Myron Alma Abbott

15 Feb 1862 - 29 Aug 1932

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Myron Alma Abbott

15 Feb 1862 - 29 Aug 1932
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Grave site information of Myron Alma Abbott (15 Feb 1862 - 29 Aug 1932) at Delta City Cemetery in Delta, Millard, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Myron Alma Abbott

Born:
Died:

Delta City Cemetery

750 North
Delta, Millard, Utah
United States
Transcriber

trishkovach

July 1, 2011
Transcriber

Cozette

October 5, 2013
Photographer

Catirrel

July 1, 2011

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Obituary from Find a grave

Contributor: Cozette Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

Birth: Feb. 15, 1862 Riverdale Weber County Utah, USA Death: Aug. 29, 1932 Sugarville Millard County Utah, USA Myron A. Abbott Dies Mr. Myron A Abbott of Sutherland died Monday morning after an illness of ten days caused by the bite of a deer fly on the point of the jaw causing tularemia popularly called here Pahvant Plague. Mayron A Abbott was born in Willard, Utah seventy years ago, he received his education in Ogden. He was the soon of Myron and Josephine Allen Abbott. At the age of sixteen the family moved to Bunkerville, Nev. There he married Mary Leavitt in 1881 and in 1886 he moved to Annabella, Sevier County. In Sevier County he became prominent both in civic and religious duties. He served as a County Commissioner of that county and for three terms was sheriff. In this period he farmed and ranched as well as attending to his duties. He came to delta in 1912 and was at all times prominent here. he was the organizer of the Sutherland district for school purposes, and was a Supervisor of Millard County Drainage District No. 3 for several terms. He always took an active and leading part in politics and was a constructive force in his neighborhood. In 1919 hi wife Mary Leavitt Abbott died, surviving him were the following children of that union: Stephen Perry Abbott, Edward Lawrence Abbott, James Howard Abbott, Mrs. Ward Robinson, William Leon Abbott, George Myron Abbott, Lemuela Brooks Abbott and Thomas Lay Abbott. In 1920 Mr. Abbott married Eliza Brown, who survives him. No children were born to that union. Funeral services were held at Sutherland Wednesday at which the speakers were Wm. E. Bunker, Royal H. Barney of Annabella, M. M. Steele and Bishop George R. Jackson. Solos were rendered by Geo. Wilchen and Bessie Brown, a step daughter, and a duet by Ila Losee and Don Rushton. Interment was held in the Delta cemetery. Mr. Abbott was a man whom we all admired and respected his work in this community will live as a testimonial to his memory. Family links: Parents: Myron Abbott (1837 - 1907) Laura Josephine Allen Abbott (1846 - 1925) Spouses: Mary Matilda Leavitt Abbott (1864 - 1919)* Mary Matilda Leavitt Abbott (1865 - 1919)* Children: Myron Alma Abbott (1882 - 1882)* Stephan Perry Abbott (1883 - 1946)* Edward Lawrence Abbott (1886 - 1965)* James Howard Abbott (1889 - 1952)* Mary Josepha Abbott Robison (1892 - 1956)* William Leon Abbott (1895 - 1952)* George Myron Abbott (1899 - 1958)* Lemuel Brooks Abbott (1902 - 1957)* Lemuel Brooks Abbott (1902 - 1957)* Siblings: Myron Alma Abbott (1862 - 1932) Mary Luella Abbott Leavitt (1865 - 1955)* James Smith Abbott (1868 - 1944)* William Elias Abbott (1869 - 1949)* John Austin Abbott (1871 - 1954)* Emily Paulina Abbott Maddock (1871 - 1934)** Abigal Melvina Abbott Horsley (1879 - 1949)** Gussie Dee Felts Bean Morris (1882 - 1909)** Lemuel Raymond Abbott (1885 - 1958)** Thomas Edward Abbott (1887 - 1948)** David Arthur Abbott (1888 - 1963)** Samuel Abbott (1889 - 1957)** Myron Decatur Abbott (1890 - 1928)** Lyman Abbott (1892 - 1916)** Lyman Abbott (1892 - 1916)** Israel Abbott (1896 - 1966)** *Calculated relationship **Half-sibling Burial: Delta City Cemetery Delta Millard County Utah, USA Created by: Kimberly Record added: Jan 19, 2006 Find A Grave Memorial# 13069167

Obituary from Find a grave

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Birth: Feb. 15, 1862 Riverdale Weber County Utah, USA Death: Aug. 29, 1932 Sugarville Millard County Utah, USA Myron A. Abbott Dies Mr. Myron A Abbott of Sutherland died Monday morning after an illness of ten days caused by the bite of a deer fly on the point of the jaw causing tularemia popularly called here Pahvant Plague. Mayron A Abbott was born in Willard, Utah seventy years ago, he received his education in Ogden. He was the soon of Myron and Josephine Allen Abbott. At the age of sixteen the family moved to Bunkerville, Nev. There he married Mary Leavitt in 1881 and in 1886 he moved to Annabella, Sevier County. In Sevier County he became prominent both in civic and religious duties. He served as a County Commissioner of that county and for three terms was sheriff. In this period he farmed and ranched as well as attending to his duties. He came to delta in 1912 and was at all times prominent here. he was the organizer of the Sutherland district for school purposes, and was a Supervisor of Millard County Drainage District No. 3 for several terms. He always took an active and leading part in politics and was a constructive force in his neighborhood. In 1919 hi wife Mary Leavitt Abbott died, surviving him were the following children of that union: Stephen Perry Abbott, Edward Lawrence Abbott, James Howard Abbott, Mrs. Ward Robinson, William Leon Abbott, George Myron Abbott, Lemuela Brooks Abbott and Thomas Lay Abbott. In 1920 Mr. Abbott married Eliza Brown, who survives him. No children were born to that union. Funeral services were held at Sutherland Wednesday at which the speakers were Wm. E. Bunker, Royal H. Barney of Annabella, M. M. Steele and Bishop George R. Jackson. Solos were rendered by Geo. Wilchen and Bessie Brown, a step daughter, and a duet by Ila Losee and Don Rushton. Interment was held in the Delta cemetery. Mr. Abbott was a man whom we all admired and respected his work in this community will live as a testimonial to his memory. Family links: Parents: Myron Abbott (1837 - 1907) Laura Josephine Allen Abbott (1846 - 1925) Spouses: Mary Matilda Leavitt Abbott (1864 - 1919)* Mary Matilda Leavitt Abbott (1865 - 1919)* Children: Myron Alma Abbott (1882 - 1882)* Stephan Perry Abbott (1883 - 1946)* Edward Lawrence Abbott (1886 - 1965)* James Howard Abbott (1889 - 1952)* Mary Josepha Abbott Robison (1892 - 1956)* William Leon Abbott (1895 - 1952)* George Myron Abbott (1899 - 1958)* Lemuel Brooks Abbott (1902 - 1957)* Lemuel Brooks Abbott (1902 - 1957)* Siblings: Myron Alma Abbott (1862 - 1932) Mary Luella Abbott Leavitt (1865 - 1955)* James Smith Abbott (1868 - 1944)* William Elias Abbott (1869 - 1949)* John Austin Abbott (1871 - 1954)* Emily Paulina Abbott Maddock (1871 - 1934)** Abigal Melvina Abbott Horsley (1879 - 1949)** Gussie Dee Felts Bean Morris (1882 - 1909)** Lemuel Raymond Abbott (1885 - 1958)** Thomas Edward Abbott (1887 - 1948)** David Arthur Abbott (1888 - 1963)** Samuel Abbott (1889 - 1957)** Myron Decatur Abbott (1890 - 1928)** Lyman Abbott (1892 - 1916)** Lyman Abbott (1892 - 1916)** Israel Abbott (1896 - 1966)** *Calculated relationship **Half-sibling Burial: Delta City Cemetery Delta Millard County Utah, USA Created by: Kimberly Record added: Jan 19, 2006 Find A Grave Memorial# 13069167

An Indian Story for James

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Mildred Robison Stutz wrote this story for her grandson James when he asked her to tell him a story about the Indians when she was little. (June 1998) Early one morning Grandma Abigail heard a noise in her backyard. She quietly opened the kitchen door and could see in the moonlight someone snooping around in the yard. She awakened her son and he slipped out to see who it was. A few minutes later he returned holding an Indian boy by the arm. "Well, here's your little thief, Ma, stealing all the chicken scraps." The little boy was frightened because he knew that very often the white people would beat Indians who were caught stealing. Grandma looked at the little fellow and said, "He looks like he could use a good meal. Help him get washed up, Jim, and I'll fix him some breakfast. She fixed him a bowl of mush and some hot biscuits and the little fellow gobbled them up like he had not eaten for a long, long time. Grandma had seen the little boy around town going through garbage barrels for bits of food to eat. She felt sorry for him and offered him a job helping her around the farm lot. He said people called him Amos and he would be only too glad to help her and he could sleep in the barn. Grandma needed the help. Her husband had been dead for many years and her youngest son, Jim, was getting ready to go on a mission to New Zealand. In the fall, another son came to visit Grandma Abigail. His name was Minie. He had come to get his brother, Jim, and take him to Salt Lake City which was about 400 miles away, so he could get started on his way to New Zealand. In those days the missionaries had to find their own way to the mission field. Grandma Abigail asked Minie if he would be willing to take Amos back to his home in Annabella, Utah and let him work on the farm. Grandma Abigail was not feeling well -- she was quite old -- and she was going to spend the winter with her daughter in Plymouth, Utah. Minie was happy to get the young man because he had much work to do on the farm and his own little boys were too young to be of much help. At first, Amos was a little bit afraid of Minie because of the memories he had of being beat by white men, but he got used to Jim and by the time they reached Annabella several days later, he was a little more relaxed. (Minie became my grandfather, so from now on, I will call him "Grandpa" instead of "Minie." Amos worked on the farm all summer long. The little boys loved him. He could run faster, throw a ball further and beat all the boys in wrestling. He could ride any horse without getting thrown and in horse racing, he could beat any of the other fellows. But he was quiet and did not talk much. The next summer Grandpa took a contract to haul logs down from the mountains for the building of houses in nearby towns. He took a big strong team of horses to pull the heavy load of logs. Amos went with him. They worked all summer and made good money. One day as they were coming down the steep, rocky road, Grandpa was driving the team and Amos was working the wagon brakes when the handle of the brakes broke and the load lurched forward against the horses. Grandpa was thrown from the wagon and fell under the wheels. Amos quickly took the reigns and, with the load of logs rolling from side to side, was able to run the wagon into a big tree and stop. Grandpa was bleeding from the nose and mouth and he could hardly breathe. He knew he would die if he did not get help quickly. Amos unhitched "Old Mack" from the wagon and headed for town. Old Mack was one of the best horses in town and with Amos to guide him they started down the steep rocky mountain. It was ten miles to town and Amos made it in 35 minutes. Soon the whole town was on the way to the mountain to help. The bishop and Grandpa's best friend, Hy Barny, were the first to reach him. Grandpa was unconscious and still bleeding. The gave him a blessing and the men loaded him into a wagon bed and took him to his home in Annabella. There were no hospitals in the little town or for many miles around. A doctor came from Monroe to help. Later, as the doctor was leaving, my grandmother asked him what he thought about Grandpa's chances, and the doctor said, "Right now I would not give three yellow dogs' hides for him." Grandpa was seriously injured. One of his lungs was crushed and several bones were broken. He had to remain in bed for several weeks, but he was a tough old guy and he did get well again. During his recovery, Amos took over the farm work and managed the farm. He also taught the little boys to work and take responsibility. The people of the town learned to respect Amos for his wisdom and loyalty. One day the men were talking to Amos and said, "Amos, we have never been able to figure out how you got that horse down Black Rock Canyon so quickly. Weren't you afraid with such a steep road and all those rocks?" Amos said, "I never saw any rocks. We flew down the mountain. The horse ran full speed all the way. He never stumbled and he never lost his footing. It was all the same as level ground." Amos stayed with Grandpa and Grandma until he was grown, and then he moved back to the reservation where he married an Indian girl and became the father of a handsome baby boy. Through the years he visited the family. The family remembered the young man all their lives and were grateful for his heroism in saving the life of their father.

MYRON ALMA ABBOTT Prominent Men of Utah

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

MYRON ALMA ABBOTT Myron Alma Abbott is the son of Myron Abbott and Laura Josephine Allen Abbott. Born February 15, 1862, in Ogden, Utah. He served as Commissioner, Sevier County 1894; and Justice of the Peace, 1898. Married Mary Matilda Leavitt, April 14, 1881, in St. George, Utah (daughter of Lemuel Sterdifent Leavitt and Betsy Mortinson; latter came to Utah in 1862.) She was born November 6, 1864, in Santa Clara, Utah. Their children are: Stephen Perry b: October 21, 1883, m: Clara Ann Etta Poulson, July 20, 1905 Edward Lawrence b: December 9, 1886, m: Josephine Bennett, Sept. 17, 1909 James Howard b: October 30, 1889, Mary Josepha b: September 27, 1892 William Leon b: April 16, 1895 George Myron b: April 15, 1899 Lemuel Brooks b: March 27, 1902 Thomas Lay b: August 8, 1905 Family home, Annabella, Utah. He is the eighth generation from George and Hannah Chandler Abbott, first settlers of Andover, Mass., 1643. Commissioner Sevier county 1894; Justice of the Peace 1898; sheriff, three terms 1904-10. Engaged in farming, mining, and interested in good horse breeding and the upbuild of his native state. Information taken from “Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah”, published in Salt Lake City, Utah 1913. After completing his third term as sheriff, Myron Abbott began to look around for a location where he could take his large family of sons and one daughter and find new land—-enough so that all of them could settle and build homes. The land in west Millard county was opening up, so in 1911 he moved his family to the north tract of Delta. He left a written history of his life that details the hardships and heartaches he encountered in this new location. There was also much satisfaction. Here his family married. At this time, only Thomas Lay survives. (Refer to Abbott Book for information. Myron Alma Abbott)

Myron Alma Abbott

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The following is an abstract of Myron (Myna) Alma Abbott’s autobiography: Lived in Weber County, Utah, and in Tocquerville in southern Utah while a small child. Family located at Plymouth, Box Elder County, 1870-76. Father a failure there, lacking ability to be successful cattleman. Parents divorced; author lived with father. Family moved to Bunkerville-Mesquite area of southeastern Nevada, 1877. Married Mary Leavitt, 1881. Worked as farmer and teamster. Located at Annabella, Sevier County, Utah, 1886, as farmer. Infertile soil required much work to be made productive. Men would "go off to work" in the summers and work at home in winters. He sees this system as demoralizing and likely to lead to acquisition of bad habits. “Myna” notes that while always defending Mormonism, he never had absolute conviction of the Church, nor did he live life of strict Mormon. Served three times as county sheriff. Went as pioneer to Millard County (1910). Aided in founding Sutherland. Involved in beet sugar industry. Supervisor of Millard County Drainage District No. 3 for eleven years. President of Utah Association of Drainage Districts. Some travel outside Utah in connection with drainage work. Death of wife, 1919. Felt life broken up. Second marriage to Mrs. Eliza Skousen, who didn't like farm life, and without telling him left for Salt Lake to live with her children.

Page 3 of "This Valley" by M. Luella Leavitt

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

My parents were both born in Illinois and crossed the plains when they were both young. They moved into Ogden, Utah were I was born. We then moved to Echo Canyon where my father and his brother-in-law took care of the stage horses. My memory begins when I was only two and a half years old. One evening father took an ax and went up the side of the mountain to chop a dry tree down and rolled it down the mountain for wood for the night. We lived in a very narrow canyon not wider than a half a block. The canyon was named Echo Canyon, because of the echoing sound. My brother Jim and I stood in the door listening to the sound of the ax. I was trying to get him to see where the sound was coming from. He was only a baby creeping on the floor. I called to father and said "call Jimmy," which he did and Jim finally saw him. I can hear the echo of the chopping and see the tree rolling down to this day. We moved from there to a place on the Weber River. My brother Will was born. My grandmother Abbott stayed with us. She was always teaching the boys some lesson in the Bible. One day they came home wet. She tied them to a bed post with carpet rags sewn together and sat by them knitting. She told them that obedience was better than sacrifice. The next Day Steve came around the house on a long willow for a horse. The horse was bucking with him. He was yelling, but the horse didn't pay any attention. He finally gave it a whipping and drew it up to a stand still and said, "Now en I ern you obedience is better than sacrifice." He'd ask mother if she didn't wish it would rain the sky down. She said "No, would you?" He said "no, but I'd like to see the Lord." He could not talk plain until he was six-years old. The freighters passing through would camp near our house and Steve would come home with sometimes as much as a dollar in dimes and nickles. Mother would say, "What did you do for that money?" He would always say, "Nothing---only talked." They would pay him just to get him to talk with them. We moved to a place called Square town. We children enjoyed digging sego. Wild flowers and wild roses were very plentiful. We would fish in the Malad River. When choke cherries, haws and berries were ripe, we would gather them. We were trying to name the town.Some wanted it to be called Zarahemla. But on the day of our walk we sat down to rest on a rock beside the road and Aunt Emily said, "Why, this rock looks like Plymouth Rock. Say, that's what we can call the town." So it was named Plymouth. I was always the ugly duckling of the family. My father and mother had a quarrel and drifted apart. I never have gotten over it. I loved them both and knew I could only have one of them. Ma went to court and it was decided for them to wait until spring for the trial. Will, John and the two girls and I would stay with mother. The other three older boys went to Ogden with father until spring. Just before Christmas, father, Mynie and two of our cousins came home to haul and chop our winters wood, kill a beef and a pig. They brought our flour and we had potatoes, carrots, turnips and beets for the winter. While father and the boys were doing this, mother was busy making the three older boys a suit of clothes. She was knitting for months getting them all some good warm woolen socks and father a pair of gloves. The last day of April 1876, we went to Brigham City, Utah to the trial which came off the first day of May. There was to be a May Day celebration, but it rained all night before and the grass was too wet. In the afternoon, we walked around town and listened to the brass band play. I just loved music and especially band music, but it just hurt me so that I cried like my heart would break. They took me back where we were staying and father and mother had partly made up and father was to buy her a home in Brigham City and support her and us children and she was to take care of us. The next morning they went to see the place. It was just a little shack and mother would not consent to live in it. Father didn't think it was worth what they asked for it and after much talking and thinking they decided to get the divorce. They knew they would not be able to go through life that way. So early the next morning after father came in and said "Well, come on children. We will have to go to Ogden." He took Will and John and the clothes and bedding and put them in the wagon and then came for me. I was kneeling on the floor with both arms around her waist. He said, "Come on, Ella," and took hold of me. I screamed and said, "I can't go. If I can't have both of you, I will kill myself." My heart was just bursting. I loved them both and could not stand to lose either of them. He finally took me in his arms and put me in the wagon. But by this time a crowd had gathered around upon hearing my screams. I jumped out of the wagon and they put me back again. Mynie was on one side of me and a man by the name of Lee Taylor. The two little girls were both crying and reaching their little arms for me. I said, "Oh Pa, let me have them." He said, "I can't lose you all." All of us were crying and so was everyone in the crowd, even though they were strangers to us. Father told the man to drive on and as he started, I turned back to see Mother falling in a faint. That was the last time I saw my mother for many years. I screamed and fought to get out of the wagon. As we drove through the city, people came to their doors and watched. When we stopped at Willard City for dinner, I started back to Brigham City. I was going to stop the divorce if I could. My two brothers, Mynie and Steve came after me and coaxed me to come back with them. Stephen and James were not with us at the trial. They stayed at Willard City and Ogden during the winter. We went to Ogden. Grandma Abbott lived with us and kept house with what help we could give her. .......Aunt Lovisa was a good mother to us and we learned to like her. You could hardly tell we were not her own children and when her children were born we all loved them and they loved us. .......In the summer of 1880, I went to Tocqueville, Utah to visit my mother's father, Orvil M. Allen, and stayed there six weeks. I dried fruit and I was very proud to bring home some dried and canned fruit, jams and preserves because our fruit trees were not yet bearing in this valley. (Virgin Valley) ......While I was gone the United Order broke up........

Myron Alma Abbott

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

1. Raised in Ogden and Ogden canyon. When his father and mother divorced, he was about 15 and decided to stay with his father. 2. They moved to Bunkerville, Nevada where the families were living the law of consecration. He started driving a team of horses at a young age and started to be more religious. Prior to this he was smoking, chewing and swearing. 3. He developed a long relationship with his future wife while in Bunkerville. It took him awhile to win her over but they finally got married. 4. Great grandfather spoke his mind and it sometimes got him in trouble with local Church leaders. 5. He ran for sheriff in Annabella, Utah and was elected for 4 terms. He was well liked. He also farmed and always tried to have good horses. Very involved in politics.

An Indian Story for James

Contributor: Cozette Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

Mildred Robison Stutz wrote this story for her grandson James when he asked her to tell him a story about the Indians when she was little. (June 1998) Early one morning Grandma Abigail heard a noise in her backyard. She quietly opened the kitchen door and could see in the moonlight someone snooping around in the yard. She awakened her son and he slipped out to see who it was. A few minutes later he returned holding an Indian boy by the arm. "Well, here's your little thief, Ma, stealing all the chicken scraps." The little boy was frightened because he knew that very often the white people would beat Indians who were caught stealing. Grandma looked at the little fellow and said, "He looks like he could use a good meal. Help him get washed up, Jim, and I'll fix him some breakfast. She fixed him a bowl of mush and some hot biscuits and the little fellow gobbled them up like he had not eaten for a long, long time. Grandma had seen the little boy around town going through garbage barrels for bits of food to eat. She felt sorry for him and offered him a job helping her around the farm lot. He said people called him Amos and he would be only too glad to help her and he could sleep in the barn. Grandma needed the help. Her husband had been dead for many years and her youngest son, Jim, was getting ready to go on a mission to New Zealand. In the fall, another son came to visit Grandma Abigail. His name was Minie. He had come to get his brother, Jim, and take him to Salt Lake City which was about 400 miles away, so he could get started on his way to New Zealand. In those days the missionaries had to find their own way to the mission field. Grandma Abigail asked Minie if he would be willing to take Amos back to his home in Annabella, Utah and let him work on the farm. Grandma Abigail was not feeling well -- she was quite old -- and she was going to spend the winter with her daughter in Plymouth, Utah. Minie was happy to get the young man because he had much work to do on the farm and his own little boys were too young to be of much help. At first, Amos was a little bit afraid of Minie because of the memories he had of being beat by white men, but he got used to Jim and by the time they reached Annabella several days later, he was a little more relaxed. (Minie became my grandfather, so from now on, I will call him "Grandpa" instead of "Minie." Amos worked on the farm all summer long. The little boys loved him. He could run faster, throw a ball further and beat all the boys in wrestling. He could ride any horse without getting thrown and in horse racing, he could beat any of the other fellows. But he was quiet and did not talk much. The next summer Grandpa took a contract to haul logs down from the mountains for the building of houses in nearby towns. He took a big strong team of horses to pull the heavy load of logs. Amos went with him. They worked all summer and made good money. One day as they were coming down the steep, rocky road, Grandpa was driving the team and Amos was working the wagon brakes when the handle of the brakes broke and the load lurched forward against the horses. Grandpa was thrown from the wagon and fell under the wheels. Amos quickly took the reigns and, with the load of logs rolling from side to side, was able to run the wagon into a big tree and stop. Grandpa was bleeding from the nose and mouth and he could hardly breathe. He knew he would die if he did not get help quickly. Amos unhitched "Old Mack" from the wagon and headed for town. Old Mack was one of the best horses in town and with Amos to guide him they started down the steep rocky mountain. It was ten miles to town and Amos made it in 35 minutes. Soon the whole town was on the way to the mountain to help. The bishop and Grandpa's best friend, Hy Barny, were the first to reach him. Grandpa was unconscious and still bleeding. The gave him a blessing and the men loaded him into a wagon bed and took him to his home in Annabella. There were no hospitals in the little town or for many miles around. A doctor came from Monroe to help. Later, as the doctor was leaving, my grandmother asked him what he thought about Grandpa's chances, and the doctor said, "Right now I would not give three yellow dogs' hides for him." Grandpa was seriously injured. One of his lungs was crushed and several bones were broken. He had to remain in bed for several weeks, but he was a tough old guy and he did get well again. During his recovery, Amos took over the farm work and managed the farm. He also taught the little boys to work and take responsibility. The people of the town learned to respect Amos for his wisdom and loyalty. One day the men were talking to Amos and said, "Amos, we have never been able to figure out how you got that horse down Black Rock Canyon so quickly. Weren't you afraid with such a steep road and all those rocks?" Amos said, "I never saw any rocks. We flew down the mountain. The horse ran full speed all the way. He never stumbled and he never lost his footing. It was all the same as level ground." Amos stayed with Grandpa and Grandma until he was grown, and then he moved back to the reservation where he married an Indian girl and became the father of a handsome baby boy. Through the years he visited the family. The family remembered the young man all their lives and were grateful for his heroism in saving the life of their father.

MYRON ALMA ABBOTT Prominent Men of Utah

Contributor: Cozette Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

MYRON ALMA ABBOTT Myron Alma Abbott is the son of Myron Abbott and Laura Josephine Allen Abbott. Born February 15, 1862, in Ogden, Utah. He served as Commissioner, Sevier County 1894; and Justice of the Peace, 1898. Married Mary Matilda Leavitt, April 14, 1881, in St. George, Utah (daughter of Lemuel Sterdifent Leavitt and Betsy Mortinson; latter came to Utah in 1862.) She was born November 6, 1864, in Santa Clara, Utah. Their children are: Stephen Perry b: October 21, 1883, m: Clara Ann Etta Poulson, July 20, 1905 Edward Lawrence b: December 9, 1886, m: Josephine Bennett, Sept. 17, 1909 James Howard b: October 30, 1889, Mary Josepha b: September 27, 1892 William Leon b: April 16, 1895 George Myron b: April 15, 1899 Lemuel Brooks b: March 27, 1902 Thomas Lay b: August 8, 1905 Family home, Annabella, Utah. He is the eighth generation from George and Hannah Chandler Abbott, first settlers of Andover, Mass., 1643. Commissioner Sevier county 1894; Justice of the Peace 1898; sheriff, three terms 1904-10. Engaged in farming, mining, and interested in good horse breeding and the upbuild of his native state. Information taken from “Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah”, published in Salt Lake City, Utah 1913. After completing his third term as sheriff, Myron Abbott began to look around for a location where he could take his large family of sons and one daughter and find new land—-enough so that all of them could settle and build homes. The land in west Millard county was opening up, so in 1911 he moved his family to the north tract of Delta. He left a written history of his life that details the hardships and heartaches he encountered in this new location. There was also much satisfaction. Here his family married. At this time, only Thomas Lay survives. (Refer to Abbott Book for information. Myron Alma Abbott)

Myron Alma Abbott

Contributor: Cozette Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

The following is an abstract of Myron (Myna) Alma Abbott’s autobiography: Lived in Weber County, Utah, and in Tocquerville in southern Utah while a small child. Family located at Plymouth, Box Elder County, 1870-76. Father a failure there, lacking ability to be successful cattleman. Parents divorced; author lived with father. Family moved to Bunkerville-Mesquite area of southeastern Nevada, 1877. Married Mary Leavitt, 1881. Worked as farmer and teamster. Located at Annabella, Sevier County, Utah, 1886, as farmer. Infertile soil required much work to be made productive. Men would "go off to work" in the summers and work at home in winters. He sees this system as demoralizing and likely to lead to acquisition of bad habits. “Myna” notes that while always defending Mormonism, he never had absolute conviction of the Church, nor did he live life of strict Mormon. Served three times as county sheriff. Went as pioneer to Millard County (1910). Aided in founding Sutherland. Involved in beet sugar industry. Supervisor of Millard County Drainage District No. 3 for eleven years. President of Utah Association of Drainage Districts. Some travel outside Utah in connection with drainage work. Death of wife, 1919. Felt life broken up. Second marriage to Mrs. Eliza Skousen, who didn't like farm life, and without telling him left for Salt Lake to live with her children.

Page 3 of "This Valley" by M. Luella Leavitt

Contributor: Cozette Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

My parents were both born in Illinois and crossed the plains when they were both young. They moved into Ogden, Utah were I was born. We then moved to Echo Canyon where my father and his brother-in-law took care of the stage horses. My memory begins when I was only two and a half years old. One evening father took an ax and went up the side of the mountain to chop a dry tree down and rolled it down the mountain for wood for the night. We lived in a very narrow canyon not wider than a half a block. The canyon was named Echo Canyon, because of the echoing sound. My brother Jim and I stood in the door listening to the sound of the ax. I was trying to get him to see where the sound was coming from. He was only a baby creeping on the floor. I called to father and said "call Jimmy," which he did and Jim finally saw him. I can hear the echo of the chopping and see the tree rolling down to this day. We moved from there to a place on the Weber River. My brother Will was born. My grandmother Abbott stayed with us. She was always teaching the boys some lesson in the Bible. One day they came home wet. She tied them to a bed post with carpet rags sewn together and sat by them knitting. She told them that obedience was better than sacrifice. The next Day Steve came around the house on a long willow for a horse. The horse was bucking with him. He was yelling, but the horse didn't pay any attention. He finally gave it a whipping and drew it up to a stand still and said, "Now en I ern you obedience is better than sacrifice." He'd ask mother if she didn't wish it would rain the sky down. She said "No, would you?" He said "no, but I'd like to see the Lord." He could not talk plain until he was six-years old. The freighters passing through would camp near our house and Steve would come home with sometimes as much as a dollar in dimes and nickles. Mother would say, "What did you do for that money?" He would always say, "Nothing---only talked." They would pay him just to get him to talk with them. We moved to a place called Square town. We children enjoyed digging sego. Wild flowers and wild roses were very plentiful. We would fish in the Malad River. When choke cherries, haws and berries were ripe, we would gather them. We were trying to name the town.Some wanted it to be called Zarahemla. But on the day of our walk we sat down to rest on a rock beside the road and Aunt Emily said, "Why, this rock looks like Plymouth Rock. Say, that's what we can call the town." So it was named Plymouth. I was always the ugly duckling of the family. My father and mother had a quarrel and drifted apart. I never have gotten over it. I loved them both and knew I could only have one of them. Ma went to court and it was decided for them to wait until spring for the trial. Will, John and the two girls and I would stay with mother. The other three older boys went to Ogden with father until spring. Just before Christmas, father, Mynie and two of our cousins came home to haul and chop our winters wood, kill a beef and a pig. They brought our flour and we had potatoes, carrots, turnips and beets for the winter. While father and the boys were doing this, mother was busy making the three older boys a suit of clothes. She was knitting for months getting them all some good warm woolen socks and father a pair of gloves. The last day of April 1876, we went to Brigham City, Utah to the trial which came off the first day of May. There was to be a May Day celebration, but it rained all night before and the grass was too wet. In the afternoon, we walked around town and listened to the brass band play. I just loved music and especially band music, but it just hurt me so that I cried like my heart would break. They took me back where we were staying and father and mother had partly made up and father was to buy her a home in Brigham City and support her and us children and she was to take care of us. The next morning they went to see the place. It was just a little shack and mother would not consent to live in it. Father didn't think it was worth what they asked for it and after much talking and thinking they decided to get the divorce. They knew they would not be able to go through life that way. So early the next morning after father came in and said "Well, come on children. We will have to go to Ogden." He took Will and John and the clothes and bedding and put them in the wagon and then came for me. I was kneeling on the floor with both arms around her waist. He said, "Come on, Ella," and took hold of me. I screamed and said, "I can't go. If I can't have both of you, I will kill myself." My heart was just bursting. I loved them both and could not stand to lose either of them. He finally took me in his arms and put me in the wagon. But by this time a crowd had gathered around upon hearing my screams. I jumped out of the wagon and they put me back again. Mynie was on one side of me and a man by the name of Lee Taylor. The two little girls were both crying and reaching their little arms for me. I said, "Oh Pa, let me have them." He said, "I can't lose you all." All of us were crying and so was everyone in the crowd, even though they were strangers to us. Father told the man to drive on and as he started, I turned back to see Mother falling in a faint. That was the last time I saw my mother for many years. I screamed and fought to get out of the wagon. As we drove through the city, people came to their doors and watched. When we stopped at Willard City for dinner, I started back to Brigham City. I was going to stop the divorce if I could. My two brothers, Mynie and Steve came after me and coaxed me to come back with them. Stephen and James were not with us at the trial. They stayed at Willard City and Ogden during the winter. We went to Ogden. Grandma Abbott lived with us and kept house with what help we could give her. .......Aunt Lovisa was a good mother to us and we learned to like her. You could hardly tell we were not her own children and when her children were born we all loved them and they loved us. .......In the summer of 1880, I went to Tocqueville, Utah to visit my mother's father, Orvil M. Allen, and stayed there six weeks. I dried fruit and I was very proud to bring home some dried and canned fruit, jams and preserves because our fruit trees were not yet bearing in this valley. (Virgin Valley) ......While I was gone the United Order broke up........

Myron Alma Abbott

Contributor: Cozette Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

1. Raised in Ogden and Ogden canyon. When his father and mother divorced, he was about 15 and decided to stay with his father. 2. They moved to Bunkerville, Nevada where the families were living the law of consecration. He started driving a team of horses at a young age and started to be more religious. Prior to this he was smoking, chewing and swearing. 3. He developed a long relationship with his future wife while in Bunkerville. It took him awhile to win her over but they finally got married. 4. Great grandfather spoke his mind and it sometimes got him in trouble with local Church leaders. 5. He ran for sheriff in Annabella, Utah and was elected for 4 terms. He was well liked. He also farmed and always tried to have good horses. Very involved in politics.

Life timeline of Myron Alma Abbott

1862
Myron Alma Abbott was born on 15 Feb 1862
Myron Alma Abbott was 18 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Myron Alma Abbott was 26 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
Myron Alma Abbott was 37 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
Myron Alma Abbott was 42 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Myron Alma Abbott was 55 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Myron Alma Abbott was 68 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
Myron Alma Abbott died on 29 Aug 1932 at the age of 70
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Myron Alma Abbott (15 Feb 1862 - 29 Aug 1932), BillionGraves Record 32876 Delta, Millard, Utah, United States

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