Nath'l H Felt

6 Feb 1816 - 27 Jan 1887

Change Your Language

close

You can change the language of the BillionGraves website by changing the default language of your browser.

Learn More
English
Register

Nath'l H Felt

6 Feb 1816 - 27 Jan 1887
edit Edit Record
photo Add Images
group_add Add Family
description Add a memory

Grave site information of Nath'l H Felt (6 Feb 1816 - 27 Jan 1887) at Salt Lake City Cemetery in Salt Lake City, Utah, Salt Lake County, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Nath'l H Felt

Born:
Died:

Salt Lake City Cemetery

200-250 N St
Salt Lake City, Utah, Salt Lake County, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Father
His wife AUNT ANNIE Aunt Ida

Headstone Description

THERE ARE SEVERAL MORE BUT I. CAN'T READ THEM
Transcriber

Maxmo11

March 17, 2013
Transcriber

Genevieve

March 17, 2013
Transcriber

MargieW

March 17, 2013
Transcriber

RobSue888

July 18, 2021
Transcriber

LaRue Johnstun

April 18, 2021
Transcriber

shirley rawlins

April 17, 2021
Transcriber

SurlyGurly

April 18, 2021
Transcriber

Jeanette

April 19, 2021
Transcriber

Christine M

April 16, 2021
Transcriber

EdwinR

April 18, 2021
Photographer

lisalund

March 17, 2013

Nearby Graves

See more nearby graves
Upgrade to BG+

Family

Relationships on the headstone

add

Relationships added by users

add

Grave Site of Nath'l H

edit

Nath'l H Felt is buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

The Home of Nathaniel Henry Felt

Contributor: LaRue Johnstun Created: 5 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

This house, formerly located at 10 Liberty Street, was once the home of Mormon pioneer and local church leader NATHANIEL HENRY FELT (1816-1887). Born and raised in Salem, Nathaniel and his brother John ran a tailoring business at 217 Essex Street. In 1839, he married Eliza Ann Preston, also of Salem. In 1843, they joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints , and along with 120 new converts, began a small branch of the Church in Salem. Because of Nathaniel’s position as branch president, this house became an important Mormon meeting place. In the late spring of 1844, Brigham Young sent his fourteen-year-old daughter Vilate to live with the Felt family while she attended finishing school in Salem. Later that summer, Brigham Young visited Salem several times while campaigning for Joseph Smith (LDS Church founder), a U.S. presidential candidate. It was on one of these visits to the area that Brigham Young and local Church members first heard news of Smith's murder at Carthage, Illinois, on June 27, 1844. One year later, Nathaniel Felt, his family, and Vilate Young left from this house to embark on the arduous journey west, eventually settling in what would become Salt Lake City, Utah. There, Nathaniel became a highly respected member of the community, with a public career that included service as Salt Lake City alderman and Utah Territorial representative. Plaque donated by the Mormon Historic Sites Foundation and the Nathaniel H. Felt Family Association.

NATHANIEL HENRY FELT Sr., Tailor - Newspaper Man

Contributor: LaRue Johnstun Created: 5 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Nathaniel Henry Felt was born 6 February, 1816, in Salem Massachusetts, the son of Nathaniel Felt and Hannah Reeves. He was the youngest of 12 children. His father, a merchant trader with the West Indies, died when Nathaniel was seven years old. The family was left in straitened circumstances having lost his property, even to his family home, through misfortune in business. Nathaniel attended the common schools of his native place, and before and after school hours acted as errand boy for a draper and tailor's business. He was not robust, but full of ambition to gain a collegiate education. He worked hard in that direction, but owing to the reduced circumstances of the family, had to abandon his purpose just as he was about to enter high school. He was apprenticed to a tailor in Lynn, five miles from Salem. He was then 15 years old. Six months before attaining the majority, and through the help of his only surviving brother, he bought out an establishment in Salem and was soon employing twenty hands. He increased his means by some fortunate ventures in the African and Chinese trade. This was the intention of himself and brothers - to found a commercial business. He also became interested in military matters, joining the "Division Corps of Independent Cadets", which was organized with the Boston cadets in colonial times under British rule. Through his musical interests Nathaniel became acquainted with Miss Eliza Ann Preston, a member of another of the old New England families, whom he married on 3 Oct. 1839. His mother's family was divided in religious belief but he, though often solicited to do so, would not identify himself with any of the popular churches. After carefully investigating "Mormonism" however, he was converted and baptized a Latter-Day-Saint. His wife also joined the church. In the winter of 1843-44 he was appointed president of the Salem Branch. During this period he became acquainted with such men as Brigham Young, Orson Pratt and Heber C. Kimball, who were frequent and welcomed visitors at his home. They left it the morning that word was received of the martyrdom of the Prophet and the Patriarch, Joseph and Hyrum Smith. He had been advised by President Young to remain at Salem for the present, but as the crowds gathered around Nauvoo, and the mobs grew more threatening, he determined to join the main body of the Church at that place. Accordingly, on the 5th day of June 1845, after closing out his business at a great sacrifice, he with his wife and one son Joseph Henry, set out for Nauvoo. There he entered into business and continued his labors in the ministry, being ordained one of the presidents of the quorum of Seventy.  "...Saints were made. The Prophet said about it, "I have reason to believe the Church is being purged. "Now I take you to the incident where, and this is being called by critical historians a great fiasco. On August 6, 1836, Joseph, Oliver Cowdery, Hyrum Smith, Sidney Rigdon undertook a trip to Salem, Massachusetts. What for? On good authority they had been told that there was a house in Salem, Massachusetts under which were not vast, but some buried treasure. "Joseph Smith had always been accused of being a money digger. He once said, "Ironically it wasn't a very profitable business. I only made .35 cents a day and we never found anything." And he was the one who prevailed upon the man to give it up. But now they go to Salem on the strength of this promise. Well, they reached Salem, they investigated and it turned out there was nothing, to be found. The Prophet prayed about it and it and a revelation is given, it's a rebuke, and then a set of promises. "I, the Lord, your God, am not displeased with your coming on this journey, not with standing your follies." That's a bit of rebuke isn't it? It goes on to say, "But I have much treasure in this city for you, for the benefit of Zion, and many people in this city whom I will gather out, in due time, for the benefit of Zion, through your instrumentality. The revelation goes on to say, that they should search for the ancient inhabitants and founders of the city, implying that there are genealogical treasures to be had. There were and they were found, but that's another story. It's the financial side of that promise I want to pursue for just a minute. "For there are more treasures than one," said the revelation, "in this city." A sequel, not the only one. "A man named Nathaniel [Henry] Felt and his wife, Eliza, were converted in Salem. He became the President of the Salem Branch. It was at his home, incidentally, that Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball first received word that Joseph and Hyrum had been killed in Carthage. "At great sacrifice, financially and other wise, Nathaniel and his wife came to Nauvoo. He was only twenty nine years old. His furniture was sent via New Orleans. His carpets, his tables, his chairs, sofas, and mirrors, all became part of the Nauvoo Temple decor. Later still, he became president of what was known as the St. Louis Conference, or we would say District. There was one place amidst the house burnings and mobbing in Illinois, a place called St Louis, that was an oasis of security. People gathered there, not just as exiles from Nauvoo, but who were coming [from] abroad after missionary work in the foreign countries. This man Nathaniel took care of these people. His Branch in that place, St Louis, became the largest District in the Church. There was a period when it was many thousands, hundreds of immigrants came. He hired an entire hotel for temporary housings, a concert hall for Sunday services, And his own funding made possible the boat, the ships, that made possible exodus, but also he outfitted, he funded, for the three to four thousand members what they needed as the bare minimum to get across the plains. In the meantime, St. Louis became, in a series of disasters, a place of a huge fire, of cholera and death. He ministered personally to the sick, though many were afflicted, none died, and none died on any of the ships that he arranged for. 1 could go on, but it seems to me that's fairly tangible evidence that there were more than one treasure and for the benefit of Zion and through his instrumentality a great portion of the saints were aided. "He came west, he was honored and loved by the brethren and came to be a member of the Prayer circle of Brigham Young." -Truman Madsen on Nathaniel Felt from "The Life and Teachings of the Prophet Joseph" 1997 (then Bookcraft) a recording. Oral (phone) permission per Deseret Book. Also see D&C Chapter 111. A longer history can be found in the L.D. S. Biographical Encyclopedia, Vol.11, by Andrew Jensen. With the completion of the Nauvoo Temple was being hurried on, Nathaniel Henry's baggage including some of his furniture such as carpets, tables, chairs, sofa and mirrors, having arrived from Salem by way of New Orleans, were used to furnish the sacred house preparatory to the performance of ordinances therein. He took part in the defense of Nauvoo and was under fire as well as on regular guard duty. Through over- exertion assisting the remnant of his co-religionists across the Mississippi, after the departure of the vanguard which he was preparing to follow up, he was taken down with fever and ague. His physical condition became such that he was counseled to take his wife to St. Louis and postpone his journey to the West. Accordingly, he turned over wagon outfit to John Taylor, one of the Twelve Apostles, and with his wife and two sons proceeded to St. Louis, Missouri, arriving there in early November. On February 14, 1847, Nathaniel Henry Felt Sr. was appointed President of the St. Louis Conference, then numbering from seven to ten thousand Latter-Day-Saints, and was the only organized conference in the United States. St. Louis was not only the gathering place of the Saints driven from Nauvoo, where they went to remain until a more permanent place was selected by the pioneers, but became the outfitting point for those traveling westward. This was also the place where missionaries, still sent out by the Church, looked for and received substantial assistance to take them on their journey both going and returning. At that point the immigrating Saints were received from foreign lands by water from New Orleans, and there secured their outfits for the crossing of the plains. Upon Nathaniel H. Felt devolved almost entirely the duty of advising these immigrants, purchasing outfits and supplies for them, and charting the necessary steamboats to take them to Kanesville. It was almost a matter of congratulation with him that no accident occurred to and no scourge prevailed on any of the vessels thus engaged by him. There were instances, however, in which steamboats were secured by other persons, contrary to his advice. In one of these instances he went to the wharf as soon as he learned of it and urged the Saints to come ashore, telling them the boat was unsafe. Many took his advice while others remained on board. The steamer had hardly left her moorings when she blew up. Several lives were lost and much baggage was destroyed. At St. Louis President Felt opened a correspondence with Colonel Thomas L. Kane, who afterwards mediated between Utah and the Federal Government. In the spring of 1850 the Felt family - consisting of the father, mother, two sons, and an infant daughter, started for the Salt Lake Valley. They were escorted as far as Council Bluffs by Ballou's band discoursing sweet music in their honor. At the Bluffs, with two wagons, four yoke of oxen, and two cows, they joined Heywood and Woolley's Church merchandise train. They arrived at their destination on the 6th of October. They located on upper Main Street, just opposite President Heber C. Kimball's residence. (At the time this article was written, the old family homestead.) During the winter they lived in wagons and tents, and in the spring they built an adobe house of two rooms. Nathaniel was appointed Alderman of Great Salt Lake City on January 9, 1851 from Gov. Brigham Young, under the Charter incorporating the city. There were some other political appointments both in Territorial and City governments. He was not idle in ecclesiastical matters. In 1851 he was appointed a traveling Bishop. As such he visited nearly all the settlements and towns of Utah, instructing the Ward Bishops relative to tithing methods, records, reports, etc. In the militia he was commissioned by Brigham Young on April 12, 1852 as Chaplain on the general staff of the Legion. He was given the rank of Colonel. Nathaniel had previously accompanied George A. Smith to Little Salt Lake Valley where they laid out the town of Parowan. The winter of 1854 - 55 found Nathaniel Henry in New York City, assisting John Taylor to establish the paper known as "The Mormon" and laboring in emigration matters. During this mission, in company with Apostle Taylor and Delegate Bernhisel, he called on Pres. Franklin Pierce in Washington D.C. At the time the President made the following statement relative to his recent appointment of Colonel Steptoe, to succeed Brigham Young as Governor of Utah. He said, "Gentlemen, you are well acquainted with the immense outside pressure that popular prejudice has arrayed against your people. This obliges me as Chief Magistrate to make some show in responding to it, so I have appointed Colonel Steptow as Governor of Utah; but you will readily conceive that Colonel Steptow, holding an honorable position in the United States army, will not be willing to resign that position for the uncertain tenure of the four year Governorship of that distant Territory. Elder Felt returned to Salt Lake City in October 1856. Having secured Government contracts to furnish supplies for the troops at Camp Floyd, he now engaged in the grain and produce business with David R. Allen. They established stores in Salt Lake City, Nephi, and Ephraim. In the years 1856 - 57 Nathaniel served a mission in Great Britain where he labored in the office of the "Millennial Star", and later as pastor of the London district. From November 1869 until 1870 he was a missionary to the New England States, laboring principally in his native state of Massachusetts. For a long period he was a member of the High Council and was actively engaged in public affairs, both State and Church. In 1873 he was stricken with a severe illness, the effects of which he never entirely recovered. During his remaining years he acted as a home missionary and contributed various articles to the press. Nathaniel Henry Felt Sr. died on January 27,1887. He is buried in the Salt Lake City cemetary. He left a posterity of eight sons, five daughters and sixteen grandchildren. He was the husband of three wives: Eliza Ann Preston who died June 19, 1875, Sarah Strange, and Mary Louise Pile whom he married respectively March 17,1854, and December 7, 1856. In addition to his first wife, two sons and two daughters preceded him beyond the veil. Partly from the L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, Vol. II. by Andrew Jensen. Compiled by Donna Joyce Mangum and Eric William Mangum in 2001.

The Felt Family

Contributor: LaRue Johnstun Created: 5 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Among the honorable old Yankee families, which have helped to make history in Utah as well as in famous old New England, is the Felt family of which the veteran pioneer, Nathaniel Henry Felt, is the founder of the western branch. Elder Felt was born in Salem on Feb 6, 1816 and married Eliza Ann Preston. He went to Nauvoo in 1845, and was a participant in all the trying events which followed that date. He came to Utah in 1850 after having presided over the St. Louis conference, number about 10,000 souls for some years. His family, which were numerous and vigorous are among Utah’s best and most respected citizens. Among the most prominent in recent years are the late Joseph H. Felt, who served as the first president of the Y. M. M. I. A. in Salt Lake City and for many years before his death June 15, 1907 in the bishopric of the Eleventh Ward. Charles B. Felt is a member of the general Sunday School Union Board having served in many capacities prior to his elevation to his present position both in civic and ecclesiastical positions. George F. Felt, John G. and A. W. Felt are well known business men of Salt Lake City. David P. Felt, one of the sons, is also a well known journalist and editor. Ida Felt, that beautiful foster mother who with her sister Annie, took the responsibility of rearing a family of six orphan children left by the demise of Minnie Felt Cutler, and who was soon after followed by the father, Joseph C. Cutler. Including these well known characters there are still living of the original Felt Family in Utah the following: Margaret Felt West, John G., Albert W., George F., Charles B., Ed H., Ida, Annie, David P., Nathaniel H., and Mary Adelia Young. Of the families associated with the Felt family and well-known in Utah, the Felt Genealogy mentions very frequently the following famililies: Adams, Aldrick, Allen, Anson, Anders, Barber,Barnes, Billings, Brown, Bryant, Chandler, Chase, Clark, Crandall, Davis,Dudley, Emery, Ferguson, Fuller, Gall, Gates, Goff, Gould, Gray, Green, Hale,Hardy, Harris, Henderson, Hill, Holly Howard, Howe, Johnson, Jones, Keeler, Kimball, Lawrence, Lee, Lowry, Lyon, Martin, Mason, Morrison, Nelson, Nicholas, Palmer, Peek, Perkins, Petit, Pierce, Porter, Pratt, Procter, Pulsipher, Reed, Reeves, Richardson, Robbins, Robinson, Russell, Saunders, Sheldon, Steele, Stevens, Symonds, Taylor, Wsebb, Wells, West, White, Whitmore, Williams, Wilson, Wood, Wright, Young. There has been a large Felt family record published, not by a direct descendant of the Felt family, but by an in-law John E. Morris. This gentleman has gathered some most interesting and valuable information regarding the descendants of the immigrant George Felt of Felt’s Casco Bay, who was born in 1601 and arrived at Salem with Endicott in 1628, and the introduction to the book contains eloquent remarks from which we herein give genuine extracts. “There is a healthy and growing interest in the subject of genealogy” many bright historical minds are now interested in this fascinating study, and giving to it much valuable time and attention. The work constantly being done by these, and others of more humble attainments, well illustrates the claim of an increasing interest, and gives the lie to the smart assertion that the modern man lives for the present and strives for the future only, and does not care a rap who or what his grandfather was. This same modern, if his ideas should be carried out by his descendants, might be somewhat chagrined could he observe the mental attitude of his great-grandchildren toward himself. Those who affect to despise the egotism of genealogy may read with interest and profit the following extract: " The preservation of pedigrees is not the mere pastime of the idle and curious; it is the honorable employment of the student and historian, for it has always formed the basis of true history. In the ancient records of Assyria, Egypt, and Arabia, the pedigree of an individual is usually the thread upon which is strung the stirring events of centuries; and so important a place did the preservation of a pedigree occupy among the Israelites, that it was established as* a positive obligation upon every Levite in the temple. Josephus regarded genealogical study as of the utmost importance, and, in giving an account of his personal history, boasts, 'I have traced my pedigree as I found it recorded on the public tablets.' Nor is the genealogical form of history peculiar to Semitic races. The earliest Greek records were also those of pedigrees. The histories of Acusilaus of Argos, and Hecataeus of Miletus were entitled genealogies; the fragmentary historits of Xanthus, Charon of Lampsacus, and Hellanicus are strongly marked with the genealogical element ; while in the Greek Testament the whole-structure of Christianity is based upon the established pedigree of its founder. It is true, many lineages contain nothing save the simple records of uneventful generations, but they preserve facts which would otherwise be lost in the history of the American nation. To continue with the Felt family, we are told by our historian that the “The origin of the FELT family is unknown, neither have we any certain knowledge of the former home of George Felt, the immigrant, though there is reason for believing that he came from Wales. It has been suggested that the name is of Flemish or Dutch origin, and that the family settled with others of like nationality in Wales or on the border. The name seems to signify the same in various languages, and to be derived from words meaning " field " or " open country." There is a probability that its earlier form was Felch. The immigrant George was the first settler in Casco Bay, near Boston, and he lived to the advanced age of 92 years, his wife surviving him even at this date. He was possessed of great wealth at one time in his life, but through the early Indian wars and the treachery of some of his friends he lost his holdings “in Broad Cove” some of which was recovered by his children. Of his descendants there were many soldiers, officers and civil incumbents in the great revolution, which gave America to the Americans. Perhaps the most famous descendant the third Samuel, born in 1735. He harried Mehitabel Buell, and the story of this winner her from his best friend, the long subsequent enmity broken only by Samuel’s heroic deed of picking up the wounded body of NATHANIEL HENRY FELT Taken Dec. 2, 1884 his one-time rival from the bloody plains of New York’s hot battle, is told with vividness in this book. It is from this Samuel, whose romantic and generous settlement of Lebanon, New York, has sprung most of the Felts of America. He was an officer in the French and Indian wars, was a trusted friend of Governor Trumbull, along down the lines of his descendants are found orators, statesmen, pioneers, philanthropists, scholars and soldiers. An interesting incident is also contained in the story of Capt. John Felt who at the opening of the Revolutionary war, residing in the North Fields, a portion of Salem, Mass. He was a tall “muscular man” and endowed with the courage of his convictions, one who in a emergency proves to be the right man in the right place. This was well shown at the time of the British invasion of Salem by Col. Leslie, Feb. 24, 1775 when by the firm stand of Capt. Felt the opening conflict of the revolution, which was precipitated seven weeks later at Concord) was here averted. Had a man of less firmness and weaker judgement stood in the his place in all probability the first battle of the war would have been fought at the North Bridge, Salem. The following account is drawn largely from a very interesting address delivered by Charles M. Endicott, Esq., January 18, 1855 before the Essex Institute of Salem. The bridge over the North River and the causeway over the flats were built by the town of Salem in 1744. Their combined length was 860 feet, with a width of 18 feet, and over the river was a draw at least 18 feet long, which was arranged to swing upward for the passage of vessels. The town's right in the bridge and flats was, by authorization of a vote in town meeting, held May 14, 1755, conveyed by the selectmen to certain citizens, (the right to the draw and its supporting piers being reserved,) upon condition that the bridge and way be always kept in suitable condition for the passage of vehicles of every description, and this failing, the property, with all improvements which might have been made, to revert to the town. The rights conveyed were, after a time, forfeited, and the town being again in possession appointed a committee to make a further conveyance. This was done June 15, 1768, and Jonathan Ropes, Jeremiah Hacker, Thorndike Proctor, and John Felt, all proprietors in the North Fields, became the owners of the bridge and adjacent flats under the same restrictions as governed the former proprietors. (See Appendix C.) This was the condition of things at the opening of the Revolutionary War. As before intimated, Capt. John Felt was a prominent figure at the time of Leslie's invasion. Mr. Endicott says : "Foremost among the friends of liberty, and the resolute and daring enemies of oppression and arbitrary power, stood Capt. John Felt, who, without any disparagement to others, appears entitled to the distinction of the Hero of the British repulse at the North Field Bridge. He was at this time about fifty years of age. His frame, square, strong and muscular, denoted him a man whom it would be the part of prudence to avoid in single combat. Salem possessed many men whose social position in life was perhaps superior, men of more wealth, of more erudition, of more influence in her public councils; but none of greater moral worth, or irreproachable private character. His love of independence and hatred of tyranny had shone through his whole life, and with these qualities was blended the most intrepid resolution. There lived no one in whose heart glowed a warmer love for the liberties of his country, and none more ready to peril, and if need be to sacrifice, his life in support of her cause. In a word, he was just the man for an emergency: of cool, determined bravery, calm and collected in the hour of danger. These qualities inspired every one with confidence in his ability successfully to control and direct any daring enterprise or forlorn hope which his inclination prompted him to lead." The object of the invasion by Col. Leslie was to take possession of a dozen or more cannon which had been collected by the citizens for the purpose of resisting British aggression should occasion require, and which were secreted about the premises of Capt. Robert Foster, a blacksmith, who had been employed in repairing them, on the north side of the North River. Col. Leslie landed his forces in a retired spot on Marblehead Neck and marched swiftly and secretly towards Salem; but the news of his movements had preceded him, and when he arrived he found the draw of the bridge open, and guarded by a large number of citizens massed upon the north shore. As he passed the Court House he was joined by Capt. John Felt, who attached himself closely to Col. Leslie, with the avowed intention of making things hot for him personally should he order a commencement of hostilities. He afterwards stated that it was his intention to grapple with Col. Leslie, had the troops fired upon the people, and to jump with him into the stream, there to try the death struggle together. A neighbor afterwards said, " He could have done so, drowned him, and then swam off." Col. Leslie, upon finding the draw open, demanded that it be immediately lowered, and remonstrated with the people for insulting his soldiers and obstructing the King's highway. " This is not the King's highway," was the reply, "it is a private way belonging to the proprietors of the North Fields, and no King or country has any control over it." " The people on the north side of the bridge had climbed upon the top of the upraised leaf by help of the chains, and there sat astride like so many hens at roost. The indignation of the Colonel at having his designs thus suddenly and unexpectedly baffled, was excited almost to frenzy, and he gave utterance to his feeling, to say the least, in no mild or becoming language ; one account says he stamped and swore, ordering the bridge to be immediately lowered. Being questioned as to his design in making this movement, and why he wished to cross the bridge, he replied that he had orders to cross it, and he would do so if it cost his life and the lives of his men. Here was, however, a dilemma from which this bravado could not relieve him. To advance under the present circumstances without the consent of the inhabitants was impossible, and to retreat, disgrace. In the bitterness of his feelings he then went upon West's (now Brown's) wharf, to reconnoitre, closely followed by Capt. Felt, who was observing every motion and order with the keen unremitting watchfulness of the tiger, and turning to an officer near him, said, ' You must face about this division, and fire upon those people.' These were the inhabitants on the northern side of the river, who had collected upon a small wharf which jutted out from the eastern side of the bridge, conspicuous among whom was Capt. Robert Foster, the owner of the premises upon which the cannon had been deposited. This order to fire having been overheard by Capt. Felt, who stood within two yards of Col. Leslie, he cried out with a loud voice, for his resentment was kindled by the order to fire : ' Fire ! you have no right to fire without further orders; if you do fire you will all be dead men.' 'Where are they who can hinder me ?' asked Col. Leslie. ' There,' said Capt. Felt, pointing to the people, ' is a multitude, every man of whom is prepared to die in this strife.' " At the moment these words were uttered by Capt. Felt, a thrill of confidence was felt through the whole multitude. The people saw at once that he was just the man for the present emergency, and with unanimous, though tacit, consent, looked1 to him as their leader in any movement which should be made for the further defense of the bridge. He was the spirit on whom the crowd now depended. How far such language induced Col. Leslie to use a praiseworthy forbearance cannot be determined; but had the command to fire been enforced, probably not a man of that whole regiment would have escaped death, and the first bloody battle of the Revolution would have been fought at the North Bridge, on the 26th of February, instead of the 9th of April, at Lexington." It was now low tide, and three gondolas lay aground on the west side of the bridge ; one of them was owned by Capt. Felt, and one by his brother Jonathan, commonly known as "Hunter Felt." Apprehensive that they might be seized by the soldiers, Capt, Felt suggested their destruction; and the citizens, conspicuous among them being Jonathan Felt, sprang to the work, and in a few moments, by the use of axes and such other implements as were found ready at hand, the work was accomplished, but not without resistance, and in the fracas which followed one Joseph Whicher received a **** in the breast from a bayonet sufficient to draw blood, which may be justly recorded as "the first blood of the Revolution." Col. Leslie having by this time become convinced of the determination of the citizens to resist his progress, announced his intention of carrying out his purpose if he remained until autumn, and was assured by Capt. Felt that nobody would care if he did so. Upwards of an hour and a half had been consumed in the fruitless attempt to cross the bridge, and the short winter day was fast drawing to a close, when the colonel, thinking perhaps to effect by diplomacy what he could not compass by force, asked Capt. Felt if he had any authority to cause the bridge to be lowered, and was answered, " There is no authority in the case, but there might be some influence." A conference was the result of this suggestion, and, upon the pledge of Col. Leslie that he would not march his troops more than fifty rods beyond the bridge and then return in a peaceable manner, " the leaf was lowered, and the troops passed quietly over, marched the stipulated distance, then wheeled and set out with all haste on their homeward march, having been completely foiled in the object of their expedition." This withdrawal without seizing the guns cost Col. Leslie his commission. Above all the traits with which this noble family are marked is that of kindliness. A serene and constant kindness, which makes them good friends, good neighbors, and good citizens. This with their tendency to extreme age and their undoubted honor and probity is traced from generation to generation through the page of this book and of time. Deseret Evening News December 11, 1909

Life History of Joseph Albert Stratton

Contributor: LaRue Johnstun Created: 5 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Life History of Joseph Albert Stratton Joseph Albert Stratton, a faithful Latter Day Saint and a Pioneer of 1847 was born the 11th of September 1821 at Bedford, Bedford County, Tennessee. He was baptized by Elder William Alred (Alfred?) about the 14th of February 1840 in the waters of Kizer’s Creek, Pike County, Illinois and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. About the 15th of April 1842, he was ordained an Elder by Brother Baker, President of the Elder’s Quorum. On the 17th of May 1844 he was ordained to the High Priesthood by Presidents Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards and licensed the same day, as recorded in record of licenses book A, page 126. His first mission was performed by working on the Temple as appointed by President Joseph Smith. He afterwards filled a mission with good success in Pennsylvania and several of the Eastern States, as appears from his journal. He also filled a mission to England, of near two years; magnifying his calling and returning home with honor. He was next appointed to preside over a numerous Branch of the Church at St. Louis, Missouri, which he filled with diligence and in a faithful manner for nearly ten months. From the Journal History of the Church, the 6th of February 1847, the following official letter (signed by Willard Richards) was written to Brother Stratton. Winter Quarters Camp Of Israel Feb. 6th, 1847 Elder Joseph A. Stratton, Beloved Brother: Your letter of recent date, suggested the Elder Felt for the Presidency of the Church at St. Louis, is received and approved by the Council, and we trust that he will be approved by the Branch and that he will requite himself as a man of God and workman indeed in his calling. Brother Stratton seems to have some fears that his license to leave St. Louis and visit the Camp, came more in answer to his prayers, than in accordance to our wishes. If this were true, it is certainly an encouragement for Bro. Stratton to continue praying, for the answer proves, that he prays in faith, and to pray without faith would be sin and no man can pray in faith, without desiring to be heard. Jesus says “Ye ask and receive not because ye ask amiss”, and again “Ask and ye shall receive.” We are willing that you should receive the Savior’s testimony in your case, and enjoy the consolation that you have asked aright, and had your petition granted. Yes Bro. Stratton it is quite right, when the children of the Kingdom have been laboring in the field as long and faithfully as you have. And circumstances are as favorable and laborers as plentiful that they return home to the Father’s house and rest, and refresh themselves, that their spirits and body become invigorated and gain strength and be prepared for a greater work as the fields may ripen for the harvest, so that independent of your request, we wish you to come, we want to see you that we may rejoice in each others society for a season. There is nothing peculiar transpired since we last wrote you. We are progressing with the organization of companies preparatory for emigration and the Saints are rejoicing themselves in the liberty of the Gospel. There is some sickness at this place, but no more that might be anticipated in the fulfillment of prophecy, “They wear out the Saints of the most High, when we contemplate labors and toil of the Camp the past year, and the many exposures they have been subjected to. The diseases are mostly of colds and canker.” Under date of January 22, 1847, President Young wrote Joseph A. Stratton at St. Louis, Missouri, to invite as many brethren as could possibly leave their families with a tolerable degree of comfort to come on and proceed to the mountains. I can find no record of his marriage but from the Journal History of the Church 21 June 1847, p.6 we read the following, Joseph Albert Stratton, born 11 September 1821, Bedford, Bedford, Tenn., and Mary Ann Stratton born 31 March 1815, Bedford, Bedfordshire, England were listed among the first fifty of the Latter Day Saints to be organized into companies for crossing the plains from the Missouri River to the Great Salt Lake Valley in the summer of 1847. Daniel Spencer was Captain of the first hundred. Peregrine Sessions Captain of the first fifty. The document giving the information was dated, West Bank of the Elkhorn River, 15th of June 1847 and signed by Elizah F. Sheets, Captain and Joseph A. Stratton, Clerk, Darwin Richardson, teamster. Polly Sessions kept a journal and recorded many interesting experiences of this company of Pioneer but a journal is a very personal thing and I was not allowed to copy from it. They arrived in the Great Salt Lake Valley, 24th September 1847. Elder Stratton’s last mission was to search out the best route to Zion, and lead the Saints therein during the fall of 1850. His obituary was written by Parley P. Pratt (from which I have frequently quoted) and among other things he said, “his exposure during this last mission, and the frosts and chilly blasts of the mountains probably tended to fasten disease upon his system. And thus he had endured to the end; spent the vigor of life and the strength of manhood in the service of his God; and at last laid down his life for his brethren. In his sickness he suffered much, begged often to be suffered to depart and died with an assurance of eternal life and usefulness in his Master’s employ. Thus another of the Latter Day Priesthood has joined his brethren behind the veil, to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord, to “preach deliverance to the captives and the opening of the prison to them that are bound.” He was buried at sundown. Seven carriages followed the remains to the grave and Orson Pratt preached the funeral sermon.

Who Was Nathaniel H. Felt

Contributor: LaRue Johnstun Created: 5 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Sketch written by Paul R. Felt Although not one of the earliest immigrants to Utah, Nathaniel H. Felt was one of the first in the new Territory to hold official position. He was not only the first alderman of Salt Lake City, but also a member of the first Territorial assembly. That he did not come west the first year was only because ill health prevented; for he was in Nauvoo at the time of the exodus and had his outfit ready for journey. Being advised to delay his departure until physically restored, and being assigned to an important duty in St. Louis, he let Elder John Taylor have his team and wagon, with which some of that pioneer's family came to the valley, Mr. Felt's arrival being in the fall of 1850. He was born in Massachusetts in 1816, and though he learned a humbled trade, his commercial instinct soon lifted him above this environment, and he was successfully engaged in the African and China trade when "Mormonism" found him. Both in civil and ecclesiastical lines he was prominent and useful in early Utah times, being scholarly in his tastes and having much ability as a writer and speaker. His activity in public affairs ceased in 1873 when he was stricken with a severe illness from which he never fully recovered; and he died in 1887. From a paper (not news) in my possession. Source not given - Paul R. Fel

Life Stoy of Thomas Charles West and Margaret Eliza Felt

Contributor: LaRue Johnstun Created: 5 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

THE LIFE STORY OF THOMAS CHARLES WEST AND MARGARET ELIZA FELT "Come, come ye Saints, no toil nor labor fear; But with joy wend your way. We'll find the place which God for us prepared, Far away in the West, Where none shall come to hurt or make afraid; There the Saints will be blessed. " Those courageous souls, our pioneer ancestors, who left homes and loved ones to explore, conquer and subdue a new unproven land were pioneers not only on the frontiers of civilization, but on the frontiers of the spirit as well. They truly repre¬sent the great American ideal, the very reason for its settlement, that of religious freedom. These emigrants possessed high ideals and objectives, and the faith and determination to achieve them. It was through hard work, and the ability to vision beyond their own time, the needs of future generations, that those objectives were consummated. Their dedication to a belief in true freedom, their love of fellowmen, their willingness to sacrifice them-selves for the good of others, and their sincere faith in God; in all these virtues and attributes our pioneers left us a magnificent heritage. It is our right — our privilege — our duty to cherish and appreciate it. Perhaps the proper way to show our appreciation for the many good things our progenitors did for us, is to pattern our lives after theirs so that when it is our time to pass on to our eternal reward, it can be said of us that we left this sphere of action better than we found it. This history is gratefully dedicated to Thomas Charles West and his wife Margaret Eliza Felt, two souls who might be counted worthy to be numbered among those spoken of above. Thomas Charles West was the first son and second child of the eleven children, born to Charles Henry John West and Eliza Dangerfield, He was born on the 9 of October 1859. At London, Middlesex, England. He was blessed 8 November 1853 at Goswell Road Branch by Elder MaCaughie. In his infancy he had a severe sickness and was thought dead. His mother washed and laid him out. A short time later she looked at him and saw his finger move. They immediately worked with him and Charles Henry administered to him; and he was restored to life. Charles Henry John West was born 12 January 1833 in London, Middle-sex England and was the third son of John West and Lydia Johnson. Eliza Dangerfield, born 7 September 1832 in Cottage Lane, City road, England, and was the daughter of Thomas and Caroline Buckwell of Middlesex, England. Charles Henry and Eliza were married 25th December 1850 at St. Andrews Church in Holborn , London by Rector I.I. Toogood in the presence of their parents. They were converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Elders John Hyde and Orson Pratt. After joining the church Charles Henry preached the gospel to Eliza’ s family and converted five members, who had formerly belonged to the Baptist church. Their other children born in England were: Caroline, Ann Lydia, Jabez William, Mary Ann, and Eliza Alice. The spirit of coming to Utah - or 'Zion' as they expressed it - had been with Charles Henry and Eliza since joining the church. They worked hard to save what they could to pay for their passage to Zion. With the expense of caring for their large family they found it difficult to save enough. It was after Eliza Alice was born when they met Elders John Brown and Fergerson, who, learning of their long desire to go to Utah, promised them that if they would send two of their girls over with friends they would be able to follow within a year. They sent Caroline ten, and Lydia six, with Brother and Sister King, who had no children. Brother King's mother and sister were traveling with them. They left in April 1862 on the "Captain Tapstock" and arrived in Salt Lake City 12 October 1862. With the blessings of the Lord, as the young mission¬aries had promised, Charles Henry and Eliza were able to accumulate the necessary amount for passage for them¬selves and their remaining four children; and in the spring of 1863, one year later, they prepared to leave their home¬land and loved ones in England. They spent a week visiting some principal places of interest, the Kew Gardens, Lon¬don Docks, Thames Tunnel, the Monument, etc. They felt they were leaving England forever. They sailed 1 June 1863 on the "Amazon" which carried nearly a thousand people on board, including eight-hundred Latter-day Saints. Traveling with them and in their care was a boy, Samuel Bezzant, and a young lady, Mary Powell. After leaving the "White Cliffs of Dover" and on into the English Channel the family all felt some seasickness; Eliza continued feeling sick most of the way over. Thomas Charles, being the oldest, was required to help take care of his little brothers and sisters; while his father prepared the meals, washed the dishes and other duties required of him. The Saints were organized into wards and had their weekly meetings, consisting of singing, prayer, sacrament, and Gospel lessons; everything was done in order and by proper authority. President George Q. Cannon had given instructions and a Gospel sermon before the ship sailed. All immigrants furnished and prepared their own food on a large cook stove. The food consisted mostly of salt beef, oatmeal, crackers, dry peas, flour, etc. Those who could afford it had better rations. Among the passengers was the famous English Author, Charles Dickens, who later wrote the book - the "Uncommerical Traveler". In this book on page 99, Mr. Dickens writes of the "Mormons" on board, describing vividly a family which the West Family like to think was the family of Charles Henry and Eliza, Quote "A father and mother and several young children on the main deck below me had formed a family circle, close to the foot of the crowded gangway, where the children had made a nest for themselves on a coil of rope, the mother, she suckling the youngest, seemed to be discussing family affairs as peaceable as if they were if perfect retirement. " Also on board were a number of Welch Brethern who composed a brass band, so they had plenty of music, which pleased the family of Charles Henry and Eliza as they loved music. They were forty-two days on the ocean and the water was rough most of the way. A severe wind storm came up and blew off part of the sails and the sailors had a hard time keeping things under control. Occasionally a whale could be seen spouting water, or a flying fish, or some water fowl. One death occurred on board ship and the body was buried at sea. The ship docked at New York City harbor 4 July 1863. The Civil War was on and conditions were far from pleasant. The journey from New York to Florence, Nebraska was very bad. They were required to travel day and night, sometimes being crowded into cattle cars without sufficient food to keep the children from crying because of hunger. The steamer that took them up river was even more crowded and they were very thankful to reach Florence, Nebraska. It was here they and the other saints were met by Brethren from Utah who were to take them by ox team to Salt Lake City; about sixty wagons were waiting to take them across the plains. The West family traveled with the ox team of Peter Nebeker. When luggage and all was loaded, there was not enough room for all to ride, so all able-bodied men and older children were required to walk. Thomas Charles and Jabez walked with their father most of the way, until Jabez slipped and got run over by one of the wagons. His injuries were treated with fresh dung, and with faith and the Elders administering to him, he was healed; but he rode the rest of the way. After ten weeks on the plains, behind the slow, pokey oxen, and the heat of the summer months, over dusty roads, and crossing streams, they arrived in Salt Lake City, 4 October 1863, in time to attend the Semi-annual Conference of Church. The Saints were taken to the Church camping grounds in the Eighth Ward Square, where relatives and friends greeted them and took them into their own homes until they could find a place to locate. Charles Henry and Eliza and their family were met by Brother Grimsdell of the Tenth Ward, an old acquaintance from London, with his team and wagon. He took them and their baggage to his home, where they stayed until after Conference; they made arrangements to go to Provo, where their girls were living with a Bishop Miller. They rode to Provo in Dixie Wagons. On the way they left the boy, Samuel Bezzant with his Grand-father at Battle Creek. (Before leaving Salt Lake City the young lady, Mary Powell, married the teamster Peter Nebeker. They went to Dixie.) There was great rejoicing when they saw Caroline and Ann. Charles Henry and Eliza were very thankful to their Father in Heaven to have their family united again and to Bishop Miller for taking care of the girls. After a few days they settled in a one room adobe house belonging to the brothers of Bishop Miller's wife. A few days after being settled a great sorrow came to them. The little girl, Mary Ann, who had been ill most of the way across the plains, became worse. She died 22 October 1863. She was buried the next day in the Provo City Cemetery, because they were newcomers, the family were the only ones present at the burial services, along with the Bishop, who had taken care of her properly, and the driver of the buggy. They returned to their humble home feeling very down cast and gloomy. They felt that it was more than they could bear. While in this frame of mind, a gentleman walked into their home without knocking, and sat down in the only chair and commenced talking to them of their trouble. He seemed to know their history, the troubles they had passed through, the sacrifices they had made and of their faithfulness in the Gospel. He talked with them about an hour, consoling and blessing them, and they felt a heavenly influence radiate from him. He was very tall and wore a dark homespun suit, his hair was grey and his beard came down to his chest. When he left, he went backwards toward the door, opened it and went out. Charles Henry followed him, and to his amazement, could see no one. Next day he called on the Bishop to thank him for sending a ward teacher to comfort them at such a trying time. The Bishop said, "We have no one in our ward as you describe. Brother West, you have been highly blessed with a visitation of one of the three Nephites that were to remain on the earth until the Savior comes." Charles Henry first worked at helping make molasses. He received his wages in molasses, carrots and potatoes. Eliza taught a small group of children, along with her own, in her home and helped the family income a little. Thomas Charles, ten, gleaned wheat from Bishop Miller's fields and other fields that had been harvested. The whole family helped glean 21 1/2 bushels. Flour was worth $25 a hundred pound. Work was hard to get that winter. The next spring, another blessing came to them. While Eliza was in Salt Lake City, visiting her brother, she secured some temple clothes. Then Charles walked fifty miles from Provo to join her, and a few days later, they were sealed to each other in the Endowment House for time and all eternity! At last they felt fully repaid for all the trails through which they had passed. Some friends in Heber City wanted Charles Henry to move there and help get out logs and haul to Provo. Thomas Charles was big enough to help him, but it was so cold he nearly froze to death riding down the canyon on the logs. Once he became snow blinded and suffered severely. His mother kept his eyes bandaged and when the other children ate their boiled wheat they slyly slipped what they couldn't eat onto his dish, as they were never allowed to waste food, and he wondered why he had so much to eat. Wheat, carrots, flour and molasses were about all they had to eat that winter. Their potatoes froze because no one had told them how to care for potatoes in such a cold climate. The winter was so much colder than any winter had been in England. While living at Heber City, a daughter Mary Rebecca, was born 9 January 1866. In the spring of 1866 the family moved to Jordon to run the J. C. Little farm on shares. The farm was located on the Jordon River and it had a more comfortable house to live in. Thomas Charles got his first experience in farm living and farm work. He helped milk cows and feed animals and harvest hay. The children helped their mother churn butter and other such tasks children can do on a farm. The older ones helped wash the wool after the spring shearing of sheep. In 1867 Charles Henry and Eliza moved their family into Salt Lake City. Here they both taught school, Charles the boys, Eliza the girls. They lived in the back of the school house. It was this way their family received most of their schooling. On twenty third of February 1868, a son Charles Jesse was born, and they continued teaching school until April when they moved into the eleventh ward. In December of that year, Charles was working on a railroad in Echo Canyon, he suddenly felt impressed that he was needed at home. Since there was no other way to go, he walked the entire distance - only to learn of the death of his little daughter, Rebecca. For the second time, the family mourned the loss of a lovely three-year-old child! That was not all, however, for the next two children John Henry born 12 April 1870 lived only 2 and one half hours. Fanny Elizabeth, born 7th June 1872 and lived with them only 5 and one half months. The loss of these three beloved babies cast an unhappy shadow over the first few years which the family spent in Salt Lake City and memories of the little one buried in Provo years before, but they did not falter in their faith and courage to carry on. They still had many blessings to be thankful for, one of which was the addition of another son William Joseph born 29 August 1973. He was a frail, weak child, and it was feared that his chances for survival were no better than those of the two little babes who preceded him - but he had come to stay. Thomas Charles and his father got work in 1868 at Promontory Point digging and hauling fill dirt for a Mr. Brighton. Mr. Brighton would not pay Thomas Charles enough for such hard work, so he went to work for a John Sharp, driving mules on a dump truck on the same project at Promontory Point. He received good pay for this work. It was dangerous work and among a rough class of men. When the job was finished he and his father went home to work for Brigham Young. They did all kinds of odd jobs, such as gardening, orchard work, harvesting in the fields, etc. When President Young obtained a contract to furnish lumber for ties for a street car company they worked up City Creek, cutting and hauling lumber out of the canyon. They also worked on the Tabernacle and Assembly Hall. In their spare time they worked on their own home, which they were building on a piece of land Charles Henry had purchased in the Tenth Ward, hauling rock and sand for the foundation, setting out fruit trees and berry bushes, etc. Thomas Charles, now working for the Gibson Lumber Company, took his pay in lumber for the new home. His next job was with George Chandler, a Salt Lake butcher. On this job he was kicked by a mule and severely injured. The doctor gave little hope for his recovery, but through faith, prayer, administration of the Priesthood, and his mother’s excellent nursing, he soon recovered and was able to resume his work. During this time he met Margaret Eliza Felt, loved her and wanted to marry her. In 1873 his father gave him part of his building lot on which he built a two room adobe house. He learned the plastering trade and became very good at it. Margaret Eliza Felt, (Maggie, as she was familiarly called) was the third child of Nathaniel H. Felt and Eliza Ann Preston. She was born in St. Louis Mo. 6 October 1849. She weighed only three pounds at birth and was a very delicate baby. Her father, Nathaniel H. Felt was born 6 February 1816 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, the son of Nathaniel Felt and Hannah Reeves. He was a draper and tailor of Salem, Mass. Eliza Ann Preston was the daughter of Joseph and Rebecca (Peele) Preston and was born 10 November 1820 in Salem, Massachusetts. Nathaniel and his wife Eliza Ann joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1842. After the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph Smith, while the saints were being buffeted around by their enemies, Nathaniel Felt moved his family to Nauvoo, Ill. When the saints were expelled from Nauvoo Nathaniel, ill with chills and fever, and on the advice of Brigham Young, remained in the east, moving his family to St. Louis Mo. While there he was appointed President of the St. Louis Conference. It was the only organized Conference of the church in the United States at that time and numbered between seven and ten thousand saints. It was here in St. Louis that this tiny delicate baby, Margaret Eliza was born. At the age of six weeks she suffered a severe case of small pox, due to the fact her parents made a practice of taking missionaries into their home to do what they could for their welfare, and one of them exposed the family to the dreaded disease. Margaret Eliza being so tiny and so ill, gave her parents grave concern for fear of losing her. It was hard to keep her tiny hands from scratching her face which was covered with pox, and she carried scars the rest of her life. (She often related how Golden Kimball, as a boy, teasingly called her 'holy face!') In 1850 the Nathaniel H. Felt family moved to Salt Lake City with the Heywood and Wooley Merchandise train. Here Nathaniel built a three story adobe house on Main Street in the block north of Temple Square. He became a grain merchant; was first alderman in Salt Lake City; was Colonel and Chaplain in the Utah Militia; was elected to the House of Representatives in the first Legislature, 1852; went to England on a mission, where he established a paper called the "Mormon". He had three wives - Eliza Ann Preston, the mother of Joseph Henry, Nathaniel Preston, Margaret Ann, John Gillingham, Albert William, George Francis, Ada Agusta, Mary Alice, Charles Brigham and Annette Rebecca; Sarah Strange, the mother of James Strange, Edward Hunter, Mary Ida and Eliza Ann; Mary Louise Pile, the mother of David Pile, Nathaniel Henry and Mary Dell. The two families of Eliza Ann and Sarah lived in the same house. Margaret Eliza, being the oldest daughter, had plenty of work to do. She tended the babies and younger children. She dug Sego Lilies with her companions on Capitol Hill, (She was intimate with the families of Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, J. C. Little and other members of the 17th and 18th Wards, where she spent her childhood.) She attended school and was outstanding in singing, grammar and spelling. Her home life was a happy one. She honored her parents and loved her brothers and sisters. Her father made a comfortable living so she did not have to go away from home to work as so many young girls of those days. Her work was at home, where she learned to be a good housekeeper, homemaker, to sew, to knit and to tat - which was one of the fancy work arts she liked best. She also enjoyed the games of childhood as played at that time: Jacks, played with rocks - Hopscotch -Run sheep run - Steal Sticks - King William was King James Son, etc. She participated in dances and parties at the Social Hall. She grew up with Salt Lake City and witnessed the building of all the familiar land marks - Tabernacle, Temple, ZCMI store, Eagle Gate, Lion House, Salt Lake Theater, Tithing Yard Square, etc. She had several offers of marriage but none suited her until she met Thomas West. Thomas Charles West and Margaret Eliza Felt were married in the Salt Lake Endowment house 10 November 1874 in the presence of their parents. They started housekeeping in the two room adobe house built by Thomas Charles on the part of the building lot given him by his father. In 1875 they moved to Round Valley, Morgan County, Utah, to live in a small log house on a farm that Nathaniel Felt had purchased from a Mr. Cooper. (None of Nathaniel's boys cared to farm.) It joined the farm of Bishop Edward W. Hunter, presiding Bishop of the Church. It was some distance from any neighbors and three miles from Morgan. It was hard for Margaret to leave the city, her family, friends and close neighbors to live in such a lonely place. The families who lived in Round Valley then were, Edward Hunter, Andrew Black, Neils Nielson, O. B. Anderson, later a bishop, Evan Richards, and Arthur Brewer. (Round Valley became part of North Morgan Ward when it was organized in 1877. The farm was divided by the tracks of the Union Pacific railroad (1868-69). A large spring was on the upper end but their land was to high to use it for irriga¬tion so they used it for drinking and household purposes. It was used by other settlers for household and irrigation purposes. Thomas Charles made a pond of the spring and planted fish; later he made another pond for boating. The watercress grew very profuse in the ponds during the summer. The County Road (later it became the highway) ran close to the house and travelers would stop to get a cold drink of water. Bands of Indians would go by, some stopped. It would frighten Margaret, but they were always friendly and occasionally they asked for biscuits or something else to eat. Tramps from the railroad pestered her for food also; she never turned them away and always fed them when she could. They often asked what they could do to earn some food and she had them chop wood to cook with. Thomas Charles fenced his land, built a barn, chicken coop, granary, vegetable cellar, etc. He planted an orchard of apples, pears and plums, raspberries, red English currants and gooseberries. He had several colonies of bees, a small herd of sheep and other necessary farm animals of that time. He was a handy man, able to do most anything he set out to do. He even made some of their furniture. (A chest of drawers that he made out of dry goods boxes was still in use in 1960.) When farm work was not pressing he worked at his plastering trade. He plastered most of the houses around Morgan from 1875-1895. He also plastered in Summit County as far as Peoa and Oakley. Before the advent of wall paper he would white wash for his customers. He was a good workman and guaranteed his work. Occasionally when he was away on these jobs, Margaret spent the time in Salt Lake City. She went to the Temple often to do work for her kindred dead. On 5 December 1875, their first child, Thomas George, was born in Salt Lake City. (About the same time Annie Neville, Thomas Charles' sister, had her first baby - also a boy. She and Margaret dressed them alike for a while, as they lived close to each other at the time.) On 16 October 1877, their second child, Charles Henry, was born in the little log house in Round Valley. On 12 October 1878, Albert William was born in Salt Lake City, as was Eliza Ann on 1 July 1880. Three more children were born to them in the log house, Frank LeRoy, 3 May 1882, Louie Mary Etta, 31 August 1884, and Amy Alice, 13 May 1886. In the fall of 1886 a severe epidemic of diphtheria broke out. All of the children came down with the dreaded disease, except six-month old Amy Alice. Dr. Wads-worth quarantined the family, and everyone was afraid to come near them, except their neighbor Arthur Brewer. He would come as far as the gate with their food and supplies. Albert William died on his eighth birthday, four days later Louie Mary Etta passed away, two years and two months old. Thomas Charles and Margaret had to prepare their children for burial themselves and he had to make the coffins. They had a short graveside service with no one allowed to come and comfort them. This was a trying and sorrowful time for them. A short time after this, Thomas Charles built a frame house connecting it to the granary and vegetable cellar he had built earlier. It had three rooms. Two children were born in the new home, Alonzo David, 20 December 1887 and their last child, a boy, 10 January 1890. They gave him the maiden names of both his grandmothers, Preston Dangerfield. They had a near tragedy happen shortly after the birth of Preston. One of Margaret's brothers was a shoe salesman and canvassed the country with horse and buggy in the summer when the roads were in good condition; other times they would bring the horses to the farm for Thomas Charles to care for and to use as he wished. This time he hitched the horses up to the white topped buggy to take Margaret and baby Preston to visit the Brewer family who had moved up the canyon to the Tunnels, Mr. Brewer being a watchman at the Tunnels. They invited a neighbor, Ann Richards, to go with them. On the way back the horses became frightened and being high spirited, started running. For some distance, over narrow-rough roads and around curves, Thomas Charles held onto the reins with all of his strength, until his muscles ached, pulling and tugging to stop them, but to no avail. They ran into a big rock, and the buggy came to an abrupt stop, then the tugs broke and the horses ran on nearly to Morgan before stopping. The women were shaken up, bruised and badly frightened, no one was seriously hurt but Thomas Charles' arms were sore for weeks. About 1896 Thomas Charles drew up plans for a two story brick house. With the three older boys helping, he laid the foundation, put in the rafters and joists, made adobes for the lining, etc. He bought the brick from Bishop Charles Turner of South Morgan and hired a good friend, Brigham Robinson of North Morgan, to lay the brick. He overworked during this time of building the new home, along with all the other work required of him. In his rundown condition he contracted typhoid fever. Dr. C. F. Osgood from the east, and newly out of training, with the help of Lucy Baker, a graduate nurse, attended him. Margaret did all in her power to help him. The fever subsided, but complications set in and the doctor had to perform surgery. He died on the 25th of June 1898 at the age of forty-five. His funeral was held in the Morgan Stake House. The building was filled with relatives and friends. Thomas Charles was active in civil and Church affairs. He was influential in get¬ting a grade school in Round Valley for the twenty-five students living there at that time. He was appointed School Trustee and hired the teachers. He was also active in helping to get a Sunday School organized. He acted as Superintendent, teacher and music director. He was Choir leader in the North Morgan Ward and would ride a horse - or walk the railroad tracks if his horses were too tired from a day of farm work - to attend rehearsal of the Choir, or one of the musical programs or operettas he organized and presented. Often the Choir members did not show up, but he was patient and never gave up. Anna Smith Dickson, organist at that time, said years later that it was through his efforts that the Ward got its first organ. (He also got an organ for his family the winter before he died by trading a cow to Nephi Hardy for it. He hauled the cow down in the sleigh and brought the organ back.) He was a stake missionary and held many other positions. His children attended their meeting0 regularly too, Margaret saw to this by always having their clothes in order and getting them ready to go, even though she seldom went, herself. Thomas Charles was humorous and witty and was usually the life of the party in the games and entertainment. In those days they had parties and dances in the homes. He was a good singer and liked to sing humorous songs as well as the sacred ones. He teased Margaret by singing "By and by, there won’t' be room for Father, By and by a half-dozen more, Father 'll have to sleep on the floor", other favorites were "Old Dan Tucker", "Hard Times Come Again No More", "Keep Your Courage Up and Your Spirit Alive", "Miss Cooper's Boarding House", etc. He had a trick game he liked to play at parties if someone new was present; it was called "Brother I'm Bobbed". He was handy and helpful when any of the children or farm animals got hurt, knowing just what to do and never getting excited, like Margaret did. He enjoyed having friends and relatives visit the farm for an evening or for a few days. One year when the family reunion was held there he made a whirligig and a teeter-totter for the young children, and a horizontal bar and boat for the older ones. He could knit stockings and piece quilts. (He pieced almost enough blocks for an entire quilt his last winter.) He had cobbler’s tools and kept his family's shoes in repair. He was never idle. He was strict in discipline, but kind and loving in correcting the wrong¬doings of the children. Margaret stayed on at the farm for a year or two. The older boys were able to do the farm work. Then she rented the farm to the oldest boy, Thomas George, and moved to Morgan so that the younger children could attend school. The school and Sunday School in Round Valley had been closed down. When the cement plant was first completed near Croydon she moved there so that Frank LeRoy and Preston, who were working there, could board at home. She also took in other boarders. She moved back to Morgan in 1909 and took in school teachers to board. By this time Thomas George (George), Eliza Ann (Lida), Alonzo David (Lonnie, or Al), Charles Henry and Frank LeRoy (Roy) were married. She sold the farm to George. In 1910 she sent Preston on a mission to Australia. She was busy in the Presidency of the Relief Society of the North Morgan Ward, working with Jane Heiner and Louisa Grover. She had served as a visiting teacher for several years, driving around to the homes with a horse and buggy. After Amy was married in 1913 Margaret gave up housekeeping and made her home with Amy, taking turns visiting with the other members of her family as she felt like doing so. She lived twenty-nine years a widow. She had many friends and all who knew her loved her for her many virtues and pleasing personality. Here are a few of the many clever sayings she would use in her jovial conversations: "Once bit, twice shy"; "Never rob Peter to pay Paul"; "Where ignorance is bliss it is folly to be wise"; "What the eye doesn't see the heart doesn't grieve"; "What can't be helped must be endured"; "If you don't at first succeed try, try, again"; "Where there is a will there is a way"; "Stand firm for what you know to be right"; "A stitch in times saves nine"; and many others. She passed away peacefully in her 78th year at the home of Amy, 12 January 1927. Her funeral was held in North Morgan Ward Chapel under the direction of Bishop E. E. Anderson. She was buried beside Thomas Charles, and their two children Albert William and Louie Mary Etta, in the North Morgan Cemetery.

Autobiography of Mary Adelia Felt Young

Contributor: LaRue Johnstun Created: 5 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Autobiography Editing Notes: The original document was provided by Edward or Eldon Price, about the year 1977 at a family reunion at the Gurr residence in Kaysville, Utah. The original was hand typed presumably by Mary Dell’s daughter. I scanned the typed xerographic pages and I publish them here now. By the way, Paul and Afton Felt are remembered also now for keeping the family together via reunions and get-togethers. -- Jonathan Clark Felt Mary Dell Young, a daughter-in-law of Brigham Young, was born May 19, 1864, to Nathaniel Henry and Mary Louisa Pile Felt on Main street, Salt Lake City, Utah. She lived there until she was two years old, when her mother moved to the Nineteenth Ward. This is her story: "Bishop Davis was our Bishop and his daughter was my first-grade teacher. We went to the school on First West. The building was pioneer style, the best they could build in those days, "but always kept clean". A large coal stove furnished the heat, and pitch pine wood was put in to keep the building warm. The interior of the school building was slightly furnished, with wooden benches for the children to sit on, and a rustic desk where the principal sat to watch the teacher direct the class, and also to watch how the children responded, as well as their behavior. He was very strict and punished them if they were disorderly in any way. EXPERIENCES IN SCHOOL. My two little (Mary Del was actual the little sister) brothers, David and Nathaniel Henry Felt, went with me to school. They were well behaved children at home, as Mother who was now living alone with us, was very strict and taught us to mind. When she told us once not to do something, we knew we had to obey her. My brother Nathaniel had made a little toy that whirled around and buzzed. He took this toy to school and some of the boys wanted to see how it worked. Nathaniel began to whirl it around and of course it made a buzzing sound and children began to laugh. The principal called Nathaniel to the desk and put on him his large white coat and a dunce cap made out of paper, then had him whirl his toy. He couldn't do it very well as the toy would hit the cap in whirling around. I stood this as long as I could, then went up to my brother pulled the dunce cap off, also the coat, and told him and David to come and we went home. My mother met us at the door and wanted to know what was the reason we had come home from school. We told her what had happened, and she let us stay home the remainder of the day. That evening the principal came over to see Mother and they talked and talked, but we children were sent from the room and didn't hear the conversation. Mother said we were to go back to school the next morning so we did, and none of us ever wore the dunce cap after that. SCHOOL DAYS. We usually had good teachers like Miss Davis; I thought a lot of her, as she taught us many things I will always remember. I went through all the readers up to the fifth reader. We were taught reading, writing and arithmetic. After finishing the fifth reader, I went to Morgan's College. I was baptized at the age of eight, by Thomas Higgs, In City Creek, and blessed by him. My teacher in the Elementary School and fifth grade, was Professor Cummings. All our lessons were written on the blackboard, and we used pencil and paper to copy them from the board, and had to learn them for the next day. We knew all the pupils who attended school and were all united as one, as no one was richer than the other, and there was no class distinction. The children were easy to get along with. EXPERIENCES IN CHURCH. Every Sunday, we attended church and had to be very quiet while the preacher was speaking. My dear mother read the Bible to us at home we memorized many passages of scripture. I attended Primary. Florence Ridges was the secretary and I was her assistant. My special interest in the Primary was teaching the little children and oh how I loved them. I taught from the first grade up to the third and rarely missed any meetings.The Mutual Improvement Association was organized to improve the lives of all who attended, and also to become more acquainted with the great principles of the gospel of Jesus Christ. It especially helped the young people and instilled in their young minds the truths of the everlasting Gospel. My mother had her three children go to Mutual, as she knew it would help her in various ways to raise them. I became interested in Mutual and looked forward to it. I always took part in whatever the Officers and teachers asked me to do. Knowing by taking part and in being obedient to those placed in authority over us, we could come back some day in the presence of God. Mother always taught me to be obedient in the home, if she asked me to do something I obeyed her without a hesitation. She said, "If you set the example of going to Mutual, other girls will follow and perhaps through this you may be the instrument of saving one girl in your crowd". OUR CROWD: We were a happy crowd of girls and had a lot of enjoyable times together. Our fun consisted of parties in our homes, one week the boys and girls would come to my home. Perhaps it was to make honey candy, popcorn, and we often made molasses candy. Then we played games: blind's buff, or rin-tin-tin come in. We sometimes sang the hymns learned in Sunday School or Mutual. We made up little plays and each one took their parts. Some of the crowd looked on while some of us did the acting, then we sat down to be the audience while they did the acting. Mother would often come in and sometimes brought surprises in the form of home made cookies. Oh! how could they be so good? The girls in our crowd were always ready for fun. No girl was dressed any better than the other girl, as there were no rich among us. We all wore large home made leghorn hats, and enjoyed going out for a walk in the fields or nearby canyons. One day Miriam Silver and I went out for a walk and saw some beautiful flowers. We picked them and trimmed out hats with beautiful bouquets. We thought our hats looked beautiful as we proudly walked home. When we got there, my Mother looked at us, took our hats and rapidly pulled the flowers off and went outside the house and buried them. We felt like crying. When she returned she told us the flowers we had picked were poison ivy and we may get sick from them. Due to some luck we did not get any bad effects or itching of the hands from It, and years after, we often had a good laugh about our trimmed hats. Another girl friend, by the name of Hattie Cooper used to come and stay at our home, as she lived at Bountiful. One night we decided we wanted to go to a dance out there. We coaxed and coaxed Mother to let us go to the dance. At last Mother said we could go If we started early in the afternoon so we could get there before dark. We started out and walked many miles along a long road. We were only young kids at this time, but wanted to look like grown ups. So we went to a second hand store and bought some long dresses. My dress had a purple front and a very full skirt. Hattie's dress was long with a full skirt too. She went to the dance with the Bishop's son and I went with Orval Hatch. The boys laughed a little when they saw us, but we tried to act like grown up young ladies. What a good time we had. When I told by Mother about the wonderful time we had and how we were dressed, she said, "good gracious, you surely didn't go to the dance dressed like that?" We girls often went out in the fields and elsewhere to gather mushrooms. They were delicious when fried in plenty of home made butter until they were brown. We used a large hook to gather them. We also would pick raspberries and then dry them. When we wanted some raspberries we would soak them and then cook them thoroughly. They were very good with hot biscuits and were often made into pies. Apples were cut in quarters after they had first been peeled and spread out in the sunshine to dry. They were carefully covered with a mosquitobar cloth and if the sky was cloudy and showed signs of rains we had to go out and bring them in as they would mold if they got wet. After the apples were dried we often stewed them and ate them with hot sods or buttermilk biscuits. They also made pies suitable for a queen’s taste, especially when topped with good whipped cream. We were always blessed with good food and Mother was an excellent cook. OUR FURNITURE. Our furniture was not the best, but it was comfortable and neatly arranged. The bed my Mother slept on was a high bed with four high posts, covered with a white bed spread that had wide white ruffles around it. My two brothers, David and Nathaniel slept on a trundle bed which wheeled under Mother’s bed in the day time. Our every day carpet was home made, but on Sunday we had a special piece of carpet we always put down. It was the first Ingrain carpet in Salt Lake City. On Monday we would carefully fold it up and put away until the next Sunday. The room had a very nice appearance, as the carpet had fresh straw under it and the fragrant smell was a clean sweet odor. We enjoyed walking on it. CHRISTMAS IN SALT LAKE CITY. How we children waited for Christmas Eve, so we could hand up our stockings. It was wonderful to awaken Christmas Morning and find home made candy, molasses cookies, and sometimes a little money tucked in the very toe of our stockings. We were just as happy then as children are today. One Christmas morning we three children were all busy working. My brothers were bringing in the wood to fill our wood box, and I was helping Mother clean the house, when a knock came at the door. We opened the door and found President Brigham Young standing there with parcels in his arms. He came in and sat down and said, “Mary, I brought you these gifts to wish you a very Merry Christmas.” Mother opened the Parcel and thanked him. She was happy to find such lovely gifts, as it was a beautiful Paisley shawl and a linsey woolsey shawl of blue and white plaid. My present was a dress of Scotch plaid. Oh! how grateful we were to receive these lovely gifts. OUR HOME. Our home was located on North West Temple and consisted of a large front room about twenty by twenty feet, with a smaller room in the back, which we called the shanty room where we used to store things. It was lined with three or four inches of paper. In here we had a very large box, which was also lined with three or four inches of paper to keep the fruit from freezing. We always had to be careful in the winter to keep from freezing ourselves for we had very severe winters. The snow in the winter would top the five foot high fences. We always had to go out and shovel a path to the house before we could enter it. The air was wonderfully crisp and cold. The climate had changed a lot since those days. We even had to wear home made board shoes to walk in the snow. THE SEVENTEENTH WARD. We girls had wonderful times together, and enjoyed each others' company at Sunday School, MIA and all meetings. We were taught to keep the Sabbath day holy. One Sunday afternoon, the boys and girls planned a picnic to the Great Salt Lake. A boy by the name of William Hislip had bought some food from the bakery. They came to my home and wanted me to go with them, and I wanted to go. I knew if I asked Mother if I may go, what her answer would be. "NO, Mary, you cannot go as it would be breaking the Sabbath Day. No, dear you cannot go." We sat on our porch and talked and talked. I told the crowd to go on with the party, as my Mother would not allow me to go on Sunday. At last we decided to have the party on our porch. Just when we had the lunch spread out, and we were eating and having a very good time, who should come up the walk but Joseph Dean, our ward teacher. He looked amazed and asked if we didn't realize it was Sunday. So I explained to him that I couldn't go to the lake. "Well, he said, it is much better for you to do it this way, than go out there especially on Sunday". He went into the house and talked with Mother, so we went on with the party, and we were glad he was not angry with us. EXPERIENCES TO REMEMBER. Judge Elias Smith was one of our neighbors and lived where the Utah Motel is now. His chicken coop and ours were In the same building. My brother David went out to gather the eggs and brought in a bucket full of eggs. Mother said, "David, where did you get all those eggs when we only have five chickens?" David told her he guessed Judge Smith's chickens' eggs were sliding down into our nests. David knew exactly how the eggs were sliding down for he had planned it that way. Mother put all the eggs into the basket and said, "David, you take those eggs right over to Judge Smith and tell him what you did and not to send one egg back, as they are all his. David was reluctant: to go, but Mother insisted. So he went out of the house slowly with Mother watching until he knocked on the door and went in. Mother waited and waited for him, and when he did come she said, “David why were you so long?” David replied, “Oh, Mrs. Smith had some buckwheat caked with sugar and cream and she invited me to have some. “My, they were good.” I’m glad I took the eggs over.” DATES. When I reached the age of thirteen years, I started to go out to the dances and went with Donald Smith. Mother went to all the dances too. She kept close watch who I went with, but I went with good boys and Mother was good to them all. All the boys used to engage us ahead of their partner for the dance and we did have a good time and never stayed out late after the dance was over. Later on one of my boy friends was young man from Springville named Emmett Lynch. I was working in my brother’s store at Provo when I met him. He wrote to me for some time, but through no fault of his, I did not get some of his letters we drifted apart. A friend of mine, Lillian Boyer, intercepted my mail and I didn’t realize it until many years later. I think it was for the best as he wasn’t a Mormon, but a good man. NAMES. After living in Salt Lake many years, Brigham Young, President of the Church, advised my mother to marry William J. Silver. He operated the silver and iron works and was the founder of this great industry. By marrying him, Mother could give my two brothers a better chance to get a vocation in life. So, she married William J. Silver on October 12, 1870. Later two children were born to them, the first, a baby boy, named William P. Silver. The second child was a little girl by the name of May, who later drowned in the 19th Ward, in the foundry pool. The Silver Machine Shop was on Center St. and Fourth North. We did our washing in a dug out close to the shop, the washer was run by the machinery from the shop. I did the ironing and received fifty cents a day to iron shirts. This money was high wages in those days, as many girls only received fifty cents a week doing house work. When the Legislature was in session, Mother boarded two men at her home. This gave her extra money and was convenient for the men for it was near the Utah State Capitol. Robert Slater was the name of one of the men) he bought me a little cup and an it was inscribed the name of Dell. I liked the name and from then on, I was called Mary Dell Felt, instead of Mary Adelia. All the boys and girls would write my name Mary Dell on Christmas and birthday cards they sent me. MY HUSBAND. One of the sons of Brigham Young by the marriage of him to Harriet Emeline Barney Young was Joseph Ormal Young. Joseph first married Martha Jane Hyde, daughter of Joseph Hyde. Their family consisted of nine children, some of their names are, Joseph, Jesse, Ruby, Raymond and Florence. Three of their children died. He also married Arbella Bird (Aunt Bell). She is his second wife. Their children were, John, Jennie, Ormal, Frank, Myrtle, and Nellie. Aunt Bell went to church and was a good mother to her family. She was born in Springville, Utah. She lived there with Josephine Grosbeck when she met Joseph Young and he married her. I was learning to dress make and worked in the Constitution Building on Main St. One day Joseph Young came in and talked me into taking guitar lessons, he furnished the guitar for me to take lessons on. I was delighted, as I wanted to learn how to play. Joseph had a big music store and sold pianos, guitars, and other musical instruments. He often came in and visited with me, but little did I think he would some day be my husband, as he was a handsome man and had very fine manners. The city had planned a fine celebration, and all the girls in our crowd dressed up for the occasion, and we all wore mustaches so we would look different, as they were going to have a parade and also roll a barrel of fire down Main St. We were all elated and having a good time laughing and talking as we passed Joe's store. Joe came out of the store and wanted to know what we were doing and we told him what was going on. He talked to us for a while and then watched us. I can't imagine what he thought. One night, George Hardy and Joe walked home with me, to Fourth North. After laughing and talking a while, George said he thought he should go and he bade us good night. Joe talked a while and then asked me to marry him. I told him before I could give him an answer he would have to go with me and ask Mother's consent. So we went to the house and visited with Mother, and then he told her he wanted to marry me. Mother replied, "That's up to Mary. She can suit her self, as I want her to be happy." The following Sunday, he took me in the buggy to introduce me to his first wife, to get her consent. She said it is all right and to go right ahead. I had met her before and I loved her and we got along swell together. So, I became Joseph Young's third wife. My husband and I were married in the Endowment House, Dec 4, 1884. Our children are as follows: Silver Howe, Mary Louise, and Glenn. My husband went on a mission to England and did much good in expounding the gospel. Traveling without purse-or script. He made many converts. He was a good church worker, and always dependable in whatever they asked him to do. He had a quiet disposition and was very kind in his ways. He thought a lot of his brother Royal, they always got along together well. He was a devoted husband to all his wives and children. We all loved him and lived very happy lives, as one large family together. My first home was a red brick house on state St. between Fourth and Fifth So. just opposite the City and County Building. At this time the circus was occupying the City and county-grounds. But many, years later the City and County Building was built in: We owned a lot of property and lived here many years and then sold out and moved to Forest Dale. We first built a large brick barn and petitioned the upstairs and down stairs with heavy muslin, and screened the doors on account of the flies. Then Joseph built a nine room house for his first-wife “Aunt Jen” and family, and I lived there too until he could build my house. He also built Aunt Bell a home. My house was at 2445 South ran East below Driggs Ave. It was a nice brick home of six rooms. We all lived close together and all of us worked in the Church. My mother became very ill and died May 11, 1912. After her death we moved into her old home on 4th North and Main St. in the Nineteenth Ward. On Oct. 30, 1915, my daughter, Mary Louise was married to Abram Harold Lewis. All during this time my husband had been very sick. He stayed in his other home because I was busy taking care of my mother when she was ill. He died Aug 1, 1917 at this home at the age of 68 years. We all missed him as he was a wonderful husband and loved all his children. He was very quiet in his way but was well liked by all his friends and neighbors. His memory will always live with us as a kind an devoted husband. LATER LIFE. After my husband's death my daughter Glenn and I moved to 3rd So. and 4th East to live with Clyde and Lavon Felt. On November 1, 1919 Glenn was married to Joseph Ralph Haas. Previous to her marriage I took a job as a cleaning woman at the City and County Building. I moved to the Lake Hotel and was a member of the Eighth and Ninth Ward. I was president of the Relief Society here for a year and a half. Also I was a Stake missionary for 18 months. I then moved to 3rd East between 4th and 5th South, where I was in the Eighth Ward. While living here we went on many Temple excursions. Bishop and Sister John Fetzer went with us also Sister Anna Tonnison and many others. We went to the following temples Logan, Manti, St. George and Arizona. Our last trip was to the Cardston Temple in Canada. This was just before Sister Fetzer died. I have worked in these temples and have done thousands of names for dead people who were waiting for someone to do the work for them. I think there is no work more enjoyable and I intend to do more Temple work as soon as I can. Until the year about 1935 I continued to work at the City and County Building. I worked there over 20 years. In the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Marth Crow was Captain; First Vice Captain, myself; Second Vice Captain, Lucy Wilson. I have worked many years with the D.U.P. and have enjoyed these many years with these wonderful women. I have been Chaplain many years and still hold this position. In 1937 I was hit by a car but I didn't go to a hospital. I stayed with my daughter, Glenn until I was well. In 1944 I was hit again and dragged down the street several feet. Again I stayed with my daughter. In 1946 I was crossing the street with my friend Anna Smith when we were both hit. She had both legs broken and I had a badly hurt leg and broken ribs. I had my eyes operated on for cataracts in 1947. After this time I could again read and enjoy our standard works. In 1947 I moved to where I now live at 261 East 6th South. In 1954 I broke my leg getting into a car. I guess it was just worn out after all the accidents. I stayed with my daughter, Louise Lewis for over a year until I was well again, then I returned home. I have been a block teacher for almost 70 years and I am still active in the Relief Society, Sunday School and Mutual Improvement Association. I will be 98 years old this May 19, 1962. I live in the same home with my daughter, Glenn and she helps me in many ways. This poem was given to Mary Dell Young on her birthday, May 19, 1940. MARY DELL YOUNG Many Happy returns dear sister true, As the years pass by I will think of you; As you stood at the door with outstretched hands To welcome me to a sister band. Your smile was sweet and very sincere, As you greeted each one with a word of good cheer; And you didn't seem strange as you stood in the door, For it seemed that somewhere I had known you before. As you walk along life's pathway, Whatever you do or whatever you say, May the spirit of God like a beacon light Shine in your path to guide you aright. And when at last your work here is done, And life's book is closed with the setting sun, And you pass beyond to that radiant shore Perchance up there you will stand at the door. And welcome those you have known down here, With a happy smile and a word of cheer. And I shall love to be among Those who are welcomed by Mary Dell Young. Maude Kenner

Martha Spence Journal 1850-1860

Contributor: LaRue Johnstun Created: 5 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Source of Trail Excerpt:Heywood, Martha Spence, Journals 1850-[1860], vol. 1, 3-14.Read Trail Excerpt: At Bethlehem camp we remained two weeks after I joined the company & on Sunday June 30th we crossed the river having commenced on the satterday[.] Monday did not travel as the cattle had not been got over & there was no crossing that day[.] Tuesday travelled a mile or two & wednesday the same[.] Thursday fourth of July camped all day[.] Washed[,] cooked & prepared the cattle for real start on the following day. Friday we took the start having to leave behind us a splendid Ox who became diseased from some cause & could not travel. also a mare belonging to brother [Edwin Dilworth] Woolley had a hurt in his leg & could not travel[.] we journeyed 12 miles this & camped with Bishop hunters company & made carrell of about 70 Waggons a new & pretty sight to me Satturday halted the forenoon during which time Elder Hyde & Brother Joh[n]son overtook us but to our great surprise & dissapointment did not take brother [Joseph Leland] Haywood [Heywood] with them as had been agreed up in Kanesville. we have travelled nearly day after day up to this Wednesday July 10th[.] This morning the first sound that met our ears was the cry that the cattle were all gone[.] the mosquitoes were very bad indeed which no doubt occasioned the cattle to stray as also brother Haywood’s Horse. The cattle were found but not the horse[.] Brother H. has spent all day trying to find him but in all probability he has been stole. I have just had the melancholy Intelligence that amongst the many who has died of cholera Sister Margaret Mac dougal & Sister Dana are reckened among its victims[.] In those falling a victim I see the pestilance nearer to me, than before the question coming up in my mind, who am I? that I may not be called upon[.] But oh may my heavenly father avert the blow & Spare my life a little longer[.] My desire is to live & glorify his name in doing the work he assigns me July 26th Started this morning from Fort Kearny after a stay of two days during which time we made some change in our affairs for the better by lighting the waggons & dispensing with one hereby strenghtening some of the other teams & also procuring two additional yokes[.] Had a sale of crockery ware which seemed a pity as it was brought all the ways from Boston expressly for the benefit of those in the Valley who had long been deprived of its conveniences. And now we have a prospect of travelling more advantagously and although our travelling heretofore has been slow it has been safe[,] comfortable & exempt from death or even sickness of any consequence[.] we have lost 1 yoke of cattle by getting into a hole with their yoke on & one or two others by giving out[.] Coln Reese & his train overtook us about 1 week from this date bringing with them brother Woolley horse & news of brother Haywood[.] it was seen but would not be given by with a man in the United State Service excusing himself from doing so, he saying he had orders to fetch him to Kanesville We are daily seeing the mementos of the ravages of Cholera[.] Sometimes 3 graves side by side[.] another familiar name (Brother Sargaent of Kanesville) affected & aware of the severe & protracted Sickness he passed through last Summer & this Spring previous to my leaving & at a time when my prospect for this journey looked rather gloomy. he was all life & continued in getting his fit out & providing presents for his daughters in the Valley[.] It will be a heavy blow to his daughters in Kanesville Oh what reason we have to be thankful that we as a company have escaped this Scourge with one exception. Brother [Nathaniel Henry] Felt’s teamster had diarhea for three days without applying for help. & when he was helped it proved unavailing[.] a child of Brother [Royal] Barney’s[,] 12 years old[,] hearing of this man’s death took fright & was instantly seized with the Cholera[.] this was at night[.] during the night she was very bad & when I heard of it (tho poorly at the time) I felt so keenly that I went at once to render my assistance (if accepted) which was very cheerfully & tho the symptoms were dangerous in that stage of the disease[.] I used the knowledge I gained on my trip from S[t]. Louis to Kanesville & in due time brought about the favorable ones & she recovered rapidly The prolongation of our noon halt occasioned by the breaking of an axletree <(in the other ten of our division & we wait for them)> has given me a chance to take some minutes of our journey[.] up to this time I have enjoyed myself well on the trip tho my health is poor & feel unequal to do my share of the work but my mind is singularly easy on Such things. I know that I acted to the best of my judgement in undertaking this journey & its consequent obligations. Knowing my accomodating are as good as the possibly good be I am content & often think of what Elder Taylor told me last winter in blessing me “That I should go up to Zion in peace.” August 11th Since leaving Fort Kearny my health has been very poor. the very warm weather & rain storms have prostrated my fragile constitution more than I could possibly expect. but having fortunately a Homeopathic physician in our train (Doctor [Charles Nephi] Smith) I take advantage of his having a little more faith in that practice than any other medical one. We passed Ash Hollow last friday which presented quite a change of Scenery the bluffs having the appearance of decayed Stone and the Shrubbery presenting the greatest variety imaginable on wild soil[.] Several kinds of flowers as delicate and interesting looking as if they were raised in well cultivated gardens of the East The Buffalo are very numerous here[.] The Scripture phrase “The cattle upon a thousand hills are the Lords” has a meaning in it, before wittnissing those animals was ideal in a measure[.] my health did not permit me to relish their flesh but I heard them speak highly of its flavor[.] Antelope is Scarce but we killed one & its flesh I did relish some like mutton[.] We have had some choke cherries which makes excellant pies August 15th just passed Court house rock & in sight of Chimney Rock and within one hundred miles of Lamarie [Fort Laramie.] our expedition in travelling has been materially fast[.] we often travel 18 miles a day & were it not for our occasional delays by loss of our Cattle for a day or less than a day[,] a waggon tongue or axletree our speed would be considerable[.] Our movements are as systematic as circumstances will allow[.] Brother Woolley being a remarkably efficient man to keep a train Straight & in order & he is blessed in having as material to work with in the shape of hands as could possibly be expected[.] Our practice is except when the cattle are Strayed or some accident to Start from 7 to ½ past every morning & as brother W’s policy is to bait the cattle before Starting & while they are doing so we women folks have plenty of time to prepare breakfast & cook for dinner. our noon halt last about 1½ hour giving the cattle a chance to bait & water[.] the principle is also to stop one day in the Seven as a Sabbath but arbitrarly on Sunday. Circumstances has to guide whether it be Satterday Sunday or Monday Satterday 17. passed Scotts bluffs which presents a romantic appearance similar to the continuous chain that commenced at ash Hollow[.] Indeed the Scenery is much more interesting this side of that place than the other[.] crossed Horse creek at noon & we have halted in good season this evening in view of spending a pleasant Sabbath tomorrow enjoying rest for ourselves but more especially for our cattle[.] that is as is often remarked our present Salvation on this trip a journey like this will teach a person to hold a higher value on the animals appropriate to the service of [-] Sunday <18th> Instead of enjoying ourselves by having a good meeting as we proposed & expected that Brother Hunters division would have met midway on the occasion they having camped about ½ miles from us. but our fairy castle was destroyed by a rest day[.] preparing meals & washing dishes is not pleasant work in a rain storm out doors[.] during the day Brother [Robert] Campbell called to get some medicine for his wife [Amelia Mikesell Campbell] who was dangerously ill from jumping out of the waggon when coming down a bad place in Ash Hollow & since has continued feverish & in great pain[.] she had her infant in her Tuesday 20. This morning the cry of the cattle [u] gone to the sink of (at least half) was anything but agreable, yesterday it rained nearly all day (making a two’s days rain) which was the cause of the cattle straying. towards noon part of them were found[.] our divided of in parties going in all directions distances of 4 to 8 miles but before night they were all found through the efficiency of Brother [William Henry Harrison] Segar [Sagers] who proposed at noontime that if a horse would be loaned him he would warrant the finding the cattle. It so turned out they were found about ten miles from the camp. Mrs Campbell died yesterday & their division lost cattle to about the same am[oun]t that ours did & in like manner found them Wednesday 21 This morning was Supposable all difficulties had and were reckoned among the things that once were. it was seen so in our division but in Brother Hunters. Brother [Sisson] Chase’s horses were gone so that the ten he belonged to remained behind & we all started[.] This camping place supplied us abundantly with choke cherries duly appreciated by all hands. travelled nearly all day but oh the disaster of this every we had not been in 15 minutes in Currall when the cry. The cattle are poisoned saluted our ears[.] The slough water was so rankly poisoned that it took immediate effect & in one hours time one of the best oxen died & before retiring for the night 2 good cows[.] others were affected some but recovered Friday 23. Within 8 miles of “Fort Lamarie [Laramie]” make our noon halt at Mr Bordeau’s trading place (who formerly had his settlement at the fort but sold out to the States government.) his constant friendliness to the mormons since the commencement of this journeying over these plains makes him interesting to us as a people[.] I visited the Indian tents & was interested in observing their symplicity in living[.] they were principally occupied in drying Buffalo meat & tanning the Skins[,] the Squaws being the operators[.] one large tent caught my attention as having several Squaws in it[.] one was elderly probably mother to some of the others the who were sitting around the tent with their little children round them[.] one was making patchwork[.] the old Squaw was packing away dried meat in a tank made of leather that looked some like vellum it was painted fancifully & looked clean[.] we held some conversation by signs[.] she called the other womens attention to my having no teeth evidently a wonderment on their part the Indians having very handsome large teeth[.] I made signs to her about the children & their mothers, & she pointed out the children of each mother, they were cleanly & handsomer than any Ive seen before[.] the children were very handsome & smart looking at another tent cooking was under operation & looked pretty good for a wild people[.] another tent was characterized by its inmates Indian & squaw looking quite stylish & gay. while gazing on them the Indian cried “pudache” a few times before I realized it signal meaning to depart. I afterward learned they [-] was it vulgarily termed “Sparking” Sunday Agust 25. yesterday camped within 1 mile of Fort Laramie on the river bank[.] Brother H. & W. went . there taking along the Provision Wagon to have it replenished, which was accordingly done by a Supply of flour Bacon Ham & (flour 17½ dollars hundred) also 5 yoke of Cattle. Some of our best men had some thoughts of leaving here an inducement of $60 a month, for two months they thought had considerable attraction togather with vague reports that in the Valley they could not earn more than their board. An hours time consumed, talking over the matter, was all the difference caused. Next excitement Cattle missing this nothing new in the Sound as disagreable as the first time heard[.] while hunting them up Brother Smoot & his train came up[.] This was the last chance of expectancy on Brother Haywoods part for his Horse[.] It was seen & that was all. Major Sanderson & two Aid a camps passed us which gave me an opportunity of seeing that personage. (a fine looking man) The mail passed us yesterday bringing general news from the Valley that was good & Brother Haywood received a letter from his Lady that abundantly confirmed the good report[.] also had the pleasure of perusing for the first time the 7th number of the pap first paper published in the Valley which was also confirmatory of good news. Our cattle found & about starting going ahead of Brother Hunters division[.] When about two hours on the road we were alarmed by most distressing cries of women & children[.] It was thought by some that the Indians were coming full speed upon us but soon found it was a wagon over turned caused by a Stampeed in Bishop Hunters camp that were close behind us[.] I went up at once to render my Services and amongst the wailing 1 female drew my attention[.] she seamed so beside herself & all she would say was “I saw my Father Killed & my Mother is now dead, & oh dear what shall I do?” on realizing that the mother was not dead I went to see her & recognized Mrs [Ann] Condit[.] She appeared insensible at first but in a little was conscious, but very much frightened[.] She was laid on a bed we supposing that she was much injured but to my great joy we found it not. So the only place I could find injured was between her shoulders & only slightly bruised[.] It seemed miraculous that she was not more. her Son in law did not escape so well he had his leg broke which was rather trying as he (Merritt Rockwell) was considered a very efficient man in the camp The Stampeed was caused by one of Bishop Hunters horses running in among the Cattle[.] I have heard that they are common among the cattle in that devision but we have not had any as yet[.] they are very dangerous and I presumed an caused as much by mismanagement as accident. I have seen the rocky mountains for the first time today[.] they look stupendous in the dim opaque of the horizon & but a faint line marking their existence & altitude[.] the highest one is called “Lamarie [Laramie] peak” Our roads are excellent[.] Today general health pretty good with the exception of Franklin Haywood who has had a pull down causing a reaction of his old complaint (consumption) that has prostrated him for some days back, he is now on the gain & we have every hope that he will regain his health & a teamster being provided in his stead he will not be subjected to anxiety or being overworked. That & the heavy rains being the cause of his pulldown Tuesday 27 Quite an excitement prevailed in our midst last night about nine oclock[.] an animal was missing[.] not a quadruped but a biped answering to the description of Bishop Haywood[.] After various remarks had been made on the occasion & sundry opinions advanced as to the suitableness of such unwarrantable freedoms as to a biped losing himself It was finally resolved by Capt McPherson that if haply the stray was found he must be counseled & picketted for the night. This morning saw us on our way near three miles when he was desired in company with another biped (Br Lamont) quietly awaiting our advancing train none the worse of wear but looking as happy as good company could make him Thursday 29th. The breaking of an axletree has given me an opportunity to journalize a little and here I will record a providential incident[.] on Tuesday orning Sister Butterfield lost an ox & was obliged to start without making as much search as wished to which grieved her very sorely & did not ful reconciled to give up hunting him[.] In the course of the day an ox was found by Capt Barney (where she is) that was so weak from the scours (evidently left behind by some forward company) that the men rejected him but Sister Butterfield thought she could cure him & drove him along with some trouble at first but today he travels well & turns out to be a better animal than the one she lost [---] is almost [-] & in ten minutes we will be rolling Yesterday we came along side our friend the Platt[e] at the place where the brethren in coming from the Valley last fall encountered a large War party of Indians about 50 miles West of Lamarie [Laramie] a communication was found from Brother Stratton indicating his coming from the Valley for the purpose of ascerta[in]ing the amt of Emigration on the way & I believe there a little in knowledge of the latter part of the route also an indication that Brother Woodruffs company p[…]t were but 5 days[.] We found notices from Brother Joseph Young’s & Woodruffs during the day & the ev[en]ing where we camped 60 miles from Laramie[.] we found another notice directed to the Camp of Israel from Brother Stratton saying that Brother Woodruffs company past there on the 25th being but 4 days ahead of us Friday 30th When passing Creek last eveing & about corralling we found Brother Stratton & Hanks from the Valley & Brother Whipple who left Bethlehem in Elder Woodruff company more than two weeks before we did[.] They have had considerable sickness & twelve death’s on the journey & now detained by the greater number of their cattle straying away but they have found nearly all[.] we expect to corrall alongside them to night. Brothers S. & H. brought with them a letter from the President that was read to the camp last eving[.] It was good and interesting detailing the prosperity of things in Valley & backed by Brothers S & H. They will return after they see Brother Hunters company & we expect Brother Haywood will accompy them[.] They think our train have done well but were expected by the president at an earlier date[.] the settled price of flour in the Valley at present is $25 Cwt [hundredweight.] It was some of the time $1 pound[.] It is expected it will fall some if the California emigration goes through[.] They related a circumstance that spoke loud of the good state of things among the people in worldly matters[.] last fall they sett apart a piece of ground to cultivate for the use of the poor[.] they found two old ladys that was willing to be called poor but are not now willing as they earn about $3 a week & this was all the poor that could be found in the Valley. there were other incidents related proving the prosperity of the place Saturday 31st Last evening we currelled [corralled] alongside Elder Woodruffs company & was quite a pleasant meeting to those who were acquainted, but this was not my case but I had the pleasure of learning that Brother Lewen & family were well & had met with no accidents by the way which gives me Sincere pleasure. May the Lord bless him, & his. How much would I not give at times to see some choice spirit to mingle with & I was want to do in past times & tho “I go up to Zion in peace.” how dreadful lonesome it is oftentimes. In the midst of spirits yet feeling all alone yet what means more powerful to drive me to him who is greater than all earthly friends We had meeting to Elder Woodruffs camp last eveng & he seemed to possess an excellent spirit from the remarks he made & deeply solicitions for the welfare of those under his care manifested much pleasure in seeing our train come along. They had a great deal of sickness. one time all were sick. 12 deaths[.] one was by lighting & 3 oxen with him leaving a widow & children To day has been our Sabbath & the last day of the month[.] Our cattle had such a hard travel yesterday that it was wisdom to rest them today[.] the roads are at this part of the journey very rough & hilly little fuel & water Scarce[.] we have had an uncommon fine day[.] Brother Woodruff’s camp left about ten, this forenoon & this evng part of Brother Hunter’s division passed us and we learned his waggon broke down & delayed him back[.] Brother Stratton & Hanks stay with us at present[.] we have had a very pleasant camping place & our Buffalo meat relished well Monday Sep 2d Had a fair days travelling yesterday although part of the road was rough[,] journeying over the black is pretty hard on invalids & cattle but we are now past them once more on the bottom & keeping hard the platte[.] we overtook Brother Smoot’s train & those of Brother Hunters, that were a head[.] The air is, & has been very invigorating for some days past[.] Frank gains but slowly[.] he has suffered from diarrhea for a few days[.] I think the fresh meat has been the cause of the change & has been too great in weakly states[.] Brother & the two brothers from the Valley have been absent from us for two day having gone back to Bishop Hunter’s division Friday night Sep 6th We have been travelling along the Willow Springs today over the mountains. Our Cattle begin to show the poverty & scarcity of water the only pay the[y] have for their hardest labor[.] roads being pretty rough & long days travel[.] This morning We parted with our Valley friends they taking with them Brother Heywood and he leaving his nephew very feeble Still suffering from diarrhea[.] I think rather worse today than any other. the jolting of the waggon I Think is very injurious to him[.] his uncle had him ride in the buggy for two days past. this was a relief to him[.] so far & he missed the privilege today[.] Brother [Ebenezer Clawson] Richardson has taken upon himself to sleep with him & have a kindly care over him which is invaluable to Frank in his weakly state. and as far as my poor services shall go. he shall have them as from an own Sister[.] My health has been remarkably better today & that suddenly[.] all day yesterday I felt much prostrated & hardly power or wish to live & today I am not only well in body but happy in mind & feeling. I feel that there is a protecting over me who can say to the stormy feelings within my breast “peace be still” as main [man] cannot. how many proofs have had of this during my pilgrimage but yesterday I was reasoned with and & comforted by one who picks to do me good but all to little or purpose[.] I lay down at night full of grief & dissatisfaction[.] This morning I arose calm confiding & willing to do anything to confer happiness on my fellow creatures and all around me looked like friends[.] I felt in particular that it would be a great privledge to take care of Frank & be a comfort to him in the absence of his Uncle[.] Oh may the God of Israel raise him up in health & strenght in body & mind Brother Woolley seems to miss his Counsellor[,] very tender in his feelings regarding Franks state & friendly towards me Saturday night 7th Camped this afternoon ½ past one at Sweet Water [Sweetwater] present out skirts of the rocky mountain chain 335 miles this side of the Valley within two miles of Saleratus Lake that we did not pass[.] Some of our men went to see it & brought some Saleratus from there[.] we travelled ten miles today on sandy soil rather hard for the cattle but very favorable to Frank who enjoyed the circumstance[.] This morning I was favorably impressed in regard to a change he boasted of when I first saw him[.] he felt that he was decidedly better having perspired freely during the night & a fair evacuation of water with out diarrhea that had not recurred for some time previous[.] he sat in the chair during our travel was lively & very communicative often attending to his feeling so much better perspective continued[.] we were about six hours travelling & when camped instead of throwing himself on the bed[,] his usual custom[,] he went out & sat with the men & eat a little biscuit crumbed in milk[.] in about an hour he returned to the waggon lay down & acted quite drowsy during the rest of the day his eyes half closed while sleeping. had a passage about 3 o clock & another tonight[.] eat a little toast & chocolate for supper[.] The Laudanum that was given during yesterday afternoon caused these symptoms I should think & I fear they are not very favorable[.] he took some more tonight[.] We came up to Woodruff camp to day but they went on while we stopped[.] Brother Haywood returned them the buggy & left his clothes which we [illegible] from them[.] No doubt he will have a hard time of it in riding all the way to the Valley Sunday night 8th Traveled 12 miles today passed right by Saleratus Lake. & laid in a supply of the article[.] & Independence rock. all hands climbed its summit save myself & Frank, but I could see that it was all covered with names & some of them I could read[.] after we currelled by the Sweet Water I took a tramp of 1½ miles to see the Devils gate which we passed but could not see to advantage at that time[.] It is a curiosity. Frank was very weak this morning had two passages during the night but otherwise rested well[.] acted more like himself this forenoon[.] Sat up all the time we were riding in preference to laying down on acct of the jolting[.] had no passage untill we currelled [corralled] about 5 o clock[.] was very tired this evng but his symptoms decididly better than yesterday As to myself I feel grateful to God for the peace of mind & health of body. I enjoy. everything wears a special aspect around me , with the exception of Frank’s health, but I have hope for him & feeling a sympathy for him I take pleasure in ministering to his wants[.] There is nothing unusual, or accident of any kind occured to us, since Brother Haywood left us. Monday night 9. Travelled 11 miles today very pleasantly[.] we are camped by the Sweet Water[,] rocky mountains all around[.] Frank appeared decidely better today the travelling was over sand hills which favored him much[.] walked about at noon time which he was not able to do yesterday[.] I visited & Sarah Lawrence at that time & the conversation was carried on pleasantly. Some knowledge imparted was calculated to make one feel sober & that the light heartedness & bouyancy of Spirits I have been want to feel will have to be given up for a vanity of perplexities that are not known amongst the friends I have left[.] How much I have thought today of the freedom that for years I have enjoyed to my hearts content amidst all my vicissitudes I have enjoyed a freedom of thought & action that will never be known again. Oh that I may have a long life according to my day. Excepting these reflections the day passed very pleasantly & my health has been good[.] Rochester friends, with all their endearments, & their forbearance, will pass before my mind & seeming to say Will you ever meet such again? Well [illegible] I enjoyed them & their goodness in the day of it, and of my own will I left them, to follow the fortunes of the Latterday faith & so far I have no serious cause to repent. & I can say “Thus far the Lord has led me on.” Tuesday 10th We are camped at Bitter Cottonwood Creek. & 304 miles from the Valley[.] travelled 12 miles over sand hills & crossed the Sweet Water twice. Last my Doctor started on a hunting esception but did not. This morning when we were ready there was some uneasiness felt in our company[.] Brother concluded to turn out of Currell on the road & then start an expedition to hunt him up[.] We had not got on the road before he was deseried [.] He had gone so far that in trying to return he could not discern our camp so had to wait till the sun arose this morning[.] he was unsuccessful but saw a Panther &c. Frank is gaining slowly but gradually & my hopes rise in proportion for him[.] I have so much confidence in this good mountain air as the best remedy for his disease[.] I wish I could realize its rivying [reviving] influence on myself today[.] I felt rather prostrated[.] I sewed pretty steady this forenoon mending shirts &c. I felt unable to sit up this afternoon & under such an influence my thoughts are anything but agreable. But like Corrinne I make my own trouble. I act upon the impulse of my own warm nature and experience a delightful enjoyment in acting natural, even while prudence is continually whispering in my ear that I am but treasuring up sorrow for the future, but yet like her I want to enjoy the present if it but yeild a speck of enjoyment[.] Well knowing “Tis all but a dream at the best” and I have had some moments of enjoyment on this trip (the mingled with mortification) that perhaps will never return[.] Well let it be I’ve had my streaks of sunshine during the pathway of life[.] What have I not enjoyed except a wedded life & its consequent happiness[.] And that is now the most dreaded thought[.] Liberty of conscience & action I have had for years & it has placed me where I am. In embracing Mormonism I followed the dictates of my own judgement, In opposition to that of my best and dearest friends. And may I be guided by the Spirit of God in what future steps I may take as I trust I was in that. And oh! may I aim to do right in all things nothwithstanding my peculiar traits of character. Friday noon 13 One week this morning since Brother Haywood left us[.] Frank gradually grows better[.] We have travelled 11 miles this forenoon[.] day very cold[.] I have seen for the first time The Snow capped Rocky mountains[.] We are now about 270 miles from the Valley[.] Yesterday I had a delightful treat in having an opportunity of visiting some of my Kan[e]sville friends[.] Sister Murray &c & Brother Hutchinson & family & Brother Pitt[.] It was truly a commingling of Spirits & has given me some animation that I have been destitute of for two or three days. There is to me such an oppressive Spirit in my own company that I find it difficult to bear Sunday 15th 10 o clock we have just met the expected teams from the Valley[.] first rate looking oxen. We travelled yesterday and on our currelling about sundown last evng were about 250 miles from the Valley[.] Frank continues to gain daily his spirits are good also his appetite & enjoys his food[.] I suffered yesterday afternoon with headache & very much at night[.] But this morning I feel well & in good spirits[.] The petty anoyances that are practiced towards me daily serve but to amuse me now[.] A plot yesterday formed against my peace turned rather bungling to the plotters[.] May the Lord bless those who are my friends and confound the plots of my enemies that they may get tired of such small business. The weather is very fine & truly healthy[.] Cold nights & mornings clear sunshine days[.] I suffer less from this now, or feel it less than I did some of our warmest days when I suffered so much from chills & cold sweats Tuesday night 17. Yesterday we kept our Sabbath had good water & feed for the cattle[.] today had good travel crossed the South Pass bidding adieu to the Sweet Water & for the first time touching upon the Pacific Springs[.] This day we have crossed the boundary of the Atlantic & Pacific sources[.] we have been coming up from the former & now we go down to the latter[.] It was keenly cold this morning but the Sun shone clear & water during the day[.] I feel my health greatly improved[.] I can endure working without inconveinance & I would scarcely know it was so cold if I did not hear all around me complain. My Spirits are good & my mind pretty clear save one vein of reflection. Frank continues to improve in health was able to write a letter to his folks yesterday & does not seem to suffer from the exertion[.] We are now 225 miles from the Valley Wednesday 18. Had a good day’s travel very pleasant weather[.] pretty late when we camped[.] imediately Brother Woodruff rode up to us saying he had been two nights & a day in the mountains having met with some disasters, concerning their horses & cattle particulary I do not clearly understand[.] Frank continues to gain but is not yet able to leave his Waggon to walk but leaves it for an airing a few minutes before we start. This morning he milked two cows which tired him some. For the last three day we have seen Indians more or less passing along the road Today I enjoyed a view of the rocky mountains on the western Side presenting to my mind a better appearance than the eastern Side Thursday 19th We travelled today over deep sand but made out about 15 miles[.] We are now from the Valley 179[.] This has been a warmer day than we have had for some time and I had a little of that oppressive feeling that I have suffered so much during this journey[.] Frank did not feel quite so well today & after sun down when we currelled having overtaken Elder Woodruffs company we have quite a large currell & had meeting on Brother Woodruffs side of the currell[.] Our train on the road was very long having also Bishop Hunters forward ten attached to our train & camped a mile from us Sunday night 22 This evng we currelled at the Fork of the Black river after a steady days travel[.] last evng on our halting perceived a carriage & 4 horses[.] after leaving I found out that it was sent by Brigham Young for his sister Mrs [Fanny Young] Murray & Mrs Persis Young[.] I felt disappointed in not knowing that I could have seen Mrs Murray & written by her untill it was too late but Sarah gave her all the particulars about Frank’s health & brought him 3 Potatoes & piece of melon from her which was indeed a treat to him[.] he has been some trouble with his cough which he thinks proceeds from the Bronchitis & causes him no alarm[.] he has taken a little cold. but now being to near the termination of our journey I do not [have] that uneasiness on his acct that I did when brother Heywood left. As to myself I feel a remarkable depression in reference to my arriving in the Valley when I think of it a sober feeling comes over me that I cannot control. I never experienced this feeling that I know of, on going to any place previous. my health continues good[.] I do my work regular sew considerable & read occasionally which is a relief to my general feelings. I have composed & written some verses. to Mrs Johnston & two pies for the guardins besides some other for myself[.] What an amusement this is for my lonely eving’s after I do up my work also our noon halt Monday night 23 Travelled but a few miles this forenoon & halted for the day on a very pretty place by a branch of the [sentence unfinished] 140 miles from the Valley[.] I accomplished considerable of a washing this afternoon without any tax on my strength nor felt the least tired when done which is very encouraging to me[.] I have suffered with a bad toothace steady all day, but this is a trifle to me, after suffering as I have in prostration of strength the most part of this trip[.] This morning I got a blessing from our capt of his peculiar kind. but it hurt me not[.] Frank’s health is more consequence to me than the pleasing of our Capt & his lady. He does not feel quite so well tonight I think he sat in the wind too much this afternoon & eat a piece of pie[.] his diarrhea returned while his cough seems gaining ground About six o clock this evng Brother Woolley’s son & a young man with waggon & seven yoke of oxen from the Valley bringing with them vegetables & potatoes[.] I had a note by them from Brother Lowens who has had a prosperous time during his journey. About an hour after they arrived two brethren from the Valley rode up to camp with us for the night on their way to Bishop Hunters company to hurry them on. I heard that Brother Haywood arrived in the Valley Sund 15th & Brother Wooleys son started next day without seeing him. I also heard Brother Hyde does not start till the first of the month. good news all the time from the Valley Tuesday 24th Had a good days travel of 17 miles but most unpleasant on acct of a strong head wind & the dust flying thicker than ever before[.] we have currelled along side of black fork[.] Frank suffered some from hard travel & dust but is better than yesterday[.] the partial return of his diarrhea seemed to ease his cough. my toothache continued bad till I fell asleep late last night & this morning my face was swollen very much[.] made me feel quite sickish & prostrated all day[.] this afternoon I could not sit up but this evng I feel better tho my face aches some Wednesday 25th We are now at Fort Bridger 115½ miles from the Valley[.] had a good days travel tho rough[.] very pleasant day & very good camping place. Boys all enjoying themselves with music & dancing[.] Frank health some better today had a good night’s rest last night. I did not suffer today with face ache but my spirits were rather depressed. I committed myself this morning (for the first time since Brother Haywood left) by giving way to an ebullition of feeling bordering on resentment. And in getting up rather later than usual made it a jumping time after breakfast to get the work done up & as usual having so much to do about Frank’s waggon[.] I was excited in my feelings and fell in a train of thought that I was indeed in a servile situation without the least sympathy or tone of friendship around[.] I[n] hurrying to get evry thing in order our teamster behaved uncivil to me & I allowed my temper to get the upper hand of me[.] Elder Kim has been anything but obliging to me since brother Haywood left us[.] not does he as much as milk a cow for some time notwithstanding Brother Wooley scolds so much about[.] For the first time I remembered how many little things Brother H would do for about starting time particularly when I was in a hurry. we have heard this evng from the Valley there a person in this place that Elder Hyde will not leave till the 15th of the next month Thursday 26th Had a good day travel and are camped at Muddy Creek[.] This evng the two brethren returned from Brother Hunters camp[.] they are about two days behind us. Some families short of provisions. Frank is about the same the riding was hard for him today[.] This morning I received a greater blessing than previous arising from a simple remark I made to Mrs Bullard[.] was told, “I might go to Hell for all he cared, was not worth the rope that would hang one” applied an epithet to me that I did not hear prefaced by the word Irish, that he had never been insulted so much by any one before, as he had by me for the last 600 miles of the journey and that I need not I can rule everything, tho I be from Ireland[.] Since Brother Heywood left us there seems to be a particular satisfaction to utter forth his insulting remarks so loud that the whole camp can hear all he says. what his object is so doing I cannot conceive for I am very careful in my conduct remaining in the waggon all the time we travel & attending faithfully to my work when we camp. occasionally some errand calls me to Mrs [Margaret Major] Butterfield but it is solely on Frank’s acct & this gives great offence, but I cannot submit to such an infringment of liberty or the slightest inconvenience to my patient. he was left in my charge as also in Mrs Butterfield and I cannot feel that I have erred in any respect since Bother H. left us Tuesday night Oct 1st This evening we are camped 39 miles from the Valley[.] today and yesterday had hard traveling crossing the creek so often & going up & down hills in crossing the mountains. The scenery has been very grand for the last few days. the rocks are so magnificent looking & the mountains so hight & perpendicular that it delights especially being interspersed with shrubbery & small wood in their coats of rich autumnal grandeur[.] How much it would enhance the pleasure of the contemplatives if I had wherewith to say to, “How delightful.” but no! just up in a waggon, only one place to look out, and the most uncompaniable sitting right before all day watching my every movement to find fault with both action & word[.] whose remarks has nothing of any interest in them to one being mostly about eating & cooking a theme that I always despised. but Frank is sick & I try to [deal] with it as patiently as I can but still its hard. and the teamster’s incivility deprives me of getting & out of the waggon as I was want to do when Brother H, was with us A report came from the Valley by a brother & another son of Brother Wooley’s that he had taken him a wife since his arrival there, in which I put no credence. This morning the brother & sons of Ws’ left us, to meet us on our arrival to the Valley with Flag &. &. Brother W wants to have a great display of his train of which I have no desire to form a part Frank has coughed distressingly last night & to day. I notice when his diarrhea ceases his cough is hard. He is much disappointed in his uncle not sending for him. or not even sending him a line or message of any kind. he remarked today that it was his new wife that prevented him Wednesday night Oct 2d a rainy morning greeted us to commence the duties of the day. and when we got fairly started Smoot’s train was in the road to our inconveinence[.] about ten o clock any thoughts were taken off of everything connected with our train by the appearance of Brother J.E. Johnston & Hyde making their appearance on their return. I spent about half an hour with brother Johnston who entertained me with a relation of his own affairs, which were prosperous & also the arrangement he made for my reception amongst his relations which makes my prospects on entering the Valley rather different from what they have been, how kind how free hearted, how confiding is his friendship, how congenial his spirit. he is a noble soul, & I feel warmly interested in his welfare, & why not. I feel to owe him a debt of gratitude for his kindness to me when a stranger. Our travelling has been very hard today, & towards night the waggon Mrs Bullard rides in, was upset while she was in it & most fortunately escaped with the exception of a lame wrist, & the spoiling of her bonnet & caps there was but little damage done. none of the company goods were injured. Brother Smoot’s had a waggon broke and goods seriously injured[.] While the waggon was getting to rights Brother Haywood came to us to take Frank away. How different I felt to meet him to what I did to see brother Johnston[.] my feelings are so chilled when I think of going to Bishop H’s home Sabbath Oct 13. Salt Lake Valley

The Home of Nathaniel Henry Felt

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 2 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

This house, formerly located at 10 Liberty Street, was once the home of Mormon pioneer and local church leader NATHANIEL HENRY FELT (1816-1887). Born and raised in Salem, Nathaniel and his brother John ran a tailoring business at 217 Essex Street. In 1839, he married Eliza Ann Preston, also of Salem. In 1843, they joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints , and along with 120 new converts, began a small branch of the Church in Salem. Because of Nathaniel’s position as branch president, this house became an important Mormon meeting place. In the late spring of 1844, Brigham Young sent his fourteen-year-old daughter Vilate to live with the Felt family while she attended finishing school in Salem. Later that summer, Brigham Young visited Salem several times while campaigning for Joseph Smith (LDS Church founder), a U.S. presidential candidate. It was on one of these visits to the area that Brigham Young and local Church members first heard news of Smith's murder at Carthage, Illinois, on June 27, 1844. One year later, Nathaniel Felt, his family, and Vilate Young left from this house to embark on the arduous journey west, eventually settling in what would become Salt Lake City, Utah. There, Nathaniel became a highly respected member of the community, with a public career that included service as Salt Lake City alderman and Utah Territorial representative. Plaque donated by the Mormon Historic Sites Foundation and the Nathaniel H. Felt Family Association.

NATHANIEL HENRY FELT Sr., Tailor - Newspaper Man

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 2 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Nathaniel Henry Felt was born 6 February, 1816, in Salem Massachusetts, the son of Nathaniel Felt and Hannah Reeves. He was the youngest of 12 children. His father, a merchant trader with the West Indies, died when Nathaniel was seven years old. The family was left in straitened circumstances having lost his property, even to his family home, through misfortune in business. Nathaniel attended the common schools of his native place, and before and after school hours acted as errand boy for a draper and tailor's business. He was not robust, but full of ambition to gain a collegiate education. He worked hard in that direction, but owing to the reduced circumstances of the family, had to abandon his purpose just as he was about to enter high school. He was apprenticed to a tailor in Lynn, five miles from Salem. He was then 15 years old. Six months before attaining the majority, and through the help of his only surviving brother, he bought out an establishment in Salem and was soon employing twenty hands. He increased his means by some fortunate ventures in the African and Chinese trade. This was the intention of himself and brothers - to found a commercial business. He also became interested in military matters, joining the "Division Corps of Independent Cadets", which was organized with the Boston cadets in colonial times under British rule. Through his musical interests Nathaniel became acquainted with Miss Eliza Ann Preston, a member of another of the old New England families, whom he married on 3 Oct. 1839. His mother's family was divided in religious belief but he, though often solicited to do so, would not identify himself with any of the popular churches. After carefully investigating "Mormonism" however, he was converted and baptized a Latter-Day-Saint. His wife also joined the church. In the winter of 1843-44 he was appointed president of the Salem Branch. During this period he became acquainted with such men as Brigham Young, Orson Pratt and Heber C. Kimball, who were frequent and welcomed visitors at his home. They left it the morning that word was received of the martyrdom of the Prophet and the Patriarch, Joseph and Hyrum Smith. He had been advised by President Young to remain at Salem for the present, but as the crowds gathered around Nauvoo, and the mobs grew more threatening, he determined to join the main body of the Church at that place. Accordingly, on the 5th day of June 1845, after closing out his business at a great sacrifice, he with his wife and one son Joseph Henry, set out for Nauvoo. There he entered into business and continued his labors in the ministry, being ordained one of the presidents of the quorum of Seventy.  "...Saints were made. The Prophet said about it, "I have reason to believe the Church is being purged. "Now I take you to the incident where, and this is being called by critical historians a great fiasco. On August 6, 1836, Joseph, Oliver Cowdery, Hyrum Smith, Sidney Rigdon undertook a trip to Salem, Massachusetts. What for? On good authority they had been told that there was a house in Salem, Massachusetts under which were not vast, but some buried treasure. "Joseph Smith had always been accused of being a money digger. He once said, "Ironically it wasn't a very profitable business. I only made .35 cents a day and we never found anything." And he was the one who prevailed upon the man to give it up. But now they go to Salem on the strength of this promise. Well, they reached Salem, they investigated and it turned out there was nothing, to be found. The Prophet prayed about it and it and a revelation is given, it's a rebuke, and then a set of promises. "I, the Lord, your God, am not displeased with your coming on this journey, not with standing your follies." That's a bit of rebuke isn't it? It goes on to say, "But I have much treasure in this city for you, for the benefit of Zion, and many people in this city whom I will gather out, in due time, for the benefit of Zion, through your instrumentality. The revelation goes on to say, that they should search for the ancient inhabitants and founders of the city, implying that there are genealogical treasures to be had. There were and they were found, but that's another story. It's the financial side of that promise I want to pursue for just a minute. "For there are more treasures than one," said the revelation, "in this city." A sequel, not the only one. "A man named Nathaniel [Henry] Felt and his wife, Eliza, were converted in Salem. He became the President of the Salem Branch. It was at his home, incidentally, that Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball first received word that Joseph and Hyrum had been killed in Carthage. "At great sacrifice, financially and other wise, Nathaniel and his wife came to Nauvoo. He was only twenty nine years old. His furniture was sent via New Orleans. His carpets, his tables, his chairs, sofas, and mirrors, all became part of the Nauvoo Temple decor. Later still, he became president of what was known as the St. Louis Conference, or we would say District. There was one place amidst the house burnings and mobbing in Illinois, a place called St Louis, that was an oasis of security. People gathered there, not just as exiles from Nauvoo, but who were coming [from] abroad after missionary work in the foreign countries. This man Nathaniel took care of these people. His Branch in that place, St Louis, became the largest District in the Church. There was a period when it was many thousands, hundreds of immigrants came. He hired an entire hotel for temporary housings, a concert hall for Sunday services, And his own funding made possible the boat, the ships, that made possible exodus, but also he outfitted, he funded, for the three to four thousand members what they needed as the bare minimum to get across the plains. In the meantime, St. Louis became, in a series of disasters, a place of a huge fire, of cholera and death. He ministered personally to the sick, though many were afflicted, none died, and none died on any of the ships that he arranged for. 1 could go on, but it seems to me that's fairly tangible evidence that there were more than one treasure and for the benefit of Zion and through his instrumentality a great portion of the saints were aided. "He came west, he was honored and loved by the brethren and came to be a member of the Prayer circle of Brigham Young." -Truman Madsen on Nathaniel Felt from "The Life and Teachings of the Prophet Joseph" 1997 (then Bookcraft) a recording. Oral (phone) permission per Deseret Book. Also see D&C Chapter 111. A longer history can be found in the L.D. S. Biographical Encyclopedia, Vol.11, by Andrew Jensen. With the completion of the Nauvoo Temple was being hurried on, Nathaniel Henry's baggage including some of his furniture such as carpets, tables, chairs, sofa and mirrors, having arrived from Salem by way of New Orleans, were used to furnish the sacred house preparatory to the performance of ordinances therein. He took part in the defense of Nauvoo and was under fire as well as on regular guard duty. Through over- exertion assisting the remnant of his co-religionists across the Mississippi, after the departure of the vanguard which he was preparing to follow up, he was taken down with fever and ague. His physical condition became such that he was counseled to take his wife to St. Louis and postpone his journey to the West. Accordingly, he turned over wagon outfit to John Taylor, one of the Twelve Apostles, and with his wife and two sons proceeded to St. Louis, Missouri, arriving there in early November. On February 14, 1847, Nathaniel Henry Felt Sr. was appointed President of the St. Louis Conference, then numbering from seven to ten thousand Latter-Day-Saints, and was the only organized conference in the United States. St. Louis was not only the gathering place of the Saints driven from Nauvoo, where they went to remain until a more permanent place was selected by the pioneers, but became the outfitting point for those traveling westward. This was also the place where missionaries, still sent out by the Church, looked for and received substantial assistance to take them on their journey both going and returning. At that point the immigrating Saints were received from foreign lands by water from New Orleans, and there secured their outfits for the crossing of the plains. Upon Nathaniel H. Felt devolved almost entirely the duty of advising these immigrants, purchasing outfits and supplies for them, and charting the necessary steamboats to take them to Kanesville. It was almost a matter of congratulation with him that no accident occurred to and no scourge prevailed on any of the vessels thus engaged by him. There were instances, however, in which steamboats were secured by other persons, contrary to his advice. In one of these instances he went to the wharf as soon as he learned of it and urged the Saints to come ashore, telling them the boat was unsafe. Many took his advice while others remained on board. The steamer had hardly left her moorings when she blew up. Several lives were lost and much baggage was destroyed. At St. Louis President Felt opened a correspondence with Colonel Thomas L. Kane, who afterwards mediated between Utah and the Federal Government. In the spring of 1850 the Felt family - consisting of the father, mother, two sons, and an infant daughter, started for the Salt Lake Valley. They were escorted as far as Council Bluffs by Ballou's band discoursing sweet music in their honor. At the Bluffs, with two wagons, four yoke of oxen, and two cows, they joined Heywood and Woolley's Church merchandise train. They arrived at their destination on the 6th of October. They located on upper Main Street, just opposite President Heber C. Kimball's residence. (At the time this article was written, the old family homestead.) During the winter they lived in wagons and tents, and in the spring they built an adobe house of two rooms. Nathaniel was appointed Alderman of Great Salt Lake City on January 9, 1851 from Gov. Brigham Young, under the Charter incorporating the city. There were some other political appointments both in Territorial and City governments. He was not idle in ecclesiastical matters. In 1851 he was appointed a traveling Bishop. As such he visited nearly all the settlements and towns of Utah, instructing the Ward Bishops relative to tithing methods, records, reports, etc. In the militia he was commissioned by Brigham Young on April 12, 1852 as Chaplain on the general staff of the Legion. He was given the rank of Colonel. Nathaniel had previously accompanied George A. Smith to Little Salt Lake Valley where they laid out the town of Parowan. The winter of 1854 - 55 found Nathaniel Henry in New York City, assisting John Taylor to establish the paper known as "The Mormon" and laboring in emigration matters. During this mission, in company with Apostle Taylor and Delegate Bernhisel, he called on Pres. Franklin Pierce in Washington D.C. At the time the President made the following statement relative to his recent appointment of Colonel Steptoe, to succeed Brigham Young as Governor of Utah. He said, "Gentlemen, you are well acquainted with the immense outside pressure that popular prejudice has arrayed against your people. This obliges me as Chief Magistrate to make some show in responding to it, so I have appointed Colonel Steptow as Governor of Utah; but you will readily conceive that Colonel Steptow, holding an honorable position in the United States army, will not be willing to resign that position for the uncertain tenure of the four year Governorship of that distant Territory. Elder Felt returned to Salt Lake City in October 1856. Having secured Government contracts to furnish supplies for the troops at Camp Floyd, he now engaged in the grain and produce business with David R. Allen. They established stores in Salt Lake City, Nephi, and Ephraim. In the years 1856 - 57 Nathaniel served a mission in Great Britain where he labored in the office of the "Millennial Star", and later as pastor of the London district. From November 1869 until 1870 he was a missionary to the New England States, laboring principally in his native state of Massachusetts. For a long period he was a member of the High Council and was actively engaged in public affairs, both State and Church. In 1873 he was stricken with a severe illness, the effects of which he never entirely recovered. During his remaining years he acted as a home missionary and contributed various articles to the press. Nathaniel Henry Felt Sr. died on January 27,1887. He is buried in the Salt Lake City cemetary. He left a posterity of eight sons, five daughters and sixteen grandchildren. He was the husband of three wives: Eliza Ann Preston who died June 19, 1875, Sarah Strange, and Mary Louise Pile whom he married respectively March 17,1854, and December 7, 1856. In addition to his first wife, two sons and two daughters preceded him beyond the veil. Partly from the L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, Vol. II. by Andrew Jensen. Compiled by Donna Joyce Mangum and Eric William Mangum in 2001.

The Felt Family

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 2 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Among the honorable old Yankee families, which have helped to make history in Utah as well as in famous old New England, is the Felt family of which the veteran pioneer, Nathaniel Henry Felt, is the founder of the western branch. Elder Felt was born in Salem on Feb 6, 1816 and married Eliza Ann Preston. He went to Nauvoo in 1845, and was a participant in all the trying events which followed that date. He came to Utah in 1850 after having presided over the St. Louis conference, number about 10,000 souls for some years. His family, which were numerous and vigorous are among Utah’s best and most respected citizens. Among the most prominent in recent years are the late Joseph H. Felt, who served as the first president of the Y. M. M. I. A. in Salt Lake City and for many years before his death June 15, 1907 in the bishopric of the Eleventh Ward. Charles B. Felt is a member of the general Sunday School Union Board having served in many capacities prior to his elevation to his present position both in civic and ecclesiastical positions. George F. Felt, John G. and A. W. Felt are well known business men of Salt Lake City. David P. Felt, one of the sons, is also a well known journalist and editor. Ida Felt, that beautiful foster mother who with her sister Annie, took the responsibility of rearing a family of six orphan children left by the demise of Minnie Felt Cutler, and who was soon after followed by the father, Joseph C. Cutler. Including these well known characters there are still living of the original Felt Family in Utah the following: Margaret Felt West, John G., Albert W., George F., Charles B., Ed H., Ida, Annie, David P., Nathaniel H., and Mary Adelia Young. Of the families associated with the Felt family and well-known in Utah, the Felt Genealogy mentions very frequently the following famililies: Adams, Aldrick, Allen, Anson, Anders, Barber,Barnes, Billings, Brown, Bryant, Chandler, Chase, Clark, Crandall, Davis,Dudley, Emery, Ferguson, Fuller, Gall, Gates, Goff, Gould, Gray, Green, Hale,Hardy, Harris, Henderson, Hill, Holly Howard, Howe, Johnson, Jones, Keeler, Kimball, Lawrence, Lee, Lowry, Lyon, Martin, Mason, Morrison, Nelson, Nicholas, Palmer, Peek, Perkins, Petit, Pierce, Porter, Pratt, Procter, Pulsipher, Reed, Reeves, Richardson, Robbins, Robinson, Russell, Saunders, Sheldon, Steele, Stevens, Symonds, Taylor, Wsebb, Wells, West, White, Whitmore, Williams, Wilson, Wood, Wright, Young. There has been a large Felt family record published, not by a direct descendant of the Felt family, but by an in-law John E. Morris. This gentleman has gathered some most interesting and valuable information regarding the descendants of the immigrant George Felt of Felt’s Casco Bay, who was born in 1601 and arrived at Salem with Endicott in 1628, and the introduction to the book contains eloquent remarks from which we herein give genuine extracts. “There is a healthy and growing interest in the subject of genealogy” many bright historical minds are now interested in this fascinating study, and giving to it much valuable time and attention. The work constantly being done by these, and others of more humble attainments, well illustrates the claim of an increasing interest, and gives the lie to the smart assertion that the modern man lives for the present and strives for the future only, and does not care a rap who or what his grandfather was. This same modern, if his ideas should be carried out by his descendants, might be somewhat chagrined could he observe the mental attitude of his great-grandchildren toward himself. Those who affect to despise the egotism of genealogy may read with interest and profit the following extract: " The preservation of pedigrees is not the mere pastime of the idle and curious; it is the honorable employment of the student and historian, for it has always formed the basis of true history. In the ancient records of Assyria, Egypt, and Arabia, the pedigree of an individual is usually the thread upon which is strung the stirring events of centuries; and so important a place did the preservation of a pedigree occupy among the Israelites, that it was established as* a positive obligation upon every Levite in the temple. Josephus regarded genealogical study as of the utmost importance, and, in giving an account of his personal history, boasts, 'I have traced my pedigree as I found it recorded on the public tablets.' Nor is the genealogical form of history peculiar to Semitic races. The earliest Greek records were also those of pedigrees. The histories of Acusilaus of Argos, and Hecataeus of Miletus were entitled genealogies; the fragmentary historits of Xanthus, Charon of Lampsacus, and Hellanicus are strongly marked with the genealogical element ; while in the Greek Testament the whole-structure of Christianity is based upon the established pedigree of its founder. It is true, many lineages contain nothing save the simple records of uneventful generations, but they preserve facts which would otherwise be lost in the history of the American nation. To continue with the Felt family, we are told by our historian that the “The origin of the FELT family is unknown, neither have we any certain knowledge of the former home of George Felt, the immigrant, though there is reason for believing that he came from Wales. It has been suggested that the name is of Flemish or Dutch origin, and that the family settled with others of like nationality in Wales or on the border. The name seems to signify the same in various languages, and to be derived from words meaning " field " or " open country." There is a probability that its earlier form was Felch. The immigrant George was the first settler in Casco Bay, near Boston, and he lived to the advanced age of 92 years, his wife surviving him even at this date. He was possessed of great wealth at one time in his life, but through the early Indian wars and the treachery of some of his friends he lost his holdings “in Broad Cove” some of which was recovered by his children. Of his descendants there were many soldiers, officers and civil incumbents in the great revolution, which gave America to the Americans. Perhaps the most famous descendant the third Samuel, born in 1735. He harried Mehitabel Buell, and the story of this winner her from his best friend, the long subsequent enmity broken only by Samuel’s heroic deed of picking up the wounded body of NATHANIEL HENRY FELT Taken Dec. 2, 1884 his one-time rival from the bloody plains of New York’s hot battle, is told with vividness in this book. It is from this Samuel, whose romantic and generous settlement of Lebanon, New York, has sprung most of the Felts of America. He was an officer in the French and Indian wars, was a trusted friend of Governor Trumbull, along down the lines of his descendants are found orators, statesmen, pioneers, philanthropists, scholars and soldiers. An interesting incident is also contained in the story of Capt. John Felt who at the opening of the Revolutionary war, residing in the North Fields, a portion of Salem, Mass. He was a tall “muscular man” and endowed with the courage of his convictions, one who in a emergency proves to be the right man in the right place. This was well shown at the time of the British invasion of Salem by Col. Leslie, Feb. 24, 1775 when by the firm stand of Capt. Felt the opening conflict of the revolution, which was precipitated seven weeks later at Concord) was here averted. Had a man of less firmness and weaker judgement stood in the his place in all probability the first battle of the war would have been fought at the North Bridge, Salem. The following account is drawn largely from a very interesting address delivered by Charles M. Endicott, Esq., January 18, 1855 before the Essex Institute of Salem. The bridge over the North River and the causeway over the flats were built by the town of Salem in 1744. Their combined length was 860 feet, with a width of 18 feet, and over the river was a draw at least 18 feet long, which was arranged to swing upward for the passage of vessels. The town's right in the bridge and flats was, by authorization of a vote in town meeting, held May 14, 1755, conveyed by the selectmen to certain citizens, (the right to the draw and its supporting piers being reserved,) upon condition that the bridge and way be always kept in suitable condition for the passage of vehicles of every description, and this failing, the property, with all improvements which might have been made, to revert to the town. The rights conveyed were, after a time, forfeited, and the town being again in possession appointed a committee to make a further conveyance. This was done June 15, 1768, and Jonathan Ropes, Jeremiah Hacker, Thorndike Proctor, and John Felt, all proprietors in the North Fields, became the owners of the bridge and adjacent flats under the same restrictions as governed the former proprietors. (See Appendix C.) This was the condition of things at the opening of the Revolutionary War. As before intimated, Capt. John Felt was a prominent figure at the time of Leslie's invasion. Mr. Endicott says : "Foremost among the friends of liberty, and the resolute and daring enemies of oppression and arbitrary power, stood Capt. John Felt, who, without any disparagement to others, appears entitled to the distinction of the Hero of the British repulse at the North Field Bridge. He was at this time about fifty years of age. His frame, square, strong and muscular, denoted him a man whom it would be the part of prudence to avoid in single combat. Salem possessed many men whose social position in life was perhaps superior, men of more wealth, of more erudition, of more influence in her public councils; but none of greater moral worth, or irreproachable private character. His love of independence and hatred of tyranny had shone through his whole life, and with these qualities was blended the most intrepid resolution. There lived no one in whose heart glowed a warmer love for the liberties of his country, and none more ready to peril, and if need be to sacrifice, his life in support of her cause. In a word, he was just the man for an emergency: of cool, determined bravery, calm and collected in the hour of danger. These qualities inspired every one with confidence in his ability successfully to control and direct any daring enterprise or forlorn hope which his inclination prompted him to lead." The object of the invasion by Col. Leslie was to take possession of a dozen or more cannon which had been collected by the citizens for the purpose of resisting British aggression should occasion require, and which were secreted about the premises of Capt. Robert Foster, a blacksmith, who had been employed in repairing them, on the north side of the North River. Col. Leslie landed his forces in a retired spot on Marblehead Neck and marched swiftly and secretly towards Salem; but the news of his movements had preceded him, and when he arrived he found the draw of the bridge open, and guarded by a large number of citizens massed upon the north shore. As he passed the Court House he was joined by Capt. John Felt, who attached himself closely to Col. Leslie, with the avowed intention of making things hot for him personally should he order a commencement of hostilities. He afterwards stated that it was his intention to grapple with Col. Leslie, had the troops fired upon the people, and to jump with him into the stream, there to try the death struggle together. A neighbor afterwards said, " He could have done so, drowned him, and then swam off." Col. Leslie, upon finding the draw open, demanded that it be immediately lowered, and remonstrated with the people for insulting his soldiers and obstructing the King's highway. " This is not the King's highway," was the reply, "it is a private way belonging to the proprietors of the North Fields, and no King or country has any control over it." " The people on the north side of the bridge had climbed upon the top of the upraised leaf by help of the chains, and there sat astride like so many hens at roost. The indignation of the Colonel at having his designs thus suddenly and unexpectedly baffled, was excited almost to frenzy, and he gave utterance to his feeling, to say the least, in no mild or becoming language ; one account says he stamped and swore, ordering the bridge to be immediately lowered. Being questioned as to his design in making this movement, and why he wished to cross the bridge, he replied that he had orders to cross it, and he would do so if it cost his life and the lives of his men. Here was, however, a dilemma from which this bravado could not relieve him. To advance under the present circumstances without the consent of the inhabitants was impossible, and to retreat, disgrace. In the bitterness of his feelings he then went upon West's (now Brown's) wharf, to reconnoitre, closely followed by Capt. Felt, who was observing every motion and order with the keen unremitting watchfulness of the tiger, and turning to an officer near him, said, ' You must face about this division, and fire upon those people.' These were the inhabitants on the northern side of the river, who had collected upon a small wharf which jutted out from the eastern side of the bridge, conspicuous among whom was Capt. Robert Foster, the owner of the premises upon which the cannon had been deposited. This order to fire having been overheard by Capt. Felt, who stood within two yards of Col. Leslie, he cried out with a loud voice, for his resentment was kindled by the order to fire : ' Fire ! you have no right to fire without further orders; if you do fire you will all be dead men.' 'Where are they who can hinder me ?' asked Col. Leslie. ' There,' said Capt. Felt, pointing to the people, ' is a multitude, every man of whom is prepared to die in this strife.' " At the moment these words were uttered by Capt. Felt, a thrill of confidence was felt through the whole multitude. The people saw at once that he was just the man for the present emergency, and with unanimous, though tacit, consent, looked1 to him as their leader in any movement which should be made for the further defense of the bridge. He was the spirit on whom the crowd now depended. How far such language induced Col. Leslie to use a praiseworthy forbearance cannot be determined; but had the command to fire been enforced, probably not a man of that whole regiment would have escaped death, and the first bloody battle of the Revolution would have been fought at the North Bridge, on the 26th of February, instead of the 9th of April, at Lexington." It was now low tide, and three gondolas lay aground on the west side of the bridge ; one of them was owned by Capt. Felt, and one by his brother Jonathan, commonly known as "Hunter Felt." Apprehensive that they might be seized by the soldiers, Capt, Felt suggested their destruction; and the citizens, conspicuous among them being Jonathan Felt, sprang to the work, and in a few moments, by the use of axes and such other implements as were found ready at hand, the work was accomplished, but not without resistance, and in the fracas which followed one Joseph Whicher received a **** in the breast from a bayonet sufficient to draw blood, which may be justly recorded as "the first blood of the Revolution." Col. Leslie having by this time become convinced of the determination of the citizens to resist his progress, announced his intention of carrying out his purpose if he remained until autumn, and was assured by Capt. Felt that nobody would care if he did so. Upwards of an hour and a half had been consumed in the fruitless attempt to cross the bridge, and the short winter day was fast drawing to a close, when the colonel, thinking perhaps to effect by diplomacy what he could not compass by force, asked Capt. Felt if he had any authority to cause the bridge to be lowered, and was answered, " There is no authority in the case, but there might be some influence." A conference was the result of this suggestion, and, upon the pledge of Col. Leslie that he would not march his troops more than fifty rods beyond the bridge and then return in a peaceable manner, " the leaf was lowered, and the troops passed quietly over, marched the stipulated distance, then wheeled and set out with all haste on their homeward march, having been completely foiled in the object of their expedition." This withdrawal without seizing the guns cost Col. Leslie his commission. Above all the traits with which this noble family are marked is that of kindliness. A serene and constant kindness, which makes them good friends, good neighbors, and good citizens. This with their tendency to extreme age and their undoubted honor and probity is traced from generation to generation through the page of this book and of time. Deseret Evening News December 11, 1909

Life History of Joseph Albert Stratton

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 2 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Life History of Joseph Albert Stratton Joseph Albert Stratton, a faithful Latter Day Saint and a Pioneer of 1847 was born the 11th of September 1821 at Bedford, Bedford County, Tennessee. He was baptized by Elder William Alred (Alfred?) about the 14th of February 1840 in the waters of Kizer’s Creek, Pike County, Illinois and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. About the 15th of April 1842, he was ordained an Elder by Brother Baker, President of the Elder’s Quorum. On the 17th of May 1844 he was ordained to the High Priesthood by Presidents Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards and licensed the same day, as recorded in record of licenses book A, page 126. His first mission was performed by working on the Temple as appointed by President Joseph Smith. He afterwards filled a mission with good success in Pennsylvania and several of the Eastern States, as appears from his journal. He also filled a mission to England, of near two years; magnifying his calling and returning home with honor. He was next appointed to preside over a numerous Branch of the Church at St. Louis, Missouri, which he filled with diligence and in a faithful manner for nearly ten months. From the Journal History of the Church, the 6th of February 1847, the following official letter (signed by Willard Richards) was written to Brother Stratton. Winter Quarters Camp Of Israel Feb. 6th, 1847 Elder Joseph A. Stratton, Beloved Brother: Your letter of recent date, suggested the Elder Felt for the Presidency of the Church at St. Louis, is received and approved by the Council, and we trust that he will be approved by the Branch and that he will requite himself as a man of God and workman indeed in his calling. Brother Stratton seems to have some fears that his license to leave St. Louis and visit the Camp, came more in answer to his prayers, than in accordance to our wishes. If this were true, it is certainly an encouragement for Bro. Stratton to continue praying, for the answer proves, that he prays in faith, and to pray without faith would be sin and no man can pray in faith, without desiring to be heard. Jesus says “Ye ask and receive not because ye ask amiss”, and again “Ask and ye shall receive.” We are willing that you should receive the Savior’s testimony in your case, and enjoy the consolation that you have asked aright, and had your petition granted. Yes Bro. Stratton it is quite right, when the children of the Kingdom have been laboring in the field as long and faithfully as you have. And circumstances are as favorable and laborers as plentiful that they return home to the Father’s house and rest, and refresh themselves, that their spirits and body become invigorated and gain strength and be prepared for a greater work as the fields may ripen for the harvest, so that independent of your request, we wish you to come, we want to see you that we may rejoice in each others society for a season. There is nothing peculiar transpired since we last wrote you. We are progressing with the organization of companies preparatory for emigration and the Saints are rejoicing themselves in the liberty of the Gospel. There is some sickness at this place, but no more that might be anticipated in the fulfillment of prophecy, “They wear out the Saints of the most High, when we contemplate labors and toil of the Camp the past year, and the many exposures they have been subjected to. The diseases are mostly of colds and canker.” Under date of January 22, 1847, President Young wrote Joseph A. Stratton at St. Louis, Missouri, to invite as many brethren as could possibly leave their families with a tolerable degree of comfort to come on and proceed to the mountains. I can find no record of his marriage but from the Journal History of the Church 21 June 1847, p.6 we read the following, Joseph Albert Stratton, born 11 September 1821, Bedford, Bedford, Tenn., and Mary Ann Stratton born 31 March 1815, Bedford, Bedfordshire, England were listed among the first fifty of the Latter Day Saints to be organized into companies for crossing the plains from the Missouri River to the Great Salt Lake Valley in the summer of 1847. Daniel Spencer was Captain of the first hundred. Peregrine Sessions Captain of the first fifty. The document giving the information was dated, West Bank of the Elkhorn River, 15th of June 1847 and signed by Elizah F. Sheets, Captain and Joseph A. Stratton, Clerk, Darwin Richardson, teamster. Polly Sessions kept a journal and recorded many interesting experiences of this company of Pioneer but a journal is a very personal thing and I was not allowed to copy from it. They arrived in the Great Salt Lake Valley, 24th September 1847. Elder Stratton’s last mission was to search out the best route to Zion, and lead the Saints therein during the fall of 1850. His obituary was written by Parley P. Pratt (from which I have frequently quoted) and among other things he said, “his exposure during this last mission, and the frosts and chilly blasts of the mountains probably tended to fasten disease upon his system. And thus he had endured to the end; spent the vigor of life and the strength of manhood in the service of his God; and at last laid down his life for his brethren. In his sickness he suffered much, begged often to be suffered to depart and died with an assurance of eternal life and usefulness in his Master’s employ. Thus another of the Latter Day Priesthood has joined his brethren behind the veil, to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord, to “preach deliverance to the captives and the opening of the prison to them that are bound.” He was buried at sundown. Seven carriages followed the remains to the grave and Orson Pratt preached the funeral sermon.

Who Was Nathaniel H. Felt

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 2 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Sketch written by Paul R. Felt Although not one of the earliest immigrants to Utah, Nathaniel H. Felt was one of the first in the new Territory to hold official position. He was not only the first alderman of Salt Lake City, but also a member of the first Territorial assembly. That he did not come west the first year was only because ill health prevented; for he was in Nauvoo at the time of the exodus and had his outfit ready for journey. Being advised to delay his departure until physically restored, and being assigned to an important duty in St. Louis, he let Elder John Taylor have his team and wagon, with which some of that pioneer's family came to the valley, Mr. Felt's arrival being in the fall of 1850. He was born in Massachusetts in 1816, and though he learned a humbled trade, his commercial instinct soon lifted him above this environment, and he was successfully engaged in the African and China trade when "Mormonism" found him. Both in civil and ecclesiastical lines he was prominent and useful in early Utah times, being scholarly in his tastes and having much ability as a writer and speaker. His activity in public affairs ceased in 1873 when he was stricken with a severe illness from which he never fully recovered; and he died in 1887. From a paper (not news) in my possession. Source not given - Paul R. Fel

Life Stoy of Thomas Charles West and Margaret Eliza Felt

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 2 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

THE LIFE STORY OF THOMAS CHARLES WEST AND MARGARET ELIZA FELT "Come, come ye Saints, no toil nor labor fear; But with joy wend your way. We'll find the place which God for us prepared, Far away in the West, Where none shall come to hurt or make afraid; There the Saints will be blessed. " Those courageous souls, our pioneer ancestors, who left homes and loved ones to explore, conquer and subdue a new unproven land were pioneers not only on the frontiers of civilization, but on the frontiers of the spirit as well. They truly repre¬sent the great American ideal, the very reason for its settlement, that of religious freedom. These emigrants possessed high ideals and objectives, and the faith and determination to achieve them. It was through hard work, and the ability to vision beyond their own time, the needs of future generations, that those objectives were consummated. Their dedication to a belief in true freedom, their love of fellowmen, their willingness to sacrifice them-selves for the good of others, and their sincere faith in God; in all these virtues and attributes our pioneers left us a magnificent heritage. It is our right — our privilege — our duty to cherish and appreciate it. Perhaps the proper way to show our appreciation for the many good things our progenitors did for us, is to pattern our lives after theirs so that when it is our time to pass on to our eternal reward, it can be said of us that we left this sphere of action better than we found it. This history is gratefully dedicated to Thomas Charles West and his wife Margaret Eliza Felt, two souls who might be counted worthy to be numbered among those spoken of above. Thomas Charles West was the first son and second child of the eleven children, born to Charles Henry John West and Eliza Dangerfield, He was born on the 9 of October 1859. At London, Middlesex, England. He was blessed 8 November 1853 at Goswell Road Branch by Elder MaCaughie. In his infancy he had a severe sickness and was thought dead. His mother washed and laid him out. A short time later she looked at him and saw his finger move. They immediately worked with him and Charles Henry administered to him; and he was restored to life. Charles Henry John West was born 12 January 1833 in London, Middle-sex England and was the third son of John West and Lydia Johnson. Eliza Dangerfield, born 7 September 1832 in Cottage Lane, City road, England, and was the daughter of Thomas and Caroline Buckwell of Middlesex, England. Charles Henry and Eliza were married 25th December 1850 at St. Andrews Church in Holborn , London by Rector I.I. Toogood in the presence of their parents. They were converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Elders John Hyde and Orson Pratt. After joining the church Charles Henry preached the gospel to Eliza’ s family and converted five members, who had formerly belonged to the Baptist church. Their other children born in England were: Caroline, Ann Lydia, Jabez William, Mary Ann, and Eliza Alice. The spirit of coming to Utah - or 'Zion' as they expressed it - had been with Charles Henry and Eliza since joining the church. They worked hard to save what they could to pay for their passage to Zion. With the expense of caring for their large family they found it difficult to save enough. It was after Eliza Alice was born when they met Elders John Brown and Fergerson, who, learning of their long desire to go to Utah, promised them that if they would send two of their girls over with friends they would be able to follow within a year. They sent Caroline ten, and Lydia six, with Brother and Sister King, who had no children. Brother King's mother and sister were traveling with them. They left in April 1862 on the "Captain Tapstock" and arrived in Salt Lake City 12 October 1862. With the blessings of the Lord, as the young mission¬aries had promised, Charles Henry and Eliza were able to accumulate the necessary amount for passage for them¬selves and their remaining four children; and in the spring of 1863, one year later, they prepared to leave their home¬land and loved ones in England. They spent a week visiting some principal places of interest, the Kew Gardens, Lon¬don Docks, Thames Tunnel, the Monument, etc. They felt they were leaving England forever. They sailed 1 June 1863 on the "Amazon" which carried nearly a thousand people on board, including eight-hundred Latter-day Saints. Traveling with them and in their care was a boy, Samuel Bezzant, and a young lady, Mary Powell. After leaving the "White Cliffs of Dover" and on into the English Channel the family all felt some seasickness; Eliza continued feeling sick most of the way over. Thomas Charles, being the oldest, was required to help take care of his little brothers and sisters; while his father prepared the meals, washed the dishes and other duties required of him. The Saints were organized into wards and had their weekly meetings, consisting of singing, prayer, sacrament, and Gospel lessons; everything was done in order and by proper authority. President George Q. Cannon had given instructions and a Gospel sermon before the ship sailed. All immigrants furnished and prepared their own food on a large cook stove. The food consisted mostly of salt beef, oatmeal, crackers, dry peas, flour, etc. Those who could afford it had better rations. Among the passengers was the famous English Author, Charles Dickens, who later wrote the book - the "Uncommerical Traveler". In this book on page 99, Mr. Dickens writes of the "Mormons" on board, describing vividly a family which the West Family like to think was the family of Charles Henry and Eliza, Quote "A father and mother and several young children on the main deck below me had formed a family circle, close to the foot of the crowded gangway, where the children had made a nest for themselves on a coil of rope, the mother, she suckling the youngest, seemed to be discussing family affairs as peaceable as if they were if perfect retirement. " Also on board were a number of Welch Brethern who composed a brass band, so they had plenty of music, which pleased the family of Charles Henry and Eliza as they loved music. They were forty-two days on the ocean and the water was rough most of the way. A severe wind storm came up and blew off part of the sails and the sailors had a hard time keeping things under control. Occasionally a whale could be seen spouting water, or a flying fish, or some water fowl. One death occurred on board ship and the body was buried at sea. The ship docked at New York City harbor 4 July 1863. The Civil War was on and conditions were far from pleasant. The journey from New York to Florence, Nebraska was very bad. They were required to travel day and night, sometimes being crowded into cattle cars without sufficient food to keep the children from crying because of hunger. The steamer that took them up river was even more crowded and they were very thankful to reach Florence, Nebraska. It was here they and the other saints were met by Brethren from Utah who were to take them by ox team to Salt Lake City; about sixty wagons were waiting to take them across the plains. The West family traveled with the ox team of Peter Nebeker. When luggage and all was loaded, there was not enough room for all to ride, so all able-bodied men and older children were required to walk. Thomas Charles and Jabez walked with their father most of the way, until Jabez slipped and got run over by one of the wagons. His injuries were treated with fresh dung, and with faith and the Elders administering to him, he was healed; but he rode the rest of the way. After ten weeks on the plains, behind the slow, pokey oxen, and the heat of the summer months, over dusty roads, and crossing streams, they arrived in Salt Lake City, 4 October 1863, in time to attend the Semi-annual Conference of Church. The Saints were taken to the Church camping grounds in the Eighth Ward Square, where relatives and friends greeted them and took them into their own homes until they could find a place to locate. Charles Henry and Eliza and their family were met by Brother Grimsdell of the Tenth Ward, an old acquaintance from London, with his team and wagon. He took them and their baggage to his home, where they stayed until after Conference; they made arrangements to go to Provo, where their girls were living with a Bishop Miller. They rode to Provo in Dixie Wagons. On the way they left the boy, Samuel Bezzant with his Grand-father at Battle Creek. (Before leaving Salt Lake City the young lady, Mary Powell, married the teamster Peter Nebeker. They went to Dixie.) There was great rejoicing when they saw Caroline and Ann. Charles Henry and Eliza were very thankful to their Father in Heaven to have their family united again and to Bishop Miller for taking care of the girls. After a few days they settled in a one room adobe house belonging to the brothers of Bishop Miller's wife. A few days after being settled a great sorrow came to them. The little girl, Mary Ann, who had been ill most of the way across the plains, became worse. She died 22 October 1863. She was buried the next day in the Provo City Cemetery, because they were newcomers, the family were the only ones present at the burial services, along with the Bishop, who had taken care of her properly, and the driver of the buggy. They returned to their humble home feeling very down cast and gloomy. They felt that it was more than they could bear. While in this frame of mind, a gentleman walked into their home without knocking, and sat down in the only chair and commenced talking to them of their trouble. He seemed to know their history, the troubles they had passed through, the sacrifices they had made and of their faithfulness in the Gospel. He talked with them about an hour, consoling and blessing them, and they felt a heavenly influence radiate from him. He was very tall and wore a dark homespun suit, his hair was grey and his beard came down to his chest. When he left, he went backwards toward the door, opened it and went out. Charles Henry followed him, and to his amazement, could see no one. Next day he called on the Bishop to thank him for sending a ward teacher to comfort them at such a trying time. The Bishop said, "We have no one in our ward as you describe. Brother West, you have been highly blessed with a visitation of one of the three Nephites that were to remain on the earth until the Savior comes." Charles Henry first worked at helping make molasses. He received his wages in molasses, carrots and potatoes. Eliza taught a small group of children, along with her own, in her home and helped the family income a little. Thomas Charles, ten, gleaned wheat from Bishop Miller's fields and other fields that had been harvested. The whole family helped glean 21 1/2 bushels. Flour was worth $25 a hundred pound. Work was hard to get that winter. The next spring, another blessing came to them. While Eliza was in Salt Lake City, visiting her brother, she secured some temple clothes. Then Charles walked fifty miles from Provo to join her, and a few days later, they were sealed to each other in the Endowment House for time and all eternity! At last they felt fully repaid for all the trails through which they had passed. Some friends in Heber City wanted Charles Henry to move there and help get out logs and haul to Provo. Thomas Charles was big enough to help him, but it was so cold he nearly froze to death riding down the canyon on the logs. Once he became snow blinded and suffered severely. His mother kept his eyes bandaged and when the other children ate their boiled wheat they slyly slipped what they couldn't eat onto his dish, as they were never allowed to waste food, and he wondered why he had so much to eat. Wheat, carrots, flour and molasses were about all they had to eat that winter. Their potatoes froze because no one had told them how to care for potatoes in such a cold climate. The winter was so much colder than any winter had been in England. While living at Heber City, a daughter Mary Rebecca, was born 9 January 1866. In the spring of 1866 the family moved to Jordon to run the J. C. Little farm on shares. The farm was located on the Jordon River and it had a more comfortable house to live in. Thomas Charles got his first experience in farm living and farm work. He helped milk cows and feed animals and harvest hay. The children helped their mother churn butter and other such tasks children can do on a farm. The older ones helped wash the wool after the spring shearing of sheep. In 1867 Charles Henry and Eliza moved their family into Salt Lake City. Here they both taught school, Charles the boys, Eliza the girls. They lived in the back of the school house. It was this way their family received most of their schooling. On twenty third of February 1868, a son Charles Jesse was born, and they continued teaching school until April when they moved into the eleventh ward. In December of that year, Charles was working on a railroad in Echo Canyon, he suddenly felt impressed that he was needed at home. Since there was no other way to go, he walked the entire distance - only to learn of the death of his little daughter, Rebecca. For the second time, the family mourned the loss of a lovely three-year-old child! That was not all, however, for the next two children John Henry born 12 April 1870 lived only 2 and one half hours. Fanny Elizabeth, born 7th June 1872 and lived with them only 5 and one half months. The loss of these three beloved babies cast an unhappy shadow over the first few years which the family spent in Salt Lake City and memories of the little one buried in Provo years before, but they did not falter in their faith and courage to carry on. They still had many blessings to be thankful for, one of which was the addition of another son William Joseph born 29 August 1973. He was a frail, weak child, and it was feared that his chances for survival were no better than those of the two little babes who preceded him - but he had come to stay. Thomas Charles and his father got work in 1868 at Promontory Point digging and hauling fill dirt for a Mr. Brighton. Mr. Brighton would not pay Thomas Charles enough for such hard work, so he went to work for a John Sharp, driving mules on a dump truck on the same project at Promontory Point. He received good pay for this work. It was dangerous work and among a rough class of men. When the job was finished he and his father went home to work for Brigham Young. They did all kinds of odd jobs, such as gardening, orchard work, harvesting in the fields, etc. When President Young obtained a contract to furnish lumber for ties for a street car company they worked up City Creek, cutting and hauling lumber out of the canyon. They also worked on the Tabernacle and Assembly Hall. In their spare time they worked on their own home, which they were building on a piece of land Charles Henry had purchased in the Tenth Ward, hauling rock and sand for the foundation, setting out fruit trees and berry bushes, etc. Thomas Charles, now working for the Gibson Lumber Company, took his pay in lumber for the new home. His next job was with George Chandler, a Salt Lake butcher. On this job he was kicked by a mule and severely injured. The doctor gave little hope for his recovery, but through faith, prayer, administration of the Priesthood, and his mother’s excellent nursing, he soon recovered and was able to resume his work. During this time he met Margaret Eliza Felt, loved her and wanted to marry her. In 1873 his father gave him part of his building lot on which he built a two room adobe house. He learned the plastering trade and became very good at it. Margaret Eliza Felt, (Maggie, as she was familiarly called) was the third child of Nathaniel H. Felt and Eliza Ann Preston. She was born in St. Louis Mo. 6 October 1849. She weighed only three pounds at birth and was a very delicate baby. Her father, Nathaniel H. Felt was born 6 February 1816 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, the son of Nathaniel Felt and Hannah Reeves. He was a draper and tailor of Salem, Mass. Eliza Ann Preston was the daughter of Joseph and Rebecca (Peele) Preston and was born 10 November 1820 in Salem, Massachusetts. Nathaniel and his wife Eliza Ann joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1842. After the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph Smith, while the saints were being buffeted around by their enemies, Nathaniel Felt moved his family to Nauvoo, Ill. When the saints were expelled from Nauvoo Nathaniel, ill with chills and fever, and on the advice of Brigham Young, remained in the east, moving his family to St. Louis Mo. While there he was appointed President of the St. Louis Conference. It was the only organized Conference of the church in the United States at that time and numbered between seven and ten thousand saints. It was here in St. Louis that this tiny delicate baby, Margaret Eliza was born. At the age of six weeks she suffered a severe case of small pox, due to the fact her parents made a practice of taking missionaries into their home to do what they could for their welfare, and one of them exposed the family to the dreaded disease. Margaret Eliza being so tiny and so ill, gave her parents grave concern for fear of losing her. It was hard to keep her tiny hands from scratching her face which was covered with pox, and she carried scars the rest of her life. (She often related how Golden Kimball, as a boy, teasingly called her 'holy face!') In 1850 the Nathaniel H. Felt family moved to Salt Lake City with the Heywood and Wooley Merchandise train. Here Nathaniel built a three story adobe house on Main Street in the block north of Temple Square. He became a grain merchant; was first alderman in Salt Lake City; was Colonel and Chaplain in the Utah Militia; was elected to the House of Representatives in the first Legislature, 1852; went to England on a mission, where he established a paper called the "Mormon". He had three wives - Eliza Ann Preston, the mother of Joseph Henry, Nathaniel Preston, Margaret Ann, John Gillingham, Albert William, George Francis, Ada Agusta, Mary Alice, Charles Brigham and Annette Rebecca; Sarah Strange, the mother of James Strange, Edward Hunter, Mary Ida and Eliza Ann; Mary Louise Pile, the mother of David Pile, Nathaniel Henry and Mary Dell. The two families of Eliza Ann and Sarah lived in the same house. Margaret Eliza, being the oldest daughter, had plenty of work to do. She tended the babies and younger children. She dug Sego Lilies with her companions on Capitol Hill, (She was intimate with the families of Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, J. C. Little and other members of the 17th and 18th Wards, where she spent her childhood.) She attended school and was outstanding in singing, grammar and spelling. Her home life was a happy one. She honored her parents and loved her brothers and sisters. Her father made a comfortable living so she did not have to go away from home to work as so many young girls of those days. Her work was at home, where she learned to be a good housekeeper, homemaker, to sew, to knit and to tat - which was one of the fancy work arts she liked best. She also enjoyed the games of childhood as played at that time: Jacks, played with rocks - Hopscotch -Run sheep run - Steal Sticks - King William was King James Son, etc. She participated in dances and parties at the Social Hall. She grew up with Salt Lake City and witnessed the building of all the familiar land marks - Tabernacle, Temple, ZCMI store, Eagle Gate, Lion House, Salt Lake Theater, Tithing Yard Square, etc. She had several offers of marriage but none suited her until she met Thomas West. Thomas Charles West and Margaret Eliza Felt were married in the Salt Lake Endowment house 10 November 1874 in the presence of their parents. They started housekeeping in the two room adobe house built by Thomas Charles on the part of the building lot given him by his father. In 1875 they moved to Round Valley, Morgan County, Utah, to live in a small log house on a farm that Nathaniel Felt had purchased from a Mr. Cooper. (None of Nathaniel's boys cared to farm.) It joined the farm of Bishop Edward W. Hunter, presiding Bishop of the Church. It was some distance from any neighbors and three miles from Morgan. It was hard for Margaret to leave the city, her family, friends and close neighbors to live in such a lonely place. The families who lived in Round Valley then were, Edward Hunter, Andrew Black, Neils Nielson, O. B. Anderson, later a bishop, Evan Richards, and Arthur Brewer. (Round Valley became part of North Morgan Ward when it was organized in 1877. The farm was divided by the tracks of the Union Pacific railroad (1868-69). A large spring was on the upper end but their land was to high to use it for irriga¬tion so they used it for drinking and household purposes. It was used by other settlers for household and irrigation purposes. Thomas Charles made a pond of the spring and planted fish; later he made another pond for boating. The watercress grew very profuse in the ponds during the summer. The County Road (later it became the highway) ran close to the house and travelers would stop to get a cold drink of water. Bands of Indians would go by, some stopped. It would frighten Margaret, but they were always friendly and occasionally they asked for biscuits or something else to eat. Tramps from the railroad pestered her for food also; she never turned them away and always fed them when she could. They often asked what they could do to earn some food and she had them chop wood to cook with. Thomas Charles fenced his land, built a barn, chicken coop, granary, vegetable cellar, etc. He planted an orchard of apples, pears and plums, raspberries, red English currants and gooseberries. He had several colonies of bees, a small herd of sheep and other necessary farm animals of that time. He was a handy man, able to do most anything he set out to do. He even made some of their furniture. (A chest of drawers that he made out of dry goods boxes was still in use in 1960.) When farm work was not pressing he worked at his plastering trade. He plastered most of the houses around Morgan from 1875-1895. He also plastered in Summit County as far as Peoa and Oakley. Before the advent of wall paper he would white wash for his customers. He was a good workman and guaranteed his work. Occasionally when he was away on these jobs, Margaret spent the time in Salt Lake City. She went to the Temple often to do work for her kindred dead. On 5 December 1875, their first child, Thomas George, was born in Salt Lake City. (About the same time Annie Neville, Thomas Charles' sister, had her first baby - also a boy. She and Margaret dressed them alike for a while, as they lived close to each other at the time.) On 16 October 1877, their second child, Charles Henry, was born in the little log house in Round Valley. On 12 October 1878, Albert William was born in Salt Lake City, as was Eliza Ann on 1 July 1880. Three more children were born to them in the log house, Frank LeRoy, 3 May 1882, Louie Mary Etta, 31 August 1884, and Amy Alice, 13 May 1886. In the fall of 1886 a severe epidemic of diphtheria broke out. All of the children came down with the dreaded disease, except six-month old Amy Alice. Dr. Wads-worth quarantined the family, and everyone was afraid to come near them, except their neighbor Arthur Brewer. He would come as far as the gate with their food and supplies. Albert William died on his eighth birthday, four days later Louie Mary Etta passed away, two years and two months old. Thomas Charles and Margaret had to prepare their children for burial themselves and he had to make the coffins. They had a short graveside service with no one allowed to come and comfort them. This was a trying and sorrowful time for them. A short time after this, Thomas Charles built a frame house connecting it to the granary and vegetable cellar he had built earlier. It had three rooms. Two children were born in the new home, Alonzo David, 20 December 1887 and their last child, a boy, 10 January 1890. They gave him the maiden names of both his grandmothers, Preston Dangerfield. They had a near tragedy happen shortly after the birth of Preston. One of Margaret's brothers was a shoe salesman and canvassed the country with horse and buggy in the summer when the roads were in good condition; other times they would bring the horses to the farm for Thomas Charles to care for and to use as he wished. This time he hitched the horses up to the white topped buggy to take Margaret and baby Preston to visit the Brewer family who had moved up the canyon to the Tunnels, Mr. Brewer being a watchman at the Tunnels. They invited a neighbor, Ann Richards, to go with them. On the way back the horses became frightened and being high spirited, started running. For some distance, over narrow-rough roads and around curves, Thomas Charles held onto the reins with all of his strength, until his muscles ached, pulling and tugging to stop them, but to no avail. They ran into a big rock, and the buggy came to an abrupt stop, then the tugs broke and the horses ran on nearly to Morgan before stopping. The women were shaken up, bruised and badly frightened, no one was seriously hurt but Thomas Charles' arms were sore for weeks. About 1896 Thomas Charles drew up plans for a two story brick house. With the three older boys helping, he laid the foundation, put in the rafters and joists, made adobes for the lining, etc. He bought the brick from Bishop Charles Turner of South Morgan and hired a good friend, Brigham Robinson of North Morgan, to lay the brick. He overworked during this time of building the new home, along with all the other work required of him. In his rundown condition he contracted typhoid fever. Dr. C. F. Osgood from the east, and newly out of training, with the help of Lucy Baker, a graduate nurse, attended him. Margaret did all in her power to help him. The fever subsided, but complications set in and the doctor had to perform surgery. He died on the 25th of June 1898 at the age of forty-five. His funeral was held in the Morgan Stake House. The building was filled with relatives and friends. Thomas Charles was active in civil and Church affairs. He was influential in get¬ting a grade school in Round Valley for the twenty-five students living there at that time. He was appointed School Trustee and hired the teachers. He was also active in helping to get a Sunday School organized. He acted as Superintendent, teacher and music director. He was Choir leader in the North Morgan Ward and would ride a horse - or walk the railroad tracks if his horses were too tired from a day of farm work - to attend rehearsal of the Choir, or one of the musical programs or operettas he organized and presented. Often the Choir members did not show up, but he was patient and never gave up. Anna Smith Dickson, organist at that time, said years later that it was through his efforts that the Ward got its first organ. (He also got an organ for his family the winter before he died by trading a cow to Nephi Hardy for it. He hauled the cow down in the sleigh and brought the organ back.) He was a stake missionary and held many other positions. His children attended their meeting0 regularly too, Margaret saw to this by always having their clothes in order and getting them ready to go, even though she seldom went, herself. Thomas Charles was humorous and witty and was usually the life of the party in the games and entertainment. In those days they had parties and dances in the homes. He was a good singer and liked to sing humorous songs as well as the sacred ones. He teased Margaret by singing "By and by, there won’t' be room for Father, By and by a half-dozen more, Father 'll have to sleep on the floor", other favorites were "Old Dan Tucker", "Hard Times Come Again No More", "Keep Your Courage Up and Your Spirit Alive", "Miss Cooper's Boarding House", etc. He had a trick game he liked to play at parties if someone new was present; it was called "Brother I'm Bobbed". He was handy and helpful when any of the children or farm animals got hurt, knowing just what to do and never getting excited, like Margaret did. He enjoyed having friends and relatives visit the farm for an evening or for a few days. One year when the family reunion was held there he made a whirligig and a teeter-totter for the young children, and a horizontal bar and boat for the older ones. He could knit stockings and piece quilts. (He pieced almost enough blocks for an entire quilt his last winter.) He had cobbler’s tools and kept his family's shoes in repair. He was never idle. He was strict in discipline, but kind and loving in correcting the wrong¬doings of the children. Margaret stayed on at the farm for a year or two. The older boys were able to do the farm work. Then she rented the farm to the oldest boy, Thomas George, and moved to Morgan so that the younger children could attend school. The school and Sunday School in Round Valley had been closed down. When the cement plant was first completed near Croydon she moved there so that Frank LeRoy and Preston, who were working there, could board at home. She also took in other boarders. She moved back to Morgan in 1909 and took in school teachers to board. By this time Thomas George (George), Eliza Ann (Lida), Alonzo David (Lonnie, or Al), Charles Henry and Frank LeRoy (Roy) were married. She sold the farm to George. In 1910 she sent Preston on a mission to Australia. She was busy in the Presidency of the Relief Society of the North Morgan Ward, working with Jane Heiner and Louisa Grover. She had served as a visiting teacher for several years, driving around to the homes with a horse and buggy. After Amy was married in 1913 Margaret gave up housekeeping and made her home with Amy, taking turns visiting with the other members of her family as she felt like doing so. She lived twenty-nine years a widow. She had many friends and all who knew her loved her for her many virtues and pleasing personality. Here are a few of the many clever sayings she would use in her jovial conversations: "Once bit, twice shy"; "Never rob Peter to pay Paul"; "Where ignorance is bliss it is folly to be wise"; "What the eye doesn't see the heart doesn't grieve"; "What can't be helped must be endured"; "If you don't at first succeed try, try, again"; "Where there is a will there is a way"; "Stand firm for what you know to be right"; "A stitch in times saves nine"; and many others. She passed away peacefully in her 78th year at the home of Amy, 12 January 1927. Her funeral was held in North Morgan Ward Chapel under the direction of Bishop E. E. Anderson. She was buried beside Thomas Charles, and their two children Albert William and Louie Mary Etta, in the North Morgan Cemetery.

Autobiography of Mary Adelia Felt Young

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 2 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Autobiography Editing Notes: The original document was provided by Edward or Eldon Price, about the year 1977 at a family reunion at the Gurr residence in Kaysville, Utah. The original was hand typed presumably by Mary Dell’s daughter. I scanned the typed xerographic pages and I publish them here now. By the way, Paul and Afton Felt are remembered also now for keeping the family together via reunions and get-togethers. -- Jonathan Clark Felt Mary Dell Young, a daughter-in-law of Brigham Young, was born May 19, 1864, to Nathaniel Henry and Mary Louisa Pile Felt on Main street, Salt Lake City, Utah. She lived there until she was two years old, when her mother moved to the Nineteenth Ward. This is her story: "Bishop Davis was our Bishop and his daughter was my first-grade teacher. We went to the school on First West. The building was pioneer style, the best they could build in those days, "but always kept clean". A large coal stove furnished the heat, and pitch pine wood was put in to keep the building warm. The interior of the school building was slightly furnished, with wooden benches for the children to sit on, and a rustic desk where the principal sat to watch the teacher direct the class, and also to watch how the children responded, as well as their behavior. He was very strict and punished them if they were disorderly in any way. EXPERIENCES IN SCHOOL. My two little (Mary Del was actual the little sister) brothers, David and Nathaniel Henry Felt, went with me to school. They were well behaved children at home, as Mother who was now living alone with us, was very strict and taught us to mind. When she told us once not to do something, we knew we had to obey her. My brother Nathaniel had made a little toy that whirled around and buzzed. He took this toy to school and some of the boys wanted to see how it worked. Nathaniel began to whirl it around and of course it made a buzzing sound and children began to laugh. The principal called Nathaniel to the desk and put on him his large white coat and a dunce cap made out of paper, then had him whirl his toy. He couldn't do it very well as the toy would hit the cap in whirling around. I stood this as long as I could, then went up to my brother pulled the dunce cap off, also the coat, and told him and David to come and we went home. My mother met us at the door and wanted to know what was the reason we had come home from school. We told her what had happened, and she let us stay home the remainder of the day. That evening the principal came over to see Mother and they talked and talked, but we children were sent from the room and didn't hear the conversation. Mother said we were to go back to school the next morning so we did, and none of us ever wore the dunce cap after that. SCHOOL DAYS. We usually had good teachers like Miss Davis; I thought a lot of her, as she taught us many things I will always remember. I went through all the readers up to the fifth reader. We were taught reading, writing and arithmetic. After finishing the fifth reader, I went to Morgan's College. I was baptized at the age of eight, by Thomas Higgs, In City Creek, and blessed by him. My teacher in the Elementary School and fifth grade, was Professor Cummings. All our lessons were written on the blackboard, and we used pencil and paper to copy them from the board, and had to learn them for the next day. We knew all the pupils who attended school and were all united as one, as no one was richer than the other, and there was no class distinction. The children were easy to get along with. EXPERIENCES IN CHURCH. Every Sunday, we attended church and had to be very quiet while the preacher was speaking. My dear mother read the Bible to us at home we memorized many passages of scripture. I attended Primary. Florence Ridges was the secretary and I was her assistant. My special interest in the Primary was teaching the little children and oh how I loved them. I taught from the first grade up to the third and rarely missed any meetings.The Mutual Improvement Association was organized to improve the lives of all who attended, and also to become more acquainted with the great principles of the gospel of Jesus Christ. It especially helped the young people and instilled in their young minds the truths of the everlasting Gospel. My mother had her three children go to Mutual, as she knew it would help her in various ways to raise them. I became interested in Mutual and looked forward to it. I always took part in whatever the Officers and teachers asked me to do. Knowing by taking part and in being obedient to those placed in authority over us, we could come back some day in the presence of God. Mother always taught me to be obedient in the home, if she asked me to do something I obeyed her without a hesitation. She said, "If you set the example of going to Mutual, other girls will follow and perhaps through this you may be the instrument of saving one girl in your crowd". OUR CROWD: We were a happy crowd of girls and had a lot of enjoyable times together. Our fun consisted of parties in our homes, one week the boys and girls would come to my home. Perhaps it was to make honey candy, popcorn, and we often made molasses candy. Then we played games: blind's buff, or rin-tin-tin come in. We sometimes sang the hymns learned in Sunday School or Mutual. We made up little plays and each one took their parts. Some of the crowd looked on while some of us did the acting, then we sat down to be the audience while they did the acting. Mother would often come in and sometimes brought surprises in the form of home made cookies. Oh! how could they be so good? The girls in our crowd were always ready for fun. No girl was dressed any better than the other girl, as there were no rich among us. We all wore large home made leghorn hats, and enjoyed going out for a walk in the fields or nearby canyons. One day Miriam Silver and I went out for a walk and saw some beautiful flowers. We picked them and trimmed out hats with beautiful bouquets. We thought our hats looked beautiful as we proudly walked home. When we got there, my Mother looked at us, took our hats and rapidly pulled the flowers off and went outside the house and buried them. We felt like crying. When she returned she told us the flowers we had picked were poison ivy and we may get sick from them. Due to some luck we did not get any bad effects or itching of the hands from It, and years after, we often had a good laugh about our trimmed hats. Another girl friend, by the name of Hattie Cooper used to come and stay at our home, as she lived at Bountiful. One night we decided we wanted to go to a dance out there. We coaxed and coaxed Mother to let us go to the dance. At last Mother said we could go If we started early in the afternoon so we could get there before dark. We started out and walked many miles along a long road. We were only young kids at this time, but wanted to look like grown ups. So we went to a second hand store and bought some long dresses. My dress had a purple front and a very full skirt. Hattie's dress was long with a full skirt too. She went to the dance with the Bishop's son and I went with Orval Hatch. The boys laughed a little when they saw us, but we tried to act like grown up young ladies. What a good time we had. When I told by Mother about the wonderful time we had and how we were dressed, she said, "good gracious, you surely didn't go to the dance dressed like that?" We girls often went out in the fields and elsewhere to gather mushrooms. They were delicious when fried in plenty of home made butter until they were brown. We used a large hook to gather them. We also would pick raspberries and then dry them. When we wanted some raspberries we would soak them and then cook them thoroughly. They were very good with hot biscuits and were often made into pies. Apples were cut in quarters after they had first been peeled and spread out in the sunshine to dry. They were carefully covered with a mosquitobar cloth and if the sky was cloudy and showed signs of rains we had to go out and bring them in as they would mold if they got wet. After the apples were dried we often stewed them and ate them with hot sods or buttermilk biscuits. They also made pies suitable for a queen’s taste, especially when topped with good whipped cream. We were always blessed with good food and Mother was an excellent cook. OUR FURNITURE. Our furniture was not the best, but it was comfortable and neatly arranged. The bed my Mother slept on was a high bed with four high posts, covered with a white bed spread that had wide white ruffles around it. My two brothers, David and Nathaniel slept on a trundle bed which wheeled under Mother’s bed in the day time. Our every day carpet was home made, but on Sunday we had a special piece of carpet we always put down. It was the first Ingrain carpet in Salt Lake City. On Monday we would carefully fold it up and put away until the next Sunday. The room had a very nice appearance, as the carpet had fresh straw under it and the fragrant smell was a clean sweet odor. We enjoyed walking on it. CHRISTMAS IN SALT LAKE CITY. How we children waited for Christmas Eve, so we could hand up our stockings. It was wonderful to awaken Christmas Morning and find home made candy, molasses cookies, and sometimes a little money tucked in the very toe of our stockings. We were just as happy then as children are today. One Christmas morning we three children were all busy working. My brothers were bringing in the wood to fill our wood box, and I was helping Mother clean the house, when a knock came at the door. We opened the door and found President Brigham Young standing there with parcels in his arms. He came in and sat down and said, “Mary, I brought you these gifts to wish you a very Merry Christmas.” Mother opened the Parcel and thanked him. She was happy to find such lovely gifts, as it was a beautiful Paisley shawl and a linsey woolsey shawl of blue and white plaid. My present was a dress of Scotch plaid. Oh! how grateful we were to receive these lovely gifts. OUR HOME. Our home was located on North West Temple and consisted of a large front room about twenty by twenty feet, with a smaller room in the back, which we called the shanty room where we used to store things. It was lined with three or four inches of paper. In here we had a very large box, which was also lined with three or four inches of paper to keep the fruit from freezing. We always had to be careful in the winter to keep from freezing ourselves for we had very severe winters. The snow in the winter would top the five foot high fences. We always had to go out and shovel a path to the house before we could enter it. The air was wonderfully crisp and cold. The climate had changed a lot since those days. We even had to wear home made board shoes to walk in the snow. THE SEVENTEENTH WARD. We girls had wonderful times together, and enjoyed each others' company at Sunday School, MIA and all meetings. We were taught to keep the Sabbath day holy. One Sunday afternoon, the boys and girls planned a picnic to the Great Salt Lake. A boy by the name of William Hislip had bought some food from the bakery. They came to my home and wanted me to go with them, and I wanted to go. I knew if I asked Mother if I may go, what her answer would be. "NO, Mary, you cannot go as it would be breaking the Sabbath Day. No, dear you cannot go." We sat on our porch and talked and talked. I told the crowd to go on with the party, as my Mother would not allow me to go on Sunday. At last we decided to have the party on our porch. Just when we had the lunch spread out, and we were eating and having a very good time, who should come up the walk but Joseph Dean, our ward teacher. He looked amazed and asked if we didn't realize it was Sunday. So I explained to him that I couldn't go to the lake. "Well, he said, it is much better for you to do it this way, than go out there especially on Sunday". He went into the house and talked with Mother, so we went on with the party, and we were glad he was not angry with us. EXPERIENCES TO REMEMBER. Judge Elias Smith was one of our neighbors and lived where the Utah Motel is now. His chicken coop and ours were In the same building. My brother David went out to gather the eggs and brought in a bucket full of eggs. Mother said, "David, where did you get all those eggs when we only have five chickens?" David told her he guessed Judge Smith's chickens' eggs were sliding down into our nests. David knew exactly how the eggs were sliding down for he had planned it that way. Mother put all the eggs into the basket and said, "David, you take those eggs right over to Judge Smith and tell him what you did and not to send one egg back, as they are all his. David was reluctant: to go, but Mother insisted. So he went out of the house slowly with Mother watching until he knocked on the door and went in. Mother waited and waited for him, and when he did come she said, “David why were you so long?” David replied, “Oh, Mrs. Smith had some buckwheat caked with sugar and cream and she invited me to have some. “My, they were good.” I’m glad I took the eggs over.” DATES. When I reached the age of thirteen years, I started to go out to the dances and went with Donald Smith. Mother went to all the dances too. She kept close watch who I went with, but I went with good boys and Mother was good to them all. All the boys used to engage us ahead of their partner for the dance and we did have a good time and never stayed out late after the dance was over. Later on one of my boy friends was young man from Springville named Emmett Lynch. I was working in my brother’s store at Provo when I met him. He wrote to me for some time, but through no fault of his, I did not get some of his letters we drifted apart. A friend of mine, Lillian Boyer, intercepted my mail and I didn’t realize it until many years later. I think it was for the best as he wasn’t a Mormon, but a good man. NAMES. After living in Salt Lake many years, Brigham Young, President of the Church, advised my mother to marry William J. Silver. He operated the silver and iron works and was the founder of this great industry. By marrying him, Mother could give my two brothers a better chance to get a vocation in life. So, she married William J. Silver on October 12, 1870. Later two children were born to them, the first, a baby boy, named William P. Silver. The second child was a little girl by the name of May, who later drowned in the 19th Ward, in the foundry pool. The Silver Machine Shop was on Center St. and Fourth North. We did our washing in a dug out close to the shop, the washer was run by the machinery from the shop. I did the ironing and received fifty cents a day to iron shirts. This money was high wages in those days, as many girls only received fifty cents a week doing house work. When the Legislature was in session, Mother boarded two men at her home. This gave her extra money and was convenient for the men for it was near the Utah State Capitol. Robert Slater was the name of one of the men) he bought me a little cup and an it was inscribed the name of Dell. I liked the name and from then on, I was called Mary Dell Felt, instead of Mary Adelia. All the boys and girls would write my name Mary Dell on Christmas and birthday cards they sent me. MY HUSBAND. One of the sons of Brigham Young by the marriage of him to Harriet Emeline Barney Young was Joseph Ormal Young. Joseph first married Martha Jane Hyde, daughter of Joseph Hyde. Their family consisted of nine children, some of their names are, Joseph, Jesse, Ruby, Raymond and Florence. Three of their children died. He also married Arbella Bird (Aunt Bell). She is his second wife. Their children were, John, Jennie, Ormal, Frank, Myrtle, and Nellie. Aunt Bell went to church and was a good mother to her family. She was born in Springville, Utah. She lived there with Josephine Grosbeck when she met Joseph Young and he married her. I was learning to dress make and worked in the Constitution Building on Main St. One day Joseph Young came in and talked me into taking guitar lessons, he furnished the guitar for me to take lessons on. I was delighted, as I wanted to learn how to play. Joseph had a big music store and sold pianos, guitars, and other musical instruments. He often came in and visited with me, but little did I think he would some day be my husband, as he was a handsome man and had very fine manners. The city had planned a fine celebration, and all the girls in our crowd dressed up for the occasion, and we all wore mustaches so we would look different, as they were going to have a parade and also roll a barrel of fire down Main St. We were all elated and having a good time laughing and talking as we passed Joe's store. Joe came out of the store and wanted to know what we were doing and we told him what was going on. He talked to us for a while and then watched us. I can't imagine what he thought. One night, George Hardy and Joe walked home with me, to Fourth North. After laughing and talking a while, George said he thought he should go and he bade us good night. Joe talked a while and then asked me to marry him. I told him before I could give him an answer he would have to go with me and ask Mother's consent. So we went to the house and visited with Mother, and then he told her he wanted to marry me. Mother replied, "That's up to Mary. She can suit her self, as I want her to be happy." The following Sunday, he took me in the buggy to introduce me to his first wife, to get her consent. She said it is all right and to go right ahead. I had met her before and I loved her and we got along swell together. So, I became Joseph Young's third wife. My husband and I were married in the Endowment House, Dec 4, 1884. Our children are as follows: Silver Howe, Mary Louise, and Glenn. My husband went on a mission to England and did much good in expounding the gospel. Traveling without purse-or script. He made many converts. He was a good church worker, and always dependable in whatever they asked him to do. He had a quiet disposition and was very kind in his ways. He thought a lot of his brother Royal, they always got along together well. He was a devoted husband to all his wives and children. We all loved him and lived very happy lives, as one large family together. My first home was a red brick house on state St. between Fourth and Fifth So. just opposite the City and County Building. At this time the circus was occupying the City and county-grounds. But many, years later the City and County Building was built in: We owned a lot of property and lived here many years and then sold out and moved to Forest Dale. We first built a large brick barn and petitioned the upstairs and down stairs with heavy muslin, and screened the doors on account of the flies. Then Joseph built a nine room house for his first-wife “Aunt Jen” and family, and I lived there too until he could build my house. He also built Aunt Bell a home. My house was at 2445 South ran East below Driggs Ave. It was a nice brick home of six rooms. We all lived close together and all of us worked in the Church. My mother became very ill and died May 11, 1912. After her death we moved into her old home on 4th North and Main St. in the Nineteenth Ward. On Oct. 30, 1915, my daughter, Mary Louise was married to Abram Harold Lewis. All during this time my husband had been very sick. He stayed in his other home because I was busy taking care of my mother when she was ill. He died Aug 1, 1917 at this home at the age of 68 years. We all missed him as he was a wonderful husband and loved all his children. He was very quiet in his way but was well liked by all his friends and neighbors. His memory will always live with us as a kind an devoted husband. LATER LIFE. After my husband's death my daughter Glenn and I moved to 3rd So. and 4th East to live with Clyde and Lavon Felt. On November 1, 1919 Glenn was married to Joseph Ralph Haas. Previous to her marriage I took a job as a cleaning woman at the City and County Building. I moved to the Lake Hotel and was a member of the Eighth and Ninth Ward. I was president of the Relief Society here for a year and a half. Also I was a Stake missionary for 18 months. I then moved to 3rd East between 4th and 5th South, where I was in the Eighth Ward. While living here we went on many Temple excursions. Bishop and Sister John Fetzer went with us also Sister Anna Tonnison and many others. We went to the following temples Logan, Manti, St. George and Arizona. Our last trip was to the Cardston Temple in Canada. This was just before Sister Fetzer died. I have worked in these temples and have done thousands of names for dead people who were waiting for someone to do the work for them. I think there is no work more enjoyable and I intend to do more Temple work as soon as I can. Until the year about 1935 I continued to work at the City and County Building. I worked there over 20 years. In the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Marth Crow was Captain; First Vice Captain, myself; Second Vice Captain, Lucy Wilson. I have worked many years with the D.U.P. and have enjoyed these many years with these wonderful women. I have been Chaplain many years and still hold this position. In 1937 I was hit by a car but I didn't go to a hospital. I stayed with my daughter, Glenn until I was well. In 1944 I was hit again and dragged down the street several feet. Again I stayed with my daughter. In 1946 I was crossing the street with my friend Anna Smith when we were both hit. She had both legs broken and I had a badly hurt leg and broken ribs. I had my eyes operated on for cataracts in 1947. After this time I could again read and enjoy our standard works. In 1947 I moved to where I now live at 261 East 6th South. In 1954 I broke my leg getting into a car. I guess it was just worn out after all the accidents. I stayed with my daughter, Louise Lewis for over a year until I was well again, then I returned home. I have been a block teacher for almost 70 years and I am still active in the Relief Society, Sunday School and Mutual Improvement Association. I will be 98 years old this May 19, 1962. I live in the same home with my daughter, Glenn and she helps me in many ways. This poem was given to Mary Dell Young on her birthday, May 19, 1940. MARY DELL YOUNG Many Happy returns dear sister true, As the years pass by I will think of you; As you stood at the door with outstretched hands To welcome me to a sister band. Your smile was sweet and very sincere, As you greeted each one with a word of good cheer; And you didn't seem strange as you stood in the door, For it seemed that somewhere I had known you before. As you walk along life's pathway, Whatever you do or whatever you say, May the spirit of God like a beacon light Shine in your path to guide you aright. And when at last your work here is done, And life's book is closed with the setting sun, And you pass beyond to that radiant shore Perchance up there you will stand at the door. And welcome those you have known down here, With a happy smile and a word of cheer. And I shall love to be among Those who are welcomed by Mary Dell Young. Maude Kenner

Martha Spence Journal 1850-1860

Contributor: RobSue888 Created: 2 months ago Updated: 2 months ago

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Source of Trail Excerpt:Heywood, Martha Spence, Journals 1850-[1860], vol. 1, 3-14.Read Trail Excerpt: At Bethlehem camp we remained two weeks after I joined the company & on Sunday June 30th we crossed the river having commenced on the satterday[.] Monday did not travel as the cattle had not been got over & there was no crossing that day[.] Tuesday travelled a mile or two & wednesday the same[.] Thursday fourth of July camped all day[.] Washed[,] cooked & prepared the cattle for real start on the following day. Friday we took the start having to leave behind us a splendid Ox who became diseased from some cause & could not travel. also a mare belonging to brother [Edwin Dilworth] Woolley had a hurt in his leg & could not travel[.] we journeyed 12 miles this & camped with Bishop hunters company & made carrell of about 70 Waggons a new & pretty sight to me Satturday halted the forenoon during which time Elder Hyde & Brother Joh[n]son overtook us but to our great surprise & dissapointment did not take brother [Joseph Leland] Haywood [Heywood] with them as had been agreed up in Kanesville. we have travelled nearly day after day up to this Wednesday July 10th[.] This morning the first sound that met our ears was the cry that the cattle were all gone[.] the mosquitoes were very bad indeed which no doubt occasioned the cattle to stray as also brother Haywood’s Horse. The cattle were found but not the horse[.] Brother H. has spent all day trying to find him but in all probability he has been stole. I have just had the melancholy Intelligence that amongst the many who has died of cholera Sister Margaret Mac dougal & Sister Dana are reckened among its victims[.] In those falling a victim I see the pestilance nearer to me, than before the question coming up in my mind, who am I? that I may not be called upon[.] But oh may my heavenly father avert the blow & Spare my life a little longer[.] My desire is to live & glorify his name in doing the work he assigns me July 26th Started this morning from Fort Kearny after a stay of two days during which time we made some change in our affairs for the better by lighting the waggons & dispensing with one hereby strenghtening some of the other teams & also procuring two additional yokes[.] Had a sale of crockery ware which seemed a pity as it was brought all the ways from Boston expressly for the benefit of those in the Valley who had long been deprived of its conveniences. And now we have a prospect of travelling more advantagously and although our travelling heretofore has been slow it has been safe[,] comfortable & exempt from death or even sickness of any consequence[.] we have lost 1 yoke of cattle by getting into a hole with their yoke on & one or two others by giving out[.] Coln Reese & his train overtook us about 1 week from this date bringing with them brother Woolley horse & news of brother Haywood[.] it was seen but would not be given by with a man in the United State Service excusing himself from doing so, he saying he had orders to fetch him to Kanesville We are daily seeing the mementos of the ravages of Cholera[.] Sometimes 3 graves side by side[.] another familiar name (Brother Sargaent of Kanesville) affected & aware of the severe & protracted Sickness he passed through last Summer & this Spring previous to my leaving & at a time when my prospect for this journey looked rather gloomy. he was all life & continued in getting his fit out & providing presents for his daughters in the Valley[.] It will be a heavy blow to his daughters in Kanesville Oh what reason we have to be thankful that we as a company have escaped this Scourge with one exception. Brother [Nathaniel Henry] Felt’s teamster had diarhea for three days without applying for help. & when he was helped it proved unavailing[.] a child of Brother [Royal] Barney’s[,] 12 years old[,] hearing of this man’s death took fright & was instantly seized with the Cholera[.] this was at night[.] during the night she was very bad & when I heard of it (tho poorly at the time) I felt so keenly that I went at once to render my assistance (if accepted) which was very cheerfully & tho the symptoms were dangerous in that stage of the disease[.] I used the knowledge I gained on my trip from S[t]. Louis to Kanesville & in due time brought about the favorable ones & she recovered rapidly The prolongation of our noon halt occasioned by the breaking of an axletree <(in the other ten of our division & we wait for them)> has given me a chance to take some minutes of our journey[.] up to this time I have enjoyed myself well on the trip tho my health is poor & feel unequal to do my share of the work but my mind is singularly easy on Such things. I know that I acted to the best of my judgement in undertaking this journey & its consequent obligations. Knowing my accomodating are as good as the possibly good be I am content & often think of what Elder Taylor told me last winter in blessing me “That I should go up to Zion in peace.” August 11th Since leaving Fort Kearny my health has been very poor. the very warm weather & rain storms have prostrated my fragile constitution more than I could possibly expect. but having fortunately a Homeopathic physician in our train (Doctor [Charles Nephi] Smith) I take advantage of his having a little more faith in that practice than any other medical one. We passed Ash Hollow last friday which presented quite a change of Scenery the bluffs having the appearance of decayed Stone and the Shrubbery presenting the greatest variety imaginable on wild soil[.] Several kinds of flowers as delicate and interesting looking as if they were raised in well cultivated gardens of the East The Buffalo are very numerous here[.] The Scripture phrase “The cattle upon a thousand hills are the Lords” has a meaning in it, before wittnissing those animals was ideal in a measure[.] my health did not permit me to relish their flesh but I heard them speak highly of its flavor[.] Antelope is Scarce but we killed one & its flesh I did relish some like mutton[.] We have had some choke cherries which makes excellant pies August 15th just passed Court house rock & in sight of Chimney Rock and within one hundred miles of Lamarie [Fort Laramie.] our expedition in travelling has been materially fast[.] we often travel 18 miles a day & were it not for our occasional delays by loss of our Cattle for a day or less than a day[,] a waggon tongue or axletree our speed would be considerable[.] Our movements are as systematic as circumstances will allow[.] Brother Woolley being a remarkably efficient man to keep a train Straight & in order & he is blessed in having as material to work with in the shape of hands as could possibly be expected[.] Our practice is except when the cattle are Strayed or some accident to Start from 7 to ½ past every morning & as brother W’s policy is to bait the cattle before Starting & while they are doing so we women folks have plenty of time to prepare breakfast & cook for dinner. our noon halt last about 1½ hour giving the cattle a chance to bait & water[.] the principle is also to stop one day in the Seven as a Sabbath but arbitrarly on Sunday. Circumstances has to guide whether it be Satterday Sunday or Monday Satterday 17. passed Scotts bluffs which presents a romantic appearance similar to the continuous chain that commenced at ash Hollow[.] Indeed the Scenery is much more interesting this side of that place than the other[.] crossed Horse creek at noon & we have halted in good season this evening in view of spending a pleasant Sabbath tomorrow enjoying rest for ourselves but more especially for our cattle[.] that is as is often remarked our present Salvation on this trip a journey like this will teach a person to hold a higher value on the animals appropriate to the service of [-] Sunday <18th> Instead of enjoying ourselves by having a good meeting as we proposed & expected that Brother Hunters division would have met midway on the occasion they having camped about ½ miles from us. but our fairy castle was destroyed by a rest day[.] preparing meals & washing dishes is not pleasant work in a rain storm out doors[.] during the day Brother [Robert] Campbell called to get some medicine for his wife [Amelia Mikesell Campbell] who was dangerously ill from jumping out of the waggon when coming down a bad place in Ash Hollow & since has continued feverish & in great pain[.] she had her infant in her Tuesday 20. This morning the cry of the cattle [u] gone to the sink of (at least half) was anything but agreable, yesterday it rained nearly all day (making a two’s days rain) which was the cause of the cattle straying. towards noon part of them were found[.] our divided of in parties going in all directions distances of 4 to 8 miles but before night they were all found through the efficiency of Brother [William Henry Harrison] Segar [Sagers] who proposed at noontime that if a horse would be loaned him he would warrant the finding the cattle. It so turned out they were found about ten miles from the camp. Mrs Campbell died yesterday & their division lost cattle to about the same am[oun]t that ours did & in like manner found them Wednesday 21 This morning was Supposable all difficulties had and were reckoned among the things that once were. it was seen so in our division but in Brother Hunters. Brother [Sisson] Chase’s horses were gone so that the ten he belonged to remained behind & we all started[.] This camping place supplied us abundantly with choke cherries duly appreciated by all hands. travelled nearly all day but oh the disaster of this every we had not been in 15 minutes in Currall when the cry. The cattle are poisoned saluted our ears[.] The slough water was so rankly poisoned that it took immediate effect & in one hours time one of the best oxen died & before retiring for the night 2 good cows[.] others were affected some but recovered Friday 23. Within 8 miles of “Fort Lamarie [Laramie]” make our noon halt at Mr Bordeau’s trading place (who formerly had his settlement at the fort but sold out to the States government.) his constant friendliness to the mormons since the commencement of this journeying over these plains makes him interesting to us as a people[.] I visited the Indian tents & was interested in observing their symplicity in living[.] they were principally occupied in drying Buffalo meat & tanning the Skins[,] the Squaws being the operators[.] one large tent caught my attention as having several Squaws in it[.] one was elderly probably mother to some of the others the who were sitting around the tent with their little children round them[.] one was making patchwork[.] the old Squaw was packing away dried meat in a tank made of leather that looked some like vellum it was painted fancifully & looked clean[.] we held some conversation by signs[.] she called the other womens attention to my having no teeth evidently a wonderment on their part the Indians having very handsome large teeth[.] I made signs to her about the children & their mothers, & she pointed out the children of each mother, they were cleanly & handsomer than any Ive seen before[.] the children were very handsome & smart looking at another tent cooking was under operation & looked pretty good for a wild people[.] another tent was characterized by its inmates Indian & squaw looking quite stylish & gay. while gazing on them the Indian cried “pudache” a few times before I realized it signal meaning to depart. I afterward learned they [-] was it vulgarily termed “Sparking” Sunday Agust 25. yesterday camped within 1 mile of Fort Laramie on the river bank[.] Brother H. & W. went . there taking along the Provision Wagon to have it replenished, which was accordingly done by a Supply of flour Bacon Ham & (flour 17½ dollars hundred) also 5 yoke of Cattle. Some of our best men had some thoughts of leaving here an inducement of $60 a month, for two months they thought had considerable attraction togather with vague reports that in the Valley they could not earn more than their board. An hours time consumed, talking over the matter, was all the difference caused. Next excitement Cattle missing this nothing new in the Sound as disagreable as the first time heard[.] while hunting them up Brother Smoot & his train came up[.] This was the last chance of expectancy on Brother Haywoods part for his Horse[.] It was seen & that was all. Major Sanderson & two Aid a camps passed us which gave me an opportunity of seeing that personage. (a fine looking man) The mail passed us yesterday bringing general news from the Valley that was good & Brother Haywood received a letter from his Lady that abundantly confirmed the good report[.] also had the pleasure of perusing for the first time the 7th number of the pap first paper published in the Valley which was also confirmatory of good news. Our cattle found & about starting going ahead of Brother Hunters division[.] When about two hours on the road we were alarmed by most distressing cries of women & children[.] It was thought by some that the Indians were coming full speed upon us but soon found it was a wagon over turned caused by a Stampeed in Bishop Hunters camp that were close behind us[.] I went up at once to render my Services and amongst the wailing 1 female drew my attention[.] she seamed so beside herself & all she would say was “I saw my Father Killed & my Mother is now dead, & oh dear what shall I do?” on realizing that the mother was not dead I went to see her & recognized Mrs [Ann] Condit[.] She appeared insensible at first but in a little was conscious, but very much frightened[.] She was laid on a bed we supposing that she was much injured but to my great joy we found it not. So the only place I could find injured was between her shoulders & only slightly bruised[.] It seemed miraculous that she was not more. her Son in law did not escape so well he had his leg broke which was rather trying as he (Merritt Rockwell) was considered a very efficient man in the camp The Stampeed was caused by one of Bishop Hunters horses running in among the Cattle[.] I have heard that they are common among the cattle in that devision but we have not had any as yet[.] they are very dangerous and I presumed an caused as much by mismanagement as accident. I have seen the rocky mountains for the first time today[.] they look stupendous in the dim opaque of the horizon & but a faint line marking their existence & altitude[.] the highest one is called “Lamarie [Laramie] peak” Our roads are excellent[.] Today general health pretty good with the exception of Franklin Haywood who has had a pull down causing a reaction of his old complaint (consumption) that has prostrated him for some days back, he is now on the gain & we have every hope that he will regain his health & a teamster being provided in his stead he will not be subjected to anxiety or being overworked. That & the heavy rains being the cause of his pulldown Tuesday 27 Quite an excitement prevailed in our midst last night about nine oclock[.] an animal was missing[.] not a quadruped but a biped answering to the description of Bishop Haywood[.] After various remarks had been made on the occasion & sundry opinions advanced as to the suitableness of such unwarrantable freedoms as to a biped losing himself It was finally resolved by Capt McPherson that if haply the stray was found he must be counseled & picketted for the night. This morning saw us on our way near three miles when he was desired in company with another biped (Br Lamont) quietly awaiting our advancing train none the worse of wear but looking as happy as good company could make him Thursday 29th. The breaking of an axletree has given me an opportunity to journalize a little and here I will record a providential incident[.] on Tuesday orning Sister Butterfield lost an ox & was obliged to start without making as much search as wished to which grieved her very sorely & did not ful reconciled to give up hunting him[.] In the course of the day an ox was found by Capt Barney (where she is) that was so weak from the scours (evidently left behind by some forward company) that the men rejected him but Sister Butterfield thought she could cure him & drove him along with some trouble at first but today he travels well & turns out to be a better animal than the one she lost [---] is almost [-] & in ten minutes we will be rolling Yesterday we came along side our friend the Platt[e] at the place where the brethren in coming from the Valley last fall encountered a large War party of Indians about 50 miles West of Lamarie [Laramie] a communication was found from Brother Stratton indicating his coming from the Valley for the purpose of ascerta[in]ing the amt of Emigration on the way & I believe there a little in knowledge of the latter part of the route also an indication that Brother Woodruffs company p[…]t were but 5 days[.] We found notices from Brother Joseph Young’s & Woodruffs during the day & the ev[en]ing where we camped 60 miles from Laramie[.] we found another notice directed to the Camp of Israel from Brother Stratton saying that Brother Woodruffs company past there on the 25th being but 4 days ahead of us Friday 30th When passing Creek last eveing & about corralling we found Brother Stratton & Hanks from the Valley & Brother Whipple who left Bethlehem in Elder Woodruff company more than two weeks before we did[.] They have had considerable sickness & twelve death’s on the journey & now detained by the greater number of their cattle straying away but they have found nearly all[.] we expect to corrall alongside them to night. Brothers S. & H. brought with them a letter from the President that was read to the camp last eving[.] It was good and interesting detailing the prosperity of things in Valley & backed by Brothers S & H. They will return after they see Brother Hunters company & we expect Brother Haywood will accompy them[.] They think our train have done well but were expected by the president at an earlier date[.] the settled price of flour in the Valley at present is $25 Cwt [hundredweight.] It was some of the time $1 pound[.] It is expected it will fall some if the California emigration goes through[.] They related a circumstance that spoke loud of the good state of things among the people in worldly matters[.] last fall they sett apart a piece of ground to cultivate for the use of the poor[.] they found two old ladys that was willing to be called poor but are not now willing as they earn about $3 a week & this was all the poor that could be found in the Valley. there were other incidents related proving the prosperity of the place Saturday 31st Last evening we currelled [corralled] alongside Elder Woodruffs company & was quite a pleasant meeting to those who were acquainted, but this was not my case but I had the pleasure of learning that Brother Lewen & family were well & had met with no accidents by the way which gives me Sincere pleasure. May the Lord bless him, & his. How much would I not give at times to see some choice spirit to mingle with & I was want to do in past times & tho “I go up to Zion in peace.” how dreadful lonesome it is oftentimes. In the midst of spirits yet feeling all alone yet what means more powerful to drive me to him who is greater than all earthly friends We had meeting to Elder Woodruffs camp last eveng & he seemed to possess an excellent spirit from the remarks he made & deeply solicitions for the welfare of those under his care manifested much pleasure in seeing our train come along. They had a great deal of sickness. one time all were sick. 12 deaths[.] one was by lighting & 3 oxen with him leaving a widow & children To day has been our Sabbath & the last day of the month[.] Our cattle had such a hard travel yesterday that it was wisdom to rest them today[.] the roads are at this part of the journey very rough & hilly little fuel & water Scarce[.] we have had an uncommon fine day[.] Brother Woodruff’s camp left about ten, this forenoon & this evng part of Brother Hunter’s division passed us and we learned his waggon broke down & delayed him back[.] Brother Stratton & Hanks stay with us at present[.] we have had a very pleasant camping place & our Buffalo meat relished well Monday Sep 2d Had a fair days travelling yesterday although part of the road was rough[,] journeying over the black is pretty hard on invalids & cattle but we are now past them once more on the bottom & keeping hard the platte[.] we overtook Brother Smoot’s train & those of Brother Hunters, that were a head[.] The air is, & has been very invigorating for some days past[.] Frank gains but slowly[.] he has suffered from diarrhea for a few days[.] I think the fresh meat has been the cause of the change & has been too great in weakly states[.] Brother & the two brothers from the Valley have been absent from us for two day having gone back to Bishop Hunter’s division Friday night Sep 6th We have been travelling along the Willow Springs today over the mountains. Our Cattle begin to show the poverty & scarcity of water the only pay the[y] have for their hardest labor[.] roads being pretty rough & long days travel[.] This morning We parted with our Valley friends they taking with them Brother Heywood and he leaving his nephew very feeble Still suffering from diarrhea[.] I think rather worse today than any other. the jolting of the waggon I Think is very injurious to him[.] his uncle had him ride in the buggy for two days past. this was a relief to him[.] so far & he missed the privilege today[.] Brother [Ebenezer Clawson] Richardson has taken upon himself to sleep with him & have a kindly care over him which is invaluable to Frank in his weakly state. and as far as my poor services shall go. he shall have them as from an own Sister[.] My health has been remarkably better today & that suddenly[.] all day yesterday I felt much prostrated & hardly power or wish to live & today I am not only well in body but happy in mind & feeling. I feel that there is a protecting over me who can say to the stormy feelings within my breast “peace be still” as main [man] cannot. how many proofs have had of this during my pilgrimage but yesterday I was reasoned with and & comforted by one who picks to do me good but all to little or purpose[.] I lay down at night full of grief & dissatisfaction[.] This morning I arose calm confiding & willing to do anything to confer happiness on my fellow creatures and all around me looked like friends[.] I felt in particular that it would be a great privledge to take care of Frank & be a comfort to him in the absence of his Uncle[.] Oh may the God of Israel raise him up in health & strenght in body & mind Brother Woolley seems to miss his Counsellor[,] very tender in his feelings regarding Franks state & friendly towards me Saturday night 7th Camped this afternoon ½ past one at Sweet Water [Sweetwater] present out skirts of the rocky mountain chain 335 miles this side of the Valley within two miles of Saleratus Lake that we did not pass[.] Some of our men went to see it & brought some Saleratus from there[.] we travelled ten miles today on sandy soil rather hard for the cattle but very favorable to Frank who enjoyed the circumstance[.] This morning I was favorably impressed in regard to a change he boasted of when I first saw him[.] he felt that he was decidedly better having perspired freely during the night & a fair evacuation of water with out diarrhea that had not recurred for some time previous[.] he sat in the chair during our travel was lively & very communicative often attending to his feeling so much better perspective continued[.] we were about six hours travelling & when camped instead of throwing himself on the bed[,] his usual custom[,] he went out & sat with the men & eat a little biscuit crumbed in milk[.] in about an hour he returned to the waggon lay down & acted quite drowsy during the rest of the day his eyes half closed while sleeping. had a passage about 3 o clock & another tonight[.] eat a little toast & chocolate for supper[.] The Laudanum that was given during yesterday afternoon caused these symptoms I should think & I fear they are not very favorable[.] he took some more tonight[.] We came up to Woodruff camp to day but they went on while we stopped[.] Brother Haywood returned them the buggy & left his clothes which we [illegible] from them[.] No doubt he will have a hard time of it in riding all the way to the Valley Sunday night 8th Traveled 12 miles today passed right by Saleratus Lake. & laid in a supply of the article[.] & Independence rock. all hands climbed its summit save myself & Frank, but I could see that it was all covered with names & some of them I could read[.] after we currelled by the Sweet Water I took a tramp of 1½ miles to see the Devils gate which we passed but could not see to advantage at that time[.] It is a curiosity. Frank was very weak this morning had two passages during the night but otherwise rested well[.] acted more like himself this forenoon[.] Sat up all the time we were riding in preference to laying down on acct of the jolting[.] had no passage untill we currelled [corralled] about 5 o clock[.] was very tired this evng but his symptoms decididly better than yesterday As to myself I feel grateful to God for the peace of mind & health of body. I enjoy. everything wears a special aspect around me , with the exception of Frank’s health, but I have hope for him & feeling a sympathy for him I take pleasure in ministering to his wants[.] There is nothing unusual, or accident of any kind occured to us, since Brother Haywood left us. Monday night 9. Travelled 11 miles today very pleasantly[.] we are camped by the Sweet Water[,] rocky mountains all around[.] Frank appeared decidely better today the travelling was over sand hills which favored him much[.] walked about at noon time which he was not able to do yesterday[.] I visited & Sarah Lawrence at that time & the conversation was carried on pleasantly. Some knowledge imparted was calculated to make one feel sober & that the light heartedness & bouyancy of Spirits I have been want to feel will have to be given up for a vanity of perplexities that are not known amongst the friends I have left[.] How much I have thought today of the freedom that for years I have enjoyed to my hearts content amidst all my vicissitudes I have enjoyed a freedom of thought & action that will never be known again. Oh that I may have a long life according to my day. Excepting these reflections the day passed very pleasantly & my health has been good[.] Rochester friends, with all their endearments, & their forbearance, will pass before my mind & seeming to say Will you ever meet such again? Well [illegible] I enjoyed them & their goodness in the day of it, and of my own will I left them, to follow the fortunes of the Latterday faith & so far I have no serious cause to repent. & I can say “Thus far the Lord has led me on.” Tuesday 10th We are camped at Bitter Cottonwood Creek. & 304 miles from the Valley[.] travelled 12 miles over sand hills & crossed the Sweet Water twice. Last my Doctor started on a hunting esception but did not. This morning when we were ready there was some uneasiness felt in our company[.] Brother concluded to turn out of Currell on the road & then start an expedition to hunt him up[.] We had not got on the road before he was deseried [.] He had gone so far that in trying to return he could not discern our camp so had to wait till the sun arose this morning[.] he was unsuccessful but saw a Panther &c. Frank is gaining slowly but gradually & my hopes rise in proportion for him[.] I have so much confidence in this good mountain air as the best remedy for his disease[.] I wish I could realize its rivying [reviving] influence on myself today[.] I felt rather prostrated[.] I sewed pretty steady this forenoon mending shirts &c. I felt unable to sit up this afternoon & under such an influence my thoughts are anything but agreable. But like Corrinne I make my own trouble. I act upon the impulse of my own warm nature and experience a delightful enjoyment in acting natural, even while prudence is continually whispering in my ear that I am but treasuring up sorrow for the future, but yet like her I want to enjoy the present if it but yeild a speck of enjoyment[.] Well knowing “Tis all but a dream at the best” and I have had some moments of enjoyment on this trip (the mingled with mortification) that perhaps will never return[.] Well let it be I’ve had my streaks of sunshine during the pathway of life[.] What have I not enjoyed except a wedded life & its consequent happiness[.] And that is now the most dreaded thought[.] Liberty of conscience & action I have had for years & it has placed me where I am. In embracing Mormonism I followed the dictates of my own judgement, In opposition to that of my best and dearest friends. And may I be guided by the Spirit of God in what future steps I may take as I trust I was in that. And oh! may I aim to do right in all things nothwithstanding my peculiar traits of character. Friday noon 13 One week this morning since Brother Haywood left us[.] Frank gradually grows better[.] We have travelled 11 miles this forenoon[.] day very cold[.] I have seen for the first time The Snow capped Rocky mountains[.] We are now about 270 miles from the Valley[.] Yesterday I had a delightful treat in having an opportunity of visiting some of my Kan[e]sville friends[.] Sister Murray &c & Brother Hutchinson & family & Brother Pitt[.] It was truly a commingling of Spirits & has given me some animation that I have been destitute of for two or three days. There is to me such an oppressive Spirit in my own company that I find it difficult to bear Sunday 15th 10 o clock we have just met the expected teams from the Valley[.] first rate looking oxen. We travelled yesterday and on our currelling about sundown last evng were about 250 miles from the Valley[.] Frank continues to gain daily his spirits are good also his appetite & enjoys his food[.] I suffered yesterday afternoon with headache & very much at night[.] But this morning I feel well & in good spirits[.] The petty anoyances that are practiced towards me daily serve but to amuse me now[.] A plot yesterday formed against my peace turned rather bungling to the plotters[.] May the Lord bless those who are my friends and confound the plots of my enemies that they may get tired of such small business. The weather is very fine & truly healthy[.] Cold nights & mornings clear sunshine days[.] I suffer less from this now, or feel it less than I did some of our warmest days when I suffered so much from chills & cold sweats Tuesday night 17. Yesterday we kept our Sabbath had good water & feed for the cattle[.] today had good travel crossed the South Pass bidding adieu to the Sweet Water & for the first time touching upon the Pacific Springs[.] This day we have crossed the boundary of the Atlantic & Pacific sources[.] we have been coming up from the former & now we go down to the latter[.] It was keenly cold this morning but the Sun shone clear & water during the day[.] I feel my health greatly improved[.] I can endure working without inconveinance & I would scarcely know it was so cold if I did not hear all around me complain. My Spirits are good & my mind pretty clear save one vein of reflection. Frank continues to improve in health was able to write a letter to his folks yesterday & does not seem to suffer from the exertion[.] We are now 225 miles from the Valley Wednesday 18. Had a good day’s travel very pleasant weather[.] pretty late when we camped[.] imediately Brother Woodruff rode up to us saying he had been two nights & a day in the mountains having met with some disasters, concerning their horses & cattle particulary I do not clearly understand[.] Frank continues to gain but is not yet able to leave his Waggon to walk but leaves it for an airing a few minutes before we start. This morning he milked two cows which tired him some. For the last three day we have seen Indians more or less passing along the road Today I enjoyed a view of the rocky mountains on the western Side presenting to my mind a better appearance than the eastern Side Thursday 19th We travelled today over deep sand but made out about 15 miles[.] We are now from the Valley 179[.] This has been a warmer day than we have had for some time and I had a little of that oppressive feeling that I have suffered so much during this journey[.] Frank did not feel quite so well today & after sun down when we currelled having overtaken Elder Woodruffs company we have quite a large currell & had meeting on Brother Woodruffs side of the currell[.] Our train on the road was very long having also Bishop Hunters forward ten attached to our train & camped a mile from us Sunday night 22 This evng we currelled at the Fork of the Black river after a steady days travel[.] last evng on our halting perceived a carriage & 4 horses[.] after leaving I found out that it was sent by Brigham Young for his sister Mrs [Fanny Young] Murray & Mrs Persis Young[.] I felt disappointed in not knowing that I could have seen Mrs Murray & written by her untill it was too late but Sarah gave her all the particulars about Frank’s health & brought him 3 Potatoes & piece of melon from her which was indeed a treat to him[.] he has been some trouble with his cough which he thinks proceeds from the Bronchitis & causes him no alarm[.] he has taken a little cold. but now being to near the termination of our journey I do not [have] that uneasiness on his acct that I did when brother Heywood left. As to myself I feel a remarkable depression in reference to my arriving in the Valley when I think of it a sober feeling comes over me that I cannot control. I never experienced this feeling that I know of, on going to any place previous. my health continues good[.] I do my work regular sew considerable & read occasionally which is a relief to my general feelings. I have composed & written some verses. to Mrs Johnston & two pies for the guardins besides some other for myself[.] What an amusement this is for my lonely eving’s after I do up my work also our noon halt Monday night 23 Travelled but a few miles this forenoon & halted for the day on a very pretty place by a branch of the [sentence unfinished] 140 miles from the Valley[.] I accomplished considerable of a washing this afternoon without any tax on my strength nor felt the least tired when done which is very encouraging to me[.] I have suffered with a bad toothace steady all day, but this is a trifle to me, after suffering as I have in prostration of strength the most part of this trip[.] This morning I got a blessing from our capt of his peculiar kind. but it hurt me not[.] Frank’s health is more consequence to me than the pleasing of our Capt & his lady. He does not feel quite so well tonight I think he sat in the wind too much this afternoon & eat a piece of pie[.] his diarrhea returned while his cough seems gaining ground About six o clock this evng Brother Woolley’s son & a young man with waggon & seven yoke of oxen from the Valley bringing with them vegetables & potatoes[.] I had a note by them from Brother Lowens who has had a prosperous time during his journey. About an hour after they arrived two brethren from the Valley rode up to camp with us for the night on their way to Bishop Hunters company to hurry them on. I heard that Brother Haywood arrived in the Valley Sund 15th & Brother Wooleys son started next day without seeing him. I also heard Brother Hyde does not start till the first of the month. good news all the time from the Valley Tuesday 24th Had a good days travel of 17 miles but most unpleasant on acct of a strong head wind & the dust flying thicker than ever before[.] we have currelled along side of black fork[.] Frank suffered some from hard travel & dust but is better than yesterday[.] the partial return of his diarrhea seemed to ease his cough. my toothache continued bad till I fell asleep late last night & this morning my face was swollen very much[.] made me feel quite sickish & prostrated all day[.] this afternoon I could not sit up but this evng I feel better tho my face aches some Wednesday 25th We are now at Fort Bridger 115½ miles from the Valley[.] had a good days travel tho rough[.] very pleasant day & very good camping place. Boys all enjoying themselves with music & dancing[.] Frank health some better today had a good night’s rest last night. I did not suffer today with face ache but my spirits were rather depressed. I committed myself this morning (for the first time since Brother Haywood left) by giving way to an ebullition of feeling bordering on resentment. And in getting up rather later than usual made it a jumping time after breakfast to get the work done up & as usual having so much to do about Frank’s waggon[.] I was excited in my feelings and fell in a train of thought that I was indeed in a servile situation without the least sympathy or tone of friendship around[.] I[n] hurrying to get evry thing in order our teamster behaved uncivil to me & I allowed my temper to get the upper hand of me[.] Elder Kim has been anything but obliging to me since brother Haywood left us[.] not does he as much as milk a cow for some time notwithstanding Brother Wooley scolds so much about[.] For the first time I remembered how many little things Brother H would do for about starting time particularly when I was in a hurry. we have heard this evng from the Valley there a person in this place that Elder Hyde will not leave till the 15th of the next month Thursday 26th Had a good day travel and are camped at Muddy Creek[.] This evng the two brethren returned from Brother Hunters camp[.] they are about two days behind us. Some families short of provisions. Frank is about the same the riding was hard for him today[.] This morning I received a greater blessing than previous arising from a simple remark I made to Mrs Bullard[.] was told, “I might go to Hell for all he cared, was not worth the rope that would hang one” applied an epithet to me that I did not hear prefaced by the word Irish, that he had never been insulted so much by any one before, as he had by me for the last 600 miles of the journey and that I need not I can rule everything, tho I be from Ireland[.] Since Brother Heywood left us there seems to be a particular satisfaction to utter forth his insulting remarks so loud that the whole camp can hear all he says. what his object is so doing I cannot conceive for I am very careful in my conduct remaining in the waggon all the time we travel & attending faithfully to my work when we camp. occasionally some errand calls me to Mrs [Margaret Major] Butterfield but it is solely on Frank’s acct & this gives great offence, but I cannot submit to such an infringment of liberty or the slightest inconvenience to my patient. he was left in my charge as also in Mrs Butterfield and I cannot feel that I have erred in any respect since Bother H. left us Tuesday night Oct 1st This evening we are camped 39 miles from the Valley[.] today and yesterday had hard traveling crossing the creek so often & going up & down hills in crossing the mountains. The scenery has been very grand for the last few days. the rocks are so magnificent looking & the mountains so hight & perpendicular that it delights especially being interspersed with shrubbery & small wood in their coats of rich autumnal grandeur[.] How much it would enhance the pleasure of the contemplatives if I had wherewith to say to, “How delightful.” but no! just up in a waggon, only one place to look out, and the most uncompaniable sitting right before all day watching my every movement to find fault with both action & word[.] whose remarks has nothing of any interest in them to one being mostly about eating & cooking a theme that I always despised. but Frank is sick & I try to [deal] with it as patiently as I can but still its hard. and the teamster’s incivility deprives me of getting & out of the waggon as I was want to do when Brother H, was with us A report came from the Valley by a brother & another son of Brother Wooley’s that he had taken him a wife since his arrival there, in which I put no credence. This morning the brother & sons of Ws’ left us, to meet us on our arrival to the Valley with Flag &. &. Brother W wants to have a great display of his train of which I have no desire to form a part Frank has coughed distressingly last night & to day. I notice when his diarrhea ceases his cough is hard. He is much disappointed in his uncle not sending for him. or not even sending him a line or message of any kind. he remarked today that it was his new wife that prevented him Wednesday night Oct 2d a rainy morning greeted us to commence the duties of the day. and when we got fairly started Smoot’s train was in the road to our inconveinence[.] about ten o clock any thoughts were taken off of everything connected with our train by the appearance of Brother J.E. Johnston & Hyde making their appearance on their return. I spent about half an hour with brother Johnston who entertained me with a relation of his own affairs, which were prosperous & also the arrangement he made for my reception amongst his relations which makes my prospects on entering the Valley rather different from what they have been, how kind how free hearted, how confiding is his friendship, how congenial his spirit. he is a noble soul, & I feel warmly interested in his welfare, & why not. I feel to owe him a debt of gratitude for his kindness to me when a stranger. Our travelling has been very hard today, & towards night the waggon Mrs Bullard rides in, was upset while she was in it & most fortunately escaped with the exception of a lame wrist, & the spoiling of her bonnet & caps there was but little damage done. none of the company goods were injured. Brother Smoot’s had a waggon broke and goods seriously injured[.] While the waggon was getting to rights Brother Haywood came to us to take Frank away. How different I felt to meet him to what I did to see brother Johnston[.] my feelings are so chilled when I think of going to Bishop H’s home Sabbath Oct 13. Salt Lake Valley

Life timeline of Nath'l H Felt

Nath'l H Felt was born on 6 Feb 1816
Nath'l H Felt was 10 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Nath'l H Felt was 16 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Nath'l H Felt was 24 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Nath'l H Felt was 44 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Nath'l H Felt was 45 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
Nath'l H Felt was 59 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Nath'l H Felt died on 27 Jan 1887 at the age of 71
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Nath'l H Felt (6 Feb 1816 - 27 Jan 1887), BillionGraves Record 3306799 Salt Lake City, Utah, Salt Lake County, Utah, United States

Loading