Oswald Barlow

1829 - 1876

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Oswald Barlow

1829 - 1876
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History of Catherine Nightingale Barlow (Wife of Oswald Barlow) (The following history was compiled from stories that were submitted to the “Daughters of the Pioneers” historical collection located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Parts of this story were submitted by Crystal Halladay.) Catherine Nighti

Life Information

Oswald Barlow

Born:
Died:

Saint George City Cemetery

2-98 S 700 E
St George, Washington, Utah
United States
Transcriber

DdraigGoch

October 9, 2012
Transcriber

RobSue888

May 6, 2021
Photographer

Chase

September 21, 2012

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Oswald Barlow is buried in the Saint George City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Cathrine Nightingale Barlow

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

History of Catherine Nightingale Barlow (Wife of Oswald Barlow) (The following history was compiled from stories that were submitted to the “Daughters of the Pioneers” historical collection located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Parts of this story were submitted by Crystal Halladay.) Catherine Nightingale was born at Charlo, Lancashire, England, March 17, 1827, daughter of John and Jane Brown Nightingale and a distant relative of Florence Nightingale. At the age of seven she entered a silk mill where she became very efficient in her line of work, that of making silk thread. Here she worked until her marriage and as result had little time for education. In fact, the only schooling she received was from her own efforts and study at home. She was married in March 1848 to Oswald Barlow at Manchester, Lancashire, England. Their first child, a son, James was born there October 22, 1849. Having become members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints and anxious to join the saints in Zion, her husband left her and the baby boy and came to Utah, where he was obliged to wait until he could earn enough money to send for them. This they received about a year later and she and the baby (scarcely four years of age) were seven weeks on the ocean, having sailed on the ship Falcon and arrived in New Orleans. They were met by her husband after they landed and he brought them to Salt Lake City along with a load of merchandise. The load being heavy and the journey long she walked most of the way across the plains, arriving October 9th, 1853. They came with the Harmon Wagon Company. She lived in Salt Lake City for a number of years and gave birth to five more children there. In 1861 she left Salt Lake to make her home in St. George where her husband was called to help settle; Arriving in Dixie December 3rd 1861. They were obliged to camp out until ground was cleared, streets laid out and building was commenced. Catherine was a very quiet woman, staying at home and sharing the hardships of early pioneer life without a murmur of complaint, living only for her family and her home. In her later life she spent all the time she could working in the Salt Lake, Manti and St. George Temples. Her husband died when he was but forty-seven years of age leaving her a widow for many years. In 1898, being 71 years of age she came to spend some time in our home, my father, James being her eldest son. Being a small child at the time, I remember how pleased we children were to have our grandma come to live with us. She used to tell us many stories about early pioneer life and her experiences in helping to build up this state of ours. She remained in our home three years and when she left she expressed herself as having spent three very happy and pleasant years. She then went to St. Anthony, Idaho to live with her daughter Mrs. Adrianna Barlow Wilson where she died May 4th, 1904 at the age of seventy-seven years. She is buried in St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho. She was the mother of nine children, four girls and five boys, sixty-three Grandchildren, one hundred fifty Great-Grand children and thirty Great- Great-Grandchildren a total of two hundred fifty-two decedents.

Milinda Barlow Riding

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

History of Malinda Barlow Riding as written by Emma Riding Hemenway When word was recieved that Johnston’s army was coming to Salt Lake Valley to destroy the Saint, President Young ordered all the men to move their families farther south, to be out of the danger of the army. The then went back to try and protect their interests in the Valley. Oswald Barlow took his wife Catherine Nightengale Barlow and children to Payson. While here their fourth Child Malinda was born April 7, 1858 in the Payson school house. In 1861, they with others were chosen by Pres. Young to go south and settle the Dixie County southern Utah. Oswald Barlow was a stone mason by trade. When they arrived in St. George, in December 1861 Malinda was three years old. It was here she grew up, was active and full of life, a leader among her friends. She loved to dance and take part in all the young people’s activities, such as, peach peeling bees, corn husking contests, melon fiests, candy pulls and hay rack rides. Choir practice and night meetings were part of their activities. at the close of which, the boys would waiting to take them home. When the young men were working on the Temple. The young girls of St. George entertained them with many parties. Linda was eighteen she spent a year north visiting her mothers people, in Salt Lake, Springville, and Provo. While there she saw Porter Rockwell with his hair in long braids He had been promised by Brigham Young that as long as he did not cut his hair bullets would never hurt him. This proved true. Linda was always neat and dressy in her appearance Had a good figure, and always made her clothes to fit well. While a young girl she worked several summers at Jeffries Ranch making butter and Cheese. She also worked at Canaan Ranch for Mr. and Mrs. James Andrus. She had an average education for those days, way a good reader and speller. As a teachers she had John Macfarlane in the Whitmore house, Samuel Miles, Kate Granger, and Martha Cox in the Third Ward school house. At that time a tuition was charged of $7.00 per term of three months. At the age of twenty she married E. T. Riding in the St. George Temple He was a boot and shoe maker also did barbering. In the house where Linda went she gave birth to twelve Children all but one growing to maturity. The one who died was Flossia who died when three years of age. During the years Linda was raising this large family she was a very busy woman. She was systematic in her work which avoided quarreling among the children as each knew when their part was allotted to them that no one else interfered with their tasks. The oldest children were girls and on Saturday one cleaned the cupboards, another the windows and the three brass buckets while the other swept and mopped the floors. After the three girls, four boys were born in succession. Her overall patching was endless each boy only had one pair at a time. A common expression of her’s was “Patch side by side is neighborly, but patch upon patch is beggarly” “but here goes another Patch” She did all the sewing for this large family making coats and hats for the boys as well as the girls clothing. At that time ready made clothes were not known. In his work at the shoe shop, her husband would take Washington Factory script for pay. When there was enough to supply some of the needs of the family. Linda would take the horse and buggy or cart, and drive to the factory where she exchanged the script for different kinds of cloth, blankets, table cloths, towels, yarn etc. She knit all the hose for the younger children which she would make last two years by knitting in new knees, heels and toes. She made her own washing soap, rag carpets to cover two floors as well as her sewing and knitting. Each spring a new carpet was made and it seemed she was always cutting and sewing rags, unless the neighbors came in to help. At such times they would bring food for an all day bee or at a lunch for half the day, according to the amount of rags to be sewed. As soon as the older children could take care of the younger ones, she began as a Relief Society teacher. She taught under Presidents Mary J. Judd, Laura Andrus, Cornelia Brooke, Esther Whitehead, Orpah Andres. and Minnie H. Taylor. She always tried to have her dime ready to give her teacher and expected those She visited to be ready with this charitable contribution. She spent many days and nights sitting up with the sick and dead. Linda couldn’t sing but she loved to listen to others. While doing her work about the house we would often hear her hum parts of My pretty Quadroon,. Her Bright Smile Haunts Me. Yet, or Belle Mahone. She became a widow in July 1811. It was then that she had to make a living for herself and her two youngest daughters, by washing, nursing the sick, and working at the Grand Gulch mine with her daughters, doing the kitchen work. When the girls married, she rented part of her home and began doing temple work for the dead. She did the ordinances for many hundred walking down and back most of the time. She continued in this work until 1935. During this time she took care of her beautiful flowers, which she enjoyed so much and made them part of her life. She was one of the first to grow the large Obrysanthemums, and helped others to get a start of them. One pleasant thing in her later life, was the visit she made to her daughter Bessie at Oakland and Mound Hill, California. When she was 76 years of age, her health failed and the Doctor told her it was too much for her heart to walk to the Temple. The next September 25th, she passed away after a full life of service to her church and family. Emma Riding Hemenway

Life of Oswald Barlow

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

LIFE OF OSWALD BARLOW July 20, 1829 Oswald Barlow was born July 20, 1829, at Prestage, Lancashire, England, son of James and Ann Crompton Barlow. At an early age he learned his trade, that of a mason and stonecutter, in which he became a master mechanic. This trade he followed the remainder of his life. Band music was his main pastime. He specialized as a fifer and drummer and later became an able teacher of these two instruments. In March,1848, he married Catherine Nightingale at Manchester, England. Their first child, James, was born there on October 22, 1849. By this time they were both members of the Latter-day Saint Church and as a result began to formulate plans to come to Zion. Oswald Barlow came to America about 1850, leaving his wife and child until he was able to send for them to join him. He came across the plains to Utah with one of the later bands of immigrants led by President Brigham Young. Oswald drove the President’s team. He also lived and worked for him all the time that he was in Salt Lake. He married his second wife, Mary Jane Oliver, in the Endowment House in 1854. In the same year he had saved up enough money for his first wife and baby to join them. Catherine and her son, James, were on the ocean seven weeks in a sailing vessel. Soon after they landed, Oswald met them and with a load of supplies took them to Salt Lake. He was a teamster for President Brigham Young while engaged in traveling among the Saints in the different Stakes of Zion. The same carriage the President rode in and Oswald drove is the one that is in the State Capitol Building now on exhibition. In 1858 he moved his family to Payson, where President Brigham Young had ordered that they should move that the families would be safe if the men were called to fight Johnston’s army. He returned to Salt Lake to help guard and resist the army in Echo Canyon. While at Payson, Malinda was born in the old school house. After the trouble with the army was settled the Barlow family returned to Salt Lake. Oswald Barlow was a member of the first Martial Band in Utah under the leadership of Professor Thomas. In 1859 he opened up a dancing school as he was an expert dancer. Many were glad to receive instructions from him as the saints were very interested in recreation and Brigham Young encouraged it. A number of his daughters were among the first pupils at the school. The people loved to hear him sing as he had a splendid bass voice and was a good entertainer. In 1861 he was called to Dixie to help settle Southern Utah. At this time they had eight children, but he loaded both families into one covered wagon which was drawn by two yokes of oxen. After a tiresome journey that lasted three weeks they arrived in St. George on December 3, 1861. They camped on the Old Camp Ground or adobe yard until the valley was cleared of brush and the streets were laid off, then Apostle Erastus Snow put Oswald to work building dwelling houses. He soon was able to purchase a lot in the west part of town, and they lived there in a tent until he built their house. He then built their house. Oswald was a good mason and stonecutter so he worked off and on for seven years on the St. George Tabernacle. He laid the foundation and walls of the Court House and helped to build all the prominent houses in this part of the country as far north as Beaver and west as far as Pioche. He did not work on the St. George Temple as he had been instructed by Apostle Erasus Snow to build homes for the saints to live in. So his sons worked on the temple. In 1863 he organized a martial band with nineteen members, and they held band practice every Saturday night at his home. (Alex Fullerton only member here now). He had bought the first bass drum that was beat in Utah. It was the one that was heard fifteen miles in Echo Canyon at the time Johnston’s Army tried to enter the canyon in 1858. It was owned by Alonzo Russell who later settled at Rockville. The same drum is being used by the present martial band and is owned by Malinda Barlow Riding. Oswald’s families went through the hardships of pioneering and early settling, many times having nothing to eat but pig weed greens, but they prospered with the rest of the saints. He died April 27, 1876, in St. George. He was the father of eighteen children, nine by the first wife, four of them still living, nine by the second wife and two still living. He had 87 grandchildren, 219 great grandchildren, and 36 great-great grandchildren, making a total of 342 descendents.

Biographial details about Oswald Barlow

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

Oswal Barlow, son of James Barlow and Ann Crompton joining the Church of Jesus Christ in the year 1848 and began to prepare to go to Zion. He came to America about 1850 leaving his wife and son, James, until he was able to send for them. Crossing the plains in one of the late companies of Brigham Young, driving one of Brigham Young's teams across the Plains. Working for President Young. In 1853 he had saved money enough to send for his wife and son James. They came in Curtise E. Bolton Company on the Sailing vessel Cornillus, arriving in Salt Lake City Oct. 16th 1853 coming by ox team. in 1862 was called by President Brigham Young to help settle southern Utah. He had learned the stone cutting and brick laying trad. Built many of the homes in St. George, the Tabernacle and helped on the Saint George Temple. He was drum Major of the Marshel Band playing Bass an snare drums. Was the Father of 18 children 87 Grand Children, 219 Great Grand children, 36 great great Grandchildren making a total of Posterity 360. 342 Grand and Great Grand and Great Great Grandchildren. 9 children by each wife. Many of his children leaving St George after his death going to to all parts of a number of the States. Born at Prestage Lanashire Co. England 20 July 1829 Married to Catherine Nightengale [Manchester] England Vocation Stone cutter and brick layer General Condition of Health Good Specially interested in The Gospel and his work Drum Major Died at Saint George, Washington Co. Utah 27 April 1876 (This was copied from a small book of Luke family genealogical records owned by Wenzel Luke - who probably got it fro his older brother John Henry Luke.)

Life timeline of Oswald Barlow

Oswald Barlow was born in 1829
Oswald Barlow was 2 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Oswald Barlow was 11 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Oswald Barlow was 30 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Oswald Barlow was 33 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Oswald Barlow died in 1876 at the age of 47
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Grave record for Oswald Barlow (1829 - 1876), BillionGraves Record 2324389 St George, Washington, Utah, United States

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