oscar married Golda on September 26, 1946 in Farmington, Utah. Oscar did not help Ruby financially. The stress of everything caused Ruby to have a mental breakdown and she was hospitalized for six months, then lived with her daughter, Carol in Idaho for another six months before returning home. From Karen—I never knew my Grandpa Mann. My father lost all respect for him and did not have any contact with him and never spoke about him. One day, when I was about four or five years old, my cousin Larry, who was couple of years older, put me on the handlebars of his bike and took me to see Grandpa Mann. His wife, Golda, took a picture of us. It was the first and last time I ever saw him. Oscar died of a heart attack on September 28, 1961 in Provo, Utah.

Life Timeline of Oscar William Mann

1893
Oscar William Mann was born on 29 Mar 1893
Oscar William Mann was 11 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
1903
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Oscar William Mann was 21 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
1914
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Oscar William Mann was 27 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
1920
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Oscar William Mann was 46 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1939
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Oscar William Mann was 52 years old when World War II: Hiroshima, Japan is devastated when the atomic bomb "Little Boy" is dropped by the United States B-29 Enola Gay. Around 70,000 people are killed instantly, and some tens of thousands die in subsequent years from burns and radiation poisoning. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1945
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Oscar William Mann was 60 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
1953
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Oscar William Mann died on 28 Sep 1961 at the age of 68
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Oscar William Mann (29 Mar 1893 - 28 Sep 1961), BillionGraves Record 4462 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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