Nephi M. Perkins

1 Mar 1867 - 10 Oct 1906

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Nephi M. Perkins

1 Mar 1867 - 10 Oct 1906
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On another cold January day - this one in 1889 - Virie Mendenhall and Nephi Perkins took a bobsleigh - and two of their school friends to act as witnesses - and rode up Dayton Canyon in Idaho. They arrived at the home of the Justice of the Peace and were married. Just like that. At the Mendenhall ra
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Life Information

Nephi M. Perkins

Born:
Died:

Dayton Cemetery

Highway 36
Dayton, Franklin, Idaho
United States

Epitaph

Father
Transcriber

BarbaraLeishman

September 22, 2013
Photographer

BarbaraLeishman

September 20, 2013

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Memories

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Marriage picture and snippet

Contributor: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

On another cold January day - this one in 1889 - Virie Mendenhall and Nephi Perkins took a bobsleigh - and two of their school friends to act as witnesses - and rode up Dayton Canyon in Idaho. They arrived at the home of the Justice of the Peace and were married. Just like that. At the Mendenhall ranch, everybody was waiting for them. There they had a wedding dinner, and rolled back the rugs for dancing. Several guests gave recitations and Nephi and his cousin, Dave Evans, sang duets. (I wish I knew what songs they sang!) So far, it seems a lot the same, doesn't it? This is where the traditions get really different... It was a custom at the time to "put the bride and groom to bed." Friends would put the bride in the groom's nightshirt and the groom in her nightgown - usually over their regular clothing. Then they were tucked into bed together. (I'm sure it was way more fun for the friends than for the bride and groom...) During the evening, Virie knew what was coming. She quietly tucked a key in the top of her high-buttoned shoe. When the festivities came to an end, it was time for the great joke. But the couple was missing. No one had seen them slip away. Soon everyone was laughing and calling through the locked door of the little upstairs bedroom. Someone asked George, her father, for the extra key - but all the keys were gone. There was not going to be any "putting to bed" on this night! Celia, Nephi's older sister, pounded on the door with both hands and shouted, "You just wait until the next time you two get married!"

Nephi Martin Perkins Wedding

Contributor: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

On another cold January day - this one in 1889 - Virie Mendenhall and Nephi Perkins took a bobsleigh - and two of their school friends to act as witnesses - and rode up Dayton Canyon in Idaho. They arrived at the home of the Justice of the Peace and were married. Just like that. At the Mendenhall ranch, everybody was waiting for them. There they had a wedding dinner, and rolled back the rugs for dancing. Several guests gave recitations and Nephi and his cousin, Dave Evans, sang duets. (I wish I knew what songs they sang!) So far, it seems a lot the same, doesn't it? This is where the traditions get really different... It was a custom at the time to "put the bride and groom to bed." Friends would put the bride in the groom's nightshirt and the groom in her nightgown - usually over their regular clothing. Then they were tucked into bed together. (I'm sure it was way more fun for the friends than for the bride and groom...) During the evening, Virie knew what was coming. She quietly tucked a key in the top of her high-buttoned shoe. When the festivities came to an end, it was time for the great joke. But the couple was missing. No one had seen them slip away. Soon everyone was laughing and calling through the locked door of the little upstairs bedroom. Someone asked George, her father, for the extra key - but all the keys were gone. There was not going to be any "putting to bed" on this night! Celia, Nephi's older sister, pounded on the door with both hands and shouted, "You just wait until the next time you two get married!"

Nephi Martin Perkins

Contributor: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Our father, Nephi Martin Perkins, was born 1 May 1867 at Franklin, Oneida, Idaho. He was the son of Joseph Thomas Perkins, who was born 24 September 1820 at Loughor, Glamorganshire, Wales and Margaret Martin, who was born 22 December 1833 at Pint, Brecknockshire, Wales. Grandfather and grandmother Perkins were married on 25 December 1852 at Dowlais, Glamorganshire, Wales and in 1855 they immigrated to the United States with their infant son, Thomas Martin; leaving Wales in March and arriving in the Salt Lake Valley on October 31st. They settled temporarily in North Ogden, Utah and lived there until the spring of 1857 when they moved to Provo, Utah where they remained until the spring of 1860 when grandfather went to Cache Valley where he joined others in establishing a settlement in Franklin. Franklin, situated in the northern end of the valley, was the first permanent settlement in Idaho. There grandfather prepared a home for his wife and four small children who joined him in June. Times were hard and difficult for the early settlers because of privation, sickness and molestation by Indians, but they were staunch in their faith and true to the gospel cause and conditions gradually improved. Grandfather and grandmother acquired some property; a team of oxen, cows, sheep and a wagon. In order for grandfather to obtain work to help support his family, it was necessary for him to be away from home most of the time. That left the care of the home and children pretty much up to grandmother, but records tell us she was very capable. Nine children were born to them: Thomas Martin, Margaret Silvia, Joseph Mathew Martin (Margaret and Joseph were twins), William Martin, Edward Martin, Celia Jane, Lorenzo Martin, Nephi Martin and David Alma. Our father, Nephi Martin, was reared with his brothers and sisters until he was five or six years of age when his parents separated and were divorced. Grandmother then took the younger children and went back to North Ogden or Hooper, Utah where they had resided before moving to Provo. page 2 They remained there for some time and then moved to Dayton, Idaho where they remained and established a home. Our father received very little schooling, but what he was able to obtain was in the old log, one-room school house in Dayton, Idaho. This building was located on the northwest corner of the block on which the new West Side High School now stands; a monument to the faithful pioneers who settled Dayton and really laid the foundation. Father grew to manhood endowed with an exceptionally pleasing personality that won the love, respect and confidence of all his associates. He was a leader in all sports and recreation, a beautiful singer and graceful dancer. At the public dances he often did the calling for the old-time quadrilles. He was rarely upset emotionally and was always congenial and pleasant with everyone. Copied by Mavanee Mitchell (Steele) on 2 January 2013. Mavanee is a 1st cousin, three times removed of Nephi Martin Perkins. Immigrants: Perkins, Joseph Thomas Martin, Margaret Comments: No comments. © 2012 Center for Family History and Genealogy at Brigham Young University. All rights reserved.

Nephi Martin Perkins

Contributor: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Nephi Martin Perkins Our father, Nephi Martin Perkins, was born May 1, 1867 at Franklin, Oneida County, Idaho. He was the son of Joseph Thomas Perkins and Margaret Martin. Nine children were born to them: Thomas Martin, the twins Margaret Sylvia and Joseph Mathew Martin, William Martin, Edward Martin, Celia Jane, Lorenzo Martin, Nephi Martin, and David Alma. Nephi Martin, was raised with his brothers and sisters until 1873 when he was five or six years old when his parents separated because his father wanted to take a second wife, Harriet Preece. Grandmother took the younger children and went to Hooperville, now Hooper, Utah. His Aunt Mary and Uncle Owen Roberts were living there at the time. They remained there for some time and then moved to Dayton, Idaho where they established a home. Nephi attended the old one-room log schoolhouse in Dayton, Idaho for four winters, which was enough for him. This building was located where the Westside High School now stands in Dayton. Nephi had a pleasing personality that won the respect, love and confidence of all his associates. He was a leader in sports and recreation, a beautiful singer and graceful dancer. He often ‘called’ the dances at dance parties in Dayton and the nearby communities. Nephi and his friends many times took their girlfriends on horseback or in wagons to Weston or Clifton, a distance of five miles either way, to attend a dance. A cousin of Father’s relates the following incident: “We were raised closely together and your father and I were the dearest of friends. We used to go hunting with all the other young fellows our age on Five Mile Flat in the cedar covered hills. We fished and swam in the Bear River. I remember one occasion when we were trying to swim the Bear River. We were racing and I was headed for two whirlpools, not seeing the danger until I was nearly to them. Your father swam to me just in time to rescue me and bring me safely to shore.” He was a good friend and a fine man.” Sarah Ann Boyce relates the following incident: “One evening Nephi called at our house and asked for his friend Dave, who was visiting with us at the time. When Dave appeared, Nephi said, “Dave, let’s go to Weston to the dance.” “Alright,” Dave answered,” but I’ll have to run home and get shaved.” So they left together on your father’s horse. When they had gone, I said to Minnie, “Say, Min, we’re not going to let them boys get away with that are we?” So we got Dave’s horse out of the pasture, harnessed it up and hitched it up to a heavy wagon. Then we tied it in the yard and proceeded to get ready for the dance. By the time the boys returned we were dolled up and waiting. When they rode into the yard and saw Dave’s horse hitched to one side of the tongue and waiting for the other horse to be hitched in, they nearly split their sides laughing, and agreed that they would have to take us along. When we got to Minnie’s place, Brother Callan told the boys to take them ponies off that heavy wagon and hitch them to his light, spring wagon, so they did. By the time we arrived at the dance it was twenty minutes to twelve almost time for the dance to let out. Nephi was the ring leader in all the fun and was the life of the parties, but he was always a perfect gentleman. Nephi worked for a while for Thomas Mendenhall who lived over at Clifton. While there, he and a daughter of the Mendenhall’s kept company. Their friends and associates thought they were seriously thinking of marriage, but then Nephi went to work for George Mendenhall who also lived near the river. The Mendenhalls had an attractive daughter, Elvira, and she Father became very fond of each other. After working at Mendenhalls for some time, Nephi had an opportunity to go to Montana and work on the railroad that was being constructed. He was away for a only a few weeks and then returned to Dayton. He worked wherever a job was available because he had to support himself and contribute to the support of his mother. In the evenings and on weekends he continued to find ways to visit Elvira. They chose Sunday, January 17, 1889 as their wedding day and went to the home of Bishop David LaPray who lived in Cedarville in Weston Canyon where they were married. Aunt Minnie and a friend, Hattie Miles accompanied them and acted as witnesses. After the wedding a group of friends and relatives gathered and went with them to the home of Elvira’s parents where a dinner was prepared for them. After everyone had eaten, the furniture was moved from the front room and they all danced for a while. Aunt Minnie said that everyone had a lively, good time and that Elvira was a beautiful bride and Nephi a handsome groom. Their first home was located near the mouth of Deep Creek. They farmed that season and Nephi helped with the work on George Mendenhall’s ranch. They attended church meetings and public gatherings of all kinds in the Dayton Branch though it was a distance of about four miles to travel. Dave Evans related an incident involving Nephi. “Nephi and I had been working out of town and were returning home horseback to attend the meeting at which the MIA was to be organized in the old log town hall. We were joshing each other about which of us would be chosen MIA president. To our surprise, Nephi was called from the crowd and sustained as President and I was called up to be his counselor. After the MIA was organized and everything was in order and running good, I remember I had to conduct the meetings in your father’s stead because he wasn’t permitted to participate. On election day that fall, the Stake President ordered that all L.D.S. men vote for a certain individual, and if they refused to do so, their membership in the Church would be denied them. Father felt the same as many others, that he could not support the individual in office whom they were requested to vote for and that the right was his as a citizen of the United States to vote any way he felt was right. Consequently those who refused to vote as directed were denied the privilege of participating in any Church activities. This unfortunate affair was soon rectified by church authorities from Salt Lake.” In 1890 missionaries were called in each stake to ‘retrench’ the members. If the members could answer the interview questions satisfactory to the missionaries, they were rebaptized. Nephi was rebaptized on August 7, 1890. On November 20, 1890 he and Mother went to the Logan Temple and received their endowments and had their infant daughter, Cloie, sealed to them. Cloie was born January 12, 1890. Shortly before their second child was due Nephi and Elvira moved into Grandfather and Grandmother Mendenhall’s home on the banks of the Bear River. On February 11, 1892 their first son was born to them. They named him Leonard Mendenhall Perkins. Soon after Leonard’s birth, Nephi and Elvira moved onto their homestead which was located in Dayton Canyon on Five Mile Creek. The cabin in the canyon was built of logs, two rooms with the front facing south located on the north side of the creek. The large front room was partitioned with curtains and used as bedrooms. The kitchen was at the back or north of the house and faced east. An attic above the front room was used for storage and was reached by means of a ladder which was fastened to the wall. The roof of the house was covered with dirt and usually leaked when storms came. The roof was repaired each fall by hauling clay and spreading it out evenly over the roof. But even so the storms found a way to leak through quite often. A short distance north of the house they dug a milk and fruit cellar with a low-pitched roof of logs and sod. Steps were dug into the end of the cellar and a door framed into the base. These cellars were cool in the summer and warm in the winter. A smaller vegetable pit was dug near the southeast corner of the house. The entrance to it was a square hole in the roof with a trapdoor of heavy planks that were moved aside to gain entrance. A short ladder was then climbed down to get to the bottom of the small cellar. All farm work was done by horses or manpower. Every settler had a few head of cattle for milk, butter, and meat. They were also efficient cheese makers. Surplus milk was fed to the calves and pigs because there was not refrigeration to keep the milk from spoiling. They planted an orchard of apple, plum, and prune trees as well as many kinds of berries which grew well in the black mountain soil. Vegetables were grown for summer use as well as for storage in the winter months. There was always plenty to share with others who needed some. Water was carried from the creek in a bucket for all uses except dinking. Drinking water was carried from a spring located approximately a quarter mile west and across the creek on the Page property. Drinking water had to be hauled in barrels during early spring while the creek was muddy due to melting snow in the mountains or after a heavy rain storm. Father and Mother worked very hard on their homestead erecting buildings, clearing sage brush, and preparing the land for planting. Fences also had to be built which was a very difficult job because there was little money to purchase wire with. They were a happy, congenial couple, rarely having any disagreements. Nephi was very staunch in his faith and his church duties were important to him. He was exceedingly kind to everyone, especially his family. Nephi was always on hand to offer his services when there was public work to be done or ready to lend a helping hand when anyone was in need or in trouble. On October 15, 1893 the Dayton Branch of the L.D.S. church was organized into a ward. Philo W. Austin was sustained as bishop with Charles F. Chadwick as first counselor and Nephi Martin Perkins as second counselor. Father was very faithful to his calling in the bishopric. During the following years the Perkins’ were blessed with other children. George Orland was born January 3,1895. Leroy Mendenhall was born on February 7, 1897, and Ina was born on March 19, 1899. On July 23, 1901 another daughter was born to the Perkins family . They named her Ada. When she was three months old, an epidemic of smallpox swept through Dayton and the surrounding communities. Father and all of the children contracted this dreaded disease. Some of them were barely recovered before others became ill, so they were able to help each other get through the ordeal. Father’s case was more severe than others of the family and his face and hands were completely covered with the pox. After he was able to be up and around the house a little, Leonard turned the horses out to go to the creek for water. They had to pass by the house and Father stood by the window, He called to them and tapped on the window, putting their noses on the glass. They bobbed their heads up and down as if trying to speak. Father was a great lover of horses and was very efficient in handling them. During the winter months he spent a great deal of time breaking young horses for his neighbors. He trained them for riding as well as for driving and work animals. The family recovered from the smallpox through prayer and the power of the priesthood. Their neighbors, the Page family, lived on up the canyon a short distance on the opposite side of the creek. They had a large family and Sister Page was the Primary president and Mother was her counselor. During the spring, summer and fall they walked to Primary with their children, a distance of perhaps a mile each way. During the winter they traveled by team and sleigh. Primary was held in the old log school house. On October 18, 1903 another baby was born to the Perkins family and they named him Nephi Mendenhall. The next year during the winter of 1904-1905 Father was called to a home mission in Mink Creek, Oneida County, Idaho. He came home to spend Christmas with his family and then returned to complete his mission. Brother Taylor Nelson an intimate friend of Father’s for many years and President of the Oneida Stake wrote the following tribute about Father: “Nephi Perkins was of medium height, well-proportioned and pleasant mannered. While he gave to others a respectful hearing, he had his own ideas on every subject, with a rare ability to present them in an inoffensive way. He was a person whom everyone was pleased to meet. His company was sought; his conversations were always on wholesome questions. On of his favorite subjects was that of astronomy on which he had given much thought. Nephi was deeply religious, was imbibed with a desire to see Jackson County. He often expressed himself as being desirous of living to see the great temple erected in that land. He had a burning desire to fill a mission for the church. While talking about going on a mission, he and I agreed that the one of us called first should be given a certain amount of money by the other one. When, however, we received calls the same day, there was no need for the exchange of money. Nephi was a real man, true to his wife and family, and loved and respected by everyone.” During the summer of 1905 Father received a call to fill a mission for the church in the Northern States Mission. He happily accepted the call and began arranging his affairs so that he could go. Most of his children were too young when he left to remember much about him. Leonard was thirteen years old at the time his father left. Roy remembered how kind his Father was to them at all times and that they usually found a few pieces of peppermint candy in his pockets. He also remembers that his father bought a new suit of clothes and hat for his mission. When at home one evening he tried he tried them on for the children. Roy ran outside and cried; he was only eight years old at the time. The people of Dayton Ward gave Nephi a farewell party and contributed whatever amount of money they were able to spare to help him with the expense of his mission. Missionaries going into the field were always assisted in this manner. During the program at Nephi’s party he was asked to sing. He chose the hymn, “I’ll Go Where You Want Me To Go.” Minnie Perkins said that she often cries when she thinks about it and shed tears as she related the story. That was the last time anyone of them would hear him sing in this life. On 1st of December 1905 a large crowd of people was at the train depot to see his father off for his mission. When Father was saying goodbye to his family at the Dayton train depot, he said to Elvira: “Take good care of these children,’ Vira, they certainly have bad colds.” Those were his last words to her. She was expecting a baby in March. He kissed each one of his family before boarding the train waving his hat to them. In Salt Lake he was set apart for his mission on December 5th by Elder Hyrum Mack Smith and given a blessing by him. After he had been gone a few days, the doctor confirmed that the colds were whooping cough. Elvira had contracted it and all during that winter of 1905-6 her health was very poor. She suffered from rheumatism and a stubborn skin infection along with the cough. On March 1, 1906 she delivered a tiny baby boy she named Harold Mendenhall. He weighed less than four pounds and was very frail, requiring a lot of special care. He was her eighth child. Nephi labored all that winter in Sullivan, Indiana with Leo V. Johnson of Downey, Idaho as a companion. Brother Johnson recalls the following about Father as a missionary: “I knew Elder Perkins as we were missionary companions one whole winter or nearly so in Sullivan, Indiana. He was one of the finest and most wonderful men I have ever met. He was so humble and kind and energetic. He was truly a great missionary. Such a noble character, kind, sympathetic, full of faith and wisdom, and genuine friendliness.” In late summer Father contracted what was believed to be malaria. The mission president, thinking that perhaps Elder Perkins might recover more rapidly in a better climate, transferred Father to Portland, Jay County, Indiana. The change didn’t help and on October 10, 1906 he passed away. When word came from Salt Lake, the bishop rode down to the Mendenhall farm and asked Grandfather and Grandmother Mendenhall to go with him to inform Elvira. They were in a buggy and Mrs. Kemp, a friend and neighbor was with them.” A few days later his body was shipped to Salt Lake by train. A missionary named Christian Buhler of Bern, Idaho whose mission was almost completed was released to accompany Grandfather’s body to Salt Lake City. When they arrived, Uncle Lorenzo Perkins was there to receive the body and to accompany it home to Dayton where Nephi was buried on October 16, 1906, leaving Mother with eight children to rear alone. (Deseret News) DIED WHILE ON MISSION Elder Nephi M. Perkins, President of the Indiana Conference, the victim. Word came to President German E. Ellsworth, of the Northern States mission, who is now visiting in Salt Lake, that Elder Nephi M. Perkins had died suddenly in Indiana. The cause of death or circumstances attending it were not stated. The deceased was president of the Indiana conference and probably died at Evansville or Columbus. Elder Perkins was born at Franklin, Idaho, May 1 1867, but for some time had resided at Dayton in that state. He is the son of Joseph and Margaret Martin Perkins, and leaves a wife and several children. On Dec. 5, 1905, he was set apart for a mission to the Northern states, under the hands of Elder Hyrum M. Smith, and left soon after for his field of labor. He proved himself to be a very able and faithful missionary, and his death is deeply deplored. Further particulars of Elder Perkins’ demise and what disposition will be made of the remains are expected soon.

Missionary Blessing for Elder Nephi Martin Perkins

Contributor: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Salt Lake City December 5, 1905 Missionary blessing upon the head of Elder Nephi Martin Perkins by Elder Hyrum M. Smith of the Twelve Apostles Brother Nephi Martin Perkins: We, the servants of the Lord lay our hands upon your head and we bless you and set you apart to fill a mission to the Northern States. We say unto you, blessed art thou, inasmuch as thou hast been found worthy in the eyes of the Lord to bear a portion of his great work in the preaching of the gospel to the people of this country. We bless you that you shall realize this great blessing and the great possibility resting upon you, that your eyes shall be opened, that you shall see the condition that the world is in, a condition of darkness, unbelief, ignorance, and superstition and that you shall sympathize with them. Because of this you have cause to rejoice in the Lord because you have been blessed with an understanding of the truth and have been given a testimony of the truth, and as you labor in this mission, you shall receive line upon line, precept upon precept, and information from time to time such as shall be for your comfort and for your instruction and benefit in strengthening you and making you adequate to the responsibilities and labor of preaching the gospel to your fellowmen. Now, we say unto you,dear brother, go among them in the spirit of the gospel, in the spirit of the Lord Jesus. Study his life and ministry, and see his anxiety for the souls of men, that they should repent and turn from their evil and follow him. Seek after this spirit that you may feel towards them even as he felt towards them, that you may labor among them to dispel their unbelief. Thou shalt not ridicule them, find fault with them and make fun of them because of their belief in foolish and wicked doctrines, which men have inspired them with. They believe in doctrines of men and of devils, but many of them are sincere in their belief, having been deceived. Therefore go among them with a desire to undeceive them that they shall be brought to a knowledge of the truth through your ministry; that you shall preach the gospel in the power and demonstration of the Holy Ghost, interpreting the scriptures unto them correctly, having the spirit upon yourself that those who wrote and spoke the things contained in the holy scriptures. Do not contend with men; do not be quarrelsome with them. Give all men the privilege of worshiping God according to the dictates of their own consciences. But seek to properly inform them and to call them from their errors unto repentance and show them the truth, even as the Lord will show it unto you. Whatsoever good thin you desire in your heart that you may use if for the furthering of the gospel, for the spread of truth, and for the benefit of mankind, if you will go to the Lord and ask him sincerely for these gifts he has promised, that he will give them. Therefore, knock and it shall be opened unto you; seek and you shall find; ask, and ye shall receive. Put your trust in the arm of Jehovah, and do not depend upon man; neither upon money; but go forth relying upon the Lord for your support and sustenance, both the body and the spirit. The Lord has promised he will open up your way and raise up friends to minister unto you, that you may have a place of shelter, food, and raiment as you may need them, for the laborer is worthy of his hire. Now, dear brother, remember that you hold the holy priesthood that you are a representative of the Latter-Day Saints, even of the Church of Christ. Therefore, always be dignified, be honest, upright, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and seek to do good unto all men. Seek after all that is good and praiseworthy in this life, and by your example as well as by your word of mouth show unto all the people that you are a servant of God, and that you desire their welfare and that; and that you are laboring for their good, even sacrificing a great deal on your part own part; and the Lord will bless you and magnify you. He will put words into your mouth when you open it, if you will seek to inform your mind; he will bring things to your memory, and you shall never be confounded and routed, so long as you put your trust in the Lord. Now we send you forth into this part of the vineyard to labor among them, to save them from their sins. Remember that the Lord has died for them and for you, and that no matter what may come upon you always remember that it is a privilege and a blessing to suffer a little in the cause of him who suffered so much for you and for the salvation of man. We bless you with life, with health, and with strength, and with the power to... End of document

Life timeline of Nephi M. Perkins

1867
Nephi M. Perkins was born on 1 Mar 1867
Nephi M. Perkins was 8 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Nephi M. Perkins was 22 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Nephi M. Perkins was 29 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
Nephi M. Perkins died on 10 Oct 1906 at the age of 39
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Nephi M. Perkins (1 Mar 1867 - 10 Oct 1906), BillionGraves Record 5231031 Dayton, Franklin, Idaho, United States

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